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AL LiB 
APR 23 1919 


T bod = Oniy, OF mice No. 16 


NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


NEW YORK AND CHICAGO PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY APRIL 19, 1919 


Entered as second-class matter, May 12, 1891, at the postoffice at New York, N. ¥., under the act of March 8, 1879. 
Subscription Price: United States, $3.00; Canada, $4.00; All Foreign Countries in Postal Union, $5.00. 


TABER CENTRIFUGAL PUMPS 


FOR PUMPING WATER, BLOOD OR BRINE 
Especially Efficient in Refrigerating Plants 


BUILT IN IRON AND BRONZE 
Send For Bulletin No. 20 


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Established 1857 Curers of the Celebrated 
“REGAL” Ham, Breakfast Bacon 


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Famous Brand “PURITY” Lard. 


GOODS FOR EXPORT AND HOME 


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THE MODERN BOX 


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WIREBOUNDS 


for 


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SAVE IN FREIGHT. NATIONAL BOX CO. 


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THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 
































April 19, 1919 








Economical Slaughtering \ 


To slaughter cattle economically with the least amount of time and 
labor requires modern hoisting and dropping machinery. 


To slaughterers who are not operating efficiently we offer modern 
equipment in this particular field and an experience based on many 
years of actual operation. 


The Brecht Crescent Beef Hoists are made single or double, with 
low or high frame or with hoist and dropper in one frame. We also 
have invented an automatic arrangement to land the bleeding roller 
on the bleeding rails, which in itself actually releases one man on 
the killing floor for other work. 


We'll gladly lay out a modern Beef Killing equipment for your 
plant—no obligation on your part. 


‘‘A Product of Experience’’ 


The Brecht Company 


ESTABLISHED 1853 
Exclusive Manufacturers of 


MACHINERY, EQUIPMENT, TOOLS AND SUPPLIES PERTAINING TO THE 
MEAT AND ALLIED INDUSTRIES 


Main Offices and Factories: 
1234 CASS Ave. ST. LOUIS, MO. 


NEW YORK CHICAGO PARIS BUENOS AIRES 
174-176 Pearl St. 725 Monadnock Bldg. 23 Rue de Rocroy Calle San Martin 201 























THE 


NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE AMERICAN MEAT PACKERS’ ASSOCIATION 
PUBLISHED EVERY SATURDAY 


Entered as second-class matter at the postoffice at New York, N. Y., under the act of March, 1879. 


— 








Vol. 60 





New York and Chicago, April 19, 1919 


— 


No. 16 








ANOTHER PROVISION EXPORT PLAN. 


Another combination of American packers 


for export purposes was completed at a 
meeting in Chicago this week, when the 


United States Provision Export Corporation 
perfected its organization by the election of 
offcers and the announcement of its list of 
The 


Powers, 


charter members. following officers 


were elected: Isaac Home Packing 
Co., Terre Haute, Ind., president; Oscar G. 
Mayer & Bro., Chicago, IIl., 
vice-president; John W. Rath, Rath Packing 
Co.. Waterloo, Iowa, vice-president; W. L. 
Gregson, Chicago, Ill., secretary; M. 
Evansville 
treasurer. 


Mayer, Oscar L. 


Mann- 
heimer, Evansville, 


Ind.. 
The organization is composed of 22 


Packing Co., 


pack- 
under the Webb-Pomerene act 
for the exportation of meat food products. 
No. 607 
suilding. The company 
New York and in- 
tends to establish agencies in foreign coun- 
tries. 


ers combined 


Offices were opened in Chicago at 
Insurance Exchange 
offices in 


will also open 


The following packers are charter members 


of the corporation: Arnold Bros., Chicago, 
Nl: Blumenstock & Reid Co., Cleveland, 


Ohio; 
Ohio: 
Ohio: 


Henry Burkhart Packing Co., Dayton, 
Columbus Co., Columbus, 
East Side Packing Co., East St. Louis, 
Ill.; Evansville Packing Co., Evansville, Ind.; 
William Foeke Sons Co., Dayton, Ohio; Home 
Haute, Ind.; Interstate 
Packing Co., Winona, Minn.; Lake Erie Pro- 
vision Co., Cleveland, Ohio; 


Packing 


Packing Co., Terre 


Pro- 
vision Co., Louisville, Ky.; Ohio Provision 
Co., Cleveland, Ohio; Oscar F. Mayer & Bro., 
Chicago, Tll.; Nuckolls Packing Co., Pueblo, 


Louisville 


Colo.; Ogden Packing & Provision Co., Ogden, 
Utah: Powers Beggs & Co., Jacksonville, 


Ill.; Rath Packing Co., Waterloo, Iowa; 
Theurer-Norton Provision Co., Cleveland, 
Ohio; Wilson Provision Co., Peoria, TIL; 
Chas. Wolff Packing Co., Topeka, Kan.; 
Chas, Sucher Packing Co., Dayton, Ohio; 
Thos. Ruddy Co., Kansas City, Kan. 
FILE PLAN FOR EXPORT TRADE. 

The American Provisions Export Co., 
Which was formed recently by a group of 
packers under the Webb-Pomerene act has 
filed « statement of its purposes with the 


Federal Trade Commission at Washington, 


as the law requires. The statement indi- 


ee 


cates the desire of the company to be classi- 
fied as engaged in exporting “packing house 
products, meats, meat products and _provi- 
tallow, 
vegetable oils and products thereof.” 
Officers as already reported in The Na- 
tional Provisioner, 


sions, hides, skins, fertilizers, soap, 


are Charles F. Hammond, 
president; A. L. Eberhart, 8S. T. Nash, and 
O. J. Roberts, vice-presidents; L. H. 
man, secretary, and T. K. Boyd, treasurer. 
The authorized common stock is $1,000,000, of 
which $60,000 is paid in. Stockholders are 
Boyd Lunham & Co., Miller & Hart and Rob- 
erts & Oake, Chicago; George A. Hormel & 
Co., Austin, Minn.; Jacob Dold Packing Co., 
Buffalo; Provision Co., Cleveland; 
St. Louis Independent Packing Co., St. Louis; 


Free- 


Cleveland 


lowa Packing Co., Des Moines; Sullivan 
Packing Co., Parker Webb & Co., and Ham- 
mond Standish & Co., Detroit. 

f= 


BRITISH CONTROL PROVISION SALE. 
Sale of imported hams, bacon and lard in 
England are now controlled by the British 


Food Ministry, being another measure to 
protect British products against imported 


provisions. The Food Ministry will appoint 
sell the imported preducts, the 
rules providing as follows: 

1, An agent may be (a) In the case of 
bacon or hams, any importer of bacon or 
hams or any other trader in bacon or hams 
who is approved by the Ministry; (b) In the 
ease of lard, any importer of lard or any 
other trader in lard who is approved by the 
Minister. 

2. The terms of agency will be: (a) Ex- 
cept with consent, allotments to agents to be 
of not less than 200 boxes of bacon and/or 
hams or ten tons of lard. (b) Agents to have 
the option to return the whole allotment 
within three days after receipt of allotment 
letter, but part of the allotment not to be 
returned except with the consent of the Min- 
istry. Claims in respect of condition and 
quality to be adjudicated on by existing 
Claims Committees. (ce) Agents to receive 
commission of 2s. 3d. per ewt. on net weight 
sold, the commission to cover del credere. 
(d) Agents to pay approximately 95 per cent. 
of fixed selling price against receipt of allot- 
ment letter. 

3. Prices at which agents are to sell will 
be notified by the Ministry, will be “ex quay” 
or “ex store” basis, and will vary according 
to brand, ete. 

4. Brands and cuts will be allotted among 
agents as evenly as possible. 

5. Agents are not to sell to other agents, 
except with consent of the Ministry, and 


agents to 


are to sell in the ordinary course of trade. 

6. Agents (other than appointed importers ) 
and, with consent of the Ministry, appointed 
importers will be allowed to take into stock 
any portion of an allotment which they re- 
quire for their regular trade, but they will 
not be allowed any commission on that por- 
tion, and will be required to specify on the 
application the amount they wish to take 
into stock. 


—— 
THANKS PACKERS FOR WAGE STAND. 

Meat packers at Chicago this week noti- 
fied the Secretary of Labor that they would 
continue existing labor agreements for a year 
This is the first 
industry thus to respond to President Wil- 
son’s Packers 
recent 
awards on wages, hours, ete., only until the 


after the signing of peace. 


cabled request from Paris. 


were under obligation to observe 
peace treaty was signed, but have voluntarily 
agreed to continue the war basis of wages 
for a vear after peace comes 

In response to this Secretary Wilson on 
Tuesday wrote these packers expressing the 
gratification of the Department of Labor at 
their expressed willingness to continue ex- 
isting labor agreements for a_ period of 
one year after peace is signed. It is un- 
derstood that representatives of the workers 
also have expressed a willingness to have 
the agreements continue as a means of pro- 
moting the general welfare during 
struction. ‘ 

The letter to Secretary Wilson, in which 
the packers express their willingness to 
abide by the agreement made with the Pres- 
ident’s mediation and the 
retary of Labor for a period of one year 
following the signing of peace was as fol- 
jows: 

Honorable William B. Wilson, 
Secretary of Labor, Washington, D. C.: 

As the existing labor agreements under 
which we have been operating during the pe- 
riod of the war will expire with the declara- 
tion of peace, and in order to avoid labor 
controversies and to promote the general 
welfare during the troublous period of re- 
construction, we have, in line with the pol- 
icy of your Department, told the representa- 
tives of our employes, and now desire to 
advise you, that we are willing to continue 
the present agreements for the term of one 
year after peace is declared. 

CUDAHY PACKING CO., 
MORRIS & COMPANY, 
SWIFT & COMPANY, 
WILSON & COMPANY, 
ARMOUR & COMPANY, 


recon- 


commission Sec- 








Paying Your Bills Is ‘Good Business’’ 
That’s why the “Victory Liberty Loan’’ is good business 
That’s Why It’s YOUR BUSINESS—Get Busy! 














16 " 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


FUTURE OF THE MEAT TRADE IN AUSTRALIA 


Labor Troubles and Dry Weather Make Conditions Precarious 
(Special Correspondence of The National Provisioner.) 


Brisbane, Queensland, March 3, 1919. 

Now that the armistice has been signed and 
peace is in sight people in the trade in Aus- 
tralia are considering the future of the in- 
dustry and the possible trend of prices. The 
producers of stock in the Commonwealth and 
New Zealand have had a rare run of good 
prices and high rates for meat, thanks to the 
contracts made with the Imperial Govern- 
ment, which stabilized prices and led to high 
prices for meat for domestic consumption. 

The general impression is that the high 
rates must continue for some time, as there 
will be a large demand for meat overseas, and 
the number of stock in Australia is smaller 
than it was some years ago, owing to the 
effects of drought and ticks, and other re- 
pressive causes. 

The impression in the trade is that if the 
various State governments encourage, instead 
of discouraging—as some of the Labor ad- 
ministrations are doing—the production of 
stock the number held can be quickly in- 
creased. But the labor conditions are diffi- 
cult, especially in the meat works. On the 
pastoral holdings this is not so much the 
ease, as the labor employed is isolated and 
not easily combined. 

But the works have experienced a serious 
set-back the 
strikes and the system 
has been 


owing to continued policy of 
of “go slow” which 
The men appear to 
have resented the action of the companies in 
going to the Arbitration Court and seeking to 
abolish the “preference to unionists” laid 
down in the award. 


inaugurated. 


The past season was a record of industrial 
troubles. The companies suffered much loss 
by the frequent stoppages, especially when 
the plant was filled with dead animals. In 
fact, the companies are becoming desperate. 

A further application has just been made 
to the court, and during the proceedings 
some rather startling information was given 
concerning the action of some of the extrem- 
ists in hatching plots and setting the men 
against the managements. The conditions 
were described by the employers as chaotic, 
and it was practically admitted on the part 
of the men that the strikes and other stop- 
pages and the slowing down methods were 
purposely adopted and would continue. Ves- 
sels have had to leave without shipments of 
meat because the workers refused to handle 
the meat, and this despite the fact that some 
of the meat was destined for the troops. 


How Labor Agitators Made Trouble. 

A few illustrations will suffice to show 
what the trade in Australia has to face at 
present. The manager of the Ross River 
works said that a deliberate slow-down was 
adopted by the men, and when it was over 
the killing figures jumped up again. The 
manager of the Gladstone works said that 
the men continually adopted “go slow” meth- 
ods, so that the management was compelled 
to put on more men to keep down the over- 
time. Yet the overtime went on and more 
men had to be put on. Then the men adopted 
the “lapse” system, which was described as 
pure loafing. At another works it took two 
men five minutes to wheel a truck ten yards. 


The application made by the employers to 
abolish preference to the members of the 
union—the award requires them to go to the 
union for any men they require—is evidently 
made in a spirit of desperation; and unless 
some relief had been given the works may 
not have been reopened. 

The judge, after a scathing indictment of 
the union officials and others in the northern 
part of the State, where they were conspir- 
ing-to prevent the ‘works from making any 
profit or even of continuing, withdrew pref- 
erence to unionists and gave the companies 
a free hand to select suitable men to run 
their plants. He concluded that certain of 
the had become banded to foment 
trouble and promote turmoil, and that the 
works could not continue under such condi- 
tions. The decision is one of the most 
notable that has been given since the indus- 
trial arbitration court was cstablished in 
Queensland. 

As a matter of fact, the forthcoming sea- 
son in Queensland will probably be brief, even 
if some of the works open at all, as the sup- 
ply of stock will be very short. The sea- 
son has been an exceedingly bad one, and as 
artificial feeding is not practiced by cattle 
raisers in Queensland and practically not by 
sheep-owners, stock which have had to de- 
pend on the natural grasses are much back- 
ward. Moreover, extensive bush fires have 
destroyed millions of acres of grass on which 
stock would have depended. Good rains have 
fallen in the far north of Queensland and in 
the Northern Territory, where a large pro- 
portion of the cattle are raised for export, 
but in the other parts of Queensland the con- 
ditions are very bad, and unless rain soon 
comes there will be little meat for export 
from this State. 

The conditions in the other parts of Aus- 
tralia are somewhat better. But the fact 
that these periodic droughts occur and affect 
the output of meat indicates that supplies 
of meat from Australia must become erratic 
until more attention is paid to the artificial 
feeding of stock. 

A promise has been made of increased re- 
frigerated space for produce for shipment 
overseas, and the difficulties that stood in 
the way of clearing the stores will soon dis- 
appear. A specially large number of ships 
has been promised for the first three months 
of this vear, and these will be hailed with 
relief by both Australia and New Zealand 
exporters. 

Seized Army Meat for State Shops. 

The Queensland State Government is still 
interposing in the meat industry, to the det- 
riment of the trade. A notable case occurred 
recently, when the steamer Port Darwin, of 
over 10,000 tons, arrived to take 1,700 tons 
of meat to the Imperial troops, but the 
meat was withheld by the State government, 
which has become nervous about the supplies 
of meat for local consumption and practically 
seized this meat for sale in the State shops. 
The vessel had to sail without the meat. 

Owing to the change in the seasons the 
State stations are not able to carry stock 
in sufficient number to supply the State 


men 





April 19, 1919 


shops, afid the meat in the various works 
has to be drawn upon for State supplies, 
In fact, one of the Labor ministers recently 
admitted that the meat position was very 
acute. The Government, he said, recognized 
the necessity of conserving meat in good 
seasons to meet the shortage in lean seasons. 
For this reason the Government is refusing 
further requests to establish State 
shops at present. 

Details have just been published concern- 
ing the operations of Vestey Brothers in the 
Northern Territory, where, in addition to 
costly meat works, the company, of which 
Sir William Vestey is the principal figure, 
holds nearly 30,000 square miles of territory, 
including many well-known cattle stations 
carrying a quarter of a million of cattle. In 
addition, the company controls country in 
the adjoining State of western Australia. 
The meat works at Geelong, in Victoria, are 
also associated with the company’s business 
in Australia. It is estimated that the com- 
pany has laid out nearly a million pounds 
sterling, mainly on its properties and works 
in the Northern Territory. The company 
has been hampered by the local unionists, 
but if it had a proper run it is probable that 
40,000 head of cattle per annum would be 
treated at the works at Darwin. 


meat 


Meat Conditions in New Zealand. 

The works are opening in New Zealand, 
though operations have been hampered by 
the severe outbreak of influenza. A good 
season is expected. Some uncertainty exists 

(Continued on page 42.) 
i? 


——e—_— 


CONGRESSMEN VISIT MEAT PLANTS. 

“Every .Member of Congress should visit 
the Chicago packing plants, and they would 
get new ideas about industrial progress and 
efficiency which would likely revise their 
ideas about big business,” declared Congress- 
man Fred Britten at a luncheon given April 
1] at the Saddle and Sirloin Club at the Chi- 
cago Stock Yards to members of the House 
Committee on Naval Affairs which visited 
the Yards that day. Mr. Britten and several 
other the Naval Committee, 
who were visiting naval stations throughout 
the country from Mare’s Island, San Fran- 
cisco, to the Great Lakes Naval Station, Chi- 
cago, declared themselves as 
favorably impressed. 

Arthur Meeker, of 
acted as toastmaster, and H. H. Merrick, . 
president of the Chicago Association of 
Commerce, also thought it would bring about 
a better understanding if more Congressmen 
would visit industrial establishments. Mr. 
Meeker told how the packers had handled 
war business on a small margin of profit. 
“Our representatives would learn problems 
of production and distribution first-hand,” 
Mr. Merrick declared, 

The Naval Committee went through the 
killing plants, the Armour oleomargarine fac- 
tory, watched the process of boning beef 
which saves many hundreds of thousands of 
dollars in shipments abroad by reducing 
weight and transportation charges, and com- 
mented on the condition of live stock in the 
pens. The Congressional party consisted of 
Daniel J. William J. Browning, 


members of 


having been 


Armour & Co., who 


Riordan, 


Frederick C. Hicks, Daniel G. Oliver, Carl 
Vinson and Fred Britten. 














April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


FATS AND OILS IN THE UNITED STATES 
Their Production and Conservation Discussed by Experts 


By Herbert S. Bailey, United States Department of Agriculture, and B. E. Reuter, United 
States Food Administration. 


(Continued from last week.) 


(EDITOR'S NOTE.—The fifth installment of this 
treatise on fats and oils, published in the last issue of 
The National Provisioner, dealt with olive and peanut 
oils. In this issue cocoanut oli is taken up.) 

For many years we, as a nation, have been 
using coconut oil in the manufacture of the 
so-called marine soaps, that is, those which 
form a lather in alkali and salt waters, to 
make pharmaceutical preparations, cosmetics, 
and, to a smaller extent, confectionery and 
cakes. It is only within the last five or six 
years that this oil has received the attention 
which it deserves as a food product. 

The rapid increase in coconut oil impor- 
tations, from 46,720,000 pounds for the year 
1912 to 1917, is 


due partly to the fact that larger amounts 


163,091,000 pounds during 


of this oil are now used in the soap industry 
than ever before. Coconut oil yields a higher 
percentage of glycerine than any of the other 
soap fats, and it can be substituted to some 
extent for tallows the price of which was 
abnormally high during 1917. Reports from 
the soap trade, as shown in table 9, indicate 
a consumption of coconut oil during 1917 of 
168,602,000 pounds, which is 5,500,000 pounds 
more than the total imports for the same 
period. 









rABLE 9.—CONSUMPTION OF FATS AND OILS BY 
THE SOAP INDUSTRY IN 1917. 
Vegetable Fats and Oils. 

Pounds 

Chinese vegetable tallow ....-sccccsccscce 6,417,000 
CRIMCME TE GEE a. oiosicinct.c0. une 900094.90:0.09 115,000 
CN 10D Ved cee eh rieinre ei edna sSan naa 168.602 000 
COUR GEE beac acnde ‘ee epee ees-e0ee hae ae 15,997,000 
Cottonseed Of] 2... creer cccccccccoscvevces 126,390,000 
Linseed oil ....... Sa eGR ania Eee ne 1,006,000 
UNG NE. ota dpie ness 0 seesecenwss£666 bee se'6 1,731,000 
ge 2 Bee rrr ee re 4.762.000 
Palm oil gigie\e see awn Ship Bele bg eRe acne we gtetetet 5,000 
PORE GN 0:00:00 :0:6:0:60:00:0.0S 0 05.0 SS Sows . 126,000 
ee eee eer eet i tee ror 5,972,000 
Sesame oil ....... Roe Saran aka ati oa aie henna 5,000 
eae ee ee 2.487.000 
Sey bean oil Seemann pas oeeRD eeemnene 124,058,000 
All other vegetable oils i eeea tes 9,692,000 
eee ves iecesss sh ahatarkaibeiaeece 509,705,000 





37,082,000 
OT ere 63,118,000 
<aesarneas . 4,104,000 


Bone grease . 
Garbage grease 
Herring oil 





ee et ee ee re 7.481.000 
Tard, mevtval .....cccccccevccsceccsccsees 166 
Menhaden oil bl laleuteals ala/arelemewlina staid ahem 2,279,000 
Neat's foot oi] and stock ........... ipa 118,000 
Recovered SFEASe 2... ecccccccccccvccscccce 12,680,000 
Byer GE ...csccscccvccsvcsssccceceseessic 17,000 
A ne ee te ee ee 

TOUMASE BVGREO 2c oo ciccdscccscveseees 15,475,000 
WUD. GEE e:¥:058:0.05555s con ge se eu cteeseveenswe 5,732,000 
er rot ee 


All other fish and Oia) GW sc 0:56:6040:0% 








RE. 66-0544 ance atcadeeesaeeeeeee 
Secondary Fats and Oils. 

Acidulated soap StoCK ......6e eee ee eeee 25,086,000 
Cottonseed foots RN es 17 SG 
Cottonseed foots (distilled)...........056- 
oe ee err tr eer er 
Fatty acids distilled.) 39,465,000 
Grease stearin .......eeceeeeeceees 19,146,000 
ee er rrr 1,436,000 
ae rere Ce cree 108,000 
OGRive GlR FOOUH o.ooie vices cesicccccccecccecaces 4,761,000 
ee er er ee re eee eT y 


Nonclassitied totals 


Total ..«2- aa 
Grand total 





*Firms under this head failed to classify 
tion of fats and oils. 


consump 


To furnish the additional oil used by the 


manufacturers of vegetable butter substi- 


tutes and other industries at least 10 copra 
crushing mills are now operating in_ the 
United States. The 1917 output of the crush- 
ers was nearly 188,500,000 pounds, which is 
thout 26,400,000 than the 


pounds greater 


umount of coconut oil imported. 





To supply these mills it was necessary to 
bring in from the Orient and the West Indies, 
in 1917, 366,700,000 pounds of dried coconut 
meat, known commercially as copra. During 
1912 the importations of copra were only 
62,168,000 one-sixth of the 
amount imported in 1917, in spite of the diffi- 
culties experienced in getting sufficient ships 
for our trade, In the fiscal year 
1913 we brought in a little 1,000,000 
pounds of coconut oil from the Philippines, 
and in 1916 over 30,000,000, nearly half of our 
entire importation for that period, 


pounds, about 


overseas 


over 


The absence of German buyers from the 
foreign copra markets caused an increase in 
the amount of coconut oil produced in the 
United States, during the past five 
Although the difficulty in obtaining ships to 


vears. 


bring the copra from the tropics has resulted 
in lowering the price of this product in the 
countries where it is produced, the domestic 
price for coconut oil has increased. At pres- 
ent a comparatively small amount of the 
world’s supply of copra is going to Germany, 
England and Holland, very large importers 
before the war began, and much of it has 
been diverted to American manufacturers. 
This, to some extent, has helped to keep the 
price of coconut oil from reaching the high 
figure it might otherwise have attained be 
cause of our greatly increased domestic con- 
sumption, 


Manufacture and Use of Coconut Oil. 

The coconut oil produced in tropical coun- 
tries where the coconuts grow is often made 
by very crude methods. Nevertheless, much 
of it reaches the American market in as good 
condition as that pressed at home. This is 
due to the fact that 


continental United 


since we-raise no coco- 
States, the 


raw material used in our oil mills is imported 


nuts in the 
from overseas. 

Copra is dried in the sun or over smoky 
fires, largely by native labor. Such meth- 
ods, of course, offer every opportunity for the 


the 


copra is 


meats are 
often 


ceil to become rancid before 


properly cured. Moreover, 
shipped by slow sailing vessels, and, being a 
comparatively cheap cargo, it is stowed in 
damp holes where it sweats and still further 
decomposes. A number of modern plants for 
both drying and pressing coconuts have re- 
cently been put into operation in the Philip- 
pines, and the product from these mills 
reaches this country in a much better condi- 
tion than that produced by the natives. 
As copra contains a higher percentage of 
oil (63 to 70 per cent.) than any of the other 
products usually pressed fer oil in the United 
States, it 


press the raw material twice. although neither 


has been found advantageous to 


pressing is done cold or with the idea of pro- 


ducing a virgin oil. A number of our coco- 
nut oil mills press once in expellers, then 
(Continued on page 27.) 
i? 


——$o—_—_ 


WILSON TO STUDY FOREIGN TRADE. 
Wilson, president of Wilson & 
Company. sailed from New York on April 15 


Thomas FE. 


for a trip through principal European coun- 


17 
tries. He expects to return about June 1. 
While the trip primarily is for the purpose 
of visiting European branches and agencies of 
Wilson & Company, Mr. Wilson will probably 
meet and confer with officials in charge of food 
distributing agencies of the govern- 
ment. It is to be expected that Mr. 
Wilson will confer with Herbert Hoover, Food 
Administrator of the United Mr. 
Wilson been chairman of the Packers’ 
Committee which has handled meat shipments 
during the war. It is that 
his visit should not be construed as being in 


various 


also 


States, as 
has 


stated, however, 


response to any request upon the part of Mr. 
Hoover to visit Europe in an effort to help in 
the serious food supply situation existing 
there, 

In a statement issued in response to nu- 
merous inquiries concerning the purposes of 
his trip, he said: 

“My trip abroad is in the interest of the 
business of Wilson & Company. Since tak- 
ing over this business I have not had an op- 
portunity of viewing our European proper- 
ties, and as other important matters have 
arisen making a trip through several Euro- 
pean countries desirable, | am taking advan- 
tage of the opportunity to visit all European 
agencies and branches of the company. I 
also wish to inquire into many matters that 
affect the packing and livestock industry. 

“We are all more or less advised, whether 
correctly or not, concerning the food prob- 
lems existing in Europe. We also have some 
knowledge of the live-stock situation, and I 
believe it to be a very serious one over there. 
There are many serious and important prob- 
lems constantly arising, and I hope to meet 
With many people in Europe with whom I 
can discuss the livestock and food situation 
as it affects them, with a view of passing 
along what information and assistance I may 
come in possession of. 

“Our own livestock producers are mightily 
interested in the future business in Europe, 
and I hope to gather information which may 
be of help to them in shaping their policies. 
During the war our livestock production was 
greatly stimulated, and we all were able to 
learn important lessons which should not be 
lost, but be taken advantage of during the 
reconstruction period. The immediate future 
looks exceptionally bright and prosperous for 
the entire livestock industry, as it 
all industries. 

“Now is the time for action, not hesita- 
tion; is: the time for sane, practical 
thinking and a commonsense understanding 
among the interests of labor, capital and our 
vovernment. Selfishness must be abandoned 
to a co-operation of interests for the best in- 
terest of this nation and the world. From 
my personal observation [ am convinced that 
business conditions in general during the com- 
ing year will be satisfactory. and approach 
the normal, even though we are emerging 
from a great war and the consequent uncer- 
tainties of the period of reconstruction, 

“Prosperity will be ours in generous meas- 
ure if we take advantage of the wonderful 
opportunities which we have won through our 
initiative and energy. The United States 
is in the strongest possible position, finan- 
cially, which should be of assurance to those 
who are hesitating. 

“Naturally, the degree to which we shall 
enjoy this prosperity rests largely in our 
own hands. <A definite plan of action rigidly 
followed is necessary to those businesses un- 
dergoing the change from making munitions 
and war materials to producing peace-time 
materials. 

“Our livestock raisers and grain producers 
are prosperous and indications are that they 
will continue to enjoy prosperity As agri- 
culture has always been considered the basis 
of our national wealth and prosperity, we 
begin with a strong foundation.” 


—~——eo— 


ck eS t¢ Yr 


now 


Do vou 
page 4S. 


want a good position? Watch 





PRACTICAL. 


ACTUAL PACKINGHOUSE TESTS. 


{EDITOR’S NOTE.—Every packinghouse superin- 
tendent keeps a record of tests, which is his most 
precious possession, and which serves him as a guide 
and reference In succeeding operations. It is only 
actual tests that tell the story in packinghouse prac- 
tice: theory is all right, but practical results are a 
necessary guide always. The National Provisioner 
bas printed on this page of ‘‘Practical Points for the 
Trade’’ many tests of this sort, in answering in- 
quiries from subscribers. It has many more of these 
test results at its conmand, ard will publish them 
from time to time for the general information of 
readers, instead of withholding them until some spe- 
elfic inquiry is made. ] 

@, 


fe 


VEGETABLE OILS IN PACKINGHOUSE. 
An inquiry from a reader of The Nation- 
follows: 





Is as 


al Provisioner 


Editor The National Provisioner: 

Could you give me a list of vegetable oils 
which are used in the packinghouse indus- 
try? 

Vegetable oils used in the packing trade 
include cottonseed oil, peanut oil, soya-bean 
oil, corn oil, sesame oil, cocoanut oil and lin- 
seed oil. Some of these oils are used in the 
manufacture of oleomargarine, butterine and 
lard compounds and substitutes and some in 


the manufacture of soaps; some in one and 


some in both. 


7 
2 


HOW TO CARRY CURED MEATS. 

The following inquiry is from an Illinois 
packer: 

Editor The National Provisioner : 

We have some pickled bellies and hams that 
are fully cured, and we have more coming out 
of cure than are readily salable at this time. 
Kindly advise us if we can take them out of 


pickle and store in a freezer without dam- 
aging them. Also if they will be first class 
hams and bacon if held in a freezer for sev- 


eral months. 

We have been told that to hold bellies they 
should be frozen fresh, and then thawed and 
cured as needed later in the season. We will 
appreciate any information that you can give 
as to the correct method of handling hams and 
bacon so that we ean hold our surplus until 
they are more salable. 


Any meat cured in vats, and to be carried 
in stock some time after being cured, must 
be overhauled and new plain pickle of 45° 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 





April 19, 1919 


POINTS FOR THE TRADE 


strength placed on same at the following 
ages: 
when 75 days old. 


Skinned hams, overhaul and repickle 
Hams, 20 lbs. and down, 
overhaul and repickle when 75 days old. 
Hams, 20 lbs., and up, overhaul and repickle 
when 90 days old. 
overhauls and 


Shoulders and picnics, 
repickle 80 days old, 
bellies at 60 days, and boneless butts at 70 
days, 


when 


Meats cured in vats, when overhauled at 
these ages, should be packed lean side down as 
tight as possible, and the cover placed and 
clamped down. Use as little pickle per 100 
Ibs. as possible—not over 4 gallons per ewt. 
Meats cured in tierces may be carried 30 days 
longer before changing pickle, if the curing 
temperature has satisfactory. Store 
repacked meat in 26° to 28° Fahr. 


been 


Now, as to fancy hams and bellies, accord- 
ing to average. Take hams 8 to 10, 10 to 12, 
12 to 14, 14 to 16 lbs., cured respectively in 
35, 40, 50 and 60 days; bellies, 6 to 8, 8 to 10, 
10 to 12, 12 to 14 lbs., cured respectively in 
20, 20, 25 and 30 days. If not used at these 
ages meats must be pulled from pickle and 
carried on the floor dry for 30 days, in 26° 
to 28° Fahr.; for 60 days, in 12° to 14° Fahr. 
If not used at these floor ages, such meats 
could scarcely be classed “fancy.” If bellies 
carried, it is best to carry them 
fresh in the freezer, at 12° to 14° Fahr. 


must be 


FORMULAS FOR OLEOMARGARINE. 


A reader in the West writes for information 








as follows: 
Editer The National Provisioner: 

Could you give me information concerning 
formulas for making oleomargarine: say, one 
or two formulas of different grades? 


Butterine formulas differ, according to price 


obtainable in different locations. In the 
higher grade geods cottonseed oil is not always 


Oleo 

oil and neutral lard is used in all qualities. 
A cheaper butterine formula would be, say, 

1.000-Ib. bateh: 150 Ibs. milk, 200 Ibs. 


used, and cream is substituted for milk. 


for a 


P. S. Y. cottonseed oil, 350 Ibs. neutral lard, 
300 Ibs. of oleo oil, and salt to taste, possibly 
5 to 6 per cent. more or less. 

One of the best grades of butterine is com- 
posed of neutral lard, oleo oil, creamery but- 
ter, milk and cream in proportions, respect- 
ively, as follows: Neutral lard, 300 Ibs.; oleo 
oil, 400 lbs.; creamery butter, 200 Ibs., and 
200 Ibs. (70 and 30 per cent., respectively) 
of milk and cream. This will result in about 
1,000 Ibs. finished butterine. 

Another cheap grade is composed of 100 
Ibs. yellow oleo oil, 550 Ibs. of P. S. Y. cotton- 
seed oil, 100 lbs. oleo stearine, 200 Ibs. butter 
oil, 4 cans of skimmed milk, 18 per cent. acid, 
125 Ibs. of salt. 
4.75 to red, 
3.50 to 5.25 red. 

Another formula for the better grade of 
butterine, tintometer test 5.25 red, is as fol- 
200 Ibs. prime summer yellow deodor- 
ized cottonseed oil, 200 lbs. neutral lard: 600 


Tintometer tests 
and butterien 


and run 


5.25 from 


from 


lows: 


lbs. of yellow oleo oil, 2 cans of cream, 18 per 
cent. acid and 17 per cent. butterfat; 3 cans 
of milk, 18 per cent. acid and 3.50 per cent. 
butterfat, and 125 pounds of salt. 

Of course, the manufacture of butterine ab- 
solutely demands experience. Consistency, 
flavor, titer, ete., all are to be carefully con- 
sidered. It takes a fully qualified expert to 
make it successfully. 

° 


bo 


BRITISH ADMIT MEAT PRODUCTS. 
The following agricultural products, which 
now be im- 





formerly were restricted 


ported freely into the United Kingdom under 


may 
general licenses: Baked beans, canned beans 
lLaked with pork and tomato sauce, canned 
pork tallow. The ar- 
ticles in the foregoing list are either addi- 


and beans, ham and 
tions to previous general license lists or are 
amendments to those lists. 


7 
%e- 


Bargains in equipment may be obtained by 
watching the “For Sale” department, page 48. 





Departmental Preference for Swenson Evaporators 


Purchasing Department 
Many of our oldest customers purchase without contract, knowing from experience that their 
installation will be satisfactory whether specified or not. 


Engineering Department 
Our co-operation to the fullest extent, which does not end when the evaporator is erected. Our 
company is essentially an engineering organization made up of graduate chemical, mechanical, elec- 


trical and civil engineers. 


Construction Department 

We furnish erection experts when wanted. However, as each and every evaporator is set up at 
our shops before shipping, to prove that they are exactly right in every particular, and as blueprints 
and construction lists are always furnished, many firms do their own erecting. 


The Management 
When you have Swensons you can be assured of the complete co-operation of all your departments. 
They have what they want and will give the management what it wants—good, harmonious service. 


Swenson arorarar(o; 


CHICAGO 











April 19, 1919 


THE 


NATIONAL PROVISIONER 
New York and 
Chicago 
Official Organ American Meat Packers’ 
Association 





Published Weekly by 


The Food Trade Publishing Co. 

(Incorporated Under the Laws of the State of New 
York) 

116 Nassau St., New York City. 

Husert Ciuis, President. 


at No. 


Orto v. Scurenk, Vice-Pres. and Sec. 


[aura B. McCartuy, Second Vice-Pres. 
HENRIETTA SENNER, Treasurer. 
Rozert G. Gouin, General Manager. 


Paut I. Atpricu, Editor. 





GENERAL OFFICES. 
No. 116 Nassau St. Cferton Building), New York, 


Cable Address: “Sampan, New York.” 
Telephone, No. 5477 Beekman. 
WESTERN OFFICES. 

Chicago, Ill., 540 Postal Telegraph Building. 
Telephone, Harrison 476. 


Correspondence on all subjects of practical inter- 
est to our readers is cordially invited. 





Money due Tme Nationa Provisioner should be 
paid direct to the General Office. 


Subscribers should notify us by letter before their 
subscriptions expire as to whether they wish to con- 
tinue for another year, as we cannot recognize any 
notice to discontinue except by letter. 


TERMS OF SUBSCRIPTION INVARIABLY IN 
ADVANCE, POSTAGE PREPAID. 


ee err eer rr er «+ $3.00 
CER. voc ov.no c0encndeeen eee senees Ceebeoy 4.00 
All Foreign Countries in the Post Union, 

PCY YOAT wo ceeereseccccesecevecceecoreces 5.00 
Single or Extra Copies, each 19 








AMERICAN MEAT PACKERS’ ASSOCIATION, 


President, James B. McCrea, Ohio Provision Com- 
pany, Cleveland, O. 

Vice-President, Gustav Bischoff, Jr., St. 
dependent Packing Co., St. Louis, Mo. 

Secretary, Robert G. Gould, THE N 
VISIONER, New York, N. 

Treasurer, Max N. Agger, 
Co., Cincinnati, O. 

Executive Committee—Charles 
burgh Packing & Provision Co., 
Chairman; B. W. Corkran, Corkran, 
more, Md.; Fred. R. Burrows, G. H. Hammond Co., 
Chieago, Ill.; James Craig, Jr., Parker, Webb & Co., 
Detroit, Mich.; James G. Cownie, Jacob Dold Pack- 
ing Co., Buffalo, N. Y.; John T. Agar, William 
Davies Co., I.td., Chicago, Ill.; J. J. Felin, J. J. 
Felin & Co., Inc., Philadelphia, Pa.; Albert T. Rohe, 
Rohe & Bro., New York, N. Y.; T. Henry Foster, 
John Morrell & Co., Ottumwa, Iowa. 


Louis In- 
NATIONAL PRO 
John C. Roth Packing 
H. Ogden, Pitts- 


Pittsburgh, Pa., 
Hill & Co., Balti- 








SEEKING TRADE ABROAD 


American meat packers have been active 


in foreign trade for many years, and certain 


of their products, particularly canned meats 


and provisions, have been known all 


the world. 


over 
The larger packers through their 
organization have been enabled to enter any 


territory that to them, 


packers have not been able to go 


seemed worth while 
but smaller 


so far afield, 


Now. however, the law permits them to 
combine to secure their share of foreign 


trade, and they are doing it. Two combina- 
tions of packers -for export business have al- 
follow. 
Representatives of one of these combinations 
the way to 

there, 


are preparing to follow. 


ready been formed, and others may 


are already on the water on 


Europe to survey the situation and 


agents of the other 





THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


Everywhere there is a general movement 
All coun- 


tries see the first opportunity for the re- 


to resume foreign trade relations. 


sumption of business prosperity following 
the stagnation of the war in trading with 


their neighbors and with the rest of the 
world. ° 

The competition to secure the business of 
those countries which need to buy is going to 
be terrific. Some will get ahead of others. 
Great Britain began long before the end of 
the war was in sight to prepare for after- 
the-war trade, and to get the 


“jump” on her 


competitors. We have done a lot of talking 
in this country about foreign business after 
the war, but not much practical preparation 
has been made to carry out our rosy plans. 


In the meat business it is different, how- 


ever. The world needs our meats and fats, 
and in spite of bars which some nations may 


try to put up against us, 


for economic and 


other reasons, there is going to be a market 
abroad for all we can produce, a market lim- 
ited only by our capacity for production and 
our distribution facilities. 

This is of the 


continued high prices of 


one underlying causes of 


meats and meat 


products, and until the world demand is sat- 
isfied meat prices 


cannot be expected to 


come down. Meanwhile, the effort of Amer- 
ican meat packers in general to secure their 
share of foreien trade is ocmmendable and a 
healthy sign. 

°, 


-~% 


REVISING TRUST LEGISLATION 


Reconsideration by 


Congress of all anti- 
trust legislation is recommended by the 


Chamber of Commerce of the United States 
as the result of a of the 


business interests of the country represented 


referendum vote 
in trade and commercial organizations. Com- 
plete returns from the referendum show that 
the constituent membership of the Chamber 
voted in favor of all four proposals advanced 


by a special committee studied the 


which 
subject. 

The proposals suggest that Congress should 
be asked immediately to consider the present 
situation of all statutes 


anti-trust legislation; 


constituting our 
that in reconsideration 
of existing anti-trust legislation there should 
be formulation of standards of general busi- 
ness conduct to be administered by a super- 
visory body; that an enlarged Federal Trade 
Commission should be made the supervisory 
body; and that, in view of the importance of 
the of the 


they would exist, the membership of the Fed- 


functions Trade Commission as 


eral Trade Commission should be increased to 
nine. 

In connection with its recommendations the 
committee pointed out that there is special 
eecasion for reconsideration of anti-trust 
legislation in the period of readjustment fol- 


lowing the war. New and difficult economic 


19 
problems will arise for the control and 
solution of which existing legislation can 


scarcely be adequate. Many of these will be 
projected into the post-bellum period from 
the controls set up with official sanction dur- 
ing the war. Not all of these controls have 
been officially conducted; perhaps most fre- 
quently they have been arranged by the in- 
dustries themselves and given official approval 
and official supervision. 

For exercising the supervisory functions 
proposed the report states further, “the ap- 
propriate agency is obviously the Federal 
Trade Commission so far as business in its 
great branches of manufacture and merchan- 
dising is concerned. In an earlier report we 
had occasion to call attention to recent de- 
partures by the Commission from the pur- 
poses of the law that created it. That re- 
port dealt only with the procedure and the 
point of view of the Commission as at pres- 
ent constituted and it ended with recom- 
the 
membership should be filled 
with men who would bring to the Commis- 
sion a proper conception of its duties and 
purposes.” 


mendations that existing vacancies in 


Commission’s 


One reason why the Federal Trade Com- 
mission should be the supervisory body, the 
report declares, is that the Commission has 
obtained a mass of information about Ameri- 


can industry and commerce. 


that the Federal 
Commission should be enlarged 


Supporting its 
recommendations Trade 
, the commit- 
tee says that such duties as the committee 
has suggested for the Federal Trade Com- 
mission upon the Commission 


greatly increased responsibilities to the public 


will impose 


and to individual industries, and will require 
constant attention to the whole field of pro- 
duction 


and distribution. For duties so ex- 


tensive and important the membership of 
the Commission should be enlarged. 

At present the law authorizes but five com- 
missioners, At the same time there are nine 
members of the Interstate Commerce Com- 
mission, which can scarcely be said to have 
more important duties than are proposed for 
the The Federal Re- 


serve members, of whom 


Trade Commission. 


Board has seven 


two are ex-officio but active. Even such war 
agencies as the Advisory Commission of the 
Council of National Defense and the War 
Trade Board have more members than the 
present law provides for the Trade Commis- 
sion, and bodies which have more specialized 
An 
with its 


tasks have an equal number of members. 
example is the Tariff Commission, 
five commissioners. 

It becomes apparent at once that if the 
Federal Trade Commission is to exercise its 
proper supervisory functions it will have to 
be enlarged and the character of its person- 
nel made to conform to the purpose for which 


it was created. 








THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


TRADE GLEANINGS 


The 
N. Y., will build a $7,000 addition to its tank 
Metcalf street. 


The Christian-Ewing Co., Fayetteville, 
N. C., has increased its capital stock from 


Danahy Packing Company, Buffalo, 


room at 25 
$50,000 to $200,000. 


The City of Columbia, 8. C., 
$40,000. 


will build an 
abattoir to 


cost For information 


address the mayor. 

An abattoir will be established at Norfolk, 
Va., by MacPherson Brothers. Capacity, 400 
to 600 beeves weekly. 

It is reported that the plant of the North 
Forks, N. D., 
will be formally opened on May 15. 

The Chicago, IIl., 


has been incorporated a capital stock 


ern Packing Company, Grand 
Fortune Products Co., 
with 
of $100,000 to deal in food and food products 

The capital stock of 


the Terry Packing 


has been in- 


from $60,000 to $100,000. 


Company, Spartanburg, 5, C., 
creased 
The Thorp Corporation, Wilmington, Del., 


to manufacture soaps, soap powders, ete., 


has been incorporated with a capital stock 


of 500.000, 
\V DD. Coggeshall, 


vy president of the Caro 


lina Ice & Packing Co., Darlington, 8. C., is 


very much interested in the installation of 


a 2 press oil mill. 
American 


The Agricultural Chemical Com- 


pany has purchased 130 acres of ground near 


Halfway, Hagerstown, Md., as a site for 
large dry fertilizer works. 

T. L. Croteau, H. E. Knox, M. M. Clancy, 
all of Wilmington, have incorporated the 
Nashville Union Stock Yards, Nashville, 
Tenn., with a capital stock of $250,000. 

The Federal Packing Company, Anderson, 
Ind., has been incorporated with a capital 
stock of $60,000 by D. M. Sisson, Walter H. 
Fairchild, Hugh Hill and J. P. Brunt. 


The Liberty Cotton Oil Co., Texarkana, 
Ark., recently incorporated with a capital 
stock of $150,000, will erect a cotton oil 
mill, cost $85,000, reinforced concrete con- 


struction. 

\ll machinery and inside equipment of the 
Equity Co-operative Packing Co. Fargo 
N. D., has been installed and it is expected 
that the plant will be ready to begin slaugh- 
tering by June 1. 


Permit has been granted to the Canton 
Provision Co., Canton, Ohio, for the erec- 
tion of an adition to its present factory 


at Carnahan and Payne avenues. N. FE., to 


cost $20,000. This addition will be of brick 
and concrete construction. 

A company has been organized with a cap- 
ital stock of $200,000 for the purpose of tak- 
ing over the Union Seed & Fertilizer Com- 
pany at Helena, Ark. About $50,000 worth 


of new machinery will be added to the plant, 
consisting of eight new presses, 12 linters 
and a mill. 

— —fo— — 


BIG BALTIMORE PACKING PLANT. 


Completion of plans for what promises to 


cake 


be one of the biggest meat packing enter- 





‘4 


™ 





Heekin Pails are: 


Furnished 
or label 


lo KNOW 


plain or handsomely 


that there 


and consideration. 








Manufacturers today are investigating “pails” for 
shipping lard. They are discovering WHY the 


Heekin Pails 


deliver the goods in such perfect condition. 


They are made of extra-strong metal! 
and shaped to make them “stand up”! Matched 
and welded so they are absolutely air-tight! 


will be 
foreign substances to spoil your products is surely worth careful thought 


Sample Lard Pail Sent on Request Without Obligation. 


The Heekin Can Co. 


Sixth and Culvert Sts., Cincinnati, Ohio 


“Heekin Can Since 1901” 


The significant facts about 


Cut 


lithographed with your trade-mark 


no leakage or the creeping-in of 


Write Today. 











J 








April 19, 1919 


prises east of Chicago was announced at 
HKaltimore, Md., this week, with the taking 
over by the Jones & Lamb Company of the 
plant and property of the Monumental Brew- 
ing Company of Baltimore. The latter plant 
will be remodelled at once at an expense of 
half a million dollars, the plans including 
every feature of a modern packing enterprise, 
including a vegetable oil refinery. 

Howard R. Smith, head of the Jones & 
Lamb Company, is the man who engineered 


the plan for the new enterprise. which is to 


be capitalized at $3,000.000. He has asso- 
ciated the Monumental company interests 
with him, and the officers of the new Jones 


& Lamb Company are as follows: Howard 


R. Smith, president; Frank B. Cahn. vice- 
president and treasurer; Jacob B. Cahn, sec- 
ond vice-president; Wm. K. Snyder. third 


vice-president; TI. Webster Smith, secretary 
and general counsel. 


The Jones & Lamb Company will dispose 
of its two plants in Baltimore and center 
its activities at the new plant, which is ad- 
mirably 


situated both as to 


railroad and 
facilities. Plans for 
the new plant, which can be completed and 
in operation in a comparatively short time, 
were made by C. B. Comstock, the New York 
When the work is 
completed it is said the plant conld not be 
duplicated for $1,500,000. 


water transportation 


packinghouse engineer. 


Howard R. Smith organized the Jones & 
lamb Company in 1906, combining the old 
meat jobing and packing firms of R. M. Jones 
& Company and G. M. 

been in 


had 


Since that time he has heen the moving force 


Lamb & Brother, 


which existence for 40 


vears. 
hehind the business, crowning a long career 
of activity by putting over this big plan for 
an enterprise which promises to be one of 
The old plant 
was three and a half miles from a railroad, 
but in spite of that fact Smith made it go. 
He had planned a modern plant with rail- 


the foremost in the industry. 


road connections, and when cireumstances put 
the great Monumental brewing plant on the 
market, the opportunity came to 
fine site and a plant capable 


secure a 
of expansion 
into 


one of the largest enterprises in the 
Fast. 

Howard Smith, who has been a director 

and vice-president of the American Meat 


Packers’ Association, and is known through- 
out the trade as a hustler, had 13 vears of 


experience in the packing business in Chi- 


cago before going to Baltimore. His 17 
Vears there have put him to the front in the 


industry, and his friends will be glad to 
this culmination of a 
long struggle to put his business on a 


dation worthy of his efforts 


know of favorable 


foun- 





JONES & LAMB CO., Baltimore, Md. 
MEAT PACKERS 


CORRESPONDENCE 


SoLNIicittTte wo 











) eeperrys who buy our SPECIAL HAM PAPER for smoked meat wrapping and 
Lard Liners, get the GREATEST VALUE the market offers. 
WRITE US FOR PLAIN OR PRINTED SAMPLES 


Hartford City Paper Company - 


Hartford City, Indiana 














April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


21 


PROVISIONS AND LARD 


WEEKLY REVIEW 


All articles under this head are’quoted by the barrel, except lard, which is quoted by the hundredweight in eierces, pork and beef by the 


Prices at New High Levels—Trading Active— 
Rumors of Large Export Business—Ship- 
ments Heavy—Stocks Somewhat Disap- 
pointing—Hog Movement Moderate. 

The action of the provision market during 
the distinct 
strength and an advance on all product to 


past week has been one of 


new high levels. This advance has been ac- 
companied by reports of large export busi- 
ness, and the air to a certain extent has been 


filled with rumors regarding alleged pur- 
chases for relief account, and for other ac- 
count. The rumors, however, seem to have 
been without foundation, because, as far as 


could be traced. there appears to have been 
no new relief business, and any advance in 
the market attributed to such reports has 
seemingly been without foundation in actual 
business. There has evidently been some 
direct business, but the most urgent demand 
for product, as far as Europe is concerned, 
to be 


seems for the relief program and for 


there is less 


the 


Germany, and 


doubt 


more or grave 


whether amount which will be 


permitted to Germany will be sufficient to 
have any important bearing on the American 


situation. Supplies on the other side which 


were accumulated during the war conditions, 


and have not vet heen distributed, seem to 


be ample for the immediate needs, and it is 


possible that the distribution of these sur- 
plus stocks on the other side will have a 
considerable iniluence on the total distribu- 


tion abroad. The demand from neutral coun 
the 
packers, does not seem to be on 
a very heavy scale. 

In this 


which 


the 


tries, comes to exporters direct, 


or to 


the 


respect, mid-month report of 
stocks of product at Chicago was very inter 
esting. and retlected what appeared to have 
been a 
of the month, offsettive the more moderate 
movement of 
month 


more moderate demand since the first 


hogs. 


The comparative mid 
statement follows: 


stock 


barrell or tierce and hogs by the hundredweight. 


April 15, April 1, April 15, 
1919. 1919. 1918. 
Mess pork, reg., bris.. 1,718 1,871 660 
Mess pork, old, bris... 1,500 1,500 Py eer 
Lard, new, Ibs........ 9,430,081 8,721,710 14,042,122 
Lard, old, lbs......... 128,760 o0n0e Se 
Other lard, ibs........ 23,140,286 22,579,184 18,320,986 
305 


Short rib sides, Ibs.... 
Extra s. c. sides, lbs.. 


460,517 
1,965,284 





305,984 15,133,168 
1,337,643 §,630,226 


The monthly stock of product of all kinds 
in all portions of the country for the first 
of April compared with the first of March 
makes a very interesting showing. These re- 
ports indicate that there has been a consid- 
erable inroad on the supplies of beef, and this 
is reflected in the large shipments of beef, 
and it has recently been reported that quite 
large additional orders have been allocated 
for beef, the report the early part of the 
week being that allocation had been made 
for about 29,000,000 Ibs. On the other hand, 
the changes in pork products have not 
been material. There was an_ increase 
during the month of 12,000,000 lbs. of frozen 


pork and a decrease in dry-salt pork of 
10,000,000 Ibs., and also a decrease of 
10,000,000 Ibs. in pickled pork. The lard 
stock decreased 14,000,000 lbs., but the de- 


crease in the stock of lard has been due, 
without any question, to the shipments out 
of previous purchases, as there has been very 
little buying of lard on a large scale during 
the month. This condition is attributed to 
the fact that the relief programs have been 
satisfied by the substitute lard, and taking 
the purchases of substitute lards which have 
been made so far of about 85,000,000 Ibs., 
they have been suflicient to fill the demand 
for fats, and if additional requirements de- 
velop, it is believed that there will be further 
purchases of substitute lards instead of ani 
mal lard. In fact. a rumor was current this 
week that another allocation had been made. 
of about 25,000,000 Tbs., although this 
not confirmed. 

Compared with last year, the situation is 
also very instructive. The stocks of beef 
show a decrease compared with a year ago 
of 37,000,000 Ibs.. but on the other hand there 
is a material increase in the stocks of pork 


was 


preducts and miscellaneous meats. Frozen 
pork increased 24,000,000 Ibs., pickled pork 
24,000,000 Ibs.. lard 21,000,000 Ibs., miscella- 


neous meats 14,000,000 Ibs.. while there was 
a decrease of 26,000,000 Ibs. in dry-salt pork. 
The aggregate stocks of pork products on 


hand, as of April 1, showed the immense 


total of 1,082,000,000 lbs., compared with 
1,040,000,000 lbs. a year ago. This is a most 
remarkable showing in view of the distribu- 
tion. The distribution during the year has 
been immensely ahead of last year, both for 
domestic account and for export. The total 
increase in distributien since July 1, up to 
the beginning of March, was about 1,400,000,- 
000 Ibs. for export and domestic account, and 
the stocks at present show a decrease of 42,- 
000,000 Ibs. compared with a year ago. It 
is evident that the marketing of hogs has 
been sufficient to meet the requirements, and 
even with the more moderate movement of 
hogs going on at present, it is believed that 
the supply will meet the requirements at 
the higher level of prices, and under the con- 
ditions of controlled exports. It is not be- 
lieved that there will be unlimited exports 
permitted, but that the exports will be regu- 
lated, so as to take the surplus of the mar- 
ket, and not abnormally affect the price of 
product to the American consumer. 

The report of the total holdings of provi- 
sions for April 1 compared with March 1 and 
April 1 last year follow: 

April 1, 719. 
Frozen beef, lbs. .218,890,871 
Cured beef, Ibs.. 30,620,692 
Total beef, Ibs. . .249,511,563 
Frozen pork, lbs.141,703,327 
Dry salt pork, Ibs.4 460 
Pickled pork, Ibs.424,316,460 434,715,640 
So ee: 110,$26,260 124,740,272 
Miscel’ous meats..124,387,944 132,371,791 


Mar. 1, °19. April 1, ’1S. 
264,914,026 
31,431,002 
296,515,028 
129,922,749 
432,396,365 


245,518,786 
33.279,152 
278,597 938 


999 











Mutton and lamb. 6,424,712 8,012,609 “ 
For the month the primal changes were 
frozen beef, decrease 41,280,666 Ibs.: frozen 
pork increased 13,093,546 Ibs.. and lard de- 
creased 16,78.936 Ibs. 
Compared with last year the primal 


changes were: Frozen beef decreased 33.245. 
020 lbs.: 


; frozen pork increased 23,878,704 Ibs.: 


dry-salt pork decreased 26,011,925 lbs. : 
pickled pork increased 23.536,400 ITbs., and 
lard increased 20,990,791 Ibs. 

BEEF.—Local market is quiet but firm. 


Mess, $3536; packers, $38@39; family. $41 

@43; Fast India, 864@66. , 
LARD.—Market quiet but strong. Quoted: 

City, 30@30%4c., nominal; Continental, $32.50: 






South America, $32.75; Brazil kegs, $33.75: 
compounds, 23@24'4c. 
PORK.—Market dull but strong. Mess, 


S56@57. 
S54@ 5d. 


SEE PAGE 29 FOR LATER MARKETS. 


nominal; clear, $51@57, and family, 











It Prevents Mutilated Skins 
in Hog Dehairing 





Powers 


The beaters will not mutilate or cut 
the skins unless the scalding-water or 


Adjustment > 
the washing-water becomes too hot. 
Automatic Thermostatic 
Regulators applied to scalding tanks Steam 
Valve > 


and scraper tanks positively prevent 


overheating of the water. 


The diagram below illustrates the applica- 
tion of the No. 16 Regulator to Hog Scraper 


Greatest speed in dehairing is pos- 
Tanks. It positively prevents changes in 


- sible only when water is just right all 





























temperature of the water. the time. 
Powers Regulators insure exactly 

7 ' the temperature desired, constantly, 

NN 4 r and without any watching. This not 

HH i! only saves time and labor, but assures a 

i! " uniformly standard product. 

i HH Our Bulletin 139 will be sent on re- _ 
: 4 ‘ quest. It tells more about the use of sg nage 
SSS Se ae ow oe dqe eam eee eet a Automatic Heat Regulation and its =? 

£ Superiority over manual control. 





ds ; ~ ee 2 Ay 3 < 964 Architects Bldg. Deus York, 2153 Mallers Bldg. Ehicage 
: The Powers Regulator Co. . ( * 375 The Federal Street Bldg., Boston > ~ «ue 
‘- Specialists in Automatic Heat a ° . The Canadian Powers Regulator Co., Ltd., Toronto, Ont. 


- . ~ >. 





. < eo 








22 


HOGS MAKE NEW PRICE RECORDS. 
Also Record-Breaking Supply of Hogs Prom- 
ised for Next Winter. 


Special Letter to The National Provisioner from W. 
G. Press & Co.) 

Chicago, April 16, 1919. and 

products are making new record prices. Hogs 

sold this week in Chicago up to $20.90 as a 


Hogs hog 


top, as against $21.00, the former record 
made last September; yesterday’s average 
was $20.51, a new high record. In Kansas 
City on Tuesday hogs sold at $21.00. Strange 


to relate, the top on hogs is higher in Kan- 
sas (ity than in Chicago; but the bulk of 
the hogs is selling lower in the West than 
in Chicago. The spread in prices in Kansas 
City is around $1.00 per 100 Ibs. In Chicago 
the spread is only 35c. per 100 Ibs. Many 
are wondering why top hogs sold higher in 
Kansas City than in Chicago and this spread 
explanation is offered as a solution. 

Another unusual feature of the hog mar 


ket this week is the Eastern markets are no 
higher than the Chicago markets, thereby 


keeping Eastern buyers out of this market. 


If Eastern buyers had been active in the 
Chicago market we would have had $21.00 
hogs with ease this week. 


The exports of hog products were again 
heavy last week; 92,315,000 Ibs. of lard and 
cured left as against 60, 
235.000 for the corresponding week last year. 


meats our ports, 


Packers report receiving liberal orders for 
export again this week 

The present prices and the tremendous 
demand for meats and lard at this time 


have not taken us by surprise; we have re 
peatedly predicted the present situation. We 
had few followers in our opinions for a long 


time when prices were 4 to de. a Ib. lower 
than they now are At the present time 
we are not lacking company in the idea that 
prices will go even higher; and, while we 


are not ourselves forecasting how high prices 
are likely to go, some of our friends are pre- 


dicting 35e. lard and 25c. hogs. 

While the present situation indicates that 
hogs and hog products are in a strong po 
sition. 25c. hogs and 35ec. lard will have to 
he made between now and the middle of 


May: for by that time our hog supply will 
he much better But next September may 
bring new records 


The quality of the hogs coming to market 
this week is not up to standard, and we will 
have to drag along until the middle of May 
with seant receipts. The quality of the hogs 
indicates that the country is well cleaned up 


on the old crop. last fall’s pigs will not 
eome before the middle of May. Our reports 
from the country on the new crop of spring 
pigs are very flattering, and with favorable 
weather and a record number of sows on 


farms, there is promise of a record-breaking 
supply of for next winter. 
OUT AMONG THE TRADE. 

That the Southern packinghouse industry 
is rapidly the front is amply 
demonstrated after a trip through the Bir- 
mingham Packing Company’s plant at Bir- 


hogs 


coming to 


mingham, Ala. The buildings cover about 10 
acres. The main building is three stories 


high, of brick and concrete 130 feet high and 


140 feet deep. This business was established 





Emory Williamson-Co. 
BROKERS & DISTRIBUTORS 
Of all Packing House Products. 
At Your Service 
Augusta, Ga. 








THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


twenty years ago and first-class business 
methods and capable management have 
brought it up to its present fine standard. 
The company operates its own refrigerator 
cars. The present capacity is 1,000 cattle, 
2,000 hogs, 100 calves and 100 small stock 
per week, and their methods are strictly up 
to date in every respect. Superintendent F. 
W. Meredith is an experienced packinghouse 
man, and is on the job every minute of the 
day. He is equally at home in the casing 
room, or selling beef or making sausages or 
smoking meats. 

The officers of the company are C. H. Un- 
german, president; J. P. Phillips, vice-presi- 
dent and treasurer, and F. N. Phillips, secre- 


tary, all of them men of good, sound judg- 
ment who are real business men in every 


sense of the word. 


The fight still goes on merrily in New Or- 
leans between the butchers who want Sunday 
closing and those who want to work seven 
days in the week. The public markets want 
to work; the shopkeepers do not, but are 
afraid to keep closed for fear of losing their 
trade. The retail butchers are at sixes and 
sevens, With no light in sight. 


2, 
~—— 


GREEN AND SWEET PICKLED MEATS. 


(Special Letter to The National Provisioner from The 
Davidson Commission Co.) 


Chicago, April 16.—Quotations on 
and sweet pickled meats f. 0. b. 
loose, are as follows: 

Regular Hams—Green, 8@10 Ib. ave., 
32¥%,c.; 10@12 lb. ave., 32%4c.; 12@14 Ib. 
ave., 14@16 |b. ave., 32¢.; 16@18 Ib. 
ave., Is@20 Ib. ave., 32¢e. Sweet 
pickled, 8@10 lb. ave., 32¢.; 10@12 Ib. ave., 
31Y%4c.; 12@14 Ib. ave., 30%¢.; 14@16 Ib. 
ave., 30¢.; 16@18 Ib. ave., 29%.@30%4¢.; 18@ 
20 Ib. ave., 29%@30'%e. 

Skinned Hams—Green, 14@16 Ib. ave., 33¢.; 
16@18 |b. ave., 338¢.; 18@20 Ib. ave., 32%4¢.; 
20422 Ib. ave., 32%,¢.; 22@24 Ib. ave., 324. 
Sweet pickled, 14@16 Ib. ave., 30¢.; 16@18 
Ib. ave., 30¢.; 18@20 Ib. ave., 30c¢.; 20@22 Ib. 
22@24 Ib. ave., 29%c. 


green 
Chicago, 





ave., 29%3,4¢.; 





Picnic Hams—4@6 lb. ave., 24e.; 6@8 Ib. 
ave., 23c.; 8@10 lb. ave., 22%c.; 10@12 Ib. 
ave., 224¢. Sweet pickled, 4@6 Ib. ave., 


2314c.; 6@8 lb. ave., 2214¢.; 
21%4c.; 10@12 Ib. ave., 2l1c. 
Clear Bellies—6@8 lb. ave., 39e.: 8@10 Ib. 
ave., 37'%4¢c.; 10@12 Ib. ave., 36c¢.; 12@14 Ib. 
ave., 34c.; 14@16 Ib. ave., 33¢. Sweet pickled, 


8@10 Ib. ave., 


6@8 Ib. ave., 3le.: 12@14 Ib. ave., 30¢.; 14@ 
12 Ib. ave., 3le.; 12@14 |b. ave., 30¢.; 14@ 
16 Ib. ave., 29. 

— — &o—____ 

PORK CUTS AT NEW YORK. 
(Special Letter to The National Provisioner from 
H, C, Zaun.) 

New York, April 18,  1919.—Wholesale 


prices on green and sweet pickled pork cuts 


in New York City are reported as follows: 
Pork loins, 38@3%e¢.; green hams, 8@10 Ibs. 
ave., 35¢.; 10@12 Ib. ave., 33%e.; 12@14 Ib. 
ave., 33Y,¢.; 14@16 |b. ave., 33¢.; 18@20 Ib. 
ave., 33c¢.; green clear bellies, 8@10 Ib. ave., 
3Ue.; 10@12 Ib. ave., 36¢.: 12@14 Ib. ave.. 
35¢.; green rib bellies, 10@12 Ib. ave., 35¢c.; 
}12@ 14 |b. ave., 35e.: S. P. clear bellies. 6@8 
lb. ave., 32¢.; 8@10 Ib. ave., 34¢.; 10@12 Ib. 
ave., 34c.; 12@14 |b. ave., 33¢.; S. P. rib 
hellies, 10@12 Ib. ave., 32¢.; 12@14 lb. ave., 
jle.; S. P. hams, 8@10 Ib. ave., 33¢.; 10@12 





April 19, 1919 


Ib. ave., 32c.; 18@20 Ih. ave., 32¢.; city steam 
lard, 3Cc.; city dressed hogs, 28%c. 

Western prices on green cuts are as fol- 
lows: Pork loins, 8@10 lb. ave., 33c.; 10@12 
Ib. ave., 32¢c.; 12@14 Ib. ave., 3lc.; 14@16 Ib. 
ave., 50c.; skinned shoulders, boneless 
butts, Boston butts, 28¢.; lean trim- 
mings, 24c.? regular trimmings, 20c.; spare- 
ribs, 18e.; neck ribs, 8¢e.; kidneys, 8¢.; tails, 
lle.; snouts, 8c.; livers, 144c.; pig tongues, 
lic. : 


25¢.; 
32¢.3 


fo —— 


CHEMICAL AND SOAP SUPPLIES. 
(Special Report to The National Provisioner.) 
New York, April 17, 1919.—Latest quota 
tions on chemical and soapmakers’ supplies 
are as follows: 74 to 76 per cent. caustic 
soda, 2%, @3c. lb.; 60 per cent. caustic soda, 
2% ase. lb; 98 per cent. powdered caustic 
soda, 3°%,@4\c. lb.; 48 per cent. carbonate 
of soda, 14%4@1%4e. lb.; 58 per cent. carbonate 
of soda, 1.65@2e. lb.; tale, 1¥%,@2e. lb.; silex, 

$20 per 2,000 Ibs. 

Clarified palm oil in casks, nominal, 15@ 
lfc. Ib.; yellow olive oil, $2.15@2.25 per gal.; 
Cochin cocoanut oil, 1644@17e. lb.; Ceylon 
cocoanut oil, 1434,@15 Me. Ib.; cottonseed oil, 
$1.55@1.58 gal.; soya bean oil, 1514.@1534¢. 
Ib.; corn oil, 163,@174e. |b.; peanut oil, 
soapmakers’ 5 per cent. acidity, $1.5714,@1.58 
gal. 


Prime city tallow (special), nominal, 12e. 


lb.; dynamite glycerine, nominal, 15@1é6e. 
Ib.; saponified glycerine, nominal, 9@10e. 


lb.; crude soap glycerine, nominal, 814 @9e. 
Ib.; chemically pure glycerine, nominal, 164 
@lie. \b.; prime packers’ 10@ 
10%4,¢. Ib. 


grease, 
eee 


EXPORTS OF PROVISIONS 


Exports of provisions from the Atlantic and Gulf 











ports for the week ending April 12, 1919, with com 
parisons: 
PORK, BBLS, 
Week Week From 
Ended Ended Novy. 1, °18, 
Apr. 12, Apr. 13. to Apr. 12, 
To 1919. 1919, 1919. 
United Kingdom. . 225 4s) 
Continent ae aiat 4.6 
So. & Cen. Amer. a 4. 
West Indies ..... Oa 7 
Br, No. Am. Col.. 107 6 
Other countries... Kem 
0 eee 697 459 25,866 
BACON AND HAMS, LBS, 
United Kingdom... 27,318,000 46,688,000 
eee 44,038,000 3,796,000 
So. & Cen. Amer.. rece” wbedilawe 485,000 
West Indies Nee 4.355.000 
Br. No. Am. Col. . arlentain’s 204,000 
Other countries... 30,000 214,000 
ee 71,386,000 52,483,000 $94,421,000 
LARD, LBS. 
United Kingdom.. 3,862,000 13,401,000 “6,068 000 
Cement ..cesces 10,602,000 2,769,000 232,643,000 
So, & Cen, Amer 44,000 4,705,000 
West Indies — ae 5,631,000 
Br, No. Am, Col.. sees 302,000 
Other countries ee ee 136,000 


Total 14,873,000 
RECAPITULATION OF THE 


16,170,000 329,456,000 
WEEK'S EXPORTS, 


Bacon and 

















From Pork, bbls. Hams, lbs. Lard, Ibs. 
New York 3 652 35,129,000 5.398 000 
Portland, Me. .. 106,000 16,000 
soston eae 510M 1,000 
Philadelphia 7.000 1,917,000 
Baltimors Se ; 63,000 pan hs 
New Orleans . cy wan 104.0100 
St. John, N. B , p 5,306,000 5,009,000 
Total week .... 697 71,386,000 14,873,000 
Previous week 2,681 87,259,000 10,400,000 
Two weeks ago 195 38,966,000 11,022,000 
Cor, week last y'r $8 52.484,.000 16,170,000 

COMPARATIVE SUMMARY OF EXPORTS 
From Nov. 1, "18, Same time 
to April 12, °19, last year Inerease, 
Pork, Ibs , 1.773.000 2,035,000 2,738,000 
Bacon and hams, 

_ SaPerrr reer. 894,421,000 345,025,000 549,397,000 

Lard, lbs B20, 456,000 138.824.0000 190,662,000 





208 South La Salle St. 
CHICAGO 





HARTJE PAPER MANUFACTURING COMPANY 


MANUFACTURERS AND JOBBERS 
WE HANDLE ALL GRADES OF PAPER FOR BUTCHERS AND PACKERS 


113 Wood St. 
PITTSBURGH 

















April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


23 


TALLOW, STEARINE, GREASE and SOAP 


rALLOW.—The 
hut quiet this week, and the change in price 
The felt the 
strength in other animal fats, and also in 


market has been strong 


has been slight. market has 


the vegetable oil position, as well as the fur- 
ther sharp advance in stearines, but the act- 
ual buying of tallow has been rather moder- 
ate. The position seems to be somewhat un- 
certain. The trade is rather looking for a 
hetter demand and a better tone to the mar- 
ket, in view of the conditions prevailing in 
competing oils and fats. The production is 
quite liberal, however, and the demand seemed 
be restricted by the advance in price, 
\liile the developments appear to be more 
the way of a demand for edible product 
than for manufacturing product. Prime city 
llow in the local market is quoted at 11\44e. 
nominal, with city specials at 12c. sales. 


QLEO-STEARINE.—The market has been 
strong and active; prices have again ad- 
vanced sharply. The large orders for sub- 
stitute lards have brought very persistent 


buying into the market, and supplies have 
been quickly taken up at the higher prices 
asked. The situation continues a rather un- 
settled one. The possibility that after the 
rrent orders are placed there may be a ces- 
sation in the allocation of substitute lard 
ders may have a bearing on the action of 
the market. Quotations: Oleo, 28@29ec. 





SEE PAGE 29 FOR LATER MARKETS. 





OQLEO OIL.—Market firmly held. Extras 
are quoted at 29@29142¢., according to quality. 

NEATSFOOT OIL.—Trade quiet and fea- 
tureless. Prices are quoted 20 cold test, 
S1.65@1.70:; 30 degrees at $1.45@1.50. and 
prime, $1.35@1.40. 

GREASE.—A better inquiry is in evidence 
and values are firm. Yellow, 73%,@84; 
11',.@12e.; house, 9@1 


bone, 
yc. brown, 74%4@8e. 
EXPORTS OF PORK PRODUCTS. 
Exports of hog products from the port of 
New 


1919 


York during the month of 
just 


February, 
are now reported by the U. S. 
Customs Service as follows: 
HOGS.—Argentina, 30 hd; 
Potal, 31 hd. 
BACON.—Belgian Kongo, 350 Ibs.; Belgium, 
11,680,543 Ibs.; Bermuda, 6,920 Ibs.; Bolivia, 
2415 Ibs.; British West Indies, 1,450 Ibs.; 
Chile, 1,890 Ibs.; Colombia, 100 Ibs.; Cuba, 
498,066 Ibs.; Danish West Indies, 349 lbs.; 
Denmark, 713 690 Ibs.; Dutch Guiana, 180 Ibs.; 
Dutch West indies, 390 Ibs.; England, 13,954,- 
909 Ibs; France, 34,418,397 Ibs.; French 
\triea, 300 Ibs.; Haiti, 200 Ibs.; Italy, 15,467,- 
205 lbs.; Jamaica, 844 Ibs.; Mexico, 3,474 lbs.; 


Cuba, 1 hd. 


WEEKLY REVIEW 


Newfoundland, 1,500 lbs.; Norway, 4,239,587 
Ibs.; Peru, 475 lbs.; San Domingo, 500 Ibs.; 
Switzerland, 6 lbs.; Venezuela, 12 lbs. Total, 
$0,943,752 Ibs. 

CURED HAMS AND SHOULDERS.—Bar- 
bados, 850 Ibs.; Belgian Kongo, 1,640 Ibs.; 
Belgium, 2,962,219. lbs.; Bermuda, 5,714 lbs.; 
Prazil, 5606 lbs.; British Guiana, 9,880 Ibs.; 
British West Indies, 5,153 lbs.; Colombia, 625 


Ibs.; Cuba, 424,670 lbs.; Danish West Indies, 
2.476 lbs.; Duteh Guiana, 4,221 Ibs.; Dutch 
West Indies, 2,622 lbs.; England, 13,421,485 
Ibs.; France, 9,606,261 lbs.; French Africa, 
600 Ibs.; French West Indies, 10,628 lbs.; 
Haiti, 9,302 lbs.; Italy, 16,851,478 bls.; Ja- 
maica, 10,398 Ibs.; Mexico, 25,844 Ibs.; 


Miquelon Island, 5,200 lbs.; Newfoundland, 
29.611 Ibs.; Nicaragua, 500 Ibs.; Norway, 
25,152 Ibs.; Panama, 14,552 lbs.; Peru, 5,454 
Ibs.; Portuguese Africa, 110 lbs.; Salvador, 
100 lbs.; San Domingo, 560 Ibs.; Trinidad, 
Island of, 7,600 lbs.; Venezuela, 18,875 Ibs. 
Total, 43,465,820 Ibs. 

LARD.—Belgian Kongo, 6,720 lbs.; 
gium, 15,861,423 lbs.; Bermuda, 600 Ibs.; 
livia, 30,000 lbs.; British Guiana, 2,000 lbs.; 
British West Africa, 6,720 Ibs.; Chile, 1,700 
Ibs.; Colombia, 10,520 lbs.; Cuba, 208,209 Ibs.; 
Danish West Indies, 2,785 lIbs.; Denmark, 
36.000 lbs.; Dutch Guiana, 3,445 lbs.; Dutch 
West Indies, 2.290 lbs.; Eeuador, 1,125 lbs.; 
England, 13,908,906 Ibs.; France, 1,326,951 
lbs.; French Africa, 13,900 lbs.; French West 
Indies, 8.025 lbs.; Greece, 243,453 Ibs.: Haiti, 
130,020 lbs.; Jamaica, 1,000 Ibs.; Mexico, 
20,300 Ibs.; Miquelon Island, 4,800 lbs.; New- 
foundland, 18,513 Ibs.; Panama, 1,490 Ilbs.; 
Peru, 20,000 lbs.; Philippine Islands, 480 lbs.; 
Portuguese Africa, 400 lbs.; San Domingo, 
28,270 lbs.; Trinidad, Island of, 3,600 Ibs.; 
Venezuela, 6.260 lbs. Total, 31,900,665 Ibs. 


Bel- 


Bo- 


NEUTRAL LARD.—Duteh Guiana, 1,000 
Ibs.; Newfoundland, 38,000 Ibs. Total, 


39.000 lbs. 
LARD COMPOUNDS.—-Belgian Kongo, 2,250 


Ibs.; Belgium, 5,507,271 lbs.; Bermuda, 36,186 
lbs.; Bolivia, 50,000 Ibs.; British Guiana, 
18.915 lbs.; British West Indies, 70,542 Ibs.; 


Cuba. 6,590 Ibs.; Danish West Indies, 2,730 
lbs.; Dutch West Indies, 12,525 lbs.; France, 
75,000 Ibs.; French West Indies, 35,750 lbs.;: 
Haiti, 120.500 Ibs.; Jamaica, 154,900 Ibs.; 
Mexico, 7,872 lbs.; Miquelon Island, 1,400 Ibs.; 
Newfoundland, 9,692 lbs.; Panama, 8,702 lbs.; 
San Domingo, 400 lbs.; Trinidad, Island of, 
154.900 lbs. Total, 6,130,515 Ibs. 

LARD OIL.—Bermuda, 50 
Guiana, 442 gals.; 


gals.; British 
Cnba, 250 gals.; Spain, 150 


gals. Total, 892 gals. 

FRESH PORK.—Belgium, 681,200 Ibs.; 
Bermuda, 1,155 Ibs.; Cuba, 5,000 Ibs.; Danish 
West Indies, 100 Ibs.; Panama, 5,000 Ibs. 
Total, 692.455 lbs. 

PICKLED PORK.—Belgium, 176,800 Ibs.; 


Jermuda, 20,000 lbs.; British Guiana, 
Ibs.; British West Indies, 34,550 lbs.; 
bia, 500 lbs.; Cuba, 49,200 Ibs.; Danish West 
Indies, 1,200 lbs.; Dutch Guiana, 15,128 lbs.; 
Dutch West Indies; 100 lbs.; England, 20,000 
lbs.; France, 20,000 lbs.: French Africa. 1.700 
Ibs.; French Guiana, 2,000 lbs.; French West 
Indies, 41,200 Ibs.; Haiti, 10,400 lbs.; Italy, 
10,008 Ibs.; Jamaica, 10400 Ibs.: Newfound- 
land, 280,000 lbs.; Panama, 3,200 lbs.: Salva- 
dor, 200 lbs.; San Domingo, 8,675 lbs.; Swe- 
den, 235,200 Ibs.; Trinidad, Island of, 132 
lbs.; Venezuela, 1,000 lbs. Total, 943,293 lbs. 
CANNED PORK.—British India, 206 Ibs.; 
British West Indies, 82 lbs.; Cuba, 90 lbs.: 
England, 189.488 Ibs.; France, 200.000 Ibs.; 
Haiti, 120 lbs.; Mexico, 105 Ibs.; Peru, 91 lbs.; 
Venezuela, 680 lbs. Total, 692,455 Ibs. 
CANNED SAUSAGE.—Barbados, 165 Ibs.; 


14,000 
Colom- 


Belgian Kongo, 24 lbs.; Bermuda, 597 Ibs.; 
Bolivia, 9.861 lbs.; British East Africa, 48 


lbs.; British India, 8,250 lbs.; British South 
Africa, 7,325 lbs.; British West Indies, 300 
lbs.; Colombia, 80 lbs.; Cuba, 16,460 Ibs.; Dan- 
ish West Indies, 1,092 lbs.; Dutch West In- 
dies, 427 lbs.; Egypt, 33,750 lbs.; England, 
136,337 lbs.; France, 142,990 lbs.: French 
Africa, 48 lbs.; French West Indies, 4,042 
Ibs.; Haiti, 1,725 lbs.; Jamaica, 1.250 Ibs.; 
Mexico, 3,137 lbs.; Miquelon Island, 500 lbs.; 
Peru, 2,620 lbs.; Portuguese Africa, 1,770 lbs.; 
Philippine Islands, 3,000 lbs.; San Domingo, 


2,523 Ibs.; Trinidad, Island of, 150 lbs.; Vene- 
zuela, 496 lbs. Total, 378,967 Ibs. 

OTHER SAUSAGE.—Belgian Kongo, 648 
Ibs.; Bermuda, 600 Ibs.: Bolivia, 765. Ibs.; 
British India, 6.588 lbs.; British West Africa, 
1,365 lbs.; British West Indies, 1,149 lbs.; 
Chile, 75 Ibs.; China, 1,049 lbs.; Colombia, 
126 Ibs.; Cuba, 35,650 Ibs.: Danish West In- 


dies, 310 Ibs.; Dutch 
France, 970,175 Ibs.; 


West Indies, 812 lbs.; 
French West Indies, 2,595 


lbs.; Haiti, 662 lbs.; Jamaica, 200 Ibs.: Mex- 
ico, 672 lbs.; Panama, 400 lbs.; Peru, 612 
lbs.; San Domingo, 5,160 Ibs.; Venezuela, 
1,063 Ibs. Total, 1,030,976 lbs. 

fe 


EXPORTS OF BEEF PRODUCTS. 
Exports of beef products from the port of 
New York during the month of February, 
1919, are just: now reported by the United 
States Customs Service as follows: 


CATTLE.—Ecuador, 4 hd.; Mexico, 16 hd. 
Total, 20 hd. 
FRESH BEEF.—Bermuda, 31.208 _Ibs.; 


Cuba, 2.000 Ibs.; England, 9,506,430 lbs. Total, 
9,539,638 lbs. 

PICKLED BEEF.—Belgium, 2,663,600 Ibs.; 
Bermuda, 12,716 lbs.; British Guiana, 25,000 
British West Indies, 22,100 lbs.; Colom- 
bia, 1,000 lbs.; Cuba, 6,150 Ibs.: Danish West 
Indies, 250 Ibs.; Duteh Guiana, 23.000 Ibs.; 


Ibs.; 





Telephone, Rector 6236 


MEAT PRODUCTS: 
PREMIER JUS 


TALLOW 





NEW YORK OVERSEA CO., Inc. 


MASON HARKER, Manager Import Department 


AUSTRALIAN and NEW ZEALAND 


TALLOW GREASE CANNED MEATS _ HIDES 
FROZEN MEAT 


SOUTH AMERICAN 
VEGETABLE OILS 


OLEO OIL 


Head Office: CHRISTIANIA 


London Stockholm Genoa Las Palmas Teneriffe 
Copenhagen San Francisco Hong Kong Calcutta Tokio 
Rio de Janeiro Buenos Aires Valparaiso Maran’ Batavia 


PREMIER JUS 


Cable Address, ‘‘Overall’’ 


17 Battery Place 
New York 


SKINS 


WAXES 


Durban Wellington 
Melbourne Sao Paule 
Surabaya Christchurch 














24 


Dutch West Indies, 2,850 lbs.; England, 138,- 
881 lbs.; French Guiana, 7,500 lbs.; French 
West Indies, 38,357 lbs.; Greece, 50,000 lbs.; 
Haiti, 3,410 lbs.; Italy, 30,000 lbs.; Jamaica, 
2,900 lbs.; Miquelon Island, 2,000 lbs.; New- 
foundland, 198,600 lbs.; Panama, 800 lbs.; 
Peru, 2,000 ibs.; San Domingo, 400 lbs.; 
Scotland, 35,200 lbs.; Trinidad, Island of, 400 
lbs.; Venezuela, 100 Ibs. Total, 3,267,214 Ibs. 
OLEO OIL.—Belgium, 1,043,983 lbs.; British 
West Indies, 250 lbs.; England, 1,602,176 lbs.; 
Greece, 263,530 lbs.; Italy, 74,158 lbs.; Swe: 
den, 2,056 lbs.; Switzerland, 414,829 Ibs. 
Total, 3,420,987 Ibs. 
OLEOMARGARINE.—Barbados, 14,000 Ibs.; 
Belgium, 170,806 lbs.; Bermuda, 8,210 lbs.; 
British Guiana 1,200 lbs.; British West Indies, 
18.450 lbs.; Colombia 100 lbs.; Cuba, 9,000 
lbs.; Danish West Indies, 1,200 lbs.; Dutch 
West Indies, 6410 lbs.; England, 1,159,601 
Ibs.; France, 2,330,670 lbs.; French West In- 
dies, 7,650 lbs.; Guatemala, 1,000 lbs.; Haiti, 
2,300 lbs.; Jamaica, 15,900 lbs.; Mexico, 2,490 
Ibs.; Panama, 35,940 lbs.; San Domingo, 4,352 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


lbs.; Trinidad, Island of, 18,500 lbs. Total, 
3,807,779 lbs: 

STEARIN FROM ANIMAL FATS.—Argen- 
tina, 22 lbs.; Australia, 1,168 lbs.; British 
South Africa, 44,800 lbs.; Colombia 1,906 lIbs.; 
Cuba, 84,440 lbs.; Denmark, 232,688 lbs.; 
Ecuador, 5,240 lbs.; England, 44,800 lbs.; 
France, 447,091 lbs.; Guatemala, 12,000 lbs.; 
Honduras, 14,000 lbs.; Italy, 22,400 lbs.; Mex- 
ico, 2,300 Ibs.; Panama, 50 lbs.; Spain, 11,200 
lbs. Total, 924,105 lbs. 

TALLOW.—Barbados, 300 lbs.; Belgium, 
370,000 lbs.; British Guiana, 13,800 lbs.; Brit- 
ish West Indies, 2,927 lbs.; Cuba, 98,731 lbs.; 
Dutch Guiana, 400 lbs.; Jamaica, 1,225 lbs.; 
Mexico, 109 lbs.; Peru, 3,400 lbs.; Portuguese 
Africa, 560 lbs.; San Domingo, 3,050 lbs.; 
Trinidad, Island of, 200 lbs.; Venezuela, 490 
Ibs. Total, 495,192 lbs. 

CANNED MEAT PRODUCTS (Value).— 
Argentina, $148; Barbados, $252; Belgian 
Kongo, $308; Belgium, $50,791; Bermuda, 
$1.818; Bolivia, $7,245; Brazil, $56; British 
East Africa, $259; British Guiana, $331; 








HOGE BLDG. 


Chicago 
Los Angeles 


San Francisco 


Oil Seeds 


We uill 
be glad to place the facili- 


Consult with us. 


ties of our organization at 


your service. 





COCcoANY 
I" Ome) | 


OGERS BROWN&Co 


—) ye Se Lt 


New York 


Liverpool 
WHEN YOU ARE IN THE MARKET FOR 


Peanut Oil Cocoanut Oil Soya Bean Oil 
Sesame Seed Oil 

Beans 

Vegetable Tallows 


CABLE ‘*ROGBRO”’ 


Kobe, Japan 
Shanghai, China 


Darien, Manchuria 


Peas . 



















April 19, 1919 


British India, $1,406; British South Africa, 
$3,343; British West Africa, $42; British 
West Indies, $3,940; Chile, $188; Colombia, 
$456; Cuba, $2,165; Danish West Indies, $159; 
Dutch Guiana, $156; Dutch West Indies, 
$995; Ecuador, $238; Egypt, $20,000; Eng- 
land, $873,058; France, $234,050; French 
Africa, $523; French West Indies, $1,193; 
Greece, $134; Guatemala, $24; Haiti, $1,349; 
Hongkong, $92; Italy, $3,107,332; Jamaica, 
$200; Mexico, $502; Miquelon Island, $2,522; 
China, $64; Newfoundland, $8; New Zealand, 
$6; Nicaragua, $69; Panama, $2,695; Peru, 
$2,106; Portuguese Africa, $1,106; San Do- 
mingo, $1,647; Scotland, $2,750; Straits Set- 
tlements, $103; Sweden, $32,205; Switzerland, 
$3; Trinidad, Island of, $883; Venezuela, $346. 
Total, $4,405,078. 

OTHER MEAT PRODUCTS (Value).—Bel- 
gian Kongo, $443; Bermuda, $486; Bolivia, 
$146; British East Africa, $37; British Gui- 
ana, $547; British India, $93; British South 
Africa, $3,970; British West Africa, $231; 
British West Indies, $885; China, $352; Co- 
lombia, $357; Cuba, $8,651; Danish West In- 
dies, $447; Dutch Guiana, $99; Dutch West 
Indies, $715; England, $245,631 lbs.; France, 
$7,612; French Guiana, $600; French West 
Indies, $13,124; Greece, $5,810 lbs.; Haiti, 
$570; Italy, $836,308; Jamaica, $635; New- 
foundland, $5,362; Nicaragua, $7; Panama, 
$17,584; Peru, $411; San Domingo, $831; 
Spain, $656; Straits Settlements, $98; Trini- 
dad, Island of $1,731; Venezuela, $51. Total, 
$1,154,486. 


—_“~—_— 


EXPORTS OF DAIRY PRODUCTS. 

Exports of dairy products from the port of 
New York during the month of February, 
1919, are just now reported by the U. S. Cus- 
toms Service as follows: 

BUTTER.—Barbados, 2,600 lbs.; Belgian 
Kongo, 88 lbs.; Belgium, 24,300 lbs.; Bermuda, 
60 lbs.; British Guiana, 2,300 lbs.; British 
West Africa, 1,250 lbs.; British West Indies, 
8,510 lbs.; Cuba, 1,200 lbs.; Danish West In- 
dies, 5,309 Ibs.; England, 2,919,825 lbs. French 
Africa, 800 lbs.; French West Indies, 3,500 
Ibs.; Jamaica, 4,258 lbs.; Mexico, 500 lbs.; 
Panama 56,034 lbs.; Philippine Islands, 400 
lbs.; San Domingo, 400 lbs.; Switzerland, 12 
Ibs.; Trinidad, Island of, 17,800 lbs. Total, 
3,049,637 lbs. 

EGGS.—Bermuda, 600 dz.; Cuba, 300 dz.; 
England, 383,430 dz. Total, 384,330 dz. 

CHEESE.—Belgian Kongo, 697 lbs.; Bel- 
gium, 5,049.637 lbs.; British Guiana, 160 lbs.; 
British India, 8,602 lbs.; British West Indies, 
205 lbs.; Colombia, 60 lbs.; Cuba, 60,086 lbs.; 
Danish West Indies, 2,115 lbs.; Dutch Guiana, 
496 lbs.; Dutch West Indies, 650 lbs.; Eng- 
land, 6 lbs.; French West Indies, 1,152 lbs.; 
Haiti, 270 lbs.; Mexico, 70 Ibs.; Miquelon 
Island, 150 lbs.; Panama, 11,985 lbs.; Peru, 
786 lbs.; Salvador, 184 lbs.; San Domingo, 
780 lbs.; Spain 30 lbs. Total, 227,131 lbs. 


Od ——_- 


INDIA’S EXPORTS OF PEANUTS. 
The total exportation of peanuts from 
India as a whole for the fiscal years of 1914 
and 1918, inclusive, in tons of 2,210 pounds, 


o,6 


were as follows: 1914, 277,900 tons; 1915, 
138,300; 1916, 175,400; 1917, 147,500; 1918, 
115,300. Recent information indicates that 


the average price at the end of January, 1919, 
and at the same date in the five preceding 
years were as follows per 100 pounds: 1914, 
$2.48; 1915, $1.53; 1916, $2.03; 1917, $2; 1918, 
$1.95; 1919, $4.42. 

Normally, France receives four-fifths of the 
total exports from India. The prevailing 
ocean rate from Madras to Marseilles during 
1918 was $3.47 per 100 pounds for shelled 
nuts, while the present rate from Madras to 
New York is quoted at $1.50 per 100 pounds, 
which would make the price of shelled pea- 
nuts $7.89 per 100 pounds at Marseilles and 
$5.92 at New York. The present rate on 
shelled peanuts from New York to Marseilles 
is approximately $1.90 per 100 pounds. 

It is not believed that substantial quanti- 
ties of peanuts will be imported into the 
United States from India, on account of 


French demand, and because of a_ probable 
decrease in this year’s crop of 55 per cent. 














April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


ie) 
ur 


VEGETABLE OILS 


WEEKLY REVIEW 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER is Official Organ of the Interstate Cottonseed Crushers’ Association, the Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ Asso- 
ciation, South Carolina Cottonseed Crushers’ Association, the Georgia Cottonseed Crushers’ Association, and 


Markets Strong—Good Business Reported— 
Further Advances in Soya-Bean and Copra 
—Good Buying of Peanut Oil. 

The which has been 
pronounced for some time was again in evi- 
lence in the oil market this week, and was 
reflected in further advances being paid, al- 
most throughout. 


advancing tendency 


The advance was accom- 
panied by quite large trading in various kinds 
of oils and at higher prices. In cottonseed 
oil the tone of the market was very firm, and’ 
prices were held at full quotations, owing to 
the strength in other oils, and the reports of 
further large allotments for compound lard, 
shortly to be made. A very persistent re- 
port was in circulation during the week to 
the effect that an order for approximately 
25,000,000 Ibs. more lard-substitute had been 
allocated, making about 110,- to 115,000,000 
lbs. so far this spring. It had been antici- 
pated by well-informed people that this al- 
lotment would be made, although when it 
was to be made was not definitely stated. 
This allotment for substitute lard is ex- 
pected to be sufficient to relieve the cotton- 
seed oil market of the surplus product for 
this year, so that there will be very little 
carry-over the coming year more than usual, 
if as much. The domestic trade is expected 
to take care of the balance of the supplies 
without difficulty. Reports have been cur- 
rent that the placing of these orders might 
be followed within a short time by a re- 
opening of the cottonseed oil market to pub- 
lic trading—in fact rumors have been current 


The Mississippi Cottonseed Crushers’ Association. 


on the Produce Exchange that the market 
might be opened for new crop months before 
May 31, and that possibly there might be 
trading in old-crop, but reports from Wash- 
ington have indicated that this was quite un- 
likely, it being feared that a reopening of 
the cotton oil market would result in oil fol- 
lowing provisions in price. 

The action of the hog product market, and 
the advance in lard to new high levels has 
also been a factor of influence in the entire 
vegetable oil market. Reports from the Pa- 
cific coast have shown a strong position in 
imported oils; rather liberal sales of soya- 
bean oil have been made at advancing prices. 
Reports were very persistent that offerings 
from abroad were being curtailed, due to the 
European demand, and at better prices. Re- 
finers have been buying pretty freely, on 
account of the general strength in the vege- 
table oil market, the expectation of further 
allotments of export orders for substitute 
Jard, and the actual active demand for ex- 
port from the neutral countries. 

