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‘KApnil 1957 


-_ 


1A AT Aa 


dit 
rT 





DSi; 
d evoted 





"% 


COMMERCIAL GRADE 


POWER COMPONE 


CG power components are conserva- 
tively designed for long, continuous 
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lation safety factors permitting 
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Application High Volt 


NTS 


ool 
T- 


OC Volt OC ma 


Plate 580-530-300-0 475/42 420 


300-530-580 
950-750-0-750-950 
3500-3000-2400-0 

2400-3000-3500 


Plate 
Plate 


Bias Tapped for any DC voltage from 15 to 100 volts within 6% 


Power 435-365-0 
& 365-435 
25-0-125 
‘OOOV Test 


Bias 


CG-33— Filament 2 


250 
760/610 360 


3000/2500 500 


2000 


125 


500V working 


Induct. Henries DC Resist 


Type No 
CG-40 
CG-44 
CG-48C 


Application 
Filter Choke 
Filter Choke 
Filter Choke 


atrated DC ma. Ohms 


110 
400 
2200 


<—— 


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COMMERCIAL GRADE 
| AUDIO COMPONENTS 
Loaf UTC CG audio units 

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. i rom hum bucking input units to 
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‘ 
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Sec. imped. 





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interstage, 1 plate to 1 grid 
66-132 interstage, 1 


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tine to 1 grid humbucking $0, 200, 500 





135,000 CT 3:1 ratio overall. 
80,000 





GET Yow Level Output, Triode plate 


250ma 





50, 200, 500 





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20 max. 


A. 3000, 5000, 6000, 7000, 


8000, 10,000, a 
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| BME Varimaien modulator, 12 watts 500 


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RUGGED, 


RELIABLE TRANSFORMER COMPONENTS FOR 


INDUSTRIAL 
APPLICATIONS 


STEPDOWN 


LINE VOLTAGE ADJUSTERS 
TRANSFORMERS 


WITH METER 


These autotransformers are a conve- 

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volt appliances to 220/240 volt cir- 
uits. Units come with 6’ cord and 

female receptacle 

Type 
No Application 

R-41 

R-42 

R-43 

R-44 

R-45 

R-46 

R-64 


The perfect answer to abnormal or fluctuating line 
voltage. Adjust switch so meter reads at red line and 
you know your equipment is working at correct volt- 
age. 





ISOLATION 
TRANSFORMER 


Excellent units for isolating line 
noise, AC-DC sets, etc. Full elec- 
trostatic shielding . 6’ cord 
and female receptacle 
Type 
No Rating 
40 watts 
100 watts 
250 watts 
600 watts 
1200 watts 
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no-cord 


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, LOS ANGELES 16, CALIF. 





etttrt hr ry 


<*>, New heavyweight champion ! 


)-}—4-- Hallicrafters new SX-101 receiver employs heaviest 





ot . 
4p 


Ke, Oe 
“ede, 


chassis in the industry . . . offers selectable side- 


’ yp 
aes oe band ... has complete coverage of seven bands. 


SX-101 


amateur net 


$39500 


It’s all amateur—and as rugged as they come! Hallicrafters 

presents the complete answer to ham reception, with every 

essential needed for today and for the future. ti ain) ia iy | ibe sad 
First—built like a battleship. Bigger. Heavier. Second—a ¥ | ~ WA Sah 

marvel of stability—the result of 22 years of experience and iN I Vy | \ 

development. Third—it brings you a long list of new features: atta “ Ml 


e Complete coverage of 7 bands—160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 11-10 meters. FR OM 
@ Special 10 mc. pos. for WWV. | 


2 
e@ Exclusive Hallicrafters upper/lower side band selection. 
e S-meter functions with A.V.C. off. itfa ers 
e Tee-notch filter. 


e Local oscillator output available for use in heterodyne V.F.O. 


PLUS: Band in use individually illuminated... built-in crystal WHERE THE BEST /DEAS IN 
calibrator...antenna trimmer...dual conversion...full gear ag 

drive from tuning knob to gang condensers... five steps of selec- (OU YI /CATIONS ARF BORN 
tivity from 500-5000 cycles...sensitivity—less than 1 microvolt 

on all bands... direct coupled series noise limiter ...50 to 1 tuning 

knob ratio...and many more. 





SUBJECT: 


DISTORTION AREA 


DESIRED TONES 


KK ORTION PRODUCTS 
3rd 


Sth 





f(ke) 2 3 
FiG. A NORMAL AB, OPERATION 


DESIRED TONES 
3rd 3rd 


fNas 


DISTORTION AREA 


AUTOMATIC LOAD 
CONTROL AND 
COLLINS KWS-1 


Over-driving of the power amplifier 
in a transmitter reduces the effective 
talk power of the unit by wasting 
power in distortion products. An 
important feature of Collins KWS-1 


5th 
is an Automatic Load Control that 


sth 
automatically keeps the signal level 
Ge 5 We adjusted to its rated Peak Envelope 
f 1 fk) 2 3 4 Power, and keeps distortion products 
FIG. B DRIVEN INTO AB,—NO ALC OPERATING at a negligible level. 
DISTORTION AREA 


DESIRED TONES | 








f(kc) 2 3 
FiG. C OPERATION SHOWN IN FIG. B CORRECTED TO AB, BY ALC 


ALC’s effect on distortion is illustrated in 
the drawings of a two-tone test above. 
Figure A shows a transmitter operated at 
rated power. Without ALC, a tone driven 
into AB» operation (Fig. B) enters a dis- 
tortion — or non-linear — area and greatly 
increases 3rd and Sth order products. ALC 
takes control and reduces the signal peaks 
to the rated power (Fig. C). The net result 
of the correction is an increase of some 8 
db in average talk power. 


This is but one of the features that make the 
KWS-1 the most versatile kilowatt on the 
market. Coupled with the 75A-4 Receiver, 
you'll have the top-performing station in 
operation. 





° oe 
PO, CREATIVE LEADER IN COMMUNICATION 





1957 


NUMBER 4 


APRIL 


VOLUME XLI 


PUBLISHED, MONTHLY, AS ITS OFFICIAL ORGAN, BY THE AMERICAN RADIO RELAY LEAGUE, INC., 
WEST HARTFORD, CONN., U. S. A.; OFFICIAL ORGAN OF THE INTERNATIONAL AMATEUR RADIO UNION 


STAFF 


A. L. BUDLONG, WIBUD 
Editor 
RICHARD L. BALDWIN, WIIKE 
Managing Editor 
GEORGE GRAMMER, W1DF 
Technical Editor 
DONALD H. MIX, WITS 
BYRON GOODMAN, W1DX 
Assistant Technical Editors 
EDWARD P. TILTON, WIHDQ 
V.H.F. Editor 
C. VERNON CHAMBERS, WIJEQ 
LEWIS G. McCOY, WIICP 
E. LAIRD CAMPBELL, W1CUT 
Technical Assistants 
ROD NEWKIRK, W9BRD 
Contributing Editor, DX 
ELEANOR WILSON, WIQON 
Contributing Editor, YLs 
ANN B. FURR, W1ZIB 
Production Assistant 


LORENTZ A. MORROW, WI1VG 
Advertising Manager 
EDGAR D. COLLINS 
Advertising Assistant 
Chris Dunkle & Associates 
740 S. Western Ave 
California Representative 


DAVID H. HOUGHTON 
Circulation Manager 
J. A. MOSKEY, W1JMY 


Assistant Circulation Manager 


OFFICES 


38 La Salle Road 
West Hartford 7, Connecticut 
TeL.: ADams 6-2535 rWX: HF 88 


Subscription rate in United States and 
Possessions, $4.00 per year, postpaid; 
$4.25 in the Dominion of Canada, 
$5.00 in all other countries. Single 
copies, 50 cents. Foreign remittances 
should be by international postal or 
express money order or bank draft 
negotiable in the U. S. and for an 
equivalent amount in U. 8. funds 
Entered as second-class matter May 
29, 1919, at the post office at Hartford, 
Connecticut, under the Act of March 
3, 1879. Acceptance for mailing at 
special rate of postage provided for in 
section 1102, Act of October 3, 1917, 
authorized September 9, 1922. Addi- 
tional entry at Concord, N. H., author- 
ized February 21, 1929, under the Act 
of February 28, 1925 
Copyright 1957 by the American Radio 
Bee League, Inc. Title registered at 
. 5. Patent Office. International copy- 
Nahe secured All rights reserved 
Quedan reservados todos los derechos 
Printed in U. 





INDEXED BY 
INDUSTRIAL ARTS INDEX 


Library of Congress Catalog 
Card No.: 21-9421 





—CONTENTS— 


TECHNICAL — 


Grounded-Grid Tetrode Kilowatt. 


.David Muir, W9DZY 


A Three-Band Cubical Quad Antenna System 


Glen R. Leach, W4NNQ 


V.H.F. Meteor Scatter Propagation 


Variable Band Width Q Multiplier 


Walter F. Bain, W4LTU 
Ronald L. Ives 


A Compact All-Band Antenna.Larsen E. Rapp, WIOU 
Simplified Design of Impedance-Matching 


Networks — Part II 
Recent Equipment: 


George Grammer, W1DF 


The Gonset G-77 Mobile Transmitter 
The Crosby Model 67A Single-Side-Band Gatweten. 
The Johnson Viking Pacemaker. . 


Calibration of the Mark II Minitrack.. 


BEGINNER — 


. Roger L. Easton 


How Well Do You Know the Regulations? 


OPERATING — 


The Governors-to-President Relay 


Lewis G. McCoy, W1ICP 


ee eee reser eeseee 


General Operating With Mike or Key 


John Huntoon, WILVQ 


1957 V.H.F. Sweepstakes Results 


Field Day Statistics 


Malibu and Morrill’s Landing 


Simulated Emergency Test — 1956 


GENERAL — 


George Hart, WINJM 


Navy Salutes WIBCR and Other Amateurs............ 

Edison Award to W3CUL a rr: 

PRP—A Progress Report 
Mason P. Southworth, W1VLH 

Some QST Abbreviations..... 


“It Seems to Us —” 

ARRL Oregon State Convention 
Coming ