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VOLUME CXXxXI 


FEBRUARY 5, 1927 


NUMBER 2514 























tHE 


, AMERICAN , 


ARCHITECT 


FOUNDED 1876 






























































THE ARCHITECT AND THE SMALL HOUSE 
By Cart A. Zirecter, A. I. A. 
Illustrated by recent work by the Author 


THE problem of how 
to build a successful 
small house is undoubt- 
edly one that interests 
more people than any 
other phase of the build- 
ing industry. Bright, 
young business men, 
newly wed perhaps, me- 
chanics grown gray at 
their crafts, married 
couples who have saved 
out of the monthly wage 
just enough to build a 


small home of their own, have all burned much 
midnight oil over this, to them, important problem. 
The American Institute of Architects has estab- 





VILLAGE OF LOG HOUSES IN WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA 


A SUBURBAN PHILADELPHIA HOUSE 


(Copyright, 1927, The Architectural 6 Building Press, Inc.) 


lished a ‘‘Small House 
Service Bureau’ and 
many corporations deal- 
ing in building materials 
have issued booklets on 
the subject, in an en- 
deavor to improve the 
architectural character of 
the small houses which 
are springing up on every 
hand and which some- 
how do not seem to im- 
prove in spite of all that 
is being done in their in- 


terest by architects and architectural organizations. 
When we consider the fact that a well designed 
small house costs no more than the very ugly ones 








THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


ARCHITECT 





A. ZIEGLER, 


CARL 


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which we see on every hand, there must be some ex- 
planation for the bad taste displayed, and it cer- 
tainly is the duty of the architectural profession to 
find the cause and apply the remedy. 

At the last convention of The American Institute 
of Architects it was stated that perhaps 50,000 small 
houses per year have been erected since 1920 and not 
five per cent of these were designed by architects. 
This lets the architect out, insofar as responsibility 
for the design of these buildings is concerned, but a 
moral responsibility still rests with the profession 
to assist the small home builder to achieve better 
results, if only to save our self respect. 

Have you ever travelled westward with a for- 
eigner fresh from abroad and tried to answer his 
questions about American housing conditions as the 
said conditions are revealed day by day from the 
train window? Can anything be more discouraging 
to the discerning mind than the acres of small houses 
one sees while passing through any of the larger 
cities in the United States? 

The squalor of the workingmen’s houses is bad 
enough, God wot, but these are far less offensive 
than the illiterate attempts at Italian and Spanish 
villas on twenty-five foot lots or Wizard of Ozz 
bungalow effects that seem so popular in certain sec- 
tions of the country. 

The foreigner seems to understand the possible 
necessity of the rows of miners and foundry work: 
ers houses around such cities as Pittsburgh, but 
that we should spend ten to twenty thousand dol- 





> 


lars on such hideously ugly structures as one sees in 
almost any suburban section, is quite beyond his 
comprehension. 

Lack of funds is always the excuse offered, if one 
is interested enough to investigate the reason for 
such bad architecture as is displayed in this type of 
house, but in most cases a well proportioned struc- 
ture, of the same area, and with much more logical 
ornamentation would have cost less. It is lack of 
intellect and not lack of funds that is responsible for 
the sad failures that occur so frequently in small 
house construction, for no structure is so small that 
it cannot have at least proper proportions. 

The writer accidentally discovered an old iron 
furnace in Western Pennsylvania that had long since 
been abandoned. Near it were the old log cabins 
of the former workers, a dozen or more, each with 
a large stone chimney at the end. Each of these cabins 
contained only one or two rooms, but the propor- 
tion of the mass and the logical handling of the 
materials made one feel at once a sense of beauty 
even in so primitive a group of houses. The angle 
of the roofs was just right and the lumber was 
used as wood should be used and not in imitation 
of some other material, which by the way, seems 
to be one of the pet hobbies of the modern builder of 
small houses. The chimneys on this particular 
group of log cabins were built of stones gathered 
in the adjoining fields, laid up in solid fashion to 
form substantial stacks that would withstand the 
Winter gales and not anemic little things that would 





HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA. 


136 





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be thrown down by the gale were they not sup- 
ported by the timbers of the building. 

The modern method of laying four inches of 
brick around a terra cotta flue lining has robbed the 
modern small house of one feature that is about as 
important as the nose is to the average face, for all 
that is necessary to make the simplest form of habi- 
tation beautiful is a generous chimney of pleasing 
line, attached to a reasonably well proportioned 
mass, covered by a roof of the proper pitch. No other 
embellishment is really necessary and the variety of 
combinations obtainable is without number. 

Although the building of well proportioned 
small houses seems to have become a lost art, there 
is sufficient evidence to show that this was not al- 
ways so in thiscountry. Anyone who will wander 
along the roads of Maryland and Virginia will find 
frequent examples of well designed small houses, 
many of them such as the old slave quarters, of the 
very simplest type of construction. Very little dis- 
secting is necessary to find the secret of their beauty 
and in almost every case the principles enumerated 
above will be found to cover all the elements of their 
design,—a well proportioned mass, a chimney of 
generous proportions and good roof pitches. 

Avoiding these simple rules, the modern small 
home builder, whether he employs an architect or 
not, approaches the matter from just the opposite 
direction. The object seems to be to compress or 
squeeze into as small a compass as possible the mul- 
tiplicity of things that go to make up the pretentious 








> 


house, both utilitarian and esthetic, and to do this 
all the laws of proportion and order are forgotten 
and the result might be described as a sort of archi- 
tectural indigestion. 

In addition to the question of form we must also 
consider the very important one of color. ‘This 
should be a very simple matter for the small home 
builder, as an ordinary weathered shingle roof over 
white clapboards, rubble stonework, or run of the 
kiln red brick gives as fine a color scheme as anyone 
could desire, and with it a splendid texture. Perhaps 
it is because these very satisfactory effects can be 
obtained so cheaply that the operative builder and 
the misled small home owner go in for red hot roofs 
over mustard colored stucco with sky blue window 
frames and green sash. 

Of course, the mistake lies in attempting to make 
the little home a small sized edition of some great 
mansion, the result of which is always ostentatious. 
What we need in order to make the suburban sec- 
tions beautiful are groups of small houses with 
pleasing mass, well pitched roofs, and large chim- 
neys and very few other prominent features; such 
houses as our forefathers built several centuries ago; 
and the addition of modern conveniences need not 
spoil their appearance. When we have these, we will 
not need to be ashamed as we approach our cities. 
with strangers from abroad, however small the hab- 
itations may be. 

On the bright side of this question it may be said 
that the average small home builder is paying con- 


HOUSE OF MRS. JOSHUA SMITH, EAST WASHINGTON LANE, GERMANTOWN, PA 


137 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 








HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA 


HOUSE AT ABINGTON, PA. 


CARL A. ZIEGLER. ARCHITECT 


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HOUSE ON LOCUST AVENUE, GERMANTOWN, PA ENTRANCE DETAIL. HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA 





HOUSE OF MRS. JOSHUA SMITH, EAST WASHINGTON LANE, GERMANTOWN, PA 


CARL A. ZIEGLER, ARCHITECT 


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LIVING ROOM, HOUSE AT DREXEL PARK, PA. 
CARL A. ZIEGLER, ARCHITECT 


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siderable more attention to the question of design 
and is following the operative builder less. My own 
impression is that there is just as much good taste 
among those who build small houses as there is 
among those who build the more pretentious ones, 
but as the small house can never be profitable to the 
architect, the subject has been more or less avoided 
by the better offices, which is a great pity as we need 
the contribution of all of our best men in order to 
solve the small house problem. 

In some circles the designing of small houses is 
referred to with a certain amount of condescension, 
but after thirty years of general practice, the writer 
is of the opinion that it is much more difficult to 
design a charming small house than it is to create a 
pretentious dwelling with all its accessories. 

Restraint is a difficult attainment for most people, 
especially for those with creative minds, but re- 
straint is a quality that must be exercised in the de- 
signing of small houses if they are to convey a sense 
of well being and refinement. 

2m 
JOSEPH CONRAD MEMORIAL 


A MEMORIAL to Joseph Conrad is to be erected 
as an addition to the village hall, Bishopsbourne, 
between Folkestone and Canterbury, England. Mr. 
Conrad lived for some time at Bishopsbourne, and 
OLD SLAVE QUARTERS IN VIRGINIA died there. 











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LIVING ROOM, HOUSE ON LOCUST AVENUE, GERMANTOWN, PA. 


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TRAVELING WITH A FOUNTAIN PEN—IV 


By Irvinc K. Ponp, F.A.LA. 
Past President, THz AMERICAN INSTITUTE OF ARCHITECTS 


ALTHOUGH the colored inks used in my youth- 
ful ventures into the field of art served to clothe and 
environ my Japanese maidens richly and vividly, 
yet I fear they could not have done justice to the 
flowers which everywhere are strewn in the path of 
the winter cruisers. Here even the fountain pen was 
impotent to do more than record an outline of form 
and masses of light and shade. The fountain pen is 
a product of the West; it is at core a Greek. Color 
comes out of the East, though it has made itself at 
home in the West; more so than form has in the 
East. Color adorned our path from Madeira to Kew 
Gardens. Madeira gave us the purple Bougainvillza, 
the scarlet Poinsetta, the tender lavender of the Wis- 
taria, and the golden tongued, ivory cupped, Calla 
lily. Kew gave us the gorgeous Rhododendron path 
and the wonderful Azaleas. Andalusia and North 
Africa blossomed forth in pink almonds and fruited 
in purple black olives among the soft gray greens. 
Sicily gleamed in golden fruit and darker green, and 
Paris spread out her gorgeous carpets of multi- 
colored Tulips. Everywhere were the soft mystic 
colors of burgeoning Spring—giving rare vistas 
through the middle ground into the beyond and 
clothing the beyond in a poignant charm. The 
prophecy might never meet fulfillment but the 
promise was alluring. The ferns, the palms, the cy- 
press trees, only speak of the beyond by insisting on 
the present. One may look around these objects; he 
cannot look through them. Their fantastic shapes, 
however, lend character to the here and now, while 
the rose purple mountains of the desert are more rose 





THIS OLD WELL-PUMP IN CATTARO, WHICH WAS QUITE 





purple and mysterious because of their dark insistent 
greens in the foreground. My fingers while wield- 
ing the pen longed for the brush; but life was too 
strenuous to permit of the general use of that soft 
and sensitive implement. So let me continue with 
the pen. 

When we reached Gibraltar on our outward 
course, it was in the silver gray of the morning. 





A wee bd- cherch 


Cadaro 


——_——— 


THIS DIMINUTIVE CHURCH WAS BACKED UP BY THE 

BLACK MASS WHICH GIVES THIS REGION THE NAME OF 

MONTENEGRO. THREE BELLS IN THE ARCHES AT THE 
PEAK OF THE GABLE DEFINE THE OCCUPANCY 


The bugles were calling to action and the marine 
bands were playing the British National Anthem 
on the decks of many warships; for the “‘Fleet’’ was 
at anchor in the Bay preparatory to manoeuvers in 
the Mediterranean. We reached Toulon in the mists 
of an early, rainy morning, and there in the harbor 
lying at anchor were the mighty vessels of the 
French Fleet. I am not a pacifist in the objectional 
sense of the term, and in the sense employed by 
pacifists themselves the term is objectionable to most 
of us, yet my reaction upon viewing at close range 
these mighty engines of war was one of pained dis- 
gust with mankind for not having been able after 
all these centuries of experience, to find a sane way 
of solving individual, local, racial, national and in- 
ternational problems. The thing to me looked like 
a huge sad joke. Said the small boy in the “‘Zoo.”’ 
“Father, I'll bet God laughed when he made mon- 
keys!’’ Viewing the race and its manner of hand- 
ling religion and politics; of formulating and deal- 
ing with the relationships of Man to God, and Man 
to Man, I am constrained to echo in a measure the 


IN SCALE WITH THE MOUNTAINS, WAS WITHIN A QUAINT : ; , “7? 
WROUGHT IRON ENCLOSURE, WHICH I DID NoT stop To | Mood and words of the boy and say, “I'll bet God 
MEASURE AND DETAIL laughed—a sardonic laugh—when he made men! 
143 





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THE LITTLE BOATS FROM 
THE PORT OF CAPRI 
COME BOBBING OUT IN 
HASTE TO GREET US AND 
TO BEAR US INTO THE 
PLUE GROTTO 


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WE PASS OUTWARD BOUND 
THROUGH THE STRAITS. 
THE LAND DIMS IN THE 
DISTANCE AND OVER 
AGAINST FADING AFRICA 
WE SEE THE BLACK HULL 
OF A FREIGHTER BOUND 
“ROUND THE CAPE 











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Te SPain ! 


I LOOKED UP FROM THE 
BOOK STALLS ACROSS THE 
SEINE AND SAID: I'LL PAY 
MY COMPLIMENTS FOR A 
MOMENT TO OUR LADY 
ACROSS THE WAY. I 
STOPPED WITH HER 
NAMESAKE IN JERUSA- 
LEM 





AND THEN AS SPAIN VAN 
ISHES INTO THE MISTS 
WE OVERHAUL VESSELS 
OF THE GRAND FLEET 
MAKING FOR ANCHOR ON 
THE PORTSMOUTH TIDE. 
WE CAN ALMOST RECOG- 
NIZE SIR JOSEPH PORTER, 
K. C. B. 











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I have recollections of a rather melancholy Venice 
when I visited it in the Fall of Nineteen hundred 
and eleven on the occasion of an international con- 
gress of architects held in that city and in Rome in 
that year. Shops seemed deserted by natives and 
tourists alike. A sea saltiness encrusted the marbles 
and tiles which were so brilliant when I spent weeks 
sketching in Calle and Canalle early in Eighteen 
eighty-four. But on this recent visit color seemed 
to have been restored to normal; the shops were 





LOVELY SYRACUSE IS GUARDED FROM THE SEA BY THIS 
DOUR MASS OF FORTIFICATION AND ATTENDANT STRUC- 
TURES 


bustling with shoppers and money was being freely 
spent. The spirit of New Italy was manifesting it- 
self, and Venice seemed prosperous. Sad or gay 
Venice is beautiful—in charm and character unique. 
But whose last words may be applied with equal 
fitness to any one of a number of ports of call; 
Cattaro on its lovely land-locked sea; Syracuse with 
its relics of the past and balcony life of the present; 
Palermo with its golden mosaics and protecting 
mountain flanks; Naples teeming with interest be- 
neath the fluttering banner of Vesuvius, and in its 
cleanliness and order and freedom from beggars and 
mendicants so different from the Naples I had 
known over two score years ago. I had promised 
cruise-mates who were complaining of the beggars 
in Cairo that they should see the real thing in 
Naples; but the promise could not be fulfilled; 
for the Italian towns, at least those we visited, 
and it was said the condition is general, are as 
free of beggars and those who parade deformity 
as Constantinople is free of dogs. Whether the 
breed was eliminated in the same manner I was 
not told. Naples in the early eighties was distress- 
ing. In the year Nineteen twenty-six it was fascinat- 
ing. From the moment I stepped on deck in the 
early morning till I took ship some days later at 
midnight and watched the boat cast off I was sur- 
rounded by beauty and bathed in romance. In that 
first minute on deck I cast my eyes up over the har- 
bor shipping to St. Malo on the hilltop. Before 
three minutes had passed my fountain pen had fixed 





> 


the scene on paper and in my mind. Rather a nice 
sort of traveling companion, the fountain pen, is it 
not? Always ready to go your way without tears 
or argument and willing to shed its last drop in 
your service! Constantinople having rid itself of 
her dogs, and Italy of her beggars, Egypt might 
banish her flies—that super-pest which is more pes- 
tiferous than her other pests ancient or modern. Vis- 
itors to Egypt swat the flies; but the natives have 
come to take them philosophically. ‘““What’s the 
use!"’ That spirit calming or sense deadening phil- 
osophy, as you choose to take it, prevails among 
all Orientals (all who do not sell ‘‘fly swatters’’) 
and it seems not to disturb the Egyptian to have 
his infant peer up at him through dense rings 
of flies as through grotesque horn rimmed spectacles. 








. SS 
Piatye Ferdinando 


NaPLer 


OVER ACROSS THE BAY VESUVIUS THREATENS WITH ITS 
SMOKE PLUME—BUT NO ONE SEEMS PERTURBED 


I speak of this in this connection for, no matter how 
altruistically inclined your fountain pen may be, 
flies, especially the flies of Egypt, may sometimes 
make its workings well nigh impossible. The Wind 
God is the only power which can rout the pests— 
the Sun God is their friend; as he is the friend and 
Father of all living things. 

At Naples, at Toulon and Gibraltar many cruise- 
mates left the ship for tours upon the continent. I 
remained on board to rest up from the strenuous 
Mediterranean part of the cruise. I bade farewell to 
the British crouching lion, to Africa and to Spain as 
we sailed through the straits and out into the broad 
Atlantic where we overhauled ships of the Fleet 
which, having manoeuvered, were returning home 
to England. The Bay of Biscay which I had dread- 
ed was as calm as a mill pond, and on its waters the 
Samaria stood steady. I would not have believed 
it. On a Sunday morning we sighted Cherbourg 
and there with a considerable party of friends, for 
we had become friends after two months of close 
companionship, I disembarked and took the boat 
train for Paris. I have landed at that port in mid- 


146 


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MY HURRYING COMPAN- 
IONS WAITED PATIENTLY 
SOME ONE HUNDRED AND 
TWENTY-SEVEN SECONDS 
WHILE I MADE THIS BIT 
SKETCH. I HAD TO FORE- 
SHORTEN THE FLECHE 
TO GET IT ON THE PA- 
PER. I DISLIKE, HOW- 
EVER, UNNECESSARILY TO 
MUTILATE AN OLD MON- 
UMENT 


Sat chepotl— wa 2 


Penin-Good Frid ay. 








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ONE HAD ONLY TO LEAN 
UP AGAINST A TREE OR 
POST AND LIFT HIS EYES, 
AND SPRING-CLAD PARIS 
REVEALED HERSELF IN 
LOVELINESS TO HIM. I! | 
SAW A REAL JULIET AT 








THIS GATE. PERHAPS 
THAT’S WHY I STOPPED 
THERE 
. ~~ it? 2m 
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Fast aN AP ui 9re 
fromthe 29 Juuet Gare \ 
RUE DERIVEL 
Pary 
147 





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THE FOREGROUND OF 
THIS SCENE GLOWED 
WITH A GORGEOUS DIS- 
PLAY OF TULIPS. THE TIP 
OF THE EIFFEL TOWER 
PEEPED OVER THE UPPER 
LEFT HAND CORNER OF 
THE ARCH TO ENJOY THE 
COLORFUL PATTERNS 


The EastGR FLOWER) 
Phace du Carrouse/ 
Pars looking west, 


She 
ERE: = ieee H catty 


Dame 4 be trative) 
PAR ey. 








I SQUANDERED FIFTEEN 
DELIGHTFUL MINUTES 
WATCHING MY FOUNTAIN 
PEN PUT THIS ON PAPER 
WHEN I MIGHT HAVE 
BEEN WITH OTHER TOUR- 
ISTS IN THE SHOPS ASK- 
ING THE PRICE OF BEADS! 





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“ON THE AIR” FROM 
PARIS TO LONDON. FLY- 
ING LOW OVER FRANCE, 
BECAUSE OF A FOG 
WHICH WAS BLOWING IN, 
I SKETCHED AT FAIRLY 
CLOSE RANGE. AT TIMES 
WE COULD GET THE EX- 
PRESSIONS ON THE FACES 
OF THE VILLAGERS 
WHOSE CHURCH SPIRES 
WE ALL BUT SCRAPED 


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IN TRE AIR OVER HonmanD Y 





THIS SCREEN IN THE 
COURTYARD OF THE 
BEAUX-ARTS IMPRESSED 
ME LONG YEARS AGO; 
BUT NEVER TILL NOW 
DID I GET A CHANCE TO 
CARRY A‘VAY MORE THAN 
A MEMORY OF IT 








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Summer, in the Autumn, and now in the unfolding 
life of Spring. In which phase the beautiful coun- 
tryside of France is the more appealing I can hardly 
say. Perhaps the Springtide, here as elsewhere, be- 
cause of the promise it holds; but that is outside the 
superficial aspect. I dreaded oft visited Paris, this 
time, as I had dreaded unvisited Venice two score 
and more years ago. But soon I loved it as I came 
to love that Venice of old; and, as with that Venice, 
left it with reluctance and poignant regret. A sad- 





THE 


STONE 
THE 


PINES ARE A CHARACTERISTIC FEATURE IN 
LANDSCAPE OF THE ITALIAN COUNTRYSIDE 


ness seemed to hover over Paris. The effects of the 
war were visible in the faces and on the persons of 
so many. But there were poise and calmness through 
it all. Sarah Bernhardt did a wonderful thing psy- 
chologically for the French. She conquered mutila- 
tion; and those of her own sex and of the opposite 
who have similarly suffered, love her and worship 
her almost as a Patron Saint. 

It was hard to keep the fountain pen from draw- 
ing too heavily on one’s time in Paris; pictures there 
were in whichever or whatever direction one looked. 
The color, ranging from the tender to the gorgeous, 
called for the painter’s kit; but limited time said, 
‘““Nay!’’ On Easter Monday, while Paris was awak- 
ening to a new social life, I reluctantly yet eagerly 
boarded an airship out at Le Bourget and sailed over 
the Channel to London, landing safely at Croydon 
in the midst of bank holiday outers. Tinney were 
outside the fence fortunately. On this crossing the 
airship simulated the Samaria in the Bay of Biscay 
and was steady as steady could be. Besides study- 
ing the terrain, (the Channel was obscured from 
vision for the greater part of the time by a dense 
fog which we avoided by traveling at a high alti- 
tude), | wrote a letter and made two sketches; one, 
two or three hundred feet in the air over France 
where we flew low to avoid the clouds, the other 
over England at a height of about a thousand feet, 
as the skies had cleared and fog and cloud were 
floating eastward over the Channel. The difference 
in the terrain of the two countries is marked. The 
color was much the same, for the budding Spring 





> 
was tinting both surfaces alike, but the make-ups 
were individual. In France the cultivated plots were 
rectangular and defined seemingly only by the plant- 
ing and the color of the crops: plow furrow or 
small ditch but faintly marking the borders. In 
England hardly a regular shaped piece of ground— 
all shapes, like a dissected map—the borders marked 
by streams, tortuous ditches, stone rows, hedges and 
fences. In France the houses were simple individu- 
ally but cluttered hit or miss in the villages and 
hamlets. In England the houses were in tortured 
shapes regularly set in the orderly plan of the towns. 
Now and then in the English wooded landscape 
could be seen the layout of some charming country 
estate with gardens and lawns and roadways and 
clustered out-buildings. Garden landscaping can be 





A FRAGMENT CUT OUT OF 


THE 
DETAIL OF THE NEAR AND FAR IN TIME AND SPACE 


MIGHTY CLIFF GIVES A 


well studied from the air. The plane seemed to its 
passengers to be all but quiescent, but when we saw 
our shadow gliding over the landscape leaving in its 
wake slow beetle-like moving auto cars and trains 
doing forty miles an hour, we knew that we were 
moving swiftly. I need not ask a smoother, 
swifter channel passage, for I shall not get it. 

The airship has landed us safely in England and 
there we sense a spirit which is not alien to us, nor 
yet is it absolutely akin to us, but toward which 
we extend a sympathy which is to be aroused in no 
other foreign land. The speech of England much 
resembles our own, and without too great effort, or 
the intercession of an interpreter, we may make our 
wants known and approach as nearly to a mutual 
understanding as is possible between two separate 
peoples on this terrestrial ball. 


150 





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FROM THE ORIGINAL SKETCH BY PAUL GMELIN, A. I. A. 


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AEOLIAN BUILDING, FIFTH AVENUE, NEW YORK—-WARREN & WETMORE, ARCHITECTS 


AWARDED 1926 FIRST PRIZE BY FIFTH AVENUE ASSOCIATION 


153 











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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 
154 














February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 155 








: 

f FIRST CHURCH OF CHRIST SCIENTIST, MAPLEWOOD, N. J. 

BERNHARDT E. MULLER, ARCHITECT 

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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


Page 157 


me 


3 


oer 





HOUSE OF GEORGE A. ALLSOPP, JR., SOUTH ORANGE, N. J.—ARTHUR N. STARIN, ARCHITECT 


Fe etal 


Seine 








HOUSE OF CHARLES SHICK, SEAGIRT, N. J.—WM. W. SLACK & SON, ARCHITECTS 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The 


imerican Institute of Architects and the New 
ersey Society of Architects) 


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February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 159 


MANSE, WESTMINSTER PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH, BLOOMFIELD, N. J.—J. F. CAPEN, ARCHITECT 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 











February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 161 





POA 


—— ee 


ee re eel 





HOUSE OF A. K. BOURNE, GREENS FARMS, CONN. 
GOODWILLIE & MORAN, ARCHITECTS 





(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Insti- 
tute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects) 




















os Se es 














February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 163 


HOUSE OF JAMES GORDON, SHORT HILLS, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT 


ENTRANCE DETAIL, HOUSE OF STANLEY HAGERMAN, MAPLEWOOD, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 








A 


February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 165 





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HOUSE OF ALFRED F. ROBERTSHAW, EDGE HILL GARDENS, PA.—WM. W. SLACK & SON, ARCHITECTS 





HOUSE OF EDGAR S. BAMBERGER, WEST ORANGE, N. J CLIFFORD C. WENDEHACK, ARCHITECT 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 


XUM 














XUM 





February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 167 


HOUSE OF CHARLES D. RAFFERTY, FISHERS ISLAND, N. Y.—C. W. FAIRWEATHER, ARCHITECT 


BATHING PAVILION AND CASINO ON GULF OF MEXICO, VENICE-NOKOMIS, FLA.—SEYMOUR WILLIAMS, ARCHITECT 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 











February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 169 





Biting te" 


SELES 





HUDSON RIVER BRIDGE 


CASS GILBERT, ARCHITECT 





(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Insti- 
tute of Architects and the New Jersey Society of Architects) 











XUM 








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February 5, 1927 


THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


Page 171 


ARTIS 


~ SER ID: 


HOUSE OF FREDERICK C. FORD, LENOX ROAD, SUMMIT, N. J ARTHUR N. STARIN. ARCHITECT 


HOUSE OF THOMAS H. FROTHINGHAM, FAR HILLS, N. J JOHN RUSSELL POPE, ARCHITECT 
(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of 


Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 

















February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 173 


J.—C. W. FAIRWEATHER, ARCHITECT 


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~ 


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| 


HOUSE OF MRS. A. T. VON SCHMID, MONTCLAIR, N. J.—HOLMES & VON SCHMID, ARCHITECTS 


under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., 
Jersey Society of Architects) 





February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 175 


We OO OF a we SS er a eee 





GARDEN FRONT, HOUSE OF WARREN MacEVOY, SOUTH ORANGE, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT 





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HOUSE OF THEODORE WIDMAYER, SHORT HILLS, N. J.—KENNETH W. DALZELL, ARCHITECT 





(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J., under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 


XUM 











February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 177 











I 
' 
CAMDEN COUNTY TUBERCULOSIS HOSPITAL, LAKELAND, N. J.—ARNOLD H. MOSES, ARCHITECT 
i 
= 
4 
i 
| 
| 
| 
' 
; THE OLD LADIES’ HOME, PATERSON, N. J.—HARRY T. STEPHENS, ARCHITECT 
' 


(Architectural Exhibition held at Newark, N. J. 


, under the auspices of the New Jersey Chapter of The American Institute of Architects and the New 
Jersey Society of Architects) 


XUM 











XUM 
































EDITORIAL 














COMMENT 






































‘ ‘In these times of labor troubles and building ac- 
tivity in England,”’ writes T. S. Tait in a recent is- 
sue of The Architects’ Journal of London, “‘it is 
as essential for every architect and draftsman in this 
country to pay a visit to America to study modern 
buildings and methods of erection, as it was in the 
past to visit the Continent to study ancient archi- 
tecture.” 

This frank acknowledgment of our progressive 
building methods and the high development of 
architectural design in this country will be read with 
satisfaction by every American architect. To sub- 
stantiate the truthfulness of his conclusions, Mr. 
Tait points out various examples. He cites a num- 
ber of our tall buildings, setting forth in days the 
time consumed in their erection, and contrasts the 
speed with the best records in England. ‘“What,” 
he asks, ‘“‘makes it possible to work with such expe- 
dition?’’ While he believes that contractors have 
reduced their operations to a matter of efficiency of 
organization and an ability to carry forward every 
branch of the work with the utmost of co-ordina- 
tion, he finds on investigation,—for he came to 
America solely to investigate these conditions,— 
that much of our high speed in building is due to the 
fine organization of architects’ offices in this coun- 
try. Mr. Tait expresses his admiration of this effi- 
ciency of architectural organization, and exclaims in 
surprise, stating “In one large office in Chicago they 
employ thirty mechanical draftsmen alone, and this 
does not include steelwork designers.” 

It is interesting to note the point of view of the 
English architect with reference to the relation of 
the quantity surveyor to building. There have been 
many who stoutly maintain the opinion that we 
should inaugurate a system of quantity survey sim- 
ilar to the English practice; that it is the only meth- 
od by which estimating the building’s cost might be 
correctly done. In this connection, it will be en- 
lightening to quote Mr. Tait in full. He writes: 


Beyond this, I believe, one of the main reasons for the slow- 
Ness in erecting buildings in our country is our system of pre- 
paring quantities. Not that the preparation of quantities itself 
is wrong, but that the architects in this country rely too much 
on the quantity surveyor. When a client asks how long it will 
take to receive tenders, and six months is given, that only leaves 
the architect about three months to prepare all plans and de- 
tails, as the surveyor will require at least three months for his 
work. The result is that the architect, in the majority of cases, 
prepares an incomplete set of drawings with a skimpy specifi- 
cation and the plans leave the office for three months, during 
which time the architect can do nothing. The quantity sur- 
veyor not finding full information on the plans supplies his 
own, with the result that when the job is accepted, the archi- 
tect immediately proceeds to amend or complete his working 
drawings and alters the specification. The quantities become 





179 








merely a schedule of prices, and give no information either to 
the draftsmen or the clerk of the works, owing solely to the 
fact that the architect does not work out everything on the job 
to the smallest detail before the plans are issued to tender. In 
America the plans and specifications must be complete, other- 
wise the contractors could not give a tender, and when the bids 
are received the work is ready to be proceeded with without de- 
lay, as the contractor has all his information. The writing of 
this specification, which is done in the architect's office along- 
side the draftsmen preparing the plans, is a complete and for- 
midable document. 

Commenting on the above, we do not believe 
that the introduction of quantity survey practices 
would result in a similar retardance of building op- 
erations. The same methods of expediting building 
operations that have enabled us to perform the most 
prodigious effort in a minimum of time, would help 
us to co-ordinate the work of the quantity surveyor 
in such a way as to make it synchronize with all the 
other building operations. 

There is, apparently, some scepticism among 
English architects as to speed of building operations 
in this country, and a belief that speed, as devel- 
oped here, cannot make for good work. Mr. Tait’s 
personal observations lead him to the conclusion 
that our methods are more conducive to good work 
as they leave ample time ahead, and there occurs no 
last minute rush. And in conclusion, Mr. Tait 
boldly declares that if the English builders are to 
compete with those in this country, they must alter 
their way of working. He suggests: 


First: By architects making more complete drawings and 
specifications. Second: By the preparation of accurate shop 
drawings by all contractors and sub-contractors, to be supplied 
to other trades. Third: By the elimination of the ‘‘ca-canny”’ 
attitude of the men by giving them what they are worth. 
Fourth: By the elimination of strikes and withdrawing the 
soul-destroying dole, as no individual or nation can stand or 
last without enterprise, hard work, and self-respect. 


After all, is it not a question of temperament? 
What we are achieving in building speed and sta- 
bility of materials, is the result of the progressive 
attitude of a younger country. We have nothing 
behind us in the way of example to “‘cramp our 
style’ or slacken our speed. Standardization of ma- 
terials and the methods of handling them have made 
it possible for men to become expert in work and 
workmanship. It might be likened to the work 
done in the assembling departments of large auto- 
‘mobile factories. Each man deals with a certain 
part, until by daily use he becomes an automatic 
machine. His every motion is timed and he is thus 
enabled to do a much larger day’s work for which 
he receives much larger pay than foreign workmen. 

This question of labor is also referred to by Mr. 
Tait in his article. He is greatly amused to find that 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


4 > 





the parking of motor cars of workmen engaged on | sources of information. Mr. Tait has reviewed the 
a building is a serious problem of street congestion. | building situation in this country in a broadminded 

We are pleased that Mr. Tait thought it worth | receptive way. The result is that his article states 
while to visit America and see for himself. The | the case of the American architect fairly and with- 
usual method has been to rely on long distance | out prejudice. 











as] ve? dikes are 7 Moalines Gtbedrale. | 


Sent. 207 mats 


MALINES CATHEDRAL 


FROM THE ORIGINAL PENCIL SKETCH BY WALTER F. BOGNER, 40TH HOLDER, 
ROTCH TRAVELING SCHOLARSHIP 


180 
































ENGINEERING AND CONSTRUCTION 












































A SMALL HOUSE BUILT OF FIRERESISTING MATERIALS 
By R. S. Titpen 


The house shown in the accompanying illustra- 
tions, built at Great Neck, Long Island, N. Y., was 
planned and erected to provide a practical demon- 
stration of the possibilities of constructing small 
houses of permanent fire-resisting materials, and to 
determine whether the cost could not be kept within 
that required for usually less costly types of good 
construction employed for similar dwellings. “The 
production of low cost individual houses has usu- 
ally been accomplished by reducing the area to a 
minimum and the selection of materials and build- 
ing methods that lowered the first cost but increased 
the maintenance cost and depreciation factor so that 
the ultimate cost equalled or exceeded the first cost 
of good construction. 

With the above ideas in mind the builders en- 
gaged John T. Briggs as architect for this demon- 
stration house and in co-operation with him devel- 
oped the building program. A study was first made 
of various construction methods or ideas that have 
been advanced or tried for similar work. These 
methods could readily be grouped as:—impractical 
as to application; true only when erected in quan- 
tities as standardized designs; or based upon the use 
of a certain material regardless of its structural, 
architectural or economic limitations to the prac- 





tical exclusion of all those which might be termed 
“competitive.” 

After determining the type and plan of the house 
to be built, it was decided that any material used 
must meet the following requirements:—it must be 
structurally good; sufficiently flexible to permit of 
good design; require little or no upkeep; be fire-safe; 
and moderate in price. In formulating these rules 
for guidance, an attempt was made to secure a 
reasonable balance between cost, quality and per- 
manence or maintenance features. 

The selection of materials based upon these rules 
has been proven fundamentally sound, and any 
changes made in subsequent buildings would prob- 
ably be in minor details rather than in any radical 
change in the selection of materials, although there 
are undoubtedly other materials that could be used 
to equal advantage. A different selection of ma- 
terial would very likely be made in other localities 
where building customs and costs varied from those 
found on Long Island. 

Common brick was decided upon as being the 
most suitable material for the exterior. Brick walls 
were therefore used from the concrete footings to 
the roof, in general 12” in thickness below grade, 
and 8” in thickness above grade. The exterior 




















HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 


JOHN T. BRIGGS, ARCHITECT 


SITE CONDITIONS PERMITTED THE LOCATION OF THE GARAGE AT THE CELLAR LEVEL. KALAMEIN DOORS BETWEEN 

GARAGE AND CELLAR AND AT HEAD OF CELLAR STAIRS SERVE AS FIRE STOPS AT THESE OPENINGS. NOTE LOCATION OF 

BATHROOMS WITH RESPECT TO FIRST FLOOR AND HOW SHORT STRUCTURAL SPANS HAVE BEEN OBTAINED THROUGH 
USE OF CENTER HALL PLAN 


18] 








THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


+ 





brickwork was laid in none of the regular bonds, 
but rather a combination of several that permitted 
the introduction of both broken and cut brick. In 
spite of the seeming lack of uniformity the neces- 
sary quantity of headers to bond the walls was 
installed. 

The floor construction was composed of 6” light 
section structural steel members upon which was 
poured a reinforced 2” gypsum arch over a gypsum 
board form. Wood sleepers as nailing for the fin- 
ished wood floors were imbedded in the floor arch. 
Roof construction was of similar materials except 
that the gypsum was pre-cast and the sleepers 
omitted. Roofing felt was applied directly over the 
gypsum and the slate fastened directly to it, using 
cut copper nails. Gutters, leaders, and flashings are 
of copper; the leaders being connected to dry wells 
were deemed sufficient provision for drainage, due to 
the character of the soil. 

Interior partitions are non-bearing and built of 
3” gypsum block except where bathroom tiling re- 
quired the use of cement mortar, and then 3” hollow 
tile blocks were used. All piping was concealed in 
furred spaces or within the partition construction. 
Bucks of wood provided temporary support for 
partitions and served to later secure the doors and 
trim. Plaster was of three coat work throughout, 











> 
placed directly on the partition tile and on metal 
lath for ceilings and exterior walls. The latter were 
furred before lathing. 

All stairs were built of iron. Basement stairs are 
of the open riser type with checkered plate treads. 
From the first floor up, steel risers were used and the 
steel treads covered with 114” oak treads bolted 
through the steel. Wooden handrails were used on 
stair rails with balusters of plain and twisted square 
bars attached to a steel facia. 

It will be noted that woodwork was reduced to 
a minimum and entered into the building as a fin- 
ishing material only, with the exceptions of bucks 
and sleepers. 

The figures compiled and published by insurance 
organizations show that outside exposure and fires 
originating in basements are largely responsible for 
the greatest fire loss percentages. In this dwelling 
outside exposure has been reduced to a minimum 
and as a safeguard from basement hazards kalamein 
doors are used at openings between the garage and 
basement, and at the head of the cellar stair. The 
garage portion is completely enclosed by a solid wall 
of brick extending up to the first floor arch. Should 
a fire originate within the house and above the base- 
ment, the damage would be limited to trim, floors 
and furnishings, and it is extremely doubtful if the 


AT LEFT: HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y., UNDER CONSTRUCTION BEFORE ROOF SLAB WAS PLACED. AT 


RIGHT 


GARAGE ENTRANCE AT CELLAR LEVEL PROVIDING DIRECT ACCESS TO STREET. BRICK RETAINING WALLS MAIN- 


TAIN IN MATERIAL, COLOR AND TEXTURE UNIFORMITY WITH THE HOUSE PROPER 


182 








XUM 


THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


a me Re es ATE EI On ES CII ON 


FLOOR CONSTRUCTION FOLLOWS THE PRINCIPLE OF THE STEEL FRAME WITH EXTERIOR BEARING WALLS. INTERIOR PAR- 
TITIONS ARE NON-BEARING. IN THE FOREGROUND NOTE THE NOTCHED TIMBER USED AS A BEAM SPACER 


DETAIL OF THE ROOF FRAMING. RAFTERS ARE SEATED AND BOLTED TO AN ANGLE SHOE RIVETED TO A CHANNEL ON 
TOP OF THE WALL. NOTE THE NOTCHED TIMBER BEAM SPACER SEEN BACK OF THE RAFTER IN FOREGROUND AND CON- 
NECTIONS USED TO SECURE BEAMS TO GIRDERS 


HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y.—JOHN T. BRIGGS, ARCHITECT 


183 











THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 











HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 


JOHN T. BRIGGS, ARCHITECT 
DETAIL OF GABLE AND CHIMNEY BEFORE COMPLETED SHOWING THE FREE HANDLING OF THE 
MASONRY. NOTE THE ARCHITRAVE AND CAP USED ON THE DOORS FROM THE LIVING ROOM TO THE TERRACE AND THE 
CIRCULAR DESIGN OVER THE TERRACE FIREPLACE. THE HORIZONTAL RECESS BELOW THE SECOND STORY WINDOWS WAS 
LEFT TO RECEIVE ADZED FIR TIMBERS USED AS A FRAME TO SUPPORT THE TERRACE AWNING. CASEMENT SASH AND 
FRAMES ARE OF STEEI THE SLATI 


ROOF LAID OVER A GYPSUM ROOF SLAB CONTRIBUTES TO THE IDEA OF AN ALL 
MASONRY STRUCTURE 


CONSTRUCTION WAS 


184 





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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 



































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DETAILS, HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 


INTERIOR PARTITIONS ARE OF 3” GYPSUM BLOCKS. 
ABOUT 2’ 6” 0. C. AND A 2” REINFORCED GYPSUM SLAB. THE BRICK PATTERNS GIVE TEXTURE AND INTEREST TO THE 
MASONRY THROUGH VARIATION IN SIZE AND SHAPE OF BRICK AND SIZE AND DIRECTION OF MORTAR JOINTS RATHER THAN 


JOHN T. BRIGGS, ARCHITECT 
FLOOR CONSTRUCTION CONSISTS OF 6” 


CONTRASTS IN COLOR. CUT BRICK IS USED FOR THE GABLE RAKE 





185 


JUNIOR SECTION I-BEAMS 

















THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


> 





blaze could make headway with any degree of 
rapidity that would prevent prompt control. 

It is further a fact that the materials used in the 
structure are practically ‘‘decay proof.’’ The slight 
changes in the steel due to variation in temperature 
would not be sufficient to cause damage to either 
arches or plaster. The brick walls will require no 
upkeep. The partitions are free from the ‘‘settle- 
ment crack”’ nuisance, stairs will not squeak, slate 
has a long record of successful service as a roofing 
material, and probably the only item needing peri- 
odical maintenance will be exterior painting of the 
steel sash and wooden doors. 

Mechanical equipment was given equal consider- 
ation. Brass was used for all water supply lines, 
X.H. cast iron pipe for drainage and genuine 
wrought iron pipe for gas and heating lines. The 
use of flexible conduit not only lessened the cost to 
some extent, but allowed the electricians to follow, 
rather than work with, the placing of the floor 
construction. 

The actual cost was very close to the original 
estimate. and practically the same as the estimate 
based on what is generally accepted as first-class 
residential construction. Some items, naturally, 
were more costly than those which they replaced, 








but this was largely overcome by savings in others. 

The exact cost is important information not only 
as regards this particular operation, but to all who 
contemplate building. In this instance it is perhaps 
more than usually necessary so that a fair compari- 
son may be made between this type of dwelling con- 
struction and others ordinarily employed. 

The total construction cost amounted to fifty- 
two (52) cents per cubic foot, and included what 
might be described as ‘‘those items usually covered 
by the general contract.’’ There are, however, some 
items which are not usually furnished by the build- 
er, but which are included in the above cubic foot 
price. Below is given the proportionate percentage 
of cost of the various items including labor and 
material, together with some explanatory notes, 
that may be useful as providing a basis for a de- 
tailed comparative cost analysis. 


Per cent 


Excavation and backfill ye 
Footings, foundation masonry, cellar and garage floors 
and finish 14.4 


Brickwork, including centers; fire-brick; flue linings, 


fireplaces; etc. 55.7 
Steel sash, glazed, sash hardware 2.0 
Structural steel—floors, roof, lintels 6.7 
Gypsum floor and roof arches 35 
Slate roofing, sheet metal, leader drains 3.9 
Gypsum and hollow tile partitions 3.0 





HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 


JOHN T. BRIGGS, ARCHITECT 


GENERAL VIEW TAKEN SOON AFTER COMPLETION AND BEFORE LANDSCAPE WORK HAD BEEN COMPLETED. WITH THE 
EXCEPTION OF DOORS AND TERRACE AWNING, THE EXTERIOR PRESENTS NO COMBUSTIBLE MATERIALS 


186 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


HOUSE AT GREAT NECK, LONG ISLAND, N. Y. 


JOHN T. BRIGGS, ARCHITECT 


THE PRINCIPAL ENTRANCE INDICATES AN INTERESTING USE OF IRREGULAR SHAPED BRICK AND IS SUGGESTIVE OF INTER- 

E NG POSSIBILITIES IN THE USE OF THIS MATERIAL THROUGH A STUDY OF MASS, DETAIL AND COMPOSITION. THE 

LIGHTING FIXTURE ADJACENT TO THE DOORWAY IS PARTLY RECESSED IN THE MASONRY. THE BRICKWORK FOLLOWS 

NONE OF THE USUAL BONDS. NOTE THE INTRODUCTION OF PATCHES OF CUT BRICK, WITH NO ATTEMPT TO OBTAIN REG- 

ULARITY OR DISTINCT PATTERN, THAT HAS PRODUCED AN UNUSUAL FREE CHARACTER AND TEXTURE. THE SILL OF THE 

BATHROOM WINDOW OVER THE ENTRANCE HAS BEEN SO TREATED THAT THE WINDOW BECOMES A PART OF THE EN- 
TRANCE MOTIVE AND AVOIDS ANY FEELING OF DETACHMENT 











THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 
al > 
Percent | ular operation, but are not necessarily to be con- 
) > > > ° . . . . . 
ted metal lath, and metal furring re sidered a standard for similar houses. In fact, it is 


Finished and rough hardware 
Plumbing, hot water heater, etc 
Painting , ; 
Electrical wiring and fixtures ' 
Stairs (wood treads and hand-rail included in finished 
carpentry ) ‘ ls , we 
Bathroom floor and wall tile, and medicine cabinets 
Finished carpentry, millwork, slate mantel, kalamein 
doors and protection 11. 
Finished wood floors; composition tile floor for kitchen 2. 
Rough carpentry—bucks, grounds, furring, temporary 


=) Co > 
aviek OO 


m= rh 


neo Nw 


doors are er 1.5 
Sewage disposal plant 0.9 
Miscellaneous—awnings, range, and other minor items 1.0 


It is not claimed that the proportionate value of 
these items would necessarily apply to other dwell- 
ings even if constructed of the same or similar mate- 
rials, nor would they apply to other sections of the 
country where labor and material rates, as well as 
construction practice, differ from conditions in the 
New York area. Both the unit cost per cubic foot 
of 52c and the proportionate values of various items 
entering into the total, are accurate for this partic- 





DETAIL OF THE TERRACE. 


ARE 9” IN DIAMETER AND 1’ 4” HIGH. 





NOTE THE FLOWER BOXES BETWEEN COLUMNS AT THE TERRACE FLOOR LEVEL. 
UMNS SUPPORTING THE FRAMEWORK FOR THE AWNING ARE 12” IN DIAMETER FOR A HEIGHT OF 6’ 0”. 


thought that with the experience gained from this 
first job, that a duplicate could probably be built at 
a saving of from 8% to 10%. It should also be 
noted that such items as grading, landscaping, 
walks, etc. have not been mentioned, as the cost of 
these features will vary widely. 

From the beginning to the completion, it was 
evident that dwellings of this type must be very 
carefully planned for all trades. It is not sufficient, 
for example, to indicate a house line and let the 
plumber work out its location and direction. It 
must be done for him and done before construction 
is actually started. Supervision must have careful 
attention and be done by one whose construction 
experience is broad in both methods and materials. 
The average subcontractor on suburban residential 
work may be willing, but his field has been too 
narrow to appreciate the possible difficulties of the 
trades associated with him in the construction of 
permanent fire-safe dwellings. 


- 





THE COL- 
THE IMPOSTS 


THE COLUMNS WERE BUILT UP BY A SERIES OF DRUMS, EACH ONE BRICK COURSE 


HIGH, MADE IN MOULDS ON THE GROUND, AND SET AS A UNIT OR LAYER OF BRICK AND MORTAR 


188 
































INTERIOR ARCHITECTURE 












































ALTERATIONS AND ADDITIONS TO ST. MICHAEL'S CHURCH, 
JERSEY CITY, N. J. 


Wirrip E. Antuony, Architect 


“THE scheme of decorations in the interior of St. 
Michael’s Church, Jersey City, N. J., has recently 
been revised whereby the church building has been 
made a model of architectural excellence. In its 
details, the decorations adhere to the Italian Renais- 
sance style. The general plan of the interior con- 
sists of a barrel vaulted nave, separated from the 
aisles by an arcade from which the barrel vault 
springs, minus a clerestory. In order to give proper 
dignity to the apsidal sanctuary, this has been pro- 
jected into one bay of the nave. In this bay the 
choir stalls are placed, separated from the side 
chapels by means of parclose, or side screens, which 
support the chancel organ. The stalls and screens 
are of walnut, designed in the style of many old 
ones to be found in the great churches of Rome and 
other parts of Italy, characteristically carved. 


THE CHOIR STALLS AND PARCLOSE 


SCREEN SUPPORT 
THE CHANCEL ORGAN 








The high altar is constructed of various marbles, 
designed after the early Christian manner as a true 
table of sacrifice. It conforms in every way to the 
decrees of the Congregation of Rites—tregulations 
that would seem to be unknown to most modern 
designers of altars in this country. It consists of a 
solid central panel with four free standing columns, 
two at each end, very much after the manner of the 
altars at St. Vitale and St. Apollinare-in-classe in 
Ravenna. ‘There are no gradines or steps for the 
cross and candlesticks, as these stand directly on 
the mensa. As the church already possessed a fine 
set of carved wood and gilt candlesticks, a cross was 
added to match, and also a seventh candlestick for 
use On visitations of the Bishop of the diocese. 

The tabernacle is free standing, affixed to the 
mensa and arranged for its complete veiling. Pro- 


LADY CHAPEL, IN WHICH WERE INSTALLED A NEW 
MARBLE ALTAR AND REREDOS 


189 





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190 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 





A NEW WOOD CANOPY WAS HUNG OVER THE PULPIT. THE NAVE ARCADE WAS ENTIRELY REDECORATED 
ST. MICHAEL’S CHURCH, JERSEY CITY, N. J.—WILFRID E. ANTHONY, ARCHITECT 


191 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


~~ 


vision was also made for the proper vesting of the 
altar with the varying colors of antependia, or altar 
frontals, to conform to the color of the vestments. 
The altar is surmounted within and enclosed by a 
baldacchino, supported on four marble columns of 
varying colors, similar to those to be found in St. 
Lorenzo and St. Giorgio-Al-Velabro. It is an 
inspiring sight at High Mass to see the clouds of 
incense filtering through the double colonnetted 
attic of the baldacchino. The apse walls were lined 


> 
with marble to a height of about eleven feet. The 
excellent copy of Raphael's ‘‘Disputa’’ on the vault 
of the apse was refreshed and corrected where it de- 
parted from the original. The old Mission Cross, 
originally affixed to the central wall of the apse, 
has been removed, and a window, similar to the 


other four, pierced through the wall. ‘The cross was 


remade into a hanging rood, with the attendant 
figures of Our Lady and St. John suspended from 
the sanctuary arch, following an ancient custom. 


LOOKING DOWN THE NAVE TOWARD THE SANCTUARY, SHOWING THE NEW BALDACCHINO 


ST. MICHAEL’S CHURCH, JERSEY CITY, N. 


192 


J.—WILFRID E. ANTHONY, ARCHITECT 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


THE DESIGN OF THE EXTERIOR IS FEATURED BY SIMPLE LINES AND GOOD PROPORTION 


THE INTERIOR TREATMENT RETAINS THE CHARACTER SUGGESTED BY THE EXTERIOR 
HOUSE OF GEORGE STEVENS, JR., TOKENEKE, DARIEN, CONN. 
CHARLES S. KEEFE, ARCHITECT 


193 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


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TEXTURED WALLS FEATURE THE DESIGN OF THE INTERIOR AS THEY DO THE EXTERIOR 


SIMPLE FURNITURE OF INTERESTING LINES HARMONIZES THOROUGHLY WITH THE ARCHITECTURE 
HOUSE OF GEORGE STEVENS, JR., TOKENEKE, DARIEN, CONN. 


CHARLES S. KEEFE, ARCHITECT 


194 





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ST. JOSEPH’S CATHEDRAL, WHEELING, W. VA.—EDWARD J. WEBER, ARCHITECT 


197 


THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


MAIN PORTAL 


ST. JOSEPH’S CATHEDRAL, WHEELING, W. VA.—EDWARD J. WEBER, ARCHITECT 


198 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 





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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


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ST. JOSEPH’S CATHEDRAL, WHEELING, W. VA.—EDWARD J. WEBER, ARCHITECT 


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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


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THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 
A MODERN TOWER 
202 


FROM THE ORIGINAL DRAWING IN PEN AND INK AND WASH COLOR BY N. VASSILIEFF 











February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT Page 11 


4 
+ 




















JAMES G. HEGGIE 
who in 1892 founded the 
Heggie Organization and 
today is President of the 
Heggie-Simplex Boiler Co. 











Heating Boiler Design 
Culminates in “Heggie-Simplex”’ 


IN Heggie’s 35 years of boiler manufacturing, boiler design has 
—arne an evolution, advancing from that of the early, 
cumbersome types up to the perfected “Heggie-Simplex” self- 
contained unit. 


The “Heggie-Simplex” is the most modern heating boiler of to- 
day. Every feature has a scientific reason and furnishes definite 
advantages. It embodies all the desirable points which earlier 
types partially afforded, without any of their drawbacks. It pro- 
vides the essentials necessary to the economical production of 
heat—in a boiler of the utmost simplicity. 


The “Heggie-Simplex” is not only the ultimate in design but “The 
Quality Boiler of the Market” as well. Made of the finest materials 
money can buy, fabricated with painstaking care—built as you 
would expect of “Heggie.” Heggie-Simplex Boiler Company, 
Joliet, Ill. (Representatives in principal cities—’phone, address, listed under ‘‘Heggie-Simplex Boiler Co.’’) 


HEGGIE-SIMPLEX 


ELECTRIC-WELDED STEEL HEATING BOILERS 


Specifications of most products advertised in THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT appear in the Specification Manual 


SPN Sere 





XUM 











BOOK NOTES 


A REAL BOOK ON BUILDING THE HOME 


At one time or another many books, addressed 
to the home builder, the home decorator or to that 
large class of people who “‘build castles in Spain,”’ 
houses in the mind's eye, but never attempted, 
have been written and published. The trouble— 
and they are in many instances sources of trouble— 
with many of the books of that type, is that they 
lack the stamp of authority. A great many of the 
so-called ‘‘homes’’ that one sees in suburban towns, 
or at which one visits, have their origins in such 
books. They lack in design, in plan, in decoration 
and, in short, in general aspect, the finished touch 
that the trained architect would give. 

A book, totally out of the usual run, is now is- 
sued from the press of Dodd, Mead & Company. 
This is called Homes of Character. It is written by 
Marcia Mead, a member of The American Institute 
of Architects, in collaboration with Daniel P. Hig- 
gins of the Office of John Russell Pope, architect, 
and is embellished,——we use the word in its correct 
application,—by Otto R. Eggers, also of the Office 
of John Russell Pope, architect. 

As far as concerns the architectural reader, this 
notice of this book could end exactly here. Its au- 
thoritative value is at once established on mention 
of the names of its distinguished collaborators. 

‘The book has a definite place as a background 
for the prospective maker of homes. It leads them 
to think in terms of heights, breadths and propor- 
tions of parts, and to visualize the house of their 
dreams on a basis of correct principles of beautiful, 
reasonable construction.”” The foregoing we quote 
from the foreword written by Mr. Higgins. It ex- 
presses without exaggeration the true value of the 
book to the client. And this value, to a great de- 
gree, is also shared by the architect. He will find 
the tiresome effort to get a client in the right men- 
tal attitude toward the thing he wants to do, en- 
tirely eliminated. 

As a preparatory education for the home builder, 
Miss Mead’s book is admirable. The work is div- 
ided into ten chapters. The various period styles 
are taken up in separate chapters, their bases of de- 
sign carefully explained, and some common errors 
corrected. Mr. Eggers’ sketches, illustrating these 
various styles, and particularly those which accom- 
pany chapter X (original design), have the fine ar- 
tistic quality that marks that man’s work. 

As a rule, reviewers do not read a book from 
cover to cover, and as a further rule, they will re- 
view most of the stuff put out for ‘“‘home consump- 
tion,’ with considerable prejudice. But in the case 
of Miss Mead’s book, this reviewer wants to state 
that he has read it all with profit and enjoyment 
and he believes that every architect will find it sim- 
ilarly worth while. Architects could save most of 





12 


the time they spend in coaching clients, if they 
would give each prospective home builder a copy of 
this book and charge them to read it carefully. 


Homes of Character. By Marcia Mead, A.1.A., in collabora- 
tion with Daniel P. Higgins, and with original sketches by 
Otto R. Eggers. Full cloth; 230 pages; size 6 x 8 inches. 
Price $3.50. New York, Dodd, Mead &% Company. 


2m 


THE 1926-27 HEATING AND VENTILATING GUIDE 


The American Society of Heating and Ventilating 
Engineers issues annually a reference book on the 
subject of heating and ventilating. The Guide is a 
book of valuable data for architects, engineers and 
contractors. The 1926-27 edition has recently been 
received. Many sections have been amplified and sev- 
eral new chapters have been added. Air condition- 
ing, drying, mechanical draft, ozone and building 
insulation are thoroughly treated and new data is 
given on greenhouse heating, water supply systems, 
boilers, oil burning and gas heating. New tables on 
heat, humidity and air motion and a new comfort 
chart included in the Guide are the result of further 
laboratory research. 

An index to the technical data section is a valu- 
able feature of this volume and adds to the value of 
the publication as a book for the everyday use of en- 
gineers. 

The preparation of the Guide was carried out by 
a committee of representative engineers under the 
direction of Perry West, consulting engineer. 

The American Society of Heating and Ventilating Engi- 
neers Guide 1926-1927, Vol. 5, 580 pp. Illustrated. Size 
6 x 9 inches, bound in blue cloth. Published by the American 


Society of Heating and Ventilating Engineers, 29 West 39th 
St., New York City. Price, $3.00. 


2m” 


ARC WELDING—THE NEW AGE IN IRON AND STEEL 


Arc WELDING-——T he New Age in Iron and Steel 
is the title of a new textbook recently published by 
The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 
It is the most comprehensive treatment of this sub- 
ject that has appeared. This book is devoted largely 
to the use of arc welding in general production man- 
ufacturing. The arc welder is a production tool 
and this book makes it evident that a knowledge of 
arc welding principles must be a part of the equip- 
ment of every designer and manufacturer working 
in iron and steel. There are numerous diagrams 
and charts showing welding speeds and costs and 
illustrations of products that have been manufac- 
tured by arc welding. Many other products usu- 
ally riveted but that can now be arc welded are 
illustrated and described. 

The opening chapter of this treatise discusses the 
superiority of steel over cast iron from both the 





February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 





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PARK CENTRAL APARTMENT HOTEL 
NEW YORK CITY 

















Gronenserc & Leucutac 
Architects 
55th to 56th Sts., Mr. Epmunp EL tits, 


Ex.is, Aaronson & HEIDRICH, 
NEw YorK Architects for Interior 


Costly Survey Discloses Facts of Utmost 
Value to Every Engineer and Architect 


AST IRON soil pipe 106 years in serv In New York City 21 out of 27 of the 
ice. In perfect condition for another finest buildings of 20 stories and over, 
century. Other pipe corroded, useless are being equipped with cast iron soil 

and dangerous in 6 to 20 years. Hundreds of pipe throughout. Park Central Apart: 
thousands of dollars necessary for replace- 
ment Hotel, designed as one of the most 


ments. Hotels, apartments and office stuc- beautiful build a deal 
tures made undesirable. An awakened public Auli DUNGINgS M sera, COMME 


consciousness. Photographic data and reports 1 &XCEsS of 14 million dollar s, will afford 
compiled by our research engineers which protection to its exquisite mural paintings 
have changed pipe specifications in many tall and health of guests, because cast iron 
buildings after construction was under way. pipe, only, has been specified. 





now being specified for buildings of twenty stories and over, 
will be mailed to engineers and architects upon request. 


[ reports, together with reasons why CAST iron pipe | 





Ci; 


TF OIL PIPE 
ASSOCIATIO 


Birmingham, Alabama 


st {RON 


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Specifications of most products advertised in THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT appear in the Specification Manual 











THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 


+ 





standpoints of strength and economy. The pro- 
cedure for redesigning machine parts is treated at 
length and there is complete data on the strength 
and cost of various types of welded construction. 


Arc Welding—The New Age in Iron and Steel. published 
by The Lincoln Electric Company, Cleveland, Ohio. 160 


pp. Illustrated, size 6 x 9 inches, bound in imitation leather. 
Price $1 50. 


2m” 


THE LIGHTNING GRAPHS 


A BOOK designed for the use of engineers, archi- 
tects and others dealing with mathematical prob- 
lems, has recently been prepared by I. S. Dalgleish, 
A.M.I.E.E. The introduction states, “In many 
technical calculations there are a few constantly 
recurring equations which cannot be solved by an 
unbroken series of operations on a standard slide- 
rule. The aim of this series of graphs is to offer 
a means of instantly solving some of these equa- 
tions with an accuracy sufficient for ordinary prac- 
tical purposes.” 

The series of graphs presented in this book are 
for solving the equations a7 = b* + c?; a" = d; 
“Va = d: The first equa- 


v = e*; and w = e*. 





> 
tion covers the relationship between the sides of a 
right-angled triangle and the last two give values 
of hyperbolic logarithms. These may also be used 
to obtain reciprocals of all numbers. 


The Lightning Graphs. By I. S. Dalgleish, A.M.I.E.E. 
Published by Crosby Lockwood & Son, 7 Stationers’ Hall 
Court, Ludgate Hill, E.C. 4. 30 pp. 10 plates of graphs, 
size 7 x 10 inches. Price 5 shillings net. 


2m” 
AMERICA’S FARMS LEAD 


Neary a million acres of farm land in the 
United States are classified as productive and a 
third as much more as arable. Argentina has about 
half as much productive land as the United States. 
Canada, which appears so large upon the map, has 
little more than one-tenth of her area under cul- 
tivation. British India has only half as much pro- 
ductive land as the United States; Australia, de- 
spite its great size, has only about one-seventh. 
Apart from Russia, the farming areas of most 
European countries seem trifling beside the Ameri- 
can. Before the war Russia had nearly 700,000,000 


productive acres. 





ANNUAL COMPETITIONS OF THE AMERICAN 
ACADEMY IN ROME 


The American Academy in Rome has announced 
its annual competitions for fellowships in architec- 
ture, landscape architecture, painting and sculp- 
ture. The competitions are open to unmarried men 
not over 30 years of age who are citizens of the 
United States. The stipend of each fellowship is 
$1,250 a year for three years, with additional an- 
nual allowances of $50 to $100 for material and 
model hire, and opportunity for extensive travel. 
Residence and studio are provided free of charge at 
the Academy, and the total estimated value of each 
fellowship is in excess of $2,000 a year. 

The Grand Central Art Galleries of New York 
City will present free membership in the Galleries 
to the painter and sculptor who win the Rome Prize 
and fulfill the obligations of the fellowship. 

Under regulations revised this year for the com- 
petition in architecture, graduates of accredited 
schools will be required to have had architectural 
office experience of six months, instead of a year, 
and men who are not graduates of such schools may 
enter the competition if they have had at least four 
years of architectural office experience and are highly 
recommended by a Fellow of The American Insti- 
tute of Architects. 

Entries for all competitions will be received until 
March first. For application blanks address Roscoe 
Guernsey, Executive Secretary, American Academy 
in Rome, 101 Park Avenue, New York City. 





14 


MARBLE TABLET NOW MARKS AUGUSTUS 
SAINT-GAUDENS’ HOUSE IN ROME 


A MARBLE tablet, marking the house where the 
American sculptor, Augustus Saint-Gaudens, lived 
and worked from 1871 to 1875 was unveiled re- 
cently before a group of prominent members of the 
world of art. 

A short address was delivered outlining Saint- 
Gaudens’ life in Rome. 

“Here for four happy years a young American 
artist inhaled the inspiration of Rome,”’ it was said. 
“We mark it with a white stone. It is anotner 
shrine in the Temple City and our loving tribute 
to America’s greatest sculptor.” 

Saint-Gaudens was only 23 years old when he 
went to Italy, working at his sculpture in the morn- 
ing and cutting canoes in the afternoon. 

“Here he did his first real work in sculpture, his 
‘Hiawatha’ and ‘Silence,’ the precursors of his ‘Puri- 
tan’ in Springfield, Mass., the Adams Memorial in 
Washington and his great Lincoln in Chicago.” 

The house marked by a tablet is in the Piazza 
Tolentino, a little open space facing the medieval 
Church of San Niccolo da Tolentino, built in 1614. 

It was there that he was discovered by Mont- 
gomery Gibbs, his first patron, and through him, 
soon after, by Governor Morgan, William Evarts, 
then United States Senator from New York, and 
by Senator Evarts’s partner, Charles C. Beaman, 
through whom, years after, he was led to make his 
home in Cornish, N. H. 





































February 5, 1927 THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 











Detroit Free Press Building 
2 ls Detroit, Michigan 
‘ : e Architect: Albert Kahn 


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Residence of Mr. McLean 
- Asheville, N.C. 
Miller & Reeves, Architects 
Columbus, Ohio 


Smooth, constant operation for life 
. . . with Ball Bearing Butts 


HEN ordinary door butts wear down, losable) washer, non-rising and self-lubricat- 
what happens? The door sags, scrapes ing pin, improved finish, and the use of ball 
against the floor and doesn’t latch properly. bearings. 
Ball bearing washers attached to the joints 
reduce this wear almost to the vanishing point. 








This wide experience enables us to make a 
product of uniformly high quality that sets 
the standard in butt manufacture. The Stan- 
ley trade-mark is on every butt. 


For frequently-used doors on residences and 
buildings, ball bearing butts are essential if 


you wish to eliminate occasional repairs, ad- 
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contains information which will aid you in selecting and 
Stanley engineers have originated most butt specifying the correct hardware. We will gladly send 


. ’ . you a copy. A description of the Stanley line of Butts 
and hinge improvements since 1852, including and Hinges can be found in Sweet’s Catalogue, pages 
cold-rolled steel, the non-detachable (non- 1500 to 1503, and 1556 to 1568. 


THE STANLEY WORKS, NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 
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Stecifications of most products advertised in THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT appear in the Specification Manual 














THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 





COMPETITION FOR A MEMORIAL BUILDING AT 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 


I; is announced that a competition for a Soldiers 
and Sailors Memorial Building for the City of Prov- 
idence, R. I., is open to all qualified architects in the 
first stage, closing February 28, 1927. From those 
participating in the first stage, there will be chosen 
three or more to participate in the second stage, and 
in addition, the three next in merit will receive a 
second prize of $100 each. To those selected for 
the second stage, there will be added by invitation 
a certain number of other architects. All partici- 
pating in the second stage will be paid $1500 each. 
The competition is to be under the rules of The 
American Institute of Architects, and while the ulti- 
mate award depends upon the City Council, it will 
undoubiedly be made as recommended by the Jury. 
Henry H. Kendall, F.A.I.A., is the professional 
advisor, and may be addressed at 142 Berkeley 
Street, Boston, Mass. 

2m 


PRINCETON UNIVERSITY ARCHITECTURAL PRIZES 


Two competitive prizes of Eight Hundred Dollars 
($800) each, in the School of Architecture, Prince- 
ton University, are announced for the year 1927- 
1928. ‘The prizes will be awarded to the winners 
of a competition in design, to be held from 9.00 
A. M. May 20th, 1927, to 9.00 A. M. May 3lst, 
1927. 

The purpose of these prizes is to place at the dis- 
posal of experienced draftsmen of unusual ability, 
who desire to complete their professional training 
by contact with the academic side of architecture, 
the advantages found in the School of Architecture, 
the Department of Art and Archaeology, and the 
Graduate School of Princeton University. The 
winners are exempt from tuition fees. 

The candidates shall be unmarried male citizens, 
not less than twenty-one nor more than thirty years 
of age on September Ist, 1927, and shall have been 
employed as draftsmen in architects’ offices for not 
less than three years. 

Applications to compete for the prizes must be 
filed on or before April 18th, 1927. 

For application blanks, and regulations govern- 
ing the competition and award, address The Secre- 
tary, The School of Architecture, Princeton Univer- 
sity, Princeton, N. J. 

2D 
CONVENTION OF THE AMERICAN FEDERATION 
OF ARTS 


Tre 1927 convention of the American Federation 
of Arts will be held in Boston, Mass., May 18, 19 
and 20. The annual meetings of the Association of 
Art Museum Directors and the American Associa- 
tion of Museums will either directly precede or fol- 
low. 





16 


> 


Boston offers many interesting sights for the art 
lover—the Museum of Fine Arts, with its rich 
collections: Fenway Court, in which is housed Mrs. 
Jack Gardiner’s varied and splendid collection; the 
Fogg Museum connected with Harvard University; 
the show rooms of the Arts and Crafts Society and, 
in the way of civic art, the Charles River Embank- 
ment Improvements. 

20 


HERBERT ADAMS HONORED 


Tue Gold Medal of the National Institute of Arts 
and Letters has lately been awarded to Herbert 
Adams, American sculptor. This medal, which is 
awarded annually for ‘distinguished creative work” 
in the field of arts and letters, has been awarded for 
sculpture approximately once every ten years since 
its institution. In 1909 it was given to Augustus 
Saint-Gaudens, and in 1917 to Daniel Chester 
French. In 1926, it was awarded to a third dis- 
tinguished artist in this field. 


fe Te a) 
A L’ENFANT MEMORIAL 


WsiincTontans are demanding a structure to 
commemorate the designer of their city, Major 
Pierre Charles L’Enfant, editorially states the New 
York Times. Heretofore his most effective memor- 
ial has been the city itself, and the greatest tribute 
paid to him the resuscitation of his original plans 
which had been partially discarded. —The Washing- 
ton Post has discovered that there is no slab of stone 
or tablet of bronze or statue to his memory within 
the precincts of the capital, and urges that a mem- 
orial be erected in one of the spaces to be cleared in 
carrying out the original plans of the city. 

This is as it should be, for thanks largely to the 
taste and work of this companion of Lafayette, 
Washington is today one of the most beautiful cities 
in the world. Had his original ideas been carried 
out from the beginning it would have been even 
finer. But the main plan, conceived in spaciousness, 
has been sufficiently followed to have made the cap- 
ital a park-like city of vistas. When the present 
work of constructing new Federal office buildings 
and of opening up new streets is finished, much 
will have been done to add to the beauty of the city. 

Major L’Enfant had the misfortune to disagree 
with some of the early politicians of Georgetown. 
In the quarrel that ensued the President sided against 
him. For his services he was offered the sum of 
$750 or a small lot not far from the site of the 
present White House. Dissatisfied and insulted, he 
refused both. In his old age he sought suitable com- 
pensation from Congress without success, and final- 
ly died in 1825 a dependent of a family in Mary- 
land. His was an eccentric disposition; he was 
somewhat suspicious and inclined to want to have 
his own way. 























4 
<4 


February 5, 1927 


THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 





Entrance, Pacific National Bank Bldg., Los Angeles, Calif., 
Morgan, Walls & Clements, Architects. Lower story ashlar, 
frieze and ornamental enrichment are entirely Terra Cotta. 


TERRA COTTA 


For Lower Story Finish 


Why not? It is capable of meeting beautifully 
all the requirements of scale and finish demanded 
for the finest type of building. And the cost is 
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(Many of the suggestions in our volume ‘‘Terra Cotta of the 


Italian Renaissance’’ are worthy of your consideration. $3.00 
per copy on approval.) 


NATIONAL TERRA COTTA SOCIETY 
19 WEST 44th STREET NEW YORK, N. Y. 


Specifications of most products advertised in THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT appear in the Specification Manual 

















THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT 





It is to his achievements rather than to his per- 
sonal qualities that it is proposed to erect a me- 
morial. In the days when the United States had 
only a few million inhabitants scattered along the 
Atlantic seaboard, L’Enfant had the vision to pre- 
pare a capital for a great nation. To be sure, the 
growth of the city has exceeded even his dreams, but 
much of this has come within the last quarter cen- 
tury. Strangely enough, one of the artistic dangers 
which he most feared when it was originally plan- 
ned to auction off the city lots not only came to pass 
soon but remained long—the erection of ‘‘huddles 
of shanties’ near important building sites. These 
at last are disappearing under the pressure of pres- 
ent-day real estate development. That they per- 
sisted so long is in a sense a further tribute to his 
foresight. He rightly understood the problems of 
planning a great city. It is high time for that city 
to show its understanding of his genius by paying 
him the tribute of a memorial. 


2m 


COLOR SCHEMES 


W: understand, writes The Builder, London, 
that the Corporation of Leeds proposes to experi- 
ment with color with a view to brightening up the 
otherwise drab appearance of some of the newer 
housing schemes. Experiments of this kind are to 
be welcomed since one of the few simple ways of 
cheering up our surroundings is to be found in the 
proper use of color and in breaking away from our 
conventional dread of gaiety. Some mistakes are 
inevitable, but in this case they have the great ad- 
vantages that they are not seriously harmful, and 
that they can easily be remedied subsequently. One 
hears that some of the tenants are protesting that 
the schemes adopted may not match their curtains 
and flower beds. Surely if the color of the house 
really neither matches nor adequately contrasts with 
the color of the curtains, it is not hard to change or 
dye the curtains. In regard to the flower beds, these 
can be of any color the tenant cares to select, and 
if the house is of a good color it is difficult to im- 
agine that flowers of any hue will fail to go with it. 
The protest appears to arise mainly from the con- 
ventionalized dread of color which we have men- 
tioned, and which is strangely universal in this 


country. 
2am 
NATIONAL FOREST ROAD AND TRAIL 
CONSTRUCTION 


D URING the past fiscal year, 1926, there were con- 
structed and improved 1,930 miles of roadway and 
4,694 miles of trails in United States national for- 
ests. During the same year, 11,965 miles of roads 
and 44,919 miles of trails were maintained. This 
work represents an expenditure of $11,861,560, of 
which $11,733,804 was obtained from funds ap- 





propriated by the federal government and $127,756 
was made available by local, state and county co- 
operators. On July 1, 1926, there was a balance of 
$2,829,926 available for expenditure in the funds 
previously appropriated and upon that day an ad- 
ditional $5,514,209 became available, thus making 
a total of $8,344,135 ready for use for road and 
trail construction at the beginning of this fiscal 


year. 
2m 


GERMAN CITY RENTS SPACE FOR CARS 


Tre City Council of Berlin has decided to make 
money out of the parking of automobiles on public 
streets and squares. Fifty parking spaces are to be 
set aside. The cars will be guarded by watchmen 
of a private detective agency. A charge of 7 cents 
an hour, or 25 cents a day, is suggested. The city 
is to get 42 per cent of the gross earnings. 


2m 


PERSONALS 


Murray Klein, architect, formerly located at 39 
Graham Avenue, is now occupying new offices at 
65 Court Street, Brooklyn, N. Y. 


2H 


A. Fraser Rose announces that he has formed a 
partnership with B. Kingston Hall, formerly prac- 
ticing in Toronto, Canada. The firm will practice 
under the name of Rose & Hall, architects and engi- 
neers, 208 Sixth Street, Miami Beach, Fla. 


2m 


Wallin & Comer, architects, 1001-3 Realty 
Building, Savannah, Ga., announce the opening of 
their branch office in Waycross, Ga., with W. L. 
Chafin in charge. Manufacturers are requested to 
send catalogs and specification data to Mr. Chafin 
at 428 Bunn Building, Waycross, Ga. 


ea) 


The firm of Gibb & Waltz, architects, has been 
dissolved by mutual consent. The members of the 
firm will continue the practice of their profession 
separately, Arthur N. Gibb having offices at 220 
North Tioga Street, Ithaca, N. Y. and Ornan H. 
Waltz retaining the offices in the Ithaca Savings 
Bank Building, same city. 


oe) 


Stephen F. Voorhees and Paul Gmelin announce 
the dissolution of the firm of McKenzie, Voorhees 
% Gmelin, 342 Madison Avenue, New York City, 
Owing to the recent death of Andrew C. McKenzie. 
Mr. Voorhees and Mr. Gmelin and Ralph T. Wal- 
ker announce the formation of a partnership for 
the practice of architecture under the name of Voor- 
hees, Gmelin & Walker, with offices at the old ad- 
dress. 








XUM 


THE PUBLISHERS’ PAGE 


The AMERICAN ARCHITECT has reserved space in 
the forty-second annual exhibition of The Archi- 
tectural League of New York, that it might by per- 
sonal representation express its appreciation of the 
work of the League in upholding the ideals of the 
profession of architecture and furthering a closer af- 
filiation between the arts and crafts allied to archi- 
tecture. Booth one hundred and thirty has been de- 
signed and carried forward to accent this outstand- 
ing feature of the League’s work, and is a co-opera- 
tive effort by THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT, Edge- 
water Tapestry Looms, Kantack & Company, Per- 
sian Rug Manufactory and the Shaw Furniture 
Company. 

A cordial invitation is extended to all in at- 
tendance at this exhibi- 





many architects who for periods ranging from fifty- 
one years to a few weeks have been on our mailing 
lists. Come in, sit down and rest and look over past 
issues and learn the things we shall do in the future 
to maintain THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT in the 
front rank where it has always been since now over 
fifty-one years. 


A large number of our readers have availed and 
continue to avail themselves of the service rendered 
by our service department. The nature of their in- 
quiries varies throughout the entire range of prob- 
lems that may confront the average practitioner— 
samples of building materials, catalogs of building 

products, names of 





tion to visit with us at 
booth one hundred 
and thirty. We want 
to renew old acquain- 
tances and make new 
ones. Representatives 
of every department of 
this journal will be on 
hand to greet you. 
The editors and 
publishers have always 
asked in the past to be 
permitted to render ser- 
vice of every nature to 
its subscribers. During 
the League exhibition 
this feature will be de- 
veloped to its highest 
power. We shall be 
glad to be of assistance 
in all professional mat- 
ters, and to the out-of- 





Visit us at 


The Forty-second Annual Exhibition 


The Architectural League of New York 
Grand Central Palace 
(Booth 130) 


Lexington Avenue and 46th Street 
New York 
February 22-March 5, both inclusive 


From 10 A. M. to 10.30 P. M. 


manufacturers making 
equipment for various 
purposes, books on ar- 
chitecture, methods of 
construction, specifica- 
tions, technical advice, 
and so on, through 
items too numerous to 
catalog. 

THE AMERICAN 
ARCHITECT Service 
Department is main- 
tained to render service 
of this nature. Com- 
plete, unbiased, unprej- 
udiced and distinterest- 
ed suggestions prompt- 
ly transmitted are the 
basis upon which the 
value of thisservice 
may be measured. Un- 
biased advice is not dif- 








town visitor, who may 
need to know of short 
sightseeing trips, places of interest, matters as to 
transportation, etc., there will at all times be a rep- 
resentative of this journal in attendance to give 
counsel and aid. 

There is one outstanding topic we like to discuss 
—THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT. We want to meet 
the needs and preferences of the large body of archi- 
tects who semi-monthly receive this journal. Tell 
us what you like, but more particularly if there are 
shortcomings let us know about them, too. Here is 
afforded just the right opportunity for close contact 
with readers. 

If you are not a subscriber to this journal, it will 
in no wise affect the warmth of your welcome. We 
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are equally at your service as if you were one of the 





ficult to give. Where 
the inquiry involves a 
matter of opinion, we endeavor to present all angles 
of the question without passing judgment or offer- 
ing a personal opinion. From the facts presented the 
maker of the inquiry must reach his own conclusions. 

Complete replies are usually more difficult of ac- 
complishment in spite of the numerous contacts that 
are directly made available to architects through 
THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT organization. In a 
very large number of cases our failure to write as 
fully as the request may warrant, is due to the in- 
quirer not making his desires specifically known. 
Questions are often made so general that a volume 
would be required to cover the subject adequately. 
Those who make use of this service can assist us in 
making it truly valuable by wording their inquiries 
as specifically as possible. 











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FROM THE ORIGINAL DRAWING BY SAMUEL CHAMBERLAIN 





THE AMERICAN ARCHITECT