The position of copra and cocoanut oil has 
also been very strong. Sales of both in lib- 
eral quantities have been made at higher 
prices. This change in position in copra and 
cocoanut oils has been influenced by reports 
that direct shipments to Europe were again 
taking a large percentage of the copra pro- 
duction, so that but a moderate amount 
would be available for shipment to the United 
States. For the past two years the ship- 
ments of copra to the United States have 
been the principal shipments from the pro- 
ducing sections. 

Demand for Chinese peanut oil has been 


on a larger scale at higher prices, and do- 
mestic peanut oil has also been firm and 
higher. The general position in edible oils 
is so different from what it was in the win- 
ter that the trade is looking back at the con- 
ditions which then prevailed as on a bad 
dream. In regard to the continuation of the 
demand, there seems to be a pretty strong 
feeling that the buying by Europe will be 
continued, and that on account of the ton- 
nage conditions, demand will be thrown up- 
en the United States, for vegetable oils. This 
condition may develop into continued liberal 
buying of the edible oils and substitute lards, 
although if this demand reaches a point. where 
it jeopardizes the American supply, there may 
be some effort at controlling this: however, 
as soon as peace is signed and the different 
markets of Europe are thrown open, the ques- 
tion will be one of ability to pay and one 
of ability to transport, and these two items 
will probably be the factors which will limit 
the volume of the demand, 

SOYA BEAN OIL.—The spot and market 
on the coast is firm with a good inquiry. 
Sellers’ tanks from the coast are quoted at 
13@13%c. per pound. Spot is quoted at 15@ 
15'\%e. 

PEANUT OIL.—Offerings remain light and 
the market firm. Oriental oil is nominally 
quoted at 18ce. with offers small. Domestic 
crude is nominal at 18@1814c. f. o. b. mill, 
buyers’ tanks. 

CORN OIL.—Offerings of crude oil are light 
and the market strong. Refined oil was 
again higher. Crude is quoted at 181,@19e. 

COCOANUT OIL.—Demand is reported fair 
and the market firm with light offerings. 





c, 





~ 


~ 
=e = 


Z 


Agents 
in all the 


Principal Eastern 


Cities of the U. S. A. 
Also all the 


Principal European Cities 





cook L 


~ 
> Ww ZS, 


MIKADO 


ZH UBTAINED FROM 2y 
“en we * + 


Shey 3 


SOLE SELLING AGENTS FOR 


Portsmouth Cotton Oil Refining Corp. 
Portsmouth, Va. 


Gulf & Valley Cotton Oil Company, Ltd. 


New Orleans, La. 


ASPEGREN & CO. 


Produce Exchange Building 
NEW YORK CITY 


My 


-_—--=~. 


“seas? 





> 


Barrels 


ER 
Qne”s ns 


~) 
APOLLO 


ZN se 


Tank Cars 


Steel Drums 


Tins 





A 
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26 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 





April 19, 1919 





LAW & COMPANY, Inc. 


FORMERLY 
THE PICARD-LAW CO. 


Consulting, Analytical, Engineering 


Chemists 


AND 


Bacteriologists 


Expert Vegetable Oil 
Chemists 


AND SPECIALISTS 
CATTLE FEEDS 
PACKINGHOUSE PRODUCTS 
FERTILIZERS 
FUEL, LUBRICATING OILS 
AND BOILER WATERS 


IN ANALYSIS OF 


Main Laboratories: 


Atlanta, Ga. 


Carolina Branch: 


Wilmington, N.C. 








RS tERYN 
5) — Ze 


\ COOKING oi | 





WG On Compant 


1303 Shelby St., Louisville, Ky. 


Boston Chicago Philadelphia 





The high excellence of our 


sy “Buttercup” and “Snowflake” 


PEANUT a” COTTONSEED OILS 


has been long recognized by the trade. 


Shipped in barrels and our own tank-cars— 
or in tins, to suit our customers’ convenience. 


MARDEN, ORTH & HASTINGS CORPORATION 


(ESTABLISHED 1837) 
(Sole Distributors for the Edible Oil .Co., Inc., Louisville, Ky.) 


Cleveland Cincinnati 





136 Liberty St., New York City 


Seattle San Francisce 











Western interests were fair buyers of Manila 
oast at 12'4c¢. April-May shipment 


sellers’ tanks Ceylon dom., 14@15ce., and 


oi] on the 


Cochin dom.. bbls li@ 1lb6Yye. 
PALM ‘th.—Market is dull and feature- 
less. Prive. red, spot, . nom.; Lagos, spot, 
, to arrive, ; palm kernel, 14@14%4e. in 
bbis.: Niger, l6@18e 
CONFER ON COTTONSEED SITUATION. 
There is to be a meeting in Washington 
on April 25 between representatives of the 


cottonseed industries and their tributary in- 


dustries. the cotton growers, oil mill men 
and the Food Administration, for the pm 
pose of considering the situation and the 
present outlook for these industries and to 
secure the views of the Food Administration 
officials. It is expected that matters of vital 
importance will be adjusted and a plan for 
mulated for the ensuing period. 


2, 
—~ 


TEXAS COTTON SEED CRUSHERS. 


\ meeting of the executive committee of 
the Ts is Cotton Seed Crushers’ \ssociation 
was held last week at Dallas to decide upon 
arrangements for the next annual conve! 
tion of that association. It was decided to 
old t convention at Galveston, as usual 
nd Hotel Galvez will be the headquar 
ters. The convention will meet on June 4 
10 and 11, and the Rules Committee will hold 
its sessions on June 6 and 7, also at 
Hotel Galvez, Galveston. Secretary Gibson 
reports that an unusually large atendance is 
expected 
% 
CALIFORNIA FIGHTS OIL IMPORTS. 
California cottonseed oil interests are con 
a campaign against imported oils 


i ompetition with their product 
the manufacture of lard stubstitute. Their 
opposition is particularly aimed at Chinese 
peanut o half a million poun Is of whiel 
it i laimed, has been brought into Califor- 
ni ! nuary | They fear the effect 

I il Tor ottonseed oil ind claim 
tocks of California seed and crude il are 
mounting vith no outlet in sight A bill 
i now efore the California legislature to 







forbid the use of any oil in food manufac- 
ture containing than one-fourth of 1 
per cent, of free fatty acid. It is claimed the 
imported oils are high on free 
An effort 


to induce the War Trade Board to place an 


more 


fatty acids. 
made through California senators 


embargo on imported oils did not succeed. 


DANISH MARKET FOR OIL CAKE. 
There is a demand for cottonseed oil cake 
and corn in Denmark, with very little of- 
fered from America. Since July 1, 1918, there 
have been no exports of oil cake to Denmark 
irom this country, and only 20,397 barrels 
of corn meal, in January, 1919. 





D. OLIVIERI, 3, Rue Fortia 


of the following articles: 


Cable address: 


desires to represent important first class American producers 


Cottonseed Oil, Oleo Oils, Oleo Stock, Tallow, Greases, Tank- 
age, Lard, etc.; Sausages; D. S. Pork Products (Hams, fat backs, 
shoulders, bellies, etc.); Abattoir by-products, etc. 


Established 1899—Highest references. 
Olicas—Marseilles.—. A. B. C. Code 5th 


.Marseilles (France) 











MADE 





HARDENED EDIBLE OILS 


VEGETABLE OILS OF ALL KINDS 
Oils Hardened to Order 


The American Oil Treating and Hardening Co. 


CINCINNATI, OHIO, U. S. A. 


FROM 











Boreas, Prime Winter fellow 
Venus, Prime Summer White 
Jersey Butter Oil 

Aurora, Prime Summer Yellow 
€ WorRYDALE, ©. 
ort Ivory, N.Y. 


KANSAS Crry, Kan. 
MACon, GA. 


Refineries: 


kKefiners of All Grades of 


COTTONSEED OIL 








Puritan, Winter Fressed Salad Oil 
White Clover Cooking Oil 
Marigold Cooking Oil 

Sterling, Prime Summer Yellow 


General Offices: 
CINCINNATI, OHIO 
Cable Address: “Procter” 














April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 





THE ANDERSON OIL EXPELLER 


A New Departure in the Oil Pressing Business 


Can be used for COTTON SEED, PEANUT or SOYA BEAN Pressing 





The Anderson Ol! Expeller. 











because of 


meal. 
38. Greater simplicity 


manufacturing. 


Manufactured by 


Cleveland, Ohlo, U. 8. A. 


BETTER THAN HYDRAULIC PRESS 
1. Superior quality of oll and cake or 


2. Great saving In cost of production. 
In method of 


THE V. D. ANDERSON COMPANY Side Drive Oll Expeller, With «ll 





Elevator and Temper!ng Apparetus. 





FATS AND OILS IN THE U. S. 


(Continued from page 17.) 


regrind the cake, and, after heating, make a 
Both 


and second-pressing oils are refined. 


second pressing in hydraulics. the first 

Refining processes similar to those used in 
the refining of other vegetable oils are em- 
the fatty 
Owing to the fact that cocoanut oil contains 


ploved to eliminate free acids. 


glycerids of the lower fatty acids, which are 


f seed 


more easily decomposed than those 


oils. greater care is necessary in its refining 


to prevent an abnormally high loss due to 
the conversion of a large portion of the oil 


into seap, 

A number of plants separate the portion 
of the oil which melts at a lower temperature 
from that which is solid at a higher tempera- 


ture, the liquid portion being sold as coconut 


clein for use as a cooking oil, while the 
stearine is used as a substitute for, or an 
adulterant of, cacao butter in the confee 
tioner\ trade and in sweet fillings for cer- 
tain cookies or wafers and in vegetable 
margarines. The by-products from the re- 
fining of coconut oil, of course, are used 


largely in the manufacture of soaps, and the 


press cake from the oil mill is a valuable 
stock and concentrated dairy feed. 

One of the most important uses of refined 
coconut oil is in the production of vegetable 
called 


these 


margarines, sometimes “nut 


butter 


marga- 


rines.” In making substitutes 


approximately 50 parts of coconut oil, 25 


parts of peanut or other vegetable oil, and 


25 parts of ripened milk are mixed thor- 
oughly by churning, and then quickly 
chilled. The cooling of the mixture must be 
done in such a way that the fat particles 
when collected and worked will vield a 


smooth butter-like product. This is usually 


accomplished by either spraying the batch 


into a large tank of cold water or running 
it from the churn in a thin sheet under an 
ice-Water spray. After the batch has con 


gealed into a mass of fine wax-like particles 
trucks and 


placed in a tempering room, where it is al- 


it usually is collected in large 
lowed to ripen and develop a buttery flavor. 
In a day or two, when properly ripened, it is 
taken to the workers, the requisite amount 
of salt added, the 
squeezed out. 


and excess of moisture 
It is then ready to be put in 


packages for the market. 


Possible Additions to the Present Supply. 
The same economies that have already been 
suggested with reference to other vegetable 


would effect 


oils 


some increase in the \ ield 





of coconut oil the American mills. 
Alroad, however, the copra cake is highly 
prized as a dairy feed, because of the belief 
left in the cake resem- 


bles milk fat more than any other oil, and 


made in 


that the coconut oil 


is therefore easily converted into cream by 
the cows. If this is true, although it seems 
a questionable theory, then, of course, the 
6 or 8 per cent. of oil in the cake is more 
valuable as a dairy feed than when it is 
extracted and used for soap making. 

As already the 
trade was entirely upset by the war, and it 
is impossible 


intimated world’s copra 


‘o predict what will happen 


when shipping conditions are again normal. 
It would seem probable, however, that our 
coconut oil mills will experience more dilli- 


Hol 


Germany, are again in 


culty in getting copra when England 
land and especially 
the market, 
Fortunately, the seeds of several varieties 
ef palms in Mexico, 
South 


and in Central and 


America contain oils so similar to 


coconut that they are for all practical pur- 


poses identical. Among these are the ba- 
bussa, the cohune, and coquito. While none 
of these have as yet become of any 


great 
commercial importance, some are being im- 
ported in small quantities, and if the prob- 


lem of cracking their hard, thick shells is 


£ 
4 





satisfactorily solved they will undoubtedly 
come into competition with the coconut. 


(‘To be continued. ) 


= 


IMPORTS OF OLIVE OIL. 

Imports of olive oil in January, 1919, are 
reported by follows by the 
Division of Statistics of the Bureau of For- 
eign and Domestic Commerce: 





countries as 


Gallons. Dollars. 

Italy : aleiets 

Spain 43.851 $83,231 

Canada Se Ae eee 2 10 

Cuba 787 3,104 
Hongkong 

Total 44,640 $86,345 


—_¢o— 

OIL TRADE CONVENTIONS. 
Inter-State Cottonseed 
tion, May 19, 20, 21. 

Orleans, La. 
National Oil Mill Superintendents’ 
ciation, May 27, 28, 29, Memphis, Tenn. 
Inter-State Oil Mill Superintendents’ As- 
Oil 
\ssociation, 


Crushers’ Associa- 
Hotel Grunewald, New 


Asso- 


sociation and Mill Superintendents Ex- 


hibitors’ June 4, 5, 6, Atlanta, 


Gia. 
Association, 


Texas Cottonseed Crushers’ 


June 9, 10, 11. Hotel Galvez, Galveston, Tex. 














“77” CHOICE SALAD OIL 
“88” CHOICE WHITE OIL 


Savannah, New 
Neoie York 


SOUTHERN COTTON 


Crushers and Refiners of Cottonseed, Peanut and other Vegeiable Oils 


SNOW DRIFT 


Scoco and Kneedit 
—vegetable shortenings 


Wesson Oil 


“44” CHOICE BUTTER OIL 
“22” YELLOW COOKING OIL 


Crude Mills throughout the Cotton States, Refineries and Plants at 


Orleans, Memphis, Chicago, Bayonne 
City Office at 120 Broadway 


OIL COMPANY 























28 THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER April 19, 1919 





The USSESA APPARATUS not only sepa- 


rates the grease from waste waters 


But it automatically ejects all sediments. 


And it is the only apparatus on the market 
that automatically ejects the sediments. 





Why remain satisfied with an old-fashioned 
system that collects sediments and creates 
free fatty acid—thereby spoiling the grease? 


USSESA SALES COMPANY, Inc. 


220 West 42nd Street Candler Building New York City, N. Y. 


Sole Distributors for the U. S. Sanitary Effluents Separating Apparatus 











MITSUI & CO., LTD. 


Mitsui Bussan Kaisha Ltd. 
Offices in Every Important City in the World 


DIRECT IMPORTERS FROM 


OIL BEANS PRODUCE 
MARU-UZURA—CRANBERRY ROUND EGG ALBUMEN 
ee ae CHUNAGA-UZURA—MEDIUM SPECKLED EGG YOLK 
COCOANUT OIL CHUFUKU—WHITE FLAT DRIED GINGER 
RAPESEED OIL DAIFUKU—LARGE BUTTER CASSIA 
CHINA WOOD OIL DAINAGON—MEDIUM BABY RED MUSTARD SEED 
JAPAN VEG. WAX KOTENASHI--PEA BEANS SESAME SEED 
CHINESE VEG. TALLOW KUMAMOTO—WHITE KIDNEY POPPY SEED 
WHITE GREEN KINTOKI—LARGE RED AJOWAN SEED 
CHINESE ANIMAL TALLOW MUROINGEN—MEDIUM BUTTER POTATO FLOUR 
NAGAUZURA—LONG SPECKLED TAPIOCA FLOUR 
RICE OHTENASHI—MEDIUM PEA BEANS BEAN FLOUR 
PEA BEANS RICE FLOUR 
SIAM GARDEN RICE ems §  epenended PEANUTS— 
SIAM RICE NO. 1 SHELLED AND UNSHELLED 
SIAM USUAL RICE RANGOON WHITE WALNUTS 
SAIGON RICE NO. 1 BEAN CAKE 
SAIGON PYCHOW RICE NO. 1 CRAB MEAT 
CALCUTTA PATNA RICE NO. 1 DRIED FISH 
RANGOON SQ. RICE CANNED FISH 
MITSUI & CO., LIMITED 
65 BROADWAY NEW YORK TEL. BOWLING GREEN 7520 


OIL DEP 1. PRODUCE DEPT. 


























April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


THE WEEK’S CLOSING MARKETS 


[Friday being a holiday markets generally 

were closed. ] 
THURSDAY’S CLOSINGS. 
Provisions. 

Hog products were easier with bearish hog 

news. 
Tallow. 

Market strong, sales reported at the quoted 

level. City special loose quoted at 12c. 


Oleo Stearine. 


Market quiet but firm. 
28ce. 


Oleo quoted at 


Cottonseed Oil. 

Trade quiet and featureless. 
THURSDAY’S GENERAL MARKETS. 
Lard in New York. 

New York, April 17, 1919.—Market firm; 
prime Western, $30.90@31.00; Middle West, 
$30.70@30.80; city steam, 30@30%2c, nom.; 
refined Continent, $32.50; South American, 
$32.75; Brazil, kegs, $33.75; compound, 23@ 
2414,¢. 

Marseilles Oils. 

Marseilles, April 17, 1919.—Copra fabrique, 
— fr.; copra edible, — fr.; peanut fabrique, 
— fr.; peanut edible, — fr. 

Liverpool Produce Markets. 

Liverpool, April 17, 1919.—(By Cable.)— 
Beef, extra 
prime 


Indian mess, not quoted; pork, 
mess, not quoted; shoulders, square, 
143s. 6d.; New York, 140s. 6d.; picnic, 119s. 
6d.; hams, long, 175s.; American cut, 173s.; 
bacon, Cumberland cut, 149s.; long clear, —; 
short backs, 168s.; bellies, 18ls. 6d. Lard, 
spot prime, 154s. 3d.; American refined, 28-lb. 
box, 160s. Lard (Hamburg), nominal. Tal- 
New York City 
Cheese, Canadian finest 
Tallow, Australian (at 


low, prime city, not quoted. 
special, not quoted. 
white, new, 130s. 6d. 
London), 72s. 


2, 


——“o-——_- 


THURSDAY’S LIVESTOCK MARKETS. 
Chicago, April 17.—Hog receipts, estimated, 


32,000. Left over, 8,282. Markets mostly 
10c. lower. Cattle receipts, 7,500; sheep, 
12,000. 


Buffalo, April 17—Hogs steady; on sale, 
1,600 at $21.00@21.15. 

Kansas City, April 17. 
$20.65. 

St. Joseph, April 17—Hogs slow at $19.50 
@20.70. 

Louisville, April 17.—Hogs steady at $20.50. 

Sioux City, April 17.—Hogs steady, at 
$20.10@20.75. 

Indianapolis, 
$20.60@20.85. 

Omaha, April 17. 
20.60. 

Cleveland, April 17.—Hogs steady, at $20.75. 

Detroit, April 17—Hogs; no market ac- 
count of strike. 


Hogs steady at 


April 17.—Hogs lower, at 


Hogs slow, at $20.00@ 


2, 
Be 


FOREIGN COMMERCIAL EXCHANGE. 
New York, April 17, 1919.—Foreign com- 


mercial exchange rates, as far as quoted, are: 
London 


fF Ae ay ser 4.614 
Se, CE Sci cues d ese bose cbewbecieien 4.654 
DR, CTI a. oonig eo ccicidic iwisiveeecescece 4.63% 
CRU: IE iran. cans kdeiskwinsewsisawaee 4.641% 
erie ne pare ae 4.61% 
CD, GO GOO oicinc cceccssesrsewcese 4.59% 
Paris— 
SN SE CN i cccesccwaaewenbnewemn 6.07 
SE, SD 5 vsiecs cieaiwue.wecawenmbee-eWers 6.02 
SEE 9a 6-9:0 hess oiededeewaeeuweses 5.99 
ME ED Koike Accictecbhacuecesesenice 6.01 
Amsterdam— 
| rr 4075 
CE SP QE bac tawcddesrsbaceeawat 39H 
RR GND oe. ns 0 000-0 tens. o0sbedeyese sens 40% 
ee ne eee 403% 
Copenhagen— 
i Se c..scunc ocenaswaeanewsseeaee 24.80 
ere 25.00 





PACKERS’ PURCHASES 


Purchases of livestock by packers at principal cen- 
ters for the 


week ending Saturday, April 12, 1919, 

are reported as follows: 

Chicago, 

Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. 
Aemeet GB CO. ccccceccese 5,450 20,700 16,505 
ee err 5,480 14,200 18,490 
Morte. & Ce... -civievcveceses 4,485 9,600 8,373 
Wilson & Co. ...-.ccccseee 4,749 12,900 8,111 
G. H. Hammond Co........ 2,265 §,800 ae 


Libby, McNeill & Libby... sss 

Anglo-Amer. Provision Co.. 680 aint ee 
Brennan Packing Co., 6,100 hogs; Independent Pack- 

ing Co., 7,200 hogs; Boyd, Lunham & Co., 6,800 hogs; 








Roberts & Oake, 5,000 hogs; Miller & Hart, 4,200 
hogs; others, 18,300 hogs. 
Kansas City. 
Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. 
Meret Bi CO. ciccivevare 3,672 13,4738 6,984 
Fowler Packing Co......... 923 cic vais 
Wileon & Co. ..ccccccccces 3,680 9,427 3,914 
Swe GB OR sos csccccceces 4,001 10,312 8,349 
Cudahy Packing Co. ...... 3,681 9,389 6,855 
Morris & Co, ..ccccccvccece 4,220 7,230 2,615 
GORE: cs vcicweuscanceconeyes £29 354 130 
Omaha,* 
Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. 
Morris & Co. ...scccoccees 1,172 2,065 2,095 
Bwikt B Co, oc .csccccevves 1,494 6,487 962 
Cudahy Packing Co........ 2,103 7,215 3,646 
Armour & Co, ......cccceses 2,688 8,192 1,533 
ee i, ee eee 2,944 eee 
ee one 6,636 eee 
Lincoln Packing Co., 144 cattle; Higgins Packing 


Co., GS cattle; South Omaha Packing Co., 23 cattle; 
Midwest Packing Co,, 8 cattle; Wilson Packing Co., 
74 cattle. 





*Incomplete. 


—— 
SLAUGHTER REPORTS 


Special reports to The National Provisioner show 
the number of livestock slaughtered at the following 
centers for the week ending April 12, 1919: 








CATTLE. 
CN pa iiseicdcctasécecestecewewoeesseperoee 30,394 
PE I Sik ewiee seek hee seew ews cen es seeeeeme 20,930 
MER aricGe we dcndn sakes tsibeqeediewowew act ae 10,806 
BE: oc cik.s 0s titres wanccins Mmarseneses 10,637 
GE, TOS cccccccvccccscsccccccecscesececeoes 6,737 
PE TN hiccnw. cevinn wwiskiceeewinadniewee caceews 5,672 
GN aes eisinsew¥06.445e sien s eee elbns Saneweern 762 
ee. arr rer ir rr 7,181 
Fort Worth 7,277 
Philadelphia 3,090 
Indianapolis 2,632 
New York and 6,553 
Oklahoma City 7,259 
re rere re re eee 956 
CN a5 0s :cip te ssaie sien Wotiveiees sidiceinweatied en 4,807 
HOGS, 
Re ere rene vere wre erin re 126,452 
SE CE ee ee ee 52,114 
POR Peer eo rer er ee 28,367 
TE TE, TR once cicceseencncccsvesenccacee 50,972 
ee Orr ee scene ae 
GUOUK CHF oi cis scisccceccccvcccesesiseseneesses 19,743 
CE ain 0 0i0:00:0.5:0'0 sare vemesb.00seyesnseneeeeee 6,304 
COMME TRAMNIN oui. ccc cccecececccccewetetes 8,159 
IN, oii hniss-3-s ee wwe wees etakerdtsanaeesen 7,741 
eT, DOE oan Socwwcswea sect wereicecees 16,268 
SS. ear re ee 10,832 
Philadelphia .........ceccccccccccecceccsccece 4,277 
TRUIAMABONS 2 oc ccccccccccceveccscceccesescess 26,187 
New York and Jersey City.......cceeeesecees 24,537 
Oklahoma City ...cccccccccccevcccccsvceccoce 9,494 
PN vain now tise crwae-onnreehsgsieeeeaie 8,438 
ry Eee CET CI ee ee 16,062 
SHEEP. 
ee er Cer mr en eee Lo 33,660 
TOON GEG coc cccccesccccecccceseccessesouss 28,909 
eS rr rrr ree ert a en 17,258 
eR eerie rer etre 4,532 
GE. FEBOGR ce vccvccrcvccccccececcsecsesesccvvess 15,571 
Sioux Clty ...cccccccccccvccccvcsssvsssscvcce 2,696 
oe ere rey ee rh en 62 
South Bt. Padl ...ccccccccevccccrvecvcvesscees 118 
SS ET re ee eee 2,217 
PRllaGeWphia 2... sc cccccsccesosecscvcscccsccens 3,725 
Indianapolis ......ccceccccccceercncccsccceres 342 
New York and Jersey City...... A eae 12,966 
Oklahoma City ...cccccccccccccverscevccecece 721 
Milwaukee... ccc es cccccc ccc eccsccccsccccees 53 
CUMEIMBATE .. ccevvccccccscccecesccesoessosceses 100 
—— 


ARGENTINE BEEF EXPORTS. 

Cable reports of Argentine exports of beef 
for the week up to April 17, 1919, show ex- 
ports from that country follows: 
To England, 85,182 the 
52,027 quarters; on orders, 32,155 
The previous week’s exports were 
as follows: To England, 117,967 quarters; to 
the Continent, 58,547 
nothing. 


were as 
quarters; to Con- 
tinent, 
quarters, 


quarters; on orders, 


RECEIPTS AT CENTERS 











SATURDAY, APRIL 12, 1919. 
Cattle. Hogs. sheep. 
CRIN oo ciwscka coe ereuee 1,000 4.419 3,000 
arr 1,009 
ping a, SO COE ee 300 100 
ey SNE cs cee asibvies cones 500 10,480 600 
eee aa 100 2,000 
ee ee 750 5,000 * 1,000 
Ee See 200 570 
PO WOE sn dvacnsiewsncies 2,500 500 
PIO cones $86 sw areeee TAT 
SNEED prcccnacnsesen's 400 2.000 At) 
I oot cers aca 6 wicca nies no7 
hee a, ee 200 4.000 
PN wes wancdauxce ss 1,500 
occ ht OEE eR EE Te SOO 2,100 2,400 
CPE iepasimedvvereeews 100 1,00) 200 
OW RR © asics éeacce's ° TSO 2,280 1,082 
MONDAY, APRIL 14, 1919, 
oe Ee Pen ere Paes 14,000 42,191 11,000 
2 err 14,000 15,381 10,000 
I cao resernigvinivie wa-siebeunie 5,000 13,082 6,000 
es I efars a awionnrionie-ave 5,300 6,145 900 
en 2,000 9,000 3,200 
te, Se or eee 1,800 $.000 100 
SES ee 1,800 5,000 1,200 
BD | 695 diene sews 1,827 
SEER, Was vininrs 's.63ee wrewiecae 2,000 6,000 100 
EES ee oe a 288 
I ee orate eeccsweree- 1,200 6,000 100 
eee 21,000 11,400 
en ey See 5,400 13,600 16,800 
CO ae 5,000 
ME SE Bieesscncsnaues 4,650 4,270 4,920 
TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1919. 
IE iinet aateesaeaee 9,000 28,927 11,000 
he ee ee 10,000 12,000 
MEE. csisnestneesansanaus 5,000 6,500 
a Ar ee 6,200 1,500 
iy SEE sci ecnnewsssctae 2, 3,500 
oo eee 2,000 : 750 
SS ee 2,000 6, 4,500 
Pe TED se tcicsienscnes 4,000 2, 2,000 
 ecesin oe nae ee CO 3, 
EEE Agua Watceats cence 300 1, 50 
WN oti eiei oc: KGieemies arin 2,707 
re 1,250 7,000 100 
ee A re 500 300 
CREE ik 6. co wiv dice ainnae's 500 2,593 100 
I re oats dass See Sin erties 900 1,600 1,2 
CRONE eiscecnonieeeeenane 100 1,000 200 
SA Wa oa wise weaese 1,780 3,820 1,240 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1919. 
hc dnaaanaw omens 5,600 14,951 11,000 
Manmees Oly <.i.0<< bales 10,000 18,144 7,000 
CL caiiecannana guess 4,500 18,239 £,500 
Ss I oie <b cece ecnsscerace's 4,600 14,759 600 
ok ee eee 2,200 9,000 3,000 
on, ee, ee eee 1,500 7.000 
rer reer 2,300 7,000 4,500 
 * 2S 6,000 2.000 1,500 
IE | airsetince:s e's sisgras 6,662 
ee 2,000 
See 1,439 
et 1,250 6.000 200 
CRUE oWalsssamwse<qwies 500 4,840 3 
MI cicarvsinisseteiaie wine dosiererers 900 1,600 1,600 
ne i, ee ere 1,000 
OE DAE ¥isacswnnss s0Kws 2,220 4,590 6,470 
THURSDAY, APRIL 17, 1919. 
CORO bccicavcscdccaeces 8,000 32,000 12,000 
pO 8 eee 2,000 6,000 5,000 
I iia Sso seth nimodoas 2,500 15,000 8,500 
eS eerrerrerr rr 1,600 9,000 1,000 
Oe EN Sisin5.o caw pana 1,700 5,000 2,500 
OS eee ree 2,200 8,000 100 
a. Serrrererrerr te 1,050 2,000 100 
ee 8,500 2,500 800 
Milwaukee .......cecccces 1.419 
ng ET 2,000 
Ae ren ae 2,293 
TROMNNNNS: oo 0ciceewsc.s. 1,000 7,000 2,000 
COE nse rc cicccsesiows 400 3,882 200 
PE 664-6 k0s2 viene sseeees 1,050 1,600 2,200 
COI, 3. eeeit essen 3,000 
FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 1919. 
CRGRNG.... sjgnvivns vcenaescce 2,000 22,000 8,000 
TE: ree ere 1,800 6.000 2.000 
NE, . hndWwceve weinewees 800 11,000 3,000 
The! Ss vic caceeeesees 800 11,000 150 
ge rr errr 200 2,000 1,000 
OE n.d seh ihonewews 800 8,400 3 
eer 1,000 3,500 100 
Oklahoma City .......... 1,400 1,100 sees 
DOMVEE vice cccccvcveceses 600 600 7.100 
Indtanapolia § ......cssccceve 700 7,000 100 


NEW YORK LIVE STOCK 





WEEKLY RECEIPTS TO APRIL 14, 1919, 
Cattle. Calves. Sheep. 
Foredy GUE scccccwcesied 2,776 7,548 5,670 
a eae 3,777 8,623 7,296 
Co) errr Te 6,553 16,171 12,966 ’ 
Totals last week........ 6,508 §,536 14,852 22,765 
“Se 


Do you want a good man? Or perhaps it 
is a position you are after. In either case 
keep an eye on page 48. It will be worth 
your while. 





THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


HIDE AND SKIN MARKETS 


(SHOE AND LEATHER REPORTER) 


Chicago. 

PACKER HIDES steady to strong,- with 
many reported not to be offering their April 
election. Nothing new in the way of trad- 
ing is learned, but there continues to be 
Witnessed a good demand for light weight 
hides, with packers apparently reluctant in 


pressing for business. Their ideas are high 


and it is diflicult to make quotations in the 


absence of trading. Buyers in some instances 


are likewise. A big packer is offering winter 
heavy native steers at 30c., heavy native cows 
at 28 lative steers Sle. heavy cows 29¢.. 
lights 27¢ heavy Texas 30c¢., extremes 27c., 


and butts 2%c. 


collies 28¢ 


Later:--A big packer sold April heavy 
lexas steers, light Texas steers. Colorados 
afd heavy native steers. Understand the 
heavy Yexas brought 30c. and lights 2%. 
Another declined 28c¢. for Colorados and 2%e. 
for butt brands. Two of the big packers are 


not offering any April hides, but one of these 


is offering two to three cars heavy winter 
hative cows at 28c. 

COUNTRY HIDES.—The market continues 
to keep strong as conditions remain un- 
changed and dealers hold steady in their 
ideas. As has been previously mentioned 
there continues to be a good demand for 
good quality light weight hides and buyers 
are in the market for all lots available. 
Few offerings of any consequence have been 
noted recently and dealers report inquiry for 
stock of this description. Current receipts 
are quoted at 22@221oc. for extremes. Some 


lots are offered at 23c. Choice quality stock 
of back salting extremes are offered at 24% 


@25\,¢., according to lots. Current receipt 
buffs are quoted at 20@2014¢., with bette 
vrades held for 21@22¢., according to quality. 
\ car of nearby free of grub buffs recently 
sold at 22¢. Heavy steers are slow and 
offered at 2244@23\%,c. as to salting, with 
some eXtra choice lots of heavy steers re- 
ported offered at 24 24boc. Heavy cows are 
slow and quoted at 201,@21e Branded hides 
are quiet with offerings at 1744@18e. Bulls 
are nominally quoted at li@16™%e. 
NORTHWESTERN HIDES.—This market 


is strong, but quiet, with the chief obstacle 


to trading the lack of supplies. Extremes 


are quoted at 22(@ 221'.¢. for current receipts 
Choice ality extremes are offered up to 
251 7p according to lots quality, ete. Bulls 
range in prices from 20@2le., acording to 
lots, et \ll weight hides are offered at 
221, (a 23¢e \s has heen mentioned from 
time to time the demand for calfskins con- 
tinue » be good, but supplies are small. 
Count re quoted at 38q@40c.. according 

lots Light calf, $2.75@3. Deacons, $2.55 

2.8). Horse hides are firmly held and are 
n good demand Stocks are small and nomi- 


nally quoted at S8.50@ 10, aceordingly. 





CALESKINS.—Unchanged, with buvers of 
thi ) on that the situation is a_ trifle 
eas Sellers continue along old lines, but 

ivers’ views have changed. Bids of 52: 
have recently been reported made for Chi 
ago cities with last sales noted at 5314c. 
Most ackers are talking 57¢. and probably 


quoted at $1.10@1.30. 


( Terings ot 


request and three-quarter cars sold at 2: 


and back salting at 22¢. 


are firm and move readily 


extremes 
other heavyweights not wante 


less for April forward skins, against former 
askings of 574%c. Mixed cities and countries 
are quoted at 45@50c. Countries at 40@43c. 
Light calf, $2.75@3. Beacons, ©$2.55@2.80. 
Packer kip, 388@40c. Mixed outside city and 
country kip, 34@36c. Countries 30@33c. 
HORSE HIDES steady and strong. Whole 
hides continue to experience a good demanu, 
but supplies are scarce in this section. Coun- 
tries are quoted at $7.50@8. Mixed cities 
and countries, $8.50@9.25. City renderers at 


$10.50@ 11. 


SHEEP PELTS.—This market is active 
and strong. A big packer sold 20,000 Chicago 
and River points packer sheep and lamb 
pelts at $4.65. This is noted to be an ad- 
vance of 5c. over last sales reported made at 


$4.60. Present askings are said to range 
from $4.65@4.75. Outside city and country 


Countries at $2.50@ 
Packer shearlings $1.25@1.50. Dry west- 
erm murrains 

HOG SKINS 


packer sheep $3.50@4. 
3. 
32 338¢e. 
unchanged. Average run is 
No. 1 pigskin strips, 
l0O@l1le.: No. 2, 84@9'%¢.; No. 3, 54@6Me., 
according to measure. 
New York. 
HIDES.— The 


somewhat active Thursday. 


PACKER 
ruled 


market is steady 


and One 


of the uptown packers sold 2 cars February- 


the 
throats. 


steers at 28c. for 
the 


Also there continues to be a persistent rumor 


March heavy native 


koshers and 28%%e. for stuck 


that another of, the uptown packers sold his 
February-March natives, but this: he firmly 


denies, claiming that he is asking ‘ec. over 
the above sale. In ‘outside packer hides 


market continues very strong on light native 


cows. Packers still holding back on April 
hides. No sales steers or bulls. In small 
packer hides it is believed that some busi- 


ness may develop in several thousand packer 
native bulls. 

COUNTRY HIDES.—Most of the large tan- 
ners are of the opinion that prices have 
reached their pinnacle on extremes. Large 
middle west bulfs at 
fail to atract buyers. Reports from Philadel 
phia state that extremes continue in good 


vood 22¢. 


ic. as to quality and range of weights. 


Good quality country buffs offered at 28c. 
and not 


taken. Middle west hides are steady 
with last sales of good extremes up to 25M4e. 
There are offerings 
noted right along of heavy cows, buffs, bulls, 


ete., without attracting buyers’ attention on 


account of the difference in price. New York 
State, New England, ete.. all weight hides 


when prices are 
within buyers’ views. Reports from Boston 
state that business is somewhat tied up there 


on account of the telephone strike now pre- 


vailing. 
rates 


Nevertheless, dealers state that high 
continue to be asked for good lots of 
from all sections. Buffs and the 
] 
i. 


CALFSKINS.—The market seems to eb 
established at S4.80-6-7 last paid for the 
three weights of New York city skins. al 


though buyers are not anxious to buy the 





Present 








your problems freely. 
answered. 


The Wannenwetsch System 

of Rendering is the most economical, is care-free, 

4 sanitary, occupies minimum space, and will net 
you greater profits than your present system. 


C. H. A. WANNENWETSCH & CO. 
563 William St. 


RENDERER! 
They will be 
We helped others, and can aid you. 


BUFFALO, N. Y. 











April 19, 1919 


high figure for the medium and_ heavier 
weight skins, since the decline on the 5@7s. 
Outside city and country skins are weaker, 
but reports received state that no goods are 


pressed on the market. Most dealers are 
busy making deliveries on old lots. Last 


sales mixed cities and countries were at $4.40- 
5.40-6.40, 

Later.—About 5,000 more 5@7s sold at 
$4.80. Large offerings of western light skins 
noted without effecting sales, 

HORSE HIDES.—The market for the pres- 
ent continues to rule strong with a car of 
New York state hides selling at $10. How- 
ever, some of the large importers are of the 
opinion that as soon as the large arrivals of 
Bb. A. dry and wet salted hides find their way 
here, the domestic market will become easier. 
At the present market, buts are very strong 
and $3.50 is asked for 22 Ib. and up, with 
large sales of all sizes on the basis of $3.20 
for city renderers’ and 5c. more*for 22 Ib. 
alone. Fronts are quoted at $7.50, with last 
sales at around $7.25. Cables from B. A. are 
offering wet salted B.A.’s averaging 52 Ibs. 
at #9. 

Later:—Philadelphia reports horse strong 
at $10.50 asked for renderers’, with bids $10 
declined. Good lots outside states have sold 
$9.50@ 10. 


2, 
——— eo 


MARCH OLEO OUTPUT AT CHICAGO. 

The oleomargarine output for the Chicago 
district for the of March, 1919, was 
14,470,969 uncolored and 492,558 
pounds colored, a total of 14,963,527 pounds. 


This is four and three-quarters million pounds 


month 
pounds 


more than the preceding month. Compared 
to a year ago, it was two and one-quarter 
million pounds less. 
the Chicago 
totaled 423,645 pounds. 


Oleomargarine 


Renovated butter pro- 


duction in district in March 


production in the Chicago 
district by months for the past year is as 
follows: 


Pounds. 
March, 1918 «veces 10,128,288 
April .. ‘ ‘ .. 12,777,094 
May 13,920,829 
June ae LA .. 11,298,221 
July . awa es : - 11,191,912 
August 10,848,902 
September : aoe 15 444 S69 
Cetober S 23,393 994 
November ‘ 18,533,070 
December : a _, 18,942,583 


January, 1919 
February 
March 


arial . 21,528,873 





FEBRUARY OLEOMARGARINE OUTPUT. 
Official 
of oleomargarine 


as shown by 


Government reports of the 
for the 


revenue 


output 
month of February, 


stamp sales, indicate 
that the production for that month was 359,- 
oO pounds colored and 15,626,872 pounds un- 

This 


pro- 


colored, or a total of 15,986,872 pounds. 


was 21 less 


million 
the 


pounds than the 
> 


duction for preceding month, and 23 


millicn pounds less than the same month last 
year, Official Government figures. based on 
stamp sales, showing oleomargarine production 


in the United States for the past vear, are: 


Pounds. 





February, 1918 

nn os ye enna eran ee 

April Coe Ceo e oe eee rerrerereeses 
EE Ie ee rt 25,675.446 
ES Bias n'g eae ech ee wore ceione 16,588,713 
PRN song os orate ais lah ec ial anes sie: alee uaa 18,153,084 
DE i 6 Sallie Sicha tat Ata 'a ao a ate gi hers GAPS 19,441,658 
NINN 5.2555: < tat dial ai earn eas cee 29,753,466 


EE COIR EE ESAT 
November 
December aes 
January, 1919 -. a 2 
MUENNED giv atta aie cvenes areas «os SESC682 














April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


LIVE STOCK MARKETS 


CHICAGO 


(Special Letter to The National Provisioner from The 
National Livestock Commission Co.) 
Union Stock Yards, Chicago, April 16. 

Jewish holidays, the closing days of the 
Lenten period and no favorable news as yet 
as to the placing of government contracts in 
the near future have exerted a very “bear- 
ish” influence on the cattle trade, and despite 
moderate receipts the market has declined 
with regularity and steer values are off any- 
where from $1@2 per cewt. as compared to 
the high spot in the trade the first of April. 
Finished beeves selling from $18@19.50 and 
the fair to medium killing steers selling from 
$14@15, along with the cheaper grades with 
quality enough to get feeder competition, 


show the least loss and are only $1@1.25 
per cwt, under the high spot in the trade. 


Yearlings have declined anywhere from 75c. 
@$1.50 and the bulk of the good to choice 
yearling steers are selling at present from 
$15.50@ 16.50, but something fancy would 
bring more, and the medium to good grades 
are going largely from $14.50@15.50, with 
fair to medium kinds all the way from $13 
@14.50. The brunt of the decline in the 
steer trade has been suffered by the medium 
to good cornfed steers which are selling all 
the way from $16@17.50, according to weight, 
quality and fat, and they are the kinds that 
are fully $2 per ewt. lower than they were 
the first of the month. 

Compared to the low spot in the market a 
week ago the trade on butcher cattle shows 
quite a decisive reaction, canners and cut- 
ters being up 25@50c., while the better grades 
and heifers show 50@75c. advance. 
with prospects rather favorable for the near 
future. Bologna bulls are steady, but the 
weighty fat bulls and the medium to good 
bulls are 15@25c. lower, especially on the 
heavier weights on account of a poor eastern 
outlet. and stock and feeding bulls are in 
moderate supply and in fair demand. Veal 
calves which recently showed a sensational 
advance of $2@3 per ewt. on account of the 
Easter trade have reacted and about half of 
the advance has been ceded back to the buy- 
ers. Heavy calves of good quality are sell- 
ing readily for the country trade, and the 
medium grades if carrying any fat are meet- 
ing with ready aceeptance for local and ship- 
ping account. High prices for she stuff 
will prevail until the first and perhaps the 
middle of June, but by that time the South- 
ern grass cattle will be moving freely to the 
other markets. 

Continued moderate 
points has resulted in 
with prices advancing from day to day and 
on Wednesday of this week the smaller 
packers and the “boys” bid ’em up and the 
early trade ruled 10@15e. higher with the 
extreme top $20.90 and the bulk of the good 
are selling from $20.60@20.80, with 
mixed grades largely $20.40@20.55. The big 
packing outfits stayed out of the trade until 
late in the day and as a consequence the 
market closed with the early advance lost, 
and while, as repeatedly stated in these col- 
umns everything indicates a continuance of 
the wonderful demand, coupled with rather 
moderate receipts for some weeks to come, 
and we rather think that the zenith of the 
trade not vet been reached, still, on the 
other hand, after such a phenomenal advance, 
a little increase in the supply and a tempo- 
rary reaction will not be surprising. 


of cows 


receipts of hogs at all 
a strong active trade 


hogs 


has 


Following last week’s decline in lamb 
values, this branch of the trade shows con- 


siderable improvement up to this time, prices 
ranging from per ewt. above last 
week's close. A feature of the trade during 
the past few days has been the urgent de- 
mand for lightweight lambs suitable for the 
Easter trade. Indications point to but little 
change during the coming few days. but most 


S0@ 50e. 


traders think the market will take on re 
newed life and activity following Faster. 
\Ve quote: Woosled—Good to choice lambs, 


S19.50@ 20; poer to medium, $17.50@18.50. 


No wooled vearlings or aged wethers on sale. 


Good to choice ewes, $14.50@15.25; well 
wooled shearing lambs, $16.75@17.25.  Shorn 
Fair to good lambs, $16@16.50; prime to 
fancy, $16.65@17; good to choice yearling 
wethers, $14.75@15.25; fair to best aged 
wethers, $13.75@14.50; good to prime spring 
lambs, $20@22.50; poor to medium, $15@18. 


o, 
-—o— 


KANSAS CITY 


(Special Letter to The National Provisioner.) 
Kansas City Stock Yards, April 15. 

Hogs sold up €0 $21.00 a hundred pounds 
in Kansas City to-day, the highest price ever 
paid, Yesterday the top price was $20.75, 
and the high record price in any former year, 
$20.65, was paid in September, 1918. Trade 
in cattle was dull, with the bulk of the offer- 
ings in the common and medium grades of 
beef steers. Sheep were fully steady, though 
receipts were liberal. Hog receipts were 13,- 
000 cattle, 10,000 hogs, and 12,000 sheep. This 
was an increase of 3,000 hogs, 3,000 sheep, 
and a decrease of 3,000 cattle compared with 
a week ago. Cattle were mostly plain native 
killing grades, and hog receipts included a 
good many light weight hogs and pigs. 

Trade in steers fat enough for killers was 
dull with prices about steady. The bulk of 
the offerings were common to fair in quality 
and killers need good to choice offerings more 
than the medium classes. Sales were largely 
at $14.50@16.00, a few sold up to $17.00, 
and some as low as $13.50. Western steers 
were in moderate supply, choice to prime 
steers are quoted at $18.00@19.25. Cows are 
down 15 to 25 cents, and good heifers steady, 
with plainer grades irregular, mostly lower. 
Cows are quoted at $8.00@14.75, and heifers 
$9.00@15.50. Canners are quoted at $4.25@ 
5.50 and cutters $5.50@8.00, veal calves $10.00 
@ 14.00. 

Some hogs sold to-day as much as 25 cents 
higher, and average prices were up 10 to 15 
cents. The advance carried the market into 
a new high position for the year. Demand is 
urgent. The top sale was $21.00 and the 
bulk of hogs brought $20.25@20.75. The mar- 
ket here is higher than elsewhere. Because 
of the scarcity of feed in Kansas a good 
many light weight hogs, and stock pigs are 
offered. Pigs are selling at $15.00@19.25. 
In Monday’s receipts of 15,000 hogs there 
were about 5,000 pigs. 

The sheep market is in a fairly good posi- 
tion, though last week prices were lower. 
Fed lambs to-day sold mostly at $19.00@19.50. 
Ewes are quoted at $14.00@15,.50 and wethers 
$15.00@16.25. California spring lambs 65 
pounds brought $19. Because of the advane- 
ing season, offerings show a greater range 
in quality, and shorn sheep and lambs are 
beginning to move more freely. 





+e. __ 


ST. LOUIS 


(Special Letter to The National Provisiouer.) 
National Stock Yards, Hl, April 15. 
Although our cattle supply continues mod- 
erate in volume and the trading is fairly ac- 
tive, prices for the past week have steadily 
declined and at this writing is a full dollar 


under a week ago; in fact the decline is 
greater than this in some instances. The 


run for the week ending to-day totals 20,400 
head and with the exception of a small per- 
centage of fairly good steers, the quality has 
been very plain indeed. We have been re- 
ceiving so few that weigh over 1,100 Ibs. that 
we have begun to consider that weight steer 
a fairly heavy one. The top for the week 
was on a string of 1,343-pound steers which 
brought 16.60 and the bulk of the best kill- 
ers ranges from 13.00@15.00. In butcher 
cattle and cows there is much irregularity 
in trading and the decline in this depart- 
ment is about the same as in beef steers. 
Yearlings topped for the week at 16.25 and 
mixed steers and heifers at 16.00. Plainer 
yearlings are selling around 10.00@10.50, In 
this grade the demand is fair and they do 
not appear to have suffered nearly so great 
a decline as is recorded on other cattle. The 


31 


decline in stockers and feeders is 25e to 50c, 
best feeders out of first hands are quoted at 
14.00@ 14.25 with the bulk selling at 12.00 
(14.00, The bulk of the stock 
covered in a range of 9.00@12.50, 

Hog receipts for the week are right at 
73,000 and while this is a fairly liberal run 
prices have held to the highest basis in the 
history of the market. The top was made 
on Friday when a number of loads of mixed 
and butcher and good heavy hogs went to 
scale at 20.85. Prices to-day are 25c to 40¢c 
higher than a week ago. The demand is for 
hogs with weight and quality and we are 
receiving a fair sprinkling of them. The 
quality generally, however, is not much bet- 
ter than fair. To-day’s quotations are: 
Mixed and butchers 20.15@20.70; Good 
heavys 20.60@20.75: Rough 15.00@19.00: 
light 20.15@20.60; Pigs 15.00@19.50; Bulk 
20.20@ 20.60. 

The sheep and lamb receipts for the week 
total 3,500, and with this very light and in- 
adequate supply the trade is active and prices 
strong. Missouri fed Mexican lambs sold 
up to 18.75 this week and clipped lambs at 
16.75. Mutton sheep brought 15.25 for the 
best fat ones. Prime wooled lambs are quot- 
ed up to 19.50 and shorn lambs could be good 


steers are 





enough ©o bring perhaps 17.25. Spring lambs 
are beginning to arrive and a few sold up to 
20.25 this week. 

o—_—_ 


OMAHA 


(Special Letter to The National Provisioner, ) 


Union Stock Yards, Omaha, April 15. 
The runs of cattle for this time of the year 
are considerably smaller than a year ago and 
supplies so far this week amount to 10588 
head, some 5,000 short of the same two days 
last week. Prices on beef continue to seek 
lower levels and on top of a 50¢.@31.00 de- 


cline at the close of last week there was 
another 25@40c, decline the first two days 
this week and packers were still bearish, 


claiming that the beef market in the east 
was glutted and that their coolers were full. 
Best beef steers here were quotably anywhere 
from $16.25@18.00 for something prime and 
the general run of fair to good short fed 
grades sold at a spread of $14.75@16.00. The 
outlet on good to choice corn fed yearlings 
seems to be a little broader than on anything 
else, prices to-day looking nearly steady with 
last week’s close. the bulk of them selling at 
$14.00@ 15.50 and plain lots on down to $10.00, 
Butcher stock was’ searce last week and with 
a fair demand showed a loss of 25@50c¢, and 
this week in spite of light supplies trading 
is 25€@50c. lower and all grades outside of 
canners and cutters share in the decline, best 
butchers selling from $12.00@13.50 and me- 
dium lots anywhere from $9.50@12.00. Stock- 
ers and feeders opened up strong this week 
With good 800 to 1,000 pound western steers 
‘elling from $13.00@14.75. Stock 
steady at $7.50@9.25. 

On a fairly liberal run of 17,000 hogs to- 
day prices went to record levels on this mar- 
ket, top bringing $20.65 and the 
bulk of the sales at a spread of $20.20@20.50. 
The market last week closed 50@60e. hivher 
and gains this week amount to 15@20e. The 
markets continue active and packers are still 
willing to give high money for choice heavy 
finished hogs, although good medium butcher 
weichts are gaining in favor. 

Trade for the last couple of weeks has 
heen decidedly slumpy in the sheep barn, al 
though the receipts have not been very heavy, 
amounting to 30.200 head last week as com- 
pared with 38,700 the week previous. Offer- 
ings so far this week amount to 13.000 head. 
Prices to-day were steady to 10@15e 
in addition to decline of 50¢.@S81.00 last week 
and best handy weight lambs are now 
able from $19.00@19.50. heavy lambs from 
$18.25@19.00. shearing lambs from $17.00@ 
18.00. clipped lambs from $15.75@16.25. vear- 
lines from 816.00@17.00, wethers from 815.00 
@1600, { small bunch of 
lambs sold vesterday at $22.00. 
ewes continues strong, best 
from $14.00@15.00. 


cows Were 


hogs hig 


lower 


anot- 


choice spring 
Demand for 


kinds anotable 





32 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


April 19, 1919 


ICE AND REFRIGERATION 


NEW CORPORATIONS. 


Chicago, Ill.—The Adent Ice & Coal Co. has 
been incorporated with a capital stock of 
$40,000. 

Michigan City, Ind. 
Co. has been incorporated 
stock of $20,000. 

Miami, Florida. 


The Dairy Products 


with a capital 
The Florida [ce Cream Co, 
has been incorporated with a capital stock 
of $10,000, with C. L. Day as president; H. R. 
Rosebro, vice-president, and W. B. Crawford, 
secretary and treasurer. 

New York, N. Y.—The U-Need Ice Co., Ine,, 
has been incorporated with a capital stock 
of $50,000 to manufacture ice, deal in chemi- 
cals, drugs, ete., by F. D’Allesandro, 11 Ver- 
non Place, Yonkers, N. Y.; L. Disanto, 2519 


Amsterdam avenue and P. Zabriello, 246 
West 146th street, New York, N. Y. 


————%e—_— 


ICE NOTES. 

Beaumont, Tex.—Ice cream plant will be 
erected by the Texas Ice Cream Company at 
a cost of $60,000. 

Miami, Fla.—A cold storage plant will be 
erected at this point by the East Coast Cat- 
tle Company, of which C. ¥. Raulerson of 
Fort Pierce, Fla., is president. 

Mobile, Ala.—A building has been leased 
by the King Ice Cream and Creamery Com- 
pany, which will be remodeled and new ma- 
chinery installed; daily capacity 2,000 gallons 
of ice cream; $20,000. V. L. King of 
West Point, Miss., is president and manager. 


cost 











BUTTER AND EGGS IN STORAGE. 


The United States Bureau of Markets reports cold storage holdings of butter and 


eggs on April 1, 1919, as follows: 
Reported for 
April 1, 1919 


Estimated holdings 
Stor. not reported 


Reported for 
March 1, 1919 


Storages Quantity Storages Quantity Storages Quantity 

SRI bon rinse oeoaue ¥: 427 316,447 8 6,354 431 26,447 

a. rer re 187 5,942,026 4 25,833 200 6,942,919 

Creamery Butter .......... 333 12,233,700 6 95,515 361 24,624,036 

Packing Stock Butter...... 122 1,217,997 5 108,114 139 1,345,798 

Comparison of holdings of April 1, 1919, with those of April 1, 1918: 

Increase Increase 

Apr. 1,1918 Apr.1,1919 ordecrease or decrease 

Storages quantity quantity quantity per cent. 
ee 422 354,908 315,655 — 39,253 —11.1 
RE ak ddscadoe ess 186 8,872,133 5,941,526 — 2,930,607 — 33.0 
Creamery Butter ......... 327 14,628,544 12,226,929 — 2,401,615 -16.4 
Packing Stock Butter..... 114 1,270,876 1,206,034 — 64,842 — 5.1 





PHILADELPHIA 


THE NATIONAL AMMONIA COMPANY 
ST. LOUIS 


QUALITY 





SERVICE 
IN CYLINDERS, 50—100—150 LBS. SIZES 
Stocks Available in Principal Cities 


NEW YORK 


1890 














WAYNESS 


New York, N. Y. 


Pittsburgh, Pa. 
Dallas, Texas 











BickGompam 
Philadelphia, Pa. 


St. Louis, Mo. 


HY not operate your 
Plant with the high- 
est efficiency and economy. 


Write us advising what 
you have been doing and 
what additions you have 
contemplated. 


Our Engineering corps 
will advise you impartially 
the best type of plant for 
you to install and what you 
will need-to reach the high- 
est efficiency and lowest 
costs. 


Baltimore, Md. 
Atlanta, Ga. 
Los Angeles, Cal. 








MEATS AND POULTRY IN STORAGE. 


A summary of cold storage holdings of 
frozen and cured meats on April 1, 1919, is 








given as followed by the U. S. Bureau of 
Markets: 
—Total Holdings 
April 1, 1919. 
No. of 
Storages 
Reporting. Pounds. 
Sere reer 362 218, $90,871 
Cured beef ....cccscccccccccsces 358 30,620,692 
Te ee eee 223 6,424,712 
eae err 3549 141,703,327 
A ae 467 422,185,369 
3 ee 535 424,316,460 
eT eee 7 110,836,260 
PN. so dic cincetecesecesis 408 124,387,944 
——Comparison of Holdings——, 
No. of April 1, April 1, 
Storages 1918. 1919. 
Reporting. Pounds. Pounds. 
a. a Sere 340 245,318,786 212.073,757 
| ee 347 = 33,279,152 28 
Lamb and mutton..... 201 5, 6,148,116 
PVOGeR BOCK .cccccess 332 111, 135,877,931 
Dry salt pork.......... 452 443,29 417,283,287 
PROMISE Pew 2. cccccce 518 396,908,134 420,444,534 
eee 543 88,409,433 109,400,224 
Miscellaneous 232 3=668,955.399 83.034,407 


A summary of cold storage holdings of 
frozen poultry on April 1, 1919, is as follows: 


Reported for April 1, 1919. Reported for March 1, 
1939. 


Storages Storages 
Commodity Reporting. Pounds. Reporting. Pounds. 
Broilers ..... 202 12,068,629 211 14,537,060 
Roasters ..... 213 27,222,016 221 30,447,154 
EE 225 23,513,602 232 28,148,770 
oe 234 8,627,387 243 10,105,284 
Miscellaneous.. 264 21,158,679 272 26,765,114 


A comparison of holdings of poultry with 
those of previous year is as follows: 


Comparison of Holdings. 





April 1 April 1, 
Storages 1918, 1919. 
Commodity Reporting. Pounds. Pounds. 
Se eet 186 4,731,324 11,870,723 
ere 195 =: 11,724,021 
SE a6 winnivn oben dead 20s $,419,207 
EL Cirtaictin dates es | 8,506,205 &, 
Miscellancous ........ 245 $,912,601 20, 
—— —— 


CINCINNATI ABATTOIR EXPANSION. 

Growth of both its domestic and foreign 
trade has compelled the Cincinnati Abattoir 
Company to arrange for additional financing 
to keep this business moving, and Eastern 
bankers have taken $1,000,000 of the com- 
pany’s 7 per cent. sinking fund gold notes, 
the money to be used in expanding the com- 
pany’s facilities and extending its business. 
During the war the company filled very large 
orders for allied governments, and is still 
continuing this export business on a large 
scale, as well as extending its distributive 
facilities in this country. The president of 
the company is Joseph Ryan of Cincinnati, 
and the chairman of the board is the first 
president of the American Meat Packers’ 
Association, General Michael Ryan. 

——— ee 

SOUTH DAKOTA PACKING PLANT. 

The Dakotah Packing Company of Rapid 
City, S. D., has completed plans for the eree- 
tion of a half-million-dollar packing plant in 
that city, which is in a locality considered 
The 
plant will be erected on the unit system, 
capable of indefinite enlargement. At the 
start the capacity will be 50.000 cattle and 
The stock of the 
company is owned by livestock men of that 
section. John L. Burke is president and 
R. E. Plumb, a well-known packinghouse ex- 


very favorable to packing operations. 


150,000 hogs per annum. 


ecutive of Chicago, is to be sales manager. 
Stockyards for the plant are already under 
way. 

















April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


33 








PURITY IS ESSENTIAL IN AMMONIA 


For Refrigerating and Ice Making. 
profits of your plant so surely as Ammonia laden with organic impurities. 


BOWER BRAND ANHYDROUS AMMONIA 


is made from pure Aqua Ammonia of our own production, thor- 
oughly refined and purified. Send for Free Book and Calendar. 


Henry Bower Chemical Manufacturing Co., *"pHifaDELpHia, PA. 


Because nothing will reduce the 





Atlanta—M. & M. Warehouse Co. 
Baltimore—Wernig Moving, Oe & Stor- 
age Co., 100 W. Lombar 
Boston—G. W. Goerner, 40 Le St. 
Buffalo—Hellriegel Scale & Supply Co.; 
stone Warehouse Co. 
Cincinnati—Pan Handle Storage .Warehouse. 
Cleveland—General Cartage Storage Co. 
ee Truck & Storage Co.; New- 
man Inc., 1147 Cass Ave. 
anaes Atlantic Commercial Co., 
Suc ccssors to Lindner & Hartman. 


Key- 


SPECIFY BOWER BRAND ANHYDROUS AMMONIA which can be obtained from the jollowing: 


Jacksonville—St. Elmo W. Acosta. 
Liverpool—Peter R. McQuie & Son. 
Mexico, D. F.—Ernst O. Heinsdorf. 
Newark—American Oil & Supply Co. 
New Orleans—United Warehouse Co., 
C. Ben Thompson, 633 North S 
New York City—Roessler & Hasslacher Chem- 
ical Co., 100 William St. 
Norfolk — Henry Bower Chemical Mfg. Co. 
Agency, First and Front Sts. 


Ltd. 


Philadelphia—Henry Bower Chemical Mfg. Co. 
Pittsburgh — Pennsylvania Transfer Co. 
Duquesne Freight Station; Pennsylvania 
Brewers Supply Co., Union Arcade Bldg. 
Providence—Rhode Island Warehouse Co.; 
Edwin Knowles. 
Richmond—Bowman Transfer & Storage Co. 
Rochester—Rochester Carting Co. 
Savannah—Benton Transfer Co. 
Toledo—Moreton Truck & Storage > 
Washington—Littlefield, Alvora & 














YORK MANUFACTURING COMPANY 


MECHANICAL REFRIGERATION 





MEANS 


Ice-Making and Refrigerat- 
ing Machinery Exclusively. 


FOR 


MEAT AND 
PRODUCE 
DEALERS 


Elimination of loss 
through trimming 

Uniform temperatures in 
refrigerators 

A Sanitary Market 
throughout 

Increased Profits! 


YORK, PA. 








EATING HORSEFLESH IN ITALY. 


The consumption of horseflesh in Milan, 


Italy, has greatly increased during the last 
few vears. In many eases horseflesh is now 
preferred to beef, as the latter has been of 


poor qi tali ty and very searce, 
1916-17 the 


slaughter 


During wholesale prices of 


horses for reached as high as 


$43.86 per cwt. However, during 1912, espe; 


cially the latter part of the year, the price 


fell, the average being $23.65 per cwt._ for 
English horses and $17.54 for Italian horses. 
Donkeys brought $8.77 per ewt. 

The reduction was due to a large supply 
being available through the termination of 
hostilities. Nevertheless. the maximum fixed 


retail price has not fallen in proportion to 
in the the con- 


from 48e. to 57e. per 


the decrease wholesale price, 


sumer paying pound 
for meat. 
flesh 


January, 


The number of shops selling horse- 
1917 to 132 in 

11,009 horses were 
16.203 in 1917, and 


from 45 in 
1919. In 1916, 
food: 


increased 


slaughtered for 
24,585 in 1918. 





FOR A 


Our Churns, 
Melters, 


Blenders, etc. 
are Standard in the 


For particulars write 


1375 W. Lake St. 





DOERING ae 


UNIFORM shel 


up-to-date Margarine Plant. 


C. DOERING & SON Inc. 






Chicago, Ill. 

















THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 




















Immediate Delivery 


REFRIGERATING EQUIPMENT 








BELT DRIVEN MACHINES 


8-TON WOLFE BELTED REFRIGERATING 
MACHINE (T.P.-372), ammonia _ condensers, 
receiver, trap and expansion pipe. 

10-TON REMINGTON, 4-cylinder refrigerating 
machine with complete high side equipment. 

7-TON VILTER BELTED REFRIGERATING 
MACHINE, 7x8. New, never used. 

10-TON VILTER BELTED REFRIGERATING 
MACHINE, 8x9. New, never used. 


10-TON YORK BELTED REFRIGERATING 
MACHINE, high speed enclosed crank case 
type twin compressor cylinders, 614x614. Com- 
plete compression side with double pipe con- 
densers, receiver and trap; brine coolers and 
brine tank, constituting a complete refrigerating 
plant, suitable for commissary purposes. 

18-TON REMINGTON CHAIN-DRIVEN 4-cylin- 
der refrigerating machine, atmospheric conden- 
sers, complete high side equipment. 

35-TON FRICK CHAIN-DRIVEN REFRIGER- 
ATING MACHINE, vertical compressors 1014x 
15, atmospheric condensers, complete high side. 

150-TON LINDE BELT DRIVEN HORIZON- 
TAL REFRIGERATING MACHINES with 225 
H.P., 3 phase, 60 cycle, 550 volt motors. Equip- 
ment represents a complete compression side 
with condensers, receivers, etc. 











STEAM DRIVEN MACHINES 


4-TON ARCTIC d. c. Troy engine. Double pipe 
condensers. 


20-TON DE LA VERGNE STEAM DRIVEN RE- 
FRIGERATING PLANT (T. P.-889) with dou- 
ble pipe condensers, complete compression side. 


5814-TON FRICK, 131!4x20x20, Corliss engine, at- 
mospheric condensers, trap and receiver. 


90-TON YORK, 14x21x20, Corliss engine, atmo- 
spheric condensers, trap and receiver. 


100-TON FRICK, 15x24, Corliss engine, double pipe 
condensers. 


200-TON WOLFE STEAM-DRIVEN REFRIG- 
ERATING MACHINE. We are prepared to 
quote this machine, arranged for belt drive, new 
outboard bearing and band wheel. 


THREE 250-TON YORK VERTICAL REFRIG- 
ERATING MACHINES d. c. York compound 
steam engine; complete high side equipment, in- 
cluding atmospheric condensers. 


300-TON DE LA VERGNE HORIZONTAL 
STEAM-DRIVEN REFRIGERATING MA- 
CHINE, cross compound engine. 


AMMONIA CONDENSERS 


First class condition. Cleaned, tested and painted before shipment. 


42-STANDS YORK ATMOSPHERIC CONDENSERS, 
flooded type, 12 pipes high, 20' long, made of 2" full 
weight black steel pipe, with headers and valves. 


156-STANDS FRICK ATMOSPHERIC CONDENSERS, 
24 pipes high, 20' iong, complete with stands, headers 


and valves. 


30-STANDS FRICK DOUBLE PIPE CONDENSERS, t4 
pipes high, 18' long, with headers and valves. 


We are prepared to make complete installations of refrigerating systems 
and ice-making plants for packing houses and the meat industry using part 
new and part used equipment. Our refrigerating engineers will be pleased 
to call on you and advance full information and advice. 





SEND FOR A COPY OF “THE ECONOMIST” LISTING REFRIGERATING MACHINES 
AND EQUIPMENT FROM DU PONT PLANTS AND NUMEROUS OTHER ITEMS. 


— 





WRITE 


WIRE 


PHONE 


TECHNICAL PRODUCTS COMPANY, Inc. 


Chicago, Ill. 
64 East Van Buren St. 


New York City 
501 Fifth Avenue 
Phone Murray Hill 6488 


St. Louis, Mo. 
Railway Exchange Bldg. 














April 19, 1919 























April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


ww 
on 


FOR PURCHASING DEPARTMENTS 


PACKERS’ STERILIZING EQUIPMENT. 

Upon the killing floors where government 
inspection plays an important part im the 
day’s work, sanitary conditions surrounding 
the operations of slaughtering and preparing 
the carcasses are absolutely essential, both 
as to the condemned parts of animals, as well 
as to those inspected and passed. It is here 
that the hands 
or instruments must have some quick, handy 


man who contaminates his 
and positive means of sterilizing them. 

An inexpensive device called a_ sterilizing 
lavatory, designed by and for the men who 
use them, and passed by the government in- 
spectors, is made by The Mechanical Manu- 
facturing Co., Chicago, for this purpose. It 
consists of a white-enameled basin mounted 
on a galvanized iron frame, with a deep pan 
on one side containing circulating hot water, 
used to sterilize knives, cleavers, saws, ete. 

These lavatories are also provided with a 
liquid soap tank, which is equipped with a 
foot-operated valve which permits the flow 
of only the necessary amount of soap to the 
operator’s hands, thus eliminating any waste, 
To those interested in this device the manu- 
facturers will be glad to furnish further 
particulars, prices, ete. 

‘7 


——_“e—— 


TWO NEW IOWA MEAT PLANTS. 

The plant of the Corn Belt Packing Co., 
Dubuque, Iowa, is practically completed, and 
will start operations about May 1. The ca- 
pacity of the plant is 2,000 hogs and 500 cat- 
A. B. McCue is president of the 
Gardner & Lindberg are architects 
and engineers. 


tle per day. 
company. 


Fred C. Sawyer, known to many readers 
of The National Provisioner, is making prog- 
ress with a new plant at the stockyards, 
The work will 
probably be finished by the end of April, and 
installation of machinery, piping, ete., has 
already been started. The name of the com- 
pany is the Midland Packing Co. 


Sioux City, Towa. concrete 


Gardner & 
Lindberg are architects and engineers. 
STIMPSON PLANT AT LOUISVILLE. 
The Stimpson Computing Scale Company 
has been organized at Louisville, Ky., with 
a capital stock of $350,000, and a plant is 
already being put in operation there for the 


manufacture of the well-known Stimpson 
computing scales and automatic weighing 


devices. Local capitalists are the officers 
and backers of the enterprise, and Walter 
F. Stimpson himself will be in charge of 
manufacturing. It is estimated that there 
are 150,000 Stimpson computing scales now 
in use throughout the country, and the new 
enterprise is expected to add largely to this 
number. 
— 

GOING ANYWHERE WITH FEDERAL. 

L. H. B. Farr, sealer of weights and meas- 
ures of Kern County, Cal., has driven a 114- 
ton Federal truck for over four vears, aver- 
aging 10,000 miles each year. In parts of 
his territory he has to make his own roads 
in getting in and out of stock 
he has to test heavy scales. 


ranches where 

One trip he 
makes through snow, starting at an elevation 
of approximately four thousand feet and 
climbing to the summit of an elevation of 
better than seven thousand feet 
miles travel. 


within nine 





YORK REFRIGERATING EQUIPMENT. 

Since their last report of March 3 the York 
Manufacturing Co., York, Pa., have made the 
following installations of refrigerating ma- 
chinery and equipment: 


United States Government, Department of 
Interior, Bureau of Mines, Washitigton, D, C.: 
two 20-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machines, together 
with a 290-ton condensing side, a one-ton 
absorption refrigerating plant complete, re- 
frigerating system and miscellaneous appa- 
ratus for the ammonia recovery plant at 
Chemical Plant No. 4, Saltville, Va. 

Wegner Machine Co., Buffalo, N. Y.: one 
75-ton vertical single-acting high speed en- 
closed type refrigerating machine, arranged 
for motor drive through Turbo-Gear, and con- 
densing side complete, also one 16-in. x 7 ft. 
vertical ammonia drier-cooler-purifier. This 
installation was made for the Handler Cream- 
ery Co., Baltimore, Md. 

I. N. Hagan Ice Cream Co., Uniontown, Pa.; 
one 50-ton vertical single-acting high speed 
enclosed type refrigerating machine, arranged 
for motor drive through Turbo-Gear, and con- 
densing side. 

Droge Elevator Company, Council Bluffs, 
lowa; a 50-ton absorption refrigerating ma- 
chine complete, including flooded double pipe 
countercurrent ammonia condensers, a 25-ton 
raw water freezing system and a 7%4-ton dis- 
tilled water freezing system. 

Sun Shipbuilding Co., Chester, Pa.; three 
60-ton horizontal double-acting CO, refrigerat- 
ing machines, each direct connected to a tan- 
dem compound steam engine, and condensing 
side, also a refrigerating system for ship’s 
cargo space. This installation was made on 
board the Steamship “Neponset.” 

Jax Iee & Cold Storage Co., Jacksonville, 
Fla.; a 30-ton flooded freezing system com- 
plete and miscellaneous material for making 
alterations to their plant. 

H. U. Neuman, York, Pa.; a 20-ton York 
improved raw water flooded freezing system 
complete. . 

Atlantic Hygienic Ice Co., Forrest Park 
Branch, Brooklyn, N. Y.; the necessary mate- 
rial and apparatus for changing their 240-ton 
freezing system to operate on the York im- 
proved raw water flooded system, and for 
changing their two 175-ton York Corliss en- 
gine driven machines to belt driven machines. 

G. B. Leecroix, butcher, Mellette, S. D.; a 
one-ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 
closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Joe Hartung, Prop. Sanitary Meat Market, 
Carrollton, Mo.; a 134-ton vertical single-act- 
ing belt driven enclosed type refrigerating 
machine and high pressure side complete. 

Yakima County Horticultural Union, fruit 
storage, Yakima. Wash.; one 17-ton vertical 
single-acting belt driven enclosed type refrig- 
erating machine and high pressure side com- 
plete. 

Fullenwider &, Son, butchers, Vancouver 
Wash.; one 2'4-ton vertical single-acting belt 
driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 
and high pressure side complete. 

H. J. Curtis. Houston, Tex.; one 2-ton ver- 
tical single-acting belt driven enclosed type 
refrigerating machine and high pressure side 
complete. This installation was made in the 
cold storage plant of the St. Joe Infirmary, 
Houston, Tex. 

Drexel Ice Cream Co., Chicago, Tll.; one 20- 
ton vertical single-acting belt driven enclosed 
type refrigerating machine and high pressure 
side complete. 

T. B. Baker Hotel Co., Honger Hotel, San 
Antonio, Tex.; one 8-ton vertical single-act- 
ing belt driven enclosed type refrigerating ma- 
chine and high pressure side complete, 

Farmers’ Union Produce Co., Ethan, 8. D.; 
one 5-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Commonwealth Public Service Co., Vian, 
Okla.; one 2-ton vertical single-acting belt 


driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 
and high pressure side complete. 

The Fleischmann Co., New Orleans, La.: 
one 2'%-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. This installation 
was made by the C. M. Robinson Co., of 
Cincinnati, Ohio. 


Marschall Dairy Laboratory, Madison, 
Wis.; one 4-ton vertical single-acting belt 
driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 


and high pressure side complete. 

The Fleischmann Company, Oklahoma 
City, Okla.; one 2%-ton vertical single-act- 
ing belt driven enclosed type refrigerating 
machine and high pressure side complete. 

J. M. Danziger, residence, Los Angeles, Cal.: 
one 4-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Corn Products Refining Co., cooling vege- 


table oils, Argo, Ill; one 6-ton vertical 
single-acting belt driven enclosed type re- 


frigerating machine and high pressure side 
complete. 

Standard Milk Co., Minneapolis, Minn.: 
one 10-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete, 

Krey Packing Company, St. Louis. Mo.; 
one 26-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 


Irwin Supply Co., supply store, Export, 
Pa.; one 2-ton vertical single-acting belt 
driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 


and high pressure side complete, 

The Max Glick Co., candy mannfacturers. 
Cleveland, Ohio; one 20-ton vertical single- 
acting belt driven enclosed type refrigerat- 
ing machine and high pressure side complete. 

Pearson Ice Co., ice cream hardening. Lau- 
rel, Miss.; one 6-ton vertical single-acting 
belt driven enclosed type refrigerating ma- 
chine and high pressure side complete. This 
installation was made by the Rantz Engi- 
neering & Machine Works, of New Orleans. 


Home Bottling Works, Memphis, Tenn.: 
one 6-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 


enclosed type refrigerating machine 
pressure side complete. 

Poteau Bottling & Ice Cream Co.. Poteau, 
Okla.; one 12-ton vertical single-acting belt 
driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 
and high pressure side complete. _ 

Climax Creamery Co., Shawnee, Okla.; one 
14-ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 
closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Peter Pantelakus, ice cream manufacturer, 
Wilkes-Barre, Pa.; one 4-ton vertical single- 
acting belt driven enclosed type refrigerating 
machine and high pressure side complete. 

Hildebrecht Ice Cream Co., Trenton, N. J.: 
one 20-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Carnegie Steel Co., Pittsburgh, Pa.; a half- 
ton vertical single-acting enclosed type re- 
frigerating machine, direct connected to a 
vertical enclosed type slide valve engine, and 
condensing side complete. This installation 
was made on board the towboat “W. H. 
Clingerman.” <A duplicate installation was 
made on board the towboat “Clarion.” 

Sanitary Iee & Cold Storage Co., Johns- 
town, Pa.; one 12-ton vertical single-acting 
belt driven enclosed type refrigerating ma- 
chine and high pressure side complete. 

F. J. Rafetto, Punxsutawney, Pa.; one 6- 
ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 
closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Esmond Dairy, Sandusky, Ohio: one 20- 
ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 
closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete, also 3 coils of atmos- 
pheric Baudelot coolers, each 20 ft. long, 
12 pipes high, made of 2-in. full weight pipe. 

Acheson Graphite Co., Tonawanda, N. Y.: 
one 2-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

(Continued on page 41.) 


and high 





THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


April 19, 1919 


Chicago Section 


July first we get back on the 2 cent post- 


age rate and—the H,O wagon. 
Board of Trade memberships are quoted 


at approximately $8,000 net to the buyer. 
Of course, 
Well, he 


few. 


everybody knows Fred Begg. 


was in the city this week—quite a 


There is nothing to indicate building mate- 
rial will be any cheaper, with the exception, 
possibly, of common brick. 

P. A. Jacobson, president of the Interstate 


Packing Co., Winona, Minn., is now an hon- 


orary—not ornery—member of the Cit of Chi, 
Now that the mayoralty election is over. 
Chicago is back in its abnormal state once 


more, for four years anyhow—if nothing hap- 


pens 

Swift & Company’s sales of beef in Chicago 
for the week ending Saturday, April 12, 1919, 
averaged as follows: Domestic beef, 21.61 
cents per pound. 
these Rooshans is like 


Try ing to pacify 


singling out one from a bunch of mad hornets 


and try to argue the point with it sensibly. 
Fine chance vou got! 
“We see no reason.” says Uptub, “why 


should 


Hay wood 


lawbreakers not be jailed or penned, 


be they Debs, 


Mooney or any other 
critter who runs wild.” 


\l Eberhart was hanging over the rail 
When Cownie came along and said: “Air ye 
sick, Al?” “Sick. hell!” said “[’m count- 


ing the water as it goes by!” 
Chicago packers agree to maintain wartime 
wage schedules until at least one year has 


expired after the signing of peace articles. 


First in war, first in peace, first in anything! 


Ek. W. Bromilow, the big, broad-gauge, 
genial general sales manager of the Conti- 


nental Can Co., is back on the job after an 
enjoyable two weeks’ at Excelsior 
Springs, Mo. 


vacation 


So far a call 
from Sir Tummas, but we live in ’opes. The 
finds more favor in Sir T’s 
eyes these days than does the bacon counter. 
Let’s yacht! 


we haven't been honored by 


old tea wagon 


The Chicago Board of Trade has been ac- 


cused of many things, but it took a New 
York food “expert” to discover that it was 


gambling in “short ribs of beef!” These “ex- 


perts’ seem to know a lot about the meat 
business! 


Provisions 
including Hon. 


The 
committee, 


American Co.’s 


is on 


Export 
Jim Cownie, 
its way to investigate trade possibilities in 
Yurrup. Latest ap- 
proached the captain, white as 
chalk, 
ship. 


wireless states Jim 


his face as 
and said: “Say, Cap; can ye stop the 
I'd much prefer to walk.” 

There are people in these yer United States 
declare the 
persuaded old Bill 
world’s war for 
fit. If so, 
Why 


men higher up? 


who financiers of our country 
Hohenzollern to start the 
his and their financial bene- 
better alibi does Bill want? 


Who are the 


what 


not cough ‘er up, Bill? 


The War Savings Society of Morris & Co. 
is the champion War Savings Society of the 
United States, according to a letter from W. 


Waid 


Loan 


Smith, of the 
Organization, U.S. 
part: “Ii 
that 
Societies in 


Savings 


War 


which 


Division, 
Treasury, 
says in gives me great pleasure 
War 


indus 


to state after an investigation of 
and 


trial institutions in practically every section 


Savings commercial 


of the country, I have come to the conclusion 


that the Morris & Co. society is not only 
the champion society for [linois, but when 
the involved is taken 
into consideration, your societies are undoubt- 
edly the the entire United 
States. While to the best of my knowledge, 
no official comparison has been made of so- 
cieties throughout the country, I feel quite 
confident that if the Treasury Department 
should undertake to determine which was the 


number of employes 


champions of 


largest, most efficient and enthusiastic so- 
ciety, the decision would go to your organi- 


zation. The work which you have been doing 
was not only of benefit to your employes and 
to the Treasury Department, but will be of 
great benefit in the future work of the Sav- 
ings Division.” 


Plans are being made by Armour & Com- 
pany for the renewal of the medical examin- 
ations of 12,900 men and women working in 
the Chicago plant of the company. This 
means of safeguarding the health and safety 
of the Armour workers is not new, but was 
discontinued during the war because of the 
urgency of orders placed to keep the fighting 
forces supplied with food and the enormous 
amount of extra labor needed. Dr. Volney 
S. Cheney, chief surgeon, and his corps of 
assistants, will have charge of the task. 
Every worker in the plant will be examined 
free of charge. The value of visiting a 
doctor at least once a year, for a medical ex- 
amination, to discover any defects in health 
which may be easily corrected by treatment, 
is recognized generally by persons of means 
who visit their doctors regularly, so that 
they may know in just what state of health 
they are. Armour & Company through their 
welfare bureau and their staff of doctors 
offer this service free to their many work- 
ers, and in ease defects which have inter- 
fered with a man’s work are brought to 
light, the man or woman will be transferred 
to some other task in the plant which, in the 
opinion of the medical men, they are better 
able to perform. 





H. P. Henschien R. J. McLaren 


HENSCHIEN & McLAREN 
Architects 
Old Colony Bldg. Chicago, Ill. 


PACKING PLANTS AND COLD STORAGE 
CONSTRUCTION. 





LINDBERG 
* GARDNER & LINDBERG 
ENGINEERS 
Mechanical, Electrical, Architectural 
SPECIALTIES: Packing Plants, Cold Storage, 
Manufacturing Plants, Power Instal- 
lations, Investigations 
1134 Marquette Bidg. CHICAGO 











THE STADLER ENGINEERING CO. 
ARCHITECTS AND ENGINEERS 


Specialties: 
PACKING HOUSES, fy peer Sr 
REDUCTION PLANTS an 
STORAGE WAREHOUSES. > 


327 So. La Salle St. Chicago, Ill. 








Manhattan Building, Chicago, Ill. 


PACKERS ARCHITECTURAL & ENGINEERING CO. 


WILLIAM H. KNEHANS, Chief Engineer 


ABATTOIR PACKING AND COLD STORAGE PLANTS 


Cable Address, Pacapco 








MUST BE 





“AND YOU CAN’T BEAT CORK!” 


OUR BOOKLET WILL INTEREST YOU. 


THE UNION INSULATING CO. Great Northern Building CHICAGO 


INSULATION 


GOoOoD 


SATISFACTORY RESULTS 
THAS A FACK—BRACK an MACK 


WRITE US 


TO OBTAIN 

















April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 





ANHYDROUS SUPREME AMMONIA 


“EVERY OUNCE ENERGIZES” 


N H3 


Used by most of the leading packers throughout the 


United States. 


SUPREME means pure, dry, highest quality anhydrous 


ammonia. 


Less power and less coal =less expense. 


Better refrigeration and more satisfaction = greater 


efficiency. 





Chicago, Union Stock Yards 








Established 1877 
W. G. PRESS & CO. 


175 W. Jackson Blv’d, Chicago 


PORK, LARD, SHORTRIBS 
For Future Deliver 


GRAIN Correspondence Solicited STOCKS 





Thomson & Taylor Spice Company 
Recleaned Whole and Ground 
Spices for Meat Packers 


CHICAGO ILLINOIS 








John Agar Co. 
Union Stock Yards CHICAGO, ILL. 


Packers and Commission 
Slaughterers 


Beef, Pork and Mutton 


Members of the American Meat 
Packers’ Association 

















CHICAGO PACKING 
COMPANY 


Beef and Pork Packers 


Boneless Beef Cuts 
Sausage Materials 


Commission Slaughterers 
U. S. GOVERNMENT INSPECTION 
Correspondence Solicited 


UNION STOCK YARDS 
CHICAGO 








BONE ~~ 





WILLIAMS 


Williams Bone Crushers and Grinders are not alone suitable for grind- 
ing bone for fertilizer purposes, they are also suitable for crushing bone 
for glue and case hardening purposes. Every packer having to dispose 
of his bone whether Green, Raw, or Junk and Steamed bone, will do 
well to get in touch with Williams. 

Williams machines are also suitable for Tankage, Cracklings, Beef 
Scrap, Oyster and Clam Shells, and any other material ae around the 
packing plant requiring crushing or grinding. 


Send for catalog No. 9 


THE WILLIAMS PAT. CRUSHER & PULVERIZER CO. 


General Sales Dept., Old Colony Bldg. 
Works: 


ST. LOUIS CHICAGO 67 Second St. 


SAN FRANCISCO 














Watch Our “Want and for Sale” Page for Business Chances 

















38 


CHICAGO LIVE STOCK 





RECEIPTS. 

— Calves. Hogs. 
Monday, April 7...... ot 2,335 41,684 
Tuesday, April &. iL 455 8,290 27,589 


Wednesday April 9. 6,687 1,460 16,459 
Thursday, April 10... 8,875 8,026 31,974 











Friday, April 11...... 1,876 S94 17,520 
Saturdays April 12... 796 134 4.909 
Total Jast week... 28 21,139 140,135 
Previous week «ofl 38 140,869 
Year ago erepeee 69. S17 208 538 
Two years ago........54,197 116,516 
SHIPMENTS, 
Mondsy, April 7 18 
Tuesday, April 8..... 2 72 
Wednesday, April 9. + 7 
Thursday April 10... 2 2 
Friday, April 11.. 2 





Saturday, April 12.... 


Total last week.. 
Previous week 
BONO BOP. 0006664 
Two years ago 





TOTAL RECEIPTS FOR YEAR TO APRIL 


1919. 
Cattle peewee aaa sithvens 931,140 
Are ae ee 3,000,003 2 
OG. sccvecdedsoteeagavnseredes 1,073,875 


Combined receipts of bogs at eleven points: 
This week ° 
Trevious week 
Cor, week, 1018 
Cor. week, 1917 
Cor. week, 1916 
Cor. week, 1015 . eee 
Cor. week, 1914 ..... 

















15.040 

12 

1918. 
973,907 


-991,494 


899,428 


922,000 
551,000 
670,000 
422,000 
479,000 
392,000 


000 
Total year to date ‘ eeeaenen 72,000 
i ee ee 10,583,000 
Same period, 1917 Pita re-eolgpioe horde 9,304,000 
Same period, 1916 .. ° tes veces . 2.980.000 
Same period, 1915 ‘ ‘ sree webb bdeRie ahs 9,087,000 
Same period, 1014 wa es Sartre o 7,258 000 
Combined receipts at seven points for week ending 
April lz, 191%, with comparisons: 
Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. 
This week : .. 171,000 421,000 156,000 
Previous week ‘ 176,000 454,000 159,000 
11s — 211,000 143,000 
W117 . é . 165,000 175.000 
1016 “ .. 128.000: ‘ 177,000 
1915 . 115,000 316,000 169,000 


TOTALS FOR YEAR WITH COMPARISONS, 


Cattle. wows. 
2 T6000 ¢ 
5,046,000 3.658. 088 





1917 2.460.000 7,918,000 2, 
116 2,110,000 8.516.000 2, 
W1h 1,774,000 6.888.000 2 


Sheep. 
“ 





12,000 
42.000 
SO1.000 


SSD 000 


CHICAGO PACKERS’ HOG SLAUGHTER. 


Armour & Co 
Angle- American 





Wils nk Co, 
Boyd-Lunham 

Western Lacking Co 
Roberts & Onake 

Mitteor & Bact ..ccccses 


Independent Packing Co 

Bren in Packing Co, 

NE o's a atarbecn aceekes Cr ensinds cena’ 
Totals 

Previous week 

Year ase 






WEEKLY AVERAGE PRICE OF LIVE 


Cattle. Hogs. Sheep. 
This week S15.50) $20.30 $14.00 
Previous week P 16.40) 19.90 14.25 
Cor. week, 1918 og: 14.85 17.50 a.75 
Cor. week, 1917 11.00 16.10 12.15 
Cor week, 1916... J 9.20 9.70 8.15 
Cor week 11s 7.05 Ta0 7.50 
Cor. week 1914.0 cece 8.00 8.75 O55 
Cor, week, 15.. , &.20 9.10 6.35 
Cor. week, 1912 7.60 7.96 5.70 


CATTLE. 
Choice to prime steers 
Good to medium steers 


20.700 
£600 
14,200 
&.s00 
9,600 
12,000 
G,S00 
6.7060 
5,000 
4.200 
7.200 
6,100 
15,500 
120,100 
122.100 
16.200 


STOCK. 


Lambs. 
$18.00 


18.75 


19.10 


aie $19.00 20.00 
whe ne 1§.00@19.00 











THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER April 19, 1919 


Medium to good steers ...........00005 15.00@18.25 CHICAGO RETAIL FRESH MEATS. 


lain to medium steers 













Yearlings, fair to choice ............... 13.00@ 18.50 (Corrected weekly by Pollack Bros., 41st and Halsted 
DOGEROES GRE TOOGNTH occ ccicciccccccesvcs §.90@14.25 Streets. 
Se SY WD iv gncccvéessusewe we 9.75@14.50 Beef, 
eee BP BO DOUNOON 66d dccedeccvesecse 9.00@15.00 - 
ale th WAGE OOM ooo). oh ciowucensce. 7.000 10.00 Native Rib Roast .........seesceesereeee-40 @50 
RN crn ei oe ee 5.25@ 6.25 Native Sirloin Steaks ........c.eeeeeeee+-40 @i0 
ie NC aE OOS ESS EE Sa 6.30@ 7.00 Native Porterhouse Steaks ..............-.50 @6O 
SS SCR es ae ee s.sousnee Native Pot Roasts .......cccccccseceseess30 @35 
Butcher bulls .............. eee 10.00@ 13.4 Rib Roasts from light cattle .............25 @30 
Wee COE soon, 5 bea boas oe cece 15.00@16. = Beet BteW .ncccsccccccesccovccccesccces -18 @2t 
a Boneless Corned. Briskets, Native..........28 @32 
HOGS. Corned Rumps, Native .......s-ceeeesees-20 @30 
Fair to choice light hogs.......... .. . .$19.90@20.40 Corned Ribs .......eces -20 @22 
Chohes WegRE BOTGRGTE ~occccccnccccccess 20.254 20.45 Corned Flanks .. -20 
Medium wt. butchers, . 20.30@ 20.55 Round Steaks 2... .ccsccceccccccvccccseees30 @38 
Heavy wt, butchers, 270-35 geet 20.35@20.60 Round Roasts ....ccsceccsecevessecscveeesed 35 
NE. WE on sccccsSweecceueatianee 20.104 20.35 Shoulder Roasts ..... eee eee eee @30 
SE RE 19.854 20.25  Shonlder Neck Bnd, Trimmed..............22 @2 
CEE. 0's src 4 0 aes eels aa «enue 19.40@ 19.90 
sO PD ale a Ca ward.diae Gedeat oss 16.504 19.00 Lamb. 
Stags (subject to 70 Ibs. dockage)...... 15.00@ 19.25 Hind Quarters, fancy ......eceeeeceeeees-38 @40 
Fore Quarters, fancy .......--esseeee++++-28 @B2 
SHEEP. Be TEE 6 vcccnccedcccccesscescese+esae. Ge 
a ae $18.50@19.50 DN 6t:bbddeddeeased eens Ohi bH6e6eNeSeReEe 20 @25 
TE DES RT ED 18.00@19.50 Chops, shoulder, ‘per las wees owners once @38 
ETE OE AP Pee ae 16.00@19.50 Chops, rib and loin per Ib. ery ere re .- 45 @50 
ONIN, oS rice: Cudaeaeedcocteaanns 14.5:0016,50 Chops, French, each .........seeeeeeeeeeee @is 
MD. sree seh edwustec uy nenebeeesed 16.00@ 17.75 
Wethers, good to choice ...............-. 13.00@ 16.75 enene 
| er errr 10.00@ 15.75 EOD <cccses Sige newenwe os sovtqedoetee 25 @28 
a ee 15.50@ 17.00 OF ER a ee @16 
Peer Shoulders ........ PREV ESECCSS CS CEO CORRES @25 


Bhowulder Gteaks ..ccccccccccccccscccevccccse 


@ 
CHICAGO PROVISION MARKETS 9 Find Quartets vccscs---ecsccessovececceee 3 GES 





Range of Prices. Rib and Loin Chops . SIRE RR DEIR Bot @35 
SATURDAY. APRIL 12. 1919. Shoulder Chops ........ ee 
Open. High, Low. Close. Pork. a 
PORK—(Per _ )— ee ee eee anseneuw iavvanee 33. @35 
ee $50.25 $50.50 $50.25 $50.45 SE EE "aaa «006s evcaimea meme erenaemet eae .35 @38 
a 47.00 $7.55 $7.00 t47.55 Pork Shoulders ......-cccccccssecccscccces @2 
LARD—(Per 100 Ibs.) — Pork Tenderloins .......... eeeeocccccecsedae Ge 
MRAP occciecce SO 30.00 29.75 29.97 Pork Butts .. oa 30 
28.70 28.92 28.70 28.90 BPOTO, TINS cccccccccccccccvccce 
. more than loose)— ED seeccwcvcvcesccoes 
} 27.85 25.00 27.85 27.97 Pigs’ Heads . 
PE wcccsions ee 25.82 25.70 425.82 RE AMEE 65 Ke scr coveueneneieacewoneeeas 


MONDAY, APRIL 14, 1919. 





















PORK—(Per pbl.)— _ Peg 

Be -cenceved 51.00 51.00 

~< ONOS 47.75 ae reeevesesenes 
LARD—Per 100 Ibs.)— Shoulders ... 

May ..eeeeeee 30,00 : 29.95 $30,957 IN Sie sient inca 4 0ceaie ae » 

FO ccsaseses Se 28.87 29.47 BD Ge ES GROG cccccccccccccsccscces de GS 
RIBS—(Boxed, 25c. more en loose) — 

Oar 23.00 27.90 2885 27.80  F28.85 Butchers’ Offal. 

Se” we cteebee 25.85 26.67 25.85 426.65 eee Co ececccccccccccccccceccoocccces @15 

phanneennee Sveanercenimde mews ns 4 
TUESDAY, APRIL 15, 1919. — Pa i , >} ies 

PORK—(Ver bbl.) Calfskins, 8 ry "15 Ibs. . iscofniee deters @40 

ME vatieesvxk 53.75 53.75 52.55 53.50 Calfskins, under 18 Ibs. (decrease). ee @7m 

Delle vc cccccess Qe 49.90 18.80 49.70 eee ovecee seenseses Coccccecoocece @28 
LARD—(Ver 100 lbs.)— 

BES ccccccses GO BOSS BOL4S 

ne alidienesed 29.60 29.60 PO O5 if POELS & BREWSTER, Inc. 
RIBS , re than loose)— 

Mats oc =a ee 28.85 Produce Exchange Bldg., New York 

PO i écccece Ee 27.00 26.35 $26.60 


Import Agents 
WEDNESDAY, APRIL 16, 1919. Hides, Skins, Pickled Pelts, 


LORK—(Ter bbl. )- ~ 























+ einai 52.50 $52.50 Wool, Tallow and Casings 
GO . wk Kanes 49.70 $49.25 
IL ARD—(Ver 100 Ibs.)— 
ae 30.50 30.75 30.25 $30.25 
July 29. 29.55 29.00 729.10 The Horn & Supply Co. 
RIBS— xed, 25c. more th: in loose)— i 
May 2 OS. S5 28.65 $28.65 Leominster, Mass. 
July 26.85 26.40 $26.40 Dealers in 
THURSDAY, APRIL 17. 1919. Horns, Hoofs, Horn Tips and Waste. 
PORK—(Per bbl.)— Manufacturers of 
“ies 15 52.70 52.15 52,55 Pressed Horn and Hoof. 
Oe 4s 30 48.75 48.00 48.75 
TARD—(Ver 100 Ibs.)— —e 
aa ae . 50.90 30.12 50.00 30.10 
ME 64-6 ss-006 28.90 29.10 28.82 29.02 
RIBS—( Boxed, 25e. more than loose)— Watch Page 48 
CE 50 28 65 28.50 28.65 


wee Wacustes 36.20 26.50 26.17 7 26.50 for 


FRIDAY, APRIL 18, 1919, e 
aia. 3s. icaiie. Business Chances 


*Bid. tAsked. 











| DRYERS AND CONTINUOUS PRESSES Economical—Efficient 


oe ae a i For Tankage, Blood, Bone, Fertilizer, all Animal and 





—Creat Capacity 


SAVING IN LABOR ALONE IN ONE YEAR WILL 
OFFSET COST TO INSTALL 


Vegetable Matter. Installed in the largest packing- 
houses, fertilizer and fish reduction plants in the 
world. Materia carried in stock for standard sizes. 


Send for Catalogue T. B. 


American Process Co. 


68 William St. . - New York 




















April 19, 1919 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


CHICAGO MARKET PRICES 


WHOLESALE FRESH MEATS. 















Carcass wont. 
Crime native steers ...ccccccssccccccece oee2t = @28 
Good native Stes occccccccccece ans --24 @25 
Native steers, medium ..........eeeseeeees 20 @22 
RNR, GO Snrnks cu ktesdatadseeoeucsaws 22 @24 
IN , ocinisw anhalt aie vacua aan amep ae beaceele 14 @22 
Mind Quarters, choice ..........ccesesccees @33 
Fore Quarters, Choice ..ccccccccccccvcccces @21 

Beef Cuts. 

Beef Tenderloins, No. 1............ cocccee @48 
Beef Tenderloins, No. 2 @45 
Steer Loins, No. 1 @50 
Steer Loins, No. 2...... @43 
Steer Short Loins, @69% 
Steer Short Loins, @60% 
Steer Loin Ends (hips).......cseccceeee —_ @32 
ee SA BE TG Be eswesccdcciecseses @30 
Cow Short Loins ....... 
Cow Loin Ends (hips) . 
Cow Leime wccccccce ° 
Sirloin Butts, No, 8 ...........+. cocccccecDO 
Se BO, BIE Mv avcccsercccscctecceee nae @20 
eee Be, HG. Liccccccccce peerawsaeeerene @40 
Se SE Dk. Bitsinrvinsecccccoscnceuesee @34 
We GE, SU aneescecveereuccesonesees @25 
Ce , S.  k:0:s:0e0ccececericceeseseo ues @22 
Gee Be. Bes @ ccccccccvcccesccscccccoss @17 
BP sccccceses Sercocecceseovore coences ° @27 
ge SS er err @25 
Gieer Reunda, Wa, B ..ccccccecocveccececes @24 
oe ers rere @18 
re re ere @30 
Bump Bete: ...ccccecece @Qigy 
Steer Chucks, No. @21 
Steer Chucks, No. 2 @20 
CO GGT cccccvccnccsscsscesescescosse @14% 
Boneless Chucks ..cccccccccccccccccccvoces @19 
CE FIGS cc eccetsviccccccccccacesecess @18% 
PEE UNO voc ce ccccesescenccencecss ene @it 
eee @20 
Briskets, No. 2 ....... @ij 
SROGIRSE CHRD  ccccctesersecccucccveceves @24 
SOE SONNES NOD n.00 cecccceveceseceeeseses aig% 
Se Se, SD vccdcaneqnesnciesweusetacs 13 @15% 
SEE 6.6-0.0.04:000 600000000 ¢0.c000e-e-eeae @10 
CD TEE. once cicctcccecescnscedeeess @ &% 
Hanging Tenderloins @20 
Trimmings ...ccccccccccceecccvcesecsccoccs @1i7 

Beef Product. 
ee OP UD, acciccacnavanwsesdaeweewaanios 914,@10% 
0 ee eee eee eer ne 8 @9 
PEREGO .cccccvecccescevcceeescacerccesone 19 @24 
BWEOCDTERAS co cccciccccccccscccccceoscecsece 31% @33 
ee I PP TRG inieweidid ves cncdnesdenecscees 7 @!1 
Fresh tripe, plain 
Fresh Tripe, H. C. 
eo 


Kidneys, per Ib. 














Fleavy Carcasm ...ccccccccccccccccccsccecs 

EAE CAPONED 2 cccccocccccveecsssceqececes 

Good CaPCASS .ccvcccccccvcecvceseccoccevee 

Good Saddles ..ccccccccccccccccccccccccces 

Medium Racks ..cccccccccccccccsccccccvcecs 

Goad BAERS cccvescccncicesecoccesvveseocs 

I, MEE | dry acaacanseeupneesecqne nae seees 9 @10% 
Sweetbreads .cccccccccccccccccccccccveces 33 @40 
Ce NO nc binswnwsodecceseewiravcecenc 32 @33 

Lamb. 
Medium Lambe occcccccccccccccccccccccccs @32 
Round Dressed Lambs.........ceeeseeeeees @33 
Baddles, MedlUM ..ccccccccccccccccccsccce @34 
R.. D. ERM FOB cc ccccccccccsecssvdcees @30 
Eamb Fores, MeGGMis..ccccccccvcceseceves @29 
R. D. Lamb ‘Saddles. ........cccccccccccces @35 
Lamb Fries, OP TD. ccccccccccccccccsccoees 19 @20 
CD DORN, GE ov0'60s:00660:05:6004806008 5% @4 
Lamb Kidneys, per Ib 2 
Mutton. 
rr ree rr @25 
NE SID al ircnikene<enaneeaemnaeonananem @27 
ee Me OC eee @26 
MN WN pieced cnebssededeuteseweseeas @30 
a er er er @22 
SEE TD ciccvvcccesecesvcevecesenss @20 
NE SE ha nice0s enews susan eeguenenounne @27 
BOE BAD ccccvcnvesesssccccsccessesees @30 
WN ID on ccnesaecavesqeenecoeneqaees @16 
Gheep TOMSUSS, CRON .ccvrccccvcvecccccceocee @a4 
CN SE, CI ec Netarkccwacnensevees 11%@12 
Fresh Pork, Etc. 

eNO ROE wns cade es sn renebarcss-aee (a 24 
PE CRIN: don 550'5 9) 0:0rdceces Sine ere pe Ce Hinieinl oleees 32% 
Pe ee rere rer ree @3l 
ID bain dnintx0s etenacewatsaeeeuneees @50 
I TE. “a: ccatin aie. o ewresitn 09Gb oe Gaubense at @20 
Butts @29 
Hocks @17 
Trimming @23 
Extra @28 
Tails @13 
Snouts @s8 
Pigs @ 6 
Pigs @l4 
Blade Rone s @9 
CRD na as aa tnletns duel ekeebmenee @16 
WE. HE vscsic-csscevcusseeensenoes oven @i4 
oe Be re 4@4% 
Neck Bones ....cccccccccccscccccccesescces @ 5% 
Skinned Shoulders ............ @25 
ROCK THOR occ cosavccvececce @ 9% 
Pork Kidneys, per Ib @ 8% 
Pork Tongues ..... @20 
Slip Bones ....... @9 
CO re @10 
DN ap. vveccunecassenneewnanuneoubenews 10 @10% 
OE 0.0.50 0s ben 0e 0s casden cevesseeeenes @28% 
OR. coche ie besWoncsen twos ween e @331 
CORD 6.0.0 00:0. 60.5:0:6. 46.00:0:00502nbecbendteeees @24 
WE  “Lcawateskwnedscanwenerseeravadeseta @A5 


SAUSAGE. 
Columbia Cloth Bologna .......cscsccccees @19% 
Bologna, large, long, round, in casings.... @18% 
EI, 00a accel babes sieeeueras @19 
PORES. cco ccvccccccceseccovecececeee @23 
Liver, With Geet and perk .nccscccccccvecs @19 
fF sk er @24 
Co a er ee @22 
New England Style Luncheon Sausage..... @23% 


Prepared Luncheon Sausage 
Special Compressed Sausage 














Liberty Luncheon Sausage 
GuberS TGRR BUGIS .cccvcscscccevessovcces 
Ee SD cechaccesercuceseseeenacees 
SR TD ccc ccccccccesseccecedeceses 
Country Smoked Sausage .......cccsccccecs 
eS ere 
Pork Sausage, bulk or link 
Pork Sawsage, Short MAE 2... cccccvcccceve 
Boneless lean butts in casings............ —@— 
BOE SOD. cnwedwonnevssesasesseeseese @23 
ET WINE S:6ic.we dcnivasucowbeeenaens @21 
POON GED wnceg ds ccanerequetnneetscdeess —@— 
Summer Sausage. 
Lr re —-@— 
ee ee ee @43% 
Italian salami (mew goods) ............... a46% 
BE AER EATS aE ne ay A @34% 
INN <5 25 sccturk- Gira and me peauinhwatie sa eed eee @36% 
EE ak bxic oes wien ace walmeremanea owen ces a40% 
CDH hcrkoakiieds chica tenninns @46% 
Sausage in Brine 
Pe. MNS 4 saa denwcenes meeweksls woes @i1 
Bologna, %s@\%s ..... ereecccevccece ee 8.20@11.20 
Posh, Tek, BS .nccccccocscese eoeeeceeee @ 
Pork, links, %s@s ...... <eveeeee eeeee 4.20@14.70 
Polish sausage, kits ............. cece @ 2. 
Polish sausage, %s@%s ....... Coe vocees 4.10@14.35 
Frankfurts, kits ..... Sedeeeeenwenee evece @ 2.380 
Frankfurts, 4e@Me ....... cc eeeees ---- 8.80@13.30 
ee een @ 1.65 
Blood sausage, Wwse@Whs..........eeeeeees 2.70@ 9.45 
Sm. a @ 1.80 
Liver sausage, Ys@Ms ........eeceeees 3.00@10.50 
Head cheese, re Seehieneereneeee eee @ 1.90 
Head cheese, %8@UYS ........ see eeeeeees . 10@10.85 
VINEGAR PICKLED GOODS. 
Pickled Pigs’ Feet, in 337-lb. barrels.......... $15.50 
Pickled Plain Tripe, in 200-Ib. barrels........-. 15.60 
Pickled H. C. Tripe, in 200-lb. barrels.......... 17.00 
Pickled Ox Lips, in 200-Ib. barrels...... boats _ 
Pickled Pork Snouts, in 200-Ib. barrels......... — 
Sheep Tongues, short cut, barrels.............. 70.50 
CANNED MEATS. Per doz 
Corned and roast beef, No. %.........00-0005: _ 
Coomed Gud Temet Beet, TR. Tac csccecscscccccess 4.60 
Corned and ronst beef, Ne. B...cccccccccccsecs 8.75 
Corned and roast beef, No. 6..........ee0e-e0: 34.50 
Sy Ge I SS Wii occ ceric ciniescceseeess -- 
oo ee er errr - 
Hamburger steak and onions, No. %.........++ 2.00 
Hamburger steak and onions, No, 1............ 3.85 
Vienna Sausage, No. ae = 
Vienna a a See eee ee oa 
XTRACT OF BEEF. Per doz. 
2-oz. jars, 1 = ISIS Ree erete $3.50 
4-oz, Jars, 1 dow, Im CaSe.......eeeeeeee evececce 6.75 
R-om. Jara, GY Gem. TW GRE... cccccccccccevceces 12.00 
16-08. jars, % GOS. I CRSB.. ccccccccccscecccses 21.00 
LARRELLED BEEF AND PORK. 
Extra Plate Beef, 200-Ib. barrels......... @45.50 
iy. a. Meer ere eT errr Tere rr errr eer @44.50 
Pete WON TSE oc cise cewrccsscceesesseves @42.00 
| MRT TEEPE T CTE LEE eT @41.00 
Beef Hams (220 Ibs, to bbl.)...........-. —-@— 
DD BOO cccccsccccccvcccesescseseces @42.00 
Meee Por .ccccce. @51.00 
Cher PRE TRACES 2 occ sccccccccccceseescees @57.00 
Family Back Pork —@— 
SP ee ere @46.00 
Pure lard, kettle rendered, per Ib. tes.... @33% 
er ret eT @32% 
Lard, substitute, tes... .cevccccccccccccces @24% 
Lard COMpPOURER ..nccccccccccccccccceseces @24% 
Cooking ofl, per gal., in barrels........... @22% 
Cooks’ and bakers’ shortening tubs........ @32% 
Barrels, %ec. over tierces, half barrels, 4c. over 
tierces; tubs and pails, 10 to &0 lbs., 4c. to 1c, over 
tierces, 
BUTTERINE. 
1 to 6, natural color, solids, f. 0, b. Pi 
GOOD sv vcccdeccescceseceecceseececeseeees 28% @30 
Cartons, rolls or prints, 1 Ib..........-+6. @33 
Cartons, rolls or prints, 2@5 lbs..... news @32% 
Shortenings. 30@60 Ib. a bikaeneeeeseeseie @24 
Nut margarine, prints, 1 Ib............... @28 
DRY SALT MEATS. 
(Boxed. Loose are \c. less.) 
Clear Bellies, 14@16 avg.....cccccrcccess 
Clear Bellies, 18@20 avg.........-seeeeeee 
Rib Bellies, 2O@2S avg... ...ccccccccccvee 
Put Tees, Bee BOG s cscs ccevecccuseves 
Fat Backs, 12@14 av@.......cccccccseees 
Wet De, DEO BOR i occ tesiwocwecsss 
Extra Short Clears .....ccccccccvccccece 
Bimtrn: Bent Tio sccisccevicvenscudes 
ee eee er eee ee 
WHOLESALE SMOKED MEATS. 
etl TS. 660 6d wig oh han cceeesedsneewee @37% 
eRe. ee oes nh eewwiawevceednscunes 27% 
Catan, GE. Bets Gi Glee vn00008.0ve ener 000s @25% 
New York Shoulders, 8@12 Ibs., avg....... @29% 
Breakfast Bacon, fancy ......-.eeeeereeees @50% 
SS a See renee rower @41% 
Wide, 12@14 avg., and strip, 6@7 avg.... @37% 
Wide. 5@6 avg., and strip, 3@4 avg...... @40% 
Rib Bacon, wide. £@12 avg., and strip, 4@6 
Se | cx. cemeansaeueveteeretleeseekah~see @36 
Dried Beef Insides @13% 
Dried Beef Knuckles @41% 





Dried Beef Outsides 


@40% 












oe errr eee ee asl 
ke ee eo aw 
Boiled Calas ..... Paani Ss 6416-0 eo bieieeeis @35 
A ee EE ake snn a sicgeeenencewe nes a49 
Cooked Rolled Shoulder ..........-eesseee+ @35 
SAUSAGE CASINGS. 
F. 0. B. CHICAGO. 

Beef rounds, per set .ccccccccccccccecece @i4 
DUCE GEROTE Bic ccctcvenccovceveeves @20 
Beef middles, per set ....cccccccccccccecs @39 
Beef bungs, per piece... ° @16 
Beef weasands ......... : @ 8% 
Beef bladders, medium ....... eocceccces ° @o60 
Beef bladders, small, per doz. pbcceee eswinw @gxs 
Hog casings, free of salt, regular ....... @1.40 
Hog casings, f. 0. s., extra narrow ...... @1.60 
Hog middles, per set a2 
Hog bungs export ....... @21 
Hog bungs, large ...... @15 
Hog bungs, medium ............- @\\ 
Ela UWURRR,. BETTOW ccvcccevcecccce @ 7 
Hog stomachs, per piece ....... ebesecees @10 
Imported wide sheep casings ............ ® 
Imported medium wide sheep casings .... ° 

. 


Imported medium sheep casings ......... 





*Owing to unsettled war conditions 


réllable sheep 
easing quotations cannot be given. 








FERTILIZERS. 

bliss nn ee eee 4.90@ 5.05 
eile oe err 3.90@ 4.00 
Concentrated tankage, ground ........... 4.25@ 4.50 
Geom CRRATE, BIG. vic sivcvons scccess 4.600 4.70 
Ground tankage, 9 and 20%...........+. 4.204 4.30 
Crushed tankage, 9-and 20%............. 3.50@ 4.25 
Ground tankage, 6% and 30%...........5 82.004 33.00 
Ground raw bone, per ton.............6. 34.00@35. 

Ground steambone, per ton.............. 26.00@30.00 

HORNS, HOOFS AND BONES. 

COG, Fees. Be RP BIE) oncesececensweneen 200.00@210.00 
ee. SE HE Seivcinescucckcenned 40.00@50.00 
Heofe, etriped, per tOR .cccsccccccecees 40.00@50.00 
Iloofs, white, per ton 80.00@ 85.00 
Flat shin bones, 40 Ibs. av. per ton .... 65.00@ 70.00 


Round shin bones, 38-40 lbs., av. per ton 65.00@70.00 
Yound shin bones, 50-52 Ibs., av. per ton 80.00@ 85.00 
Long thigh bones, 90-95 Ibs., av. per ton 150.00@160.00 











Skulls, jaws and knuckles, per ton . 25.00@ 30.00 
LARD. 
Pree: UCR: CER 4.45-insoig ends 4x a0, 45 
gy ee. eee eee reer 2 : 
TOONS, (a. Adaatia 4 WN Re ibeeele see a ues 
WRN. bi sic cpu bag ch caieiahe-cveeeucwee 22.5 23. 
OGD GEOE  6.s4 dtcoeeues 089 40 31.50@: 31.7 75 
' STEARINES. 
NE: ARES | ara ec Gten ts Ria sb a ae ss oh ea oat 27 @27% 
MN cis ge -4 cg Cann ib eeiew eee aeos a 3 al 
re ne ere ee Ww aio} 
Grohee, A. WHE, LOCOS n66o6ciscccdccecses 124%4a12% 
OILS. 
Oleo oil, extra sttteeceeesereseeeeeeeress sao a2, 
OU QE... Bs IN iss ke eae a eRe eenwes @2s\ 
i og A ing Ee PO CERT TEEPE: 
Linseed, Toome, Pet Gals. .0.6sscevsavs ‘ fa 1.54 
a eS, ene WZ «aij! 
Soya bean oil, seller tank, f. 0. b. coast.... @12'2 
TALLOWS. 
oc res oof a bs Ts Ga er .20 @20% 
tN IIE a erica chile /nigns hic 6 seule 18441314 
COE MS FIN ii oie ices ecienincwed 12,4138 
ene nee, ae NI ong eas ereteak ste Oe a owsle 12 @12%4 
PeCeEe Os. Docc came habe keine sree tens 9 @ 9% 
GREASES. 
es CEN vc oeaicas ecmnneadossseneeben 124% @12% 
a, fe. ere ee ree 11% @12 
White ——" Sas Ssa ascetic cgrhte bin wraleawieaaatecontaed 1014,410% 
Bone, naphtha extracted........ccccccccees 6 @ 6% 
REE ~ a isapen dues eoraesiene sae eee 10 @10% 
DE OsUlnies aptwaesamateawhinbkawb aaa. R1,@ 8% 
WE, Sa cuwnsackkaivin sanseweepiceenennn 9% @10%4 
IN i ioc alight at allen garal we catalina aria tave eee ve ate 84,@ 8% 
Pigs’ foot grease @20 


Garbage grease, 


5 @5% 
Glycerine, C. P, 


. 16 @16% 
@14 





Seen, - GIN bp wan awceuieedkamuuawnle 

Glycerine, CrUGe GOAP.....cccccccccccccece ™@ 8 

Giycerine, Came 66 isis sisin cc ciccsecsens nom. @9o 
COTTONSEED OILS. 

P. B Dix: BR TN naw cnnwcanenaasoses 19% @20 

P. S. Y.. soap grade, f. o. b. Texas, nom....19 @19% 

Soap stock, bbls., concen. a f.o.b. Tex. 4%@ 5 





Sopp stock, loose, reg., 00% . a, Chgo.... 1%@ 2 
COOPEKAGE. 
Ash pork barrels, black iron hoops........ 1.60@1.65 
Gak pork barrels, black iron hoops......... 1.70@1.75 
Ash pork barrels, galv. iron hoops......... 1.80@1. 85 
ee 2S 8 err Perr rr re T5@ 2.80 
Te COR BIE GE a. wade wes dweisacue 2.854 2.90 
White: COM Titi GOON oc nk s.scsikecac<cewse 3.40 
Prices f. 0. b. Chicago. 
CURING MATERIALS. 
Renfined saltpetre, granulated, bbls. ...... a2 
Refined saltpetre, crystals, bbls. .......... @27T% 
Double refined nitrate of soda, gran., f.0.b. 
9586600400200 000e-e00 ion @ 6% 
Double refined nitrate of soda, crystals..... @T™% 
Boric acid, crystals to powdered...... wees. 18% @15 
Borax, crystals to powdered...... seeccceeee THE BH 
Sugar— 
White, clarified ........... coccccccee @ 8.85 
Yellow, clarified ...........00. eeeeee eee @ 8.70 
Plantation, granulated .........sseeeees @ 8.90 
F. o. b. New Orleans. Less ‘2 per cent. 
Salt— 
Aebton, te Geeks, THE WB. ccscccccccscsecce: 
Ashton, car lots, per sack................. 
English packing, T. H. & Co., car lots. per 
MT Pe ie ee eer eee ee 


English packing, Cheshire, car lots. fer anck _ 
English packing, pure dried, waen m per eack -~ 


English packing, — ground alum, per 
GREK co ccce ere ce eee secccersescescsccecs 
Michigan, granulated, car lots, per tom........+. 8.35 
Michigan, medium car lots, per tom............-. 9.88 


-——- Prices f. o bd. Chicago. 
*Stocks exhausted. 





40 





And every effort is made to please and 
the Prompt delivery is 
The 
old-timer would scarcely recognize the mar- 


satisfy customer. 


considered a necessity and not a favor. 


ket as it is today, compared with his con- 
ception of what a meat shop was in his 
day, the 
kerosene lamps or fly-specked gas pipes, the 


with the dirty wooden counters, 
sand on the floor, and the brown sheets ot 
straw paper. 

Not alone the butcher, but almost every 
trade, has felt the uplifting effect of the 
effort to make their places of business more 
attractive and orderly. 
ago all kinds of 


counters and 


In shoe stores years 
goods were displayed on 
Much of it 


shop worn and dust covered, so that it be- 


shelves. became 
came necessary every little while to place 
this stock on a bargain counter at greatly 
reduced prices, in order to get rid of it. 
ut 
today and look around. 


store 
Not a shoe in sight. 
The walls are all shelves, and there is row 


go into an shoe 


up-to-date 


after row of neat boxes, each containing 
a pair of shoes, properly labeled as to quality, 
size, style, ete., so that any kind that is 
wanted can be found instantly, and every 
pair clean and bright, and no necessity for 
bargain sales. 

Drug stores have been brightened up and 
share in the general change for the better. 
They do not look or smell like the old fash- 
ioned pill shop. Glass top or marble tables 
show the goods to much better advantage 
than the old-fashioned 


attractive showcases hold such a vast 


wooden counter, and 
vari- 
ety of goods that today an up-to-date drug 
store is more like a department store. 

The modern plumber is a far different man 
than he 


was 20 years ago. His shop has 
been made neat and attractive. And now, 


instead of a mass of dirty junk scattered 
about, will be found a _ neat room 
showing bath luxuries and all the newest, 


sales 


best and most modern and useful appliances 
of his trade. 

While these trades have nothing to do with 
the butcher shop, it goes to show that clean- 
liness, order and system are absolutely neces- 
sary for a business to grow and prosper, be- 
that 
dry rot, as it were, 


cause a_ business remains stationary 


is going backward 

While every shopkeeper cannot have the 
finest up-to-date fixtures and the most ap 
proved appliances, he can have his shop neat, 
orderly, and brightly attractive. 
And in doing so, there is no doubt that his 
business will gradually grow and prosper, be- 


sanitary 


cause, if he is a good enough business man to 
conduct his business along these lines, he is 
also wise enough to be affable and prompt 
when attending to his customers’ wants. 

He will be a careful buyer. 
how to He 
displays, 


He will know 


advertise. know 


will how to 


make window keep a_ brightly- 


(Coneluded from last 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


Retail Section 


PRACTICAL TALKS WITH SHOP BUTCHERS 
Some Reasons Why Meat Retailers Must Be Up-to-Date 


By a Veteran Butcher. 


Ww eek. ) 


He 


He wiil know how to figure 


lighted store. will know whom to ex- 
tend credit to. 
“overhead” and percentage of profit, that he 
must if he 

And by no means last or least, he 


have the ability to 


have wants to succeed. 
must 
the loyalty 


These cannot 


command 
and respect of his employees. 
be purchased, and mean much, because the 
man who is hated and feared by his help is 
working under an extremely difficult handi- 
cap, which means constant vigilance. One 
dishonest or careless man in a shop can do 
untold harm. 

So besides being a good business man, a 
butcher must also be a good diplomat, a 
fair judge of human nature, and a courteous 
gentleman besides. The “rough neck” meth- 
ods of 25 years ago are obsolete. 

In those days he who could talk the most 
and cuss the loudest was considered the 
best é 


most 


buyer. Today his buying can be al- 
The branch 
house managers and other wholesalers know 
their 


all done by telephone. 


customers’ wants, and try to attend 


to them as conscientiously as possible, be- 
cause it pays them to do so. It 
tinued that’s 


means con- 


patronage, and what every- 


hody is in business for. 

This being the case, the vutcher can spend 
all of his time in his shop, where he belongs. 
Almost every customer likes to see the boss 


around. It is a well-known fact that the 
man who is on the job is the prosperous man 
in the end, particularly so in the retail 


butcher business, where all kinds of pieces of 
meat are scattered around so abundantly 
that their real value is lost in the eyes of 
the journeyman, notwithstanding their enor- 
mous cost. 

Employees become careless in their cutting 
if the is not 
liberally at times. 


boss around. They trim too 
Too much suet and bones 
are apt to be given away to favorite cus- 
tomers who have the tipping habit. 

So for these and many other reasons that 
every butcher knows, it pays immensely to 
be “on the job.” L. A. 


2, 
—— ~—_— — 


LOCAL AND PERSONAL. 


Matthew Chupas, a meat 
sonia, Conn., is bankrupt. 
Everett F. McMurray will establish a meat 
stall at the City Market. Des Moines, Towa. 
Nicholas Sorino will move his meat market 
in Plainfield, N. J., to the northwest corner 
of West Fourth street and Spooner avenue. 
Joseph Bombaci has purchased the meat 
business of C. L. Jones at Centerbrook, Conn. 


dealer at An- 


It is reported that Mr. Jones will open a 
meat market at 459 Main street, Williman- 
tie, Conn. 

The new Mellett store in Hazleton. Pa.. 


on South Wyoming street, has been opened. 
W. C. Davey is manager. 
Henry Weyer, who has conducted a gro- 


cery and meat market at the corner of Park 
avenue and Washington street. Waukegan. 


Ill., has sold out to Frank Cory, proprietor 





April 19, 1919 


of a meat and grocery market at Genesee 
and Washington streets. 


M. Forkosh has sold the Retail Kosher 
Meat Market, 299 Pine street, Bridgeport, 


Conn., to A. Nandelbaum. 

Martin Erdle, Sr., proprietor of the meat 
market on South avenue neat Gregory street, 
Rochester, N. Y., died at the age of 85 vears. 

kdward Dwan will open a meat market in 
Torrington, Conn. 

The Mohican Company opened another 
branch market, this one being located at 260 
Main street, Norwich, Conn. 

Max Biester’s meat market at 4609 South 
Thirty-third street, Omaha, Neb., been 
burglarized. 

Mendel’s Fish 
98+100 Mulberry 


} 
has 


Market has been opened at 
street, Newark, N. J. 


Neil Callahan & Son have opened a meat 
market in the Taylor Building on Main 
street, Saco, Mont, 

Charles Miller of Hillside avenue. New 


Brunswick, N. J., has purchased the grocery 
market operated by Charles Summons on 
upper Main street, and will instal] a meat 
department. 

Frank B. Walker will open a meat and gro- 


cery market at 34 Durham street, Portland, 
Me. 

A. M. Kelley expects to open a meat mar- 
ket at Hill, N. H. 


A meat market has been opened at High- 
field, Md.. by J. E. Siferd. 


Frank Essielionis will open a meat and 
grocery market on Mill street, Fitchburg, 
Mass. 


Hector Barretta has opened a meat market 
on New street. Swanton. Vt. 

S. O. Burgess has sold his meat and gro- 
cery market in Glenwood, Iowa. to Fred 
Mendenhall. 

John LL, Madsen has disposed of his meat 
market in Askov, Minn... to Andrew and 
Christian Henriksen. 

Clark Hill has purchased the meat market 
in Wolford, N. D., formerly conducted by 
H. B. Emerson. 

John Sanstrom bought the Van Curen meat 
market in Barron, Wis. 

The Sanitary Meat Market in New 
don, Wis., has been sold by F. A. 
to Mever Bros. 5 

B. J. Halstead opened a 
Plattsmouth, Neb. 

Otis Jones and L. Westgate bought 
Carvin Meat Market, Carvin. Minn. 

M. Jacobson bought the meat market at 
Fingall, N. D. 

A meat market has been opened at Scotts- 
bluff. Neb.. by William Southwell. 

Anton Stefanich, Jr.. will 
market at Tower, Minn. 

\. Lavin has disposed of his meat market 
in. Swanville, Minn. 


Lon 
Jennings 
meat market in 


the 


open a meat 


C. W. Splitstoser will open a meat market 
at Morris, Minn. 


Oscar Erickson bought the Palace Meat 
Market at Jasper, Minn. 
(iff Anderson has sold his meat market 


in Bumo, Minn., to William Tapeer. 
The City Market, Plainville. 
heen opened by R. J. Carpenter. 
Ernest Carter is now owner of the Kings- 
ton Market and Produce Co.. Kingston, Okla. 
I W. 
meat 


Kan... has 


Caylor is arranging to engage in the 
business at Beaver, Okla. 

The Beaumont-Diekey Market las opened 
at 46 East Seventh street. Paul. Minn., 
and will do a cash and carry meat business. 


st. 


Wm. Fick has engaged in the meat busi- 
ness at Fort Calhoun, Neb. 
Hastriter’s Cash Grocery has « ged in 





the meat 


business at MePherson. 
Graham & Rouse have engaved 
Smith 
Keener & Phipps have opened a meat mar- 
ket and grocery store at Tishomingo, Okla. 


Kan. 


n the meat 
business at Center, Kan. 














April 19, 1919 


Charles Staley has purchased the old J. M. 
Rogers meat business at Pauls Valley, Okla., 
from Nichols & Cole and has moved it back 
to the Rogers location. 


P. J. Roth is about to open a meat market 
in the Windsor annex, Hays, Kan. 
fe 


YORK REFRIGERATING EQUIPMENT. 
(Continued from page 35.) 
Carnation Milk Products Co., Berlin, Wis.; 
one 20-ton vertical single-acting enclosed 
type refrigerating machine, direct connected 
to a vertical enclosed type slide valve en- 

gine and high pressure side complete. 

Carnation Milk Products Co., Richland 
Center, Wis.; one 20-ton vertical single-act- 
ing enclosed type refrigerating machine, di- 
rect connected to a vertical enclosed type 
slide valve engine, and high pressure side 
complete, 

Carnation Milk Products Co., Chilton, Wis.:; 
one 20-ton vertical single-acting enclosed 
type refrigerating machine, direct connected 
to a vertical enclosed type slide valve en- 
gine. and high pressure side complete. 

Louis Galliker., Johnstown, Pa.; one 25-ton 
vertical single-acting belt driven enclosed 
type refrigerating machine and high pressure 
side complete. 


Irwin Supply Co.. New Alexandria, Pa.:, 
one 2-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and 


high pressure side complete. 

New Cleveland Restaurant, Cleveland, 
Ohio; one 12-ton vertical single-acting belt 
driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 
and high pressure side complete. 

Folmer Tce Cream Co., Hanover, Pa.; one 
8-ton vertical single-acting enclosed type re- 
frigerating machine. direct connected to a 
vertical enclosed type slide valve engine, and 
high pressure side complete. 

Elm City Cotton Mills, La Grange. Ga.: 
one 2-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Unity Cotton Mills, La Grange, Ga.: one 
2-ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 
closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Alabama Tee Cream Co., 


Anniston, Ala.: 


THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


one 20-ton vertical single-acting belt driven 
enclosed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Coca Cola Bottling Co., cooling water, 
Raleigh, N. C.; one 2-ton vertical single- 
acting belt driven enclosed type refrigerat- 
ing machine and high pressure side complete. 

E. A. Arthur Baldwin, milk dealer, Phil- 
adelphia, Pa.; one 12-ton vertical single-act- 
ing belt driven enclosed type refrigerating 
machine and high pressure side complete. 

W. H. Meyer. Bethlehem, Pa.; two 20-ton 
vertical single-acting belt driven enclosed 
type refrigerating machines and high pres- 
sure side complete. 

Reynoldsville Candy Works, Reynoldsville. 
Pa.; one 4-ton vertical single-acting belt 
driven enclosed type refrigerating machine 
and high pressure side complete. 

John Lambros, ice cream manufacturer, 
Vandergrift, Pa.: one 3-ton vertical single- 
acting belt driven enclosed type refrigerat- 
ing machine and high pressure side complete. 

Tampa Packing Co., wholesale meats, 
Tampa, Fla.; one 20-ton vertical single-act- 
ing belt driven enclosed type refrigerating 
machine and high pressure side complete. 


Eek & Fisher Co., Allenton, Pa.; one 12- 
ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 


closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Furnas Ice Cream Co.. Akron, Ohio; one 
20-ton vertical single-acting belt driven en- 
closed type refrigerating machine and high 
pressure side complete. 

Papadeos Brothers, ice cream manufactur- 
ers and confectioners, Altoona, Pa.; one 2- 
ton vertical single-acting belt driven enclosed 
tyne refrigerating machine and high pressure 
side complete. 

Coea Cola Bottling Works. cooling water, 
Jackson, Tenn.; one 4-ton vertical single-act- 
ing belt driven enclosed tyne refrigerating 
machine and high pressvre side complete. 

Mississippi A. & M. College Dairy Denart- 
ment. Agricultural College. Miss.; one 4-ton 
vertical single-acting belt driven enclosed 
tyre refrigerating machine. 

Cameron Tee & Cold Storage Co., Cameron 
Tex : two coils of fl6oded atmosnheric am- 
movia condensers, each 20 ft. long. 12 pipes 
high. made of 2-in. pipe. 





for their high standard of quality. 


85 Cliff Street 





FOSTER BROTHERS’ CLEAVERS 


meet the exacting requirements of discriminating users. They have for many years been famed 
Write for Catalogue No. 17 for full information. 


JOHN CHATILLON & SONS 


Established 1835 


CLEAVERS 


Time Savers—Knife Savers. 
In the COMPLETE FOSTER 
BROTHERS’ LINE there is a 
cleaver for every purpose. Each 
of these cleavers is properly bal- 
az gro tempered and sharp- 
ened. 


Years of service have proven that 


New York City 








41 










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For Sausage Makers 


BELL’S 


Patent Parchment Lined 


SAUSAGE 
BAGS 
BELL’S 

SAUSAGE 

SEASONINGS 


For Samples and Prices, write 


THE WM. G. BELL CO. 


Boston Mass. 


ZILLA LLL h hhh 





N 
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MR. PACKER 
MR. BUTCHER 
Save 75 Per Cent 





Cut Your Meats By 
Power—Instead of By 
Hand ‘ms 

Send for Circular 
OLNEY & WARRIN 


408 Broome St., NEW YORK CITY 














CONRON BROS. COMPANY 


One of Greater New York’s Largest Wholesale Distributors of 


DRESSED MEATS and PROVISIONS 











DRESSED POULTRY, BUTTER, EGGS, OLEOMARGARINE, ETC. 


CARLOAD ACCOUNTS SOLICITED with Railroad Facilities for Unloading Cars Direct to our Houses 


GENERAL OFFICES GANSEVOORT MARKET, 
10th Ave. 13th to 14th St. Manhattan 


HOTEL, STEAMSHIP AND CUT MEAT DEPARTMENT 
447445 West 13th Street, Manhattan 


FORT GREENE MARKET, 
189-191 Fort Greene Place, Brooklyn 


WEST HARLEM MARKET, 
12th Ave., and 131st St., Manhattan 


BRONX MARKET, PACKING HOUSE, 


Manufacturing of high grade provisions under U. S. Govern- 
ment Supervision. 


643-645 Brook Avenue, The Bronx. 


U. S. Inspection No. 1009. 























THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 


April 19, 1919 


New York Section 


\. E. Petersen, vice-president of Wilson & 
Company, returned to Chicago this week. 


‘The Easter provision trade has been very 
good in New York, in spite of high prices, 
and the beef trade correspondingly dull. 


John P. Shaughnessy, of Morris & Com- 
pany’s beef department at Chicago, was in 
New York this week greeting old friends. 
Wilson, president of Wilson & 
Company, was in New York a day or two 


Thomas E. 


hefore his departure on Tuesday for his Eu- 
ropean trip. 

Swift & Company’s sales of beef in New 
York City for the week ending April 12, 1919, 
Domestic beef, 22.35 


averaged as follows: 


cents per pound. 
(ieneral manager C. J. Higgins of Morris & 
Company’s Eastern territory left this week 
visit to Mt. 
Mich., to enjoy a well-earnest rest. 


for a three weeks’ Clemens, 


Newspaper reports of a four-million-dollar 
improvement by Armour & Company at Jer- 
sey City are denied by officials of that com- 
pany. Extensive improvements are contem- 
plated, but in no such amount, 


The Eastern Provision Corporation, with a 
capital stock of $20,000, has been incorporated 
in Manhattan to deal in meats, hides and 
fats, ete.; Barney Ershowsky, Hyman Glass- 
746 


Brooklyn, are the incorporators., 


er and Isidore Horn, Sackman street, 


The Gomos Packing Company, Ine., with a 
capital stock of $15,000, has been formed in 
Manhattan to deal in food products and op- 
erate slaughter houses. N. H. Moskowitz, 
Max Moskowitz and D. H. Goldstein, of 945 
Fox street, Brooklyn, are the incorpotators. 


Fred F. Finkeldey, head of Wilson & Com- 
pany’s provision department in New York, 
who has been taking a vacation in Maryland, 
was expected to return to New York at the 
end of this week, in time to celebrate Easter 
at home, also to usher in the “Certified” 
brand of smoked meats which replace the 
“Majestic” line. 


The following is a report of the number 
of pounds of meat, fish, poultry and game 
seized and destroyed in the City of New 


York during the week ending April 12, 1919, 
by the New York City Department of Health: 


Meat—Manhattan, 1.348 Ibs. ; Brooklyn, 23,713 
Ibs.: Bronx, 19 Ibs.; total, 25,070 Ibs. Horse 
Meat—Brooklyn, 1,295 Ibs. Fish—Manhat- 
tan, 5.678 Ibs.: Brooklyn, 70 Ibs.; Bronx, 1 
Ib.: total, 5,749 Ibs. Poultry and game— 
Manhattan, 1,778 Ibs. 

= 


MEAT TRADE IN VICTORY LOAN. 
The allied trades of 
York were busy this week organizing for the 


meat Greater New 
Victory Loan campaign, and the meat men 
expect to do their share toward the success 
J. C. Good of Wilson & 
Company been appointed chairman of 
Meat Allied Trades Committee for 
Greater New York, and he has gone to work 
with 


of this final drive. 
has 


the and 


his characteristic energy to organize 


his forces. He has an able co-worker in Irving 


Blumenthal of the United Dressed Beef Com- 


who is vice-chairman, and the 
tary of the campaign is Dr. J. J. Pardue of 
the Manhattan Sanitary Inspection Associa- 
tion. 


pany, secre- 


The various branches of the trade will be 
Albert 
Rohe, of Rohe & Bro., is again at the head 
of the hog slaughterers and provision trade 
committee. Thos. C. Swift «& 
has the 
may 
brisk campaign 


thoroughly organized and canvassed. 


Sullivan of 


Company been made 
Western 
he expected to 
the organizations. 


Herman Brand will again come to the front 


chairman of 
house committee, and 
organize a 


branch 


through branch house 


as chairman of the renderers and fat dealers’ 
committee, and David Mayer will have charge 
of the work among the jobbers. E. J. Mayer 
is chairman of the wholesale butchers’ com- 
mittee, and William Minder will again head 
the drive in Washington Market. John Halk 
the Italian butchers 
Pivnik for the kosher trade. The stock yards 
will be looked after by David Degen, and the 
labor interests by John Kennedy. 

The retail will have committees 
for each borough and district, and this corps 
of workers has not yet been fully organized. 

For weeks the workers of the Government 
Joan the Federal Reserve 
districts have been laying plans for the com- 
campaign. When the Secretary of the 
Treasury presses a figurative button in Wash- 
ington, the great governmental machine will 
start burning its way toward another finan- 
cial victory for Uncle Sam. 

Benjamin Strong, Governor of the Federal 
Bank of New York, who has been 
chairman of the Central Liberty Loan Com- 
mittee since the opening of the first Liberty 
Loan campaign, has mobilized a great army 
of workers for the Victory Liberty Loan. 

Under the guidance of the Distribution Com- 
mittee, the various selling agencies of the Gov- 
ernment loan organization are ready to func- 
tion. The Advisory Trades Committee (Rain- 
bow Division), the Metropolitan Canvass 
Committee, and the hundreds of local Liberty 
Loan committees—one for every town, village 
and hamlet in the district—have recruited 
many of their veteran workers and thousands 
of other volunteers. In Greater New York 
the Advisory Trades Committee has under its 
jurisdiction 102 sub-committees. These sub- 
committees have 3,578 active members, with 
probably three times that number of actual 
workers. 

Nothing contributed more to the success of 
the first four loans than the results obtained 
through the sub-committees of the Rainbow 
Division of Allied Trades of the Government 
loan organization for the district. In Greater 
New York these committees oversubscribed 
their quota for the Fourth Liberty Loan by 
25 per cent. The sum of $865,205,000 was set 
as a quota for them in the last loan, and sub- 
scriptions amounted to $1,083,861,080, nearly 
equalling the quota set for the whole city of 
New York. Sub-committee workers among 
trades piled up a total of $411,099,200 worth 
of subscriptions in the Second Liberty Loan 
and $553,005,650 in the Third Liberty Loan. 

The Metropolitan Canvass Committee has 
planned a thorough canvass of New York City. 
It will work through an organization of dis- 
trict chairmen, vice-chairmen, block captains, 
block lieutenants and subordinate workers. 
Assisting the committee in the city will be 
nine district superintendents of leading insur- 
ance companies who have volunteered their 
services. 


is chairman for 


and LL. 


butchers 


organization in all 


ing 


Reserve 





STOP SALE OF HORSE MEAT. 

The slaughtering of horses for human con- 
sumption under the inspection of the New 
York City Department of Health will be dis- 
continued on May 1. It is felt that the ex- 
periment has not been successful, and among 
the reasons assigned for its failure is the fact 
that the class of horses offered for slaughter 
has been decidedly below the average work 
horse. In most cases old worn-out animals 
which had outlived their usefulness, and in- 
jured horses which could not be cured, were 
being slaughtered. 

The class of meat obtained was in many 
instances not fit for human consumption, so 
that it was found that a very large pro- 
portion of the product was going to 
Bronx Zoo to feed the animals. 


the 
Another rea- 


.son assigned was the fact that the general 


public did not take readily to the idea of 
eating horse flesh, and practically all of the 
sales were made to people coming from coun- 
tries where horse flesh is more commonly 
used. 

In all, there were about six markets located 
in Greater New York engaged in selling horse 
meat. The average number of animals slaugh- 
tered each week has been between twenty-five 
and thirty. In general, prices were some- 
what lower than the quotations for common 
beef. A 


steak meat reached 23¢. a pound retail. 


where 

But 
lic. a 
The Department of Health consid- 
ered that the volume of business has not been 
sufficient to justify the continuation of the 
inspection, particularly because the percen- 


few instances were found 
in general the price was from 8c. to 


pound. 


tage of condemned animals was so great and 
because only a relatively small proportion 
of the meat was being used for human con- 


sumption, 
Sa 
MEAT CONDITIONS IN NEW ZEALAND. 
(Continued from page 16.) 

regarding prices. It appears that 75 steam- 
ers have been allotted to Australia and New 
Zealand between March and May, and al- 
though some of them are small it is antici- 
pated that much of the frozen meat in stores 


in the Dominion from last season will be 
lifted. Nevertheless, some stoppages are ex- 


pected to enable the stores to be cleared. 

I have already mentioned the scare raised 
in New Zealand regarding the ‘American 
Beef Trust.” The amendment made in the 
Slaughtering and Inspection Act includes the 
following provision, specially aimed at the 
possible operations of American companies: 


“It will not be lawful for any person, firm 
or company to carry on the business of a 
meat exporter unless authorized to do so by 
a meat export license issu» under the Act. 
Application for such a license must be made 
to the Minister of Agriculture, and the Min- 
ister may, in his absolute discretion, grant 
or refuse the license, as he thinks fit. Every 
license is to be valid for a term of one year 
only. The penalty for carrying on business 
may be a fine of £2,000, and £200 per day for 
every day during which such business is car- 
ried on after service of a notice. All meat 


shipped by any person or firm not holding a 
license shall be forfeit to His Majesty, and 
may be sold or otherwise disposed of, as the 
Minister directs.” 

















April 19, 1919 THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER 43 








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1355 W. 3lst Street 











at THE NATIONAL PROVISIONER April 19, 1919 


NEW YORK MARKET PRICES van aetne Ceee qu 


Western, 36 to 42 Ibs. to dozen........... @36 













































Western, 30 to 35 Ibs. to dozen.......... @33 
LIVE CATTLE. BONES, HOOFS AND HORNS Western, under 30 lbs. to dozen......... @32 
ee iil tm oie 506 75 1 7 ; ‘3 Fowls—Fresh—dry packed, barrels— 
Shae = GON. ne ceentgee<ostes ener cr —— twa wie poled rang ‘ $0.00@ 85.00 Western, 5 lbs. and over, per Ib........ 36144 @37 
Salts. ordinary to aie Flat shin bones, avg. 40 to 45 ibs. ‘per Southwestern, dry-picked, mixed weights.36 @37 
Cows, common to choice Pm. 4 Eesth: see a, ee een 0.006 oa Old Cocks—Fresh—Dry packed, barrels— 2 @2 
seeccecccccccecece OO. . Dry-picked, No. 1 ......... seaseesarme ten 6% 
Striped hoofs, per ton .. ++ 6€.00@ 70.00 ald. Bs DPA hie 25 
LIVE CALVES. White hoofs, per ton .... eee 0 encanta @ 
5 Thigh bones, avg. 85 to “90. ‘Tbs. per Other Poultry— 
Live calves, common to prime....-..+++++ 14.00@ 18.50 3 
- oniven w RA IOS. 10.00@ 11.00 BED POR. crccccccccccccecceses setececMeennenee Squabs, prime, white, 10 Ibs, to doz., 
> pe sy cane hs Ck ARR, SR Chas @12.00 Horns, avg. 7% oz. and over, No. 1’s...225.00@240.00 DOF GOB. occ ccccesvcvccsese eeseeeeses 8,50@9.00 
cian ania Game <.sccc.ccorcnaseree pan Horns, avg. 7% oz. and over, No. 2’s...150.00@175.00 
ene daieen WAM foc vs oodedesecrcacacoes 11.00@13.00 Horns, avg. 7% oz. and over, No, 3’s...100.00@125.00 FROZEN—1918 Pack. 
‘ 1 nicodadeonsnenees Siete 
BUTCHERS’ SUNDRIES. W'n, small bxs. d. p. select young hens.47 @48 
LIVE SHEEP AND LAMBS. W’n, small bxs. d. pk. select young toms.47 @48 
; ’ ip’d.16.00@ 16.50 Fresh steer tongues, L. C. trim’d @27c. a pound W’n, bbls. d. pk. select young hens......46 @48 
Live lambs, ordinary to rather good clip’d.16, a my Fresh steer tongues, untrimmed.. @21c. a pound W'n. bbls., dry-pkd., select young toms.46 @48 
Live lambs, clipped wethers. se eeereeeeees 16.50 Fresh cow tongues .............. @18e. a pound W’'n, bbls., dry-pkd., y’g hens and toms.45 @46 
Live lambs. unshorn yearlings eecceennneye ery Calves’ heads, scalded ........... @70c. apiece Texas, dry picked, choice........-.s+ 44 @45 
Live sheep, unshorn, ordinary.........+++ 11. Sweetbreads, veal ............-- 40 @100c. a pair Texas, fair to good ......... Sorry 
Live sheep, unshorn culls ......+++++++- ———— Sweetbreads, beef ........+.+++- @40c, a pound WN SE wexatekdtwiecunecunineunceeuns @41 
ge a ere yer @35e. a pound Broil 
CE an bog weva-aiee a cawae @lse. a pound rollers— 
LIVE HOGS. NE ROENIG: cecccvscesvesctas @5e. each Milk fed, fancy, 18 to 24 Ibs. to doz.... @48 
ete Deets. ous cvddidacaennencanaasere @20.75 aaa eres es @18e. a pound Milk fed, fancy, 25 to 30 lbs. to doz....44 @45 
Hogs, medium .......ccesccccccssccsceces RE IE acre x necro cannsuremaiine @l4c. a pound Corn fed, fancy, 18 to 24 lbs, to doz....44 @45 
ee. DONO, pac ceeccsendneseeusnegrass 5 SS @l4e._ a pound Corn fed, fancy, 25 to 30 lbs. to dow....42 @43 
Pigs pedvenewede coeeeeweaes MOG, BOGE cccccecivcoveseasveses @30ce. a pound Chickens— 
Rougns ... 0... eee eeeeeneeeeereceseeeeees ee een cece ae ae Milk fed, 31 to 36 Ibs, to doz............ @38 
uaa gle ag SE baa a os Milk fed, 37 to 42 Ibs. to doz........... @38s 
DRESSED BEEF. Extra lean pork trimmings...... @26ce. a pound Milk fed, 43 to 47 lbs. to doz........... 38 @39 
ea ee Fe eer @40 
CITY DRESSED. BUTCHERS’ FAT. Milk fed, 60 Ibs. and over to doz...,.... 40 @41 
. i atheist 3027 28 a Corn fed, 31 to 36 Ibs. to doz............ @3T 
ee, eee eee Pe 26 Gor Ordinary shop fat ......++. stetseeeeeecers @ 4% Corn fed, 37 to 42 Ibs. to doz........... @37 
Choice native Light ....eeeecereeereeeceees DOSS, CPUS GG TONG  vcvscsvaccccsocsass @l11 eee ae ¢ 7 x 7 mar 
Nativ eenne te GU 2. cccdccsenaeteuss 2314 @25 Shop bones rt 25 85 Corn fed, 48 to 47 Ibs, to doz........eeee 37 = @3T% 
ative im WM sccccsee Shop bones, per cwt......... coccesce eeeees @ Cats Geek, WN Wk 06 GH. bcs cosasceeeen. @38 
WESTERN DRESSED BEEF. Comm Tek, GP Bie. Oe Git cc ccccveesecees @39 
Choice native heavy 26 @27 SAUSAGE CASINGS. Fowls . 
Choice native light ........+++..- cocccccceses GR Sheep, imp., wide, per bundle ....... eos ° Milk fed, 60 lbs, and over to doz........ @36% 
Native, common to fair........---- ees = Sheep, imp., medium wide, per bundle ... “ Milk fed, 48 to 55 Ibs. to dos.........ce- = ase 
Choice Western, heavy ....... seer eweeeees @25 Sheep, imp., medium, per bundle jae bd Milk fed, 43 to 47 WBS. 16 GOB....ccccceess oJ @35% 
Choice Western, light ....... inenweenbeeewe @22 Sheep, imp., narrow, per bundle ..... 4 . Milk fed, 36 to 42 Rs BP BR ac scecnscs : @34% 
Common to fair Texas ..... ccccccccccoces 23 @24 Hog, free of salt, tes. or bbls., per lb., 2 Milk fed, 30 to 35 ee eer 33 Ges" 
Good to choice heifers .......+.. cococcceess GES <i Se ee ee @1.40 Milk fed, under SS a. 31 @3 
Common to fair heifers ..... stccecececesoe Gee Hog, extra narrow, selected, per Ib........ @1.60 Corn fed, 60 ibs. to doz.........eeeee ees @36 
Choice COWS ......0+.scceee sasees eeeeteney = SNE ES. nacounsiaeekoeoubbectewnsecsa @18 _ re 48 = . ~ = - hcsiaareciebtnaa pn 
Common to fair COWS .....-++++ eccccccccce EE SS SSeS ee —@— orn fed, 43 to 47 Ibs. to doz........... @35 
Fresh Bologna DUIS. ....+eeeeeeeeeeeeeeees 16 @18 Beef rounds, domestic, - set, f. o. b. New Corn _— = oe = _ = = Ceccccesees = 
TE enecucenes ays @16 Corn fed, 30 to 35 Ibs, to doz...........3 @32 
BEEF CUTS. Beef rounds, ‘export, per ‘set, t & ’b. “New Corn fed, under 30 Ibs. to doz..........30 @31 
York «. eked @24 . 
Western. City. Beef bungs, ‘piece, “t.'o. b. New York... @18 —— a ee ee 47 @48 
No. 1 ribs uinénies igi @36 @38 Beef middles, per set, f, 0. b. New aes @50 eataen Ot Ok Ws conc @46 
No. 2 ribs ASRS ae" @30 @36 seef weasands, No. 1s, each @ 8% 7 Fee a ee ee See 
No. 3 ribs ‘ paves @26 @32 Beef weasands, No. 2s, each ° @4 Old Cocks— 
No. 1 loins sf liane @36 @40 Beef bladders, small, per doz...... aeenand @95 WaNOGH GENUINE nicdxcecccecdecevdacorsats @26 
No. 2 loins , pas @30 @38 —— 
on & letne eas tops @26 @34 *Owing to unsettled war conditions reliable sheep 
No. 1 hinds and ribs........ @31 @33% easing quotations cannot be given. LIVE PJULTRY. 
No. 2 hinds and ribs........ @29 30% @31 % Spring chickens, broilers, via exp. per Ib...85 @90 
No. 3 hinds and ribs........ » ” ym SPICES Chickens, fancy, via express, per 1b D 
_ 1 Her . sees @21 2 @24 ’ Whole, Ground. Ee = see eee eer er ener ecseseees 
No. Brounds s.ceeeeeeeeeee  @IO oS. ew. Ga, wee i a Te neem 
gt eon lll aa p +-4 pm Pepper, an WINE ccasenateecee st se Turkeys, via freight .....cccccscescees 
No. 2 chucks ....+-eeeeeees @ii @e Pepper, red ........eseee ea en, 26 DG cpcicecknesdweteenoen aed uesiaep aa b+ 
No. 3 chucks ©. ...+eeeeees - @15 @21 EEO eeoccccccccceccee 10 12 Ducks, Long Island, "spring, per Ib........ 
SOD. catcsceneawnwes piwairece.) 29 Guineas, per pair Pevritoncteesselmonneninie” 
DRESSED CALVES. rrr seseceeccese - 1% 9% 
CE -aductw one tekeeanas ecccecce ace, ae 33 
Veals, city dressed, good to ee per Ib,. .27 @2s OT osunedeutevinasde re «oe ae 27 BUTTER. 
Veals, eon sb 7 come wrt . ; . . ' 7° , a PGE  cnececcnb eens ( ~~eeeeneeeees 60 Creamery (92 ND rscxsievinsiviasiail 6314 @O4 
Western, calves, fair to good..... covcccread @24 Creamery higher (scoring lots)...........+. 6414 @65 
Gracecrs avd buttermilks @20 CURING MATERIALS EE RE sic conde ccrmcnntentwiananaed 621% @63% 
ee ee et ee Ree eee rn ~ DN, CEE © oicccrticrnnsaneeseeauseaeen 51 
Refine! saltpetre, granulated, bbls........ @20 Ren SO SS oo Rc dsu oe oe ates ue 49 @00 
DRESSED HOGS. tefined saltpetre, crystals, bbls............ @21 = 
= ~~ le refined nitrate of soda, gran., f.o.b. 
ite, eee oth akaweckedeee Ceres atheees @27%5 TC Be cece i paiaake @ 6% EGGS. 
AO 5 ag sda aw bewennnidbedede @27% Mm... refined nitrate of ‘soda, “crystals. mee @i7 
—— a _ c1AECKCEELSEMECC RENEE SOS ore Fresh gathered, extras, per dozen......... 45144@46 
oss, DF MDG, ss ccccccecevececccscceseces Ces Fresh gathered, storage pkd., extra firsts. .444%4.@45 
Pigs . CU HMMEM ECCS O OSE EEC ESS @28%% GREEN CALFSKINS. Fresh ‘gathered, storage packed, firsts....43 @44% 
: _ Fresh gathered, firsts, northerly sections....4144@43%4 
DRESSED SHEEP AND LAMBS. NO. 1 SKINS oe. sees ee seeeeseeeeseerereeees Fresh gathered, firsts, southerly sections. ...401%4@43 
. on No. 2 a COLUPCD EH ABER e er eeeTeseheeese Fresh gathered, seconds and poorer 
Lambs, choice spring.......ccccscccccscces 32 @ NO.  SKIMS ceccceesececeeccrreccecsececces Fresh gathered, dirties, No, 1........... 
Lambs, Choice .......ecee eee eeereeeeecers 31 @32 Branded SKINS «1... +++ seeeseeeer eee ee ress Fresh gathered, dirties, No. 2, and poorer 
Sheep, choice ..........+- éxevecnveareanecn ee icky skins seas reeeer rec enrrecereeserereee Fresh gath., checks, good to choice, dry.. 
Sheep, medium to good ........... esescsele Ge No. 1 B. M. SKINS .....+..++seeeeereeceres Fresh gathered, checks, undergrades.... 
UNE. WEEN 3: 600c0eacacdauuranseennesecene @15 No. 2B. M. Skins 2.2.0.0. - cece cece ee eeeee ER TUR ae 
ls he as oo cheeses eceresseaus 
a 2 OMe UR, oe oo reiwornes 
ee ie, Be i. De ee cc bcvccccctecceea @6.55 
(Jobbing Trade.) No, 3M, CO Win... cocesasccces @6.35 FERTILIZER MARKETS. 
Smok« ’ a a @36 Branded skins. 914 ge REE Seer @5.25 BASIS NEW YORK DELIVERY 
Smoked hams, 12 to 14 lbs. avg............ @35 Ticky skins, 936-12% IDS. .......ccccccceee @5.25 ‘i 
Smoked hams, BO We 36 WA BiRcccccccces @33 eS ee eae ee @7.00 Bone meal, steamed, 3 and 50, per 
Smoked picnics, light ..........ecceeeseees @26 es. © Te. ick bbb tiecdccesscevaes @6.75 WE  cdcccccnccuccecesssens peewee ee bo 
Smoked picnics, hea @25 os SW hs Te ioc cticceeciicwesss @6.T5 Bone meal, FAW, POT COR. .cccccccecs x 
Smoked yo ee FE am @24 We. 2 B.. B., TRUTH TOs. icc cccccccncsene @6.50 Dried blood, high grade ......... eee @ 5.00 
Smoked beef tongue. per Ib..........2.+4-30 @32 ils DA I irc centre ssahecesmuns @7.25 Nitrate of soda—spot.............. @ 4.42% 
ee SS aaa eS @37 Ho, S Mi De WR cw 5.6 ec oes ccsccsecsvesas @7.00 Bone black, discard, sugar house ‘del. 
Dried beef sets ......... sia tS a ad 42 @46 i ee ee FE rrr cere ere @7.00 POO FE vevccvvcceuss nom. 40.00 
Pickled bellies, heavy.........cccceccecee @35 a> eS Me fre ere @6.75 3round tankage, N. Y., 9 to 12 per 
7 No. 1 heavy kips, 18 Ibs. and over......... @7.75 Cent. AMMONIA ....cececceseeeese 5,00 ont = 
FRESH POR a No. 2 heavy kips, 18 lbs, and over.......... @7.50 Garbage tankage ......cccsccecccece @10. 
ORK CUTS ee errr rere ee @6.00 ‘Fish scrap, dried, 11 p. ¢, ammonia 
Fresh pork loins, Clty ...cccccscccsccccces @37 Heavy branded kips ........essesseeceeeees @6.50 and 15 p. ¢. bone wenanen de- 
Fresh pork loins, Western ........+++.+..33 @36 Ticky Kips ...eceee eee c eee cee e eee eeeeeees @6.00 livered, Baltimore ...... —@— 
RN DON FE oie vv eb vkecuwiaded weve’ 30 @35 Heavy ticky KipS ........sseeereeesecenens @6.50 Foreign fish guano, testing "13@14% 
Fresh Ry NM ee ee eee ees @46 All skins must have tail bone cut. —_ and about 10% B. Phos. 
Progen posk tenderloins ..cccccccccccceccs @45 Lim eee cccccccceceecccee -@- 
Seaiek Stee an DRESSED POULTRY. ey ge 
§ ders, WED car ceeeecceecctsreeneee @2 ' . 
Butts, regular fresh Western ............. @31 Ducks—Fresh—Dry packed— available phos. “oy ee —@e-— 
Butts, boneless fresh Western ............ @36 Long Island, Penn. and Florida, spring.. @46 Sulphate a Pp per 
GOD cds vaccesancdenee oiennwees @36 eS re ree @—. 100 lbs., guar., oo @ 4.7% { 
Fresh hams, Western ........cceeecceeeees @34 Fowls—Fresh—Boxes—Dry packed, milk fed— Sulphate ammonia, per 100 Ibs. spot i 
Fresh picnic hams, Western ..............- @26 Western. 60 Ibs. and over to dozen...... @37 SUAP., 25% woccecccccccccccccceses @ 4.7% i 
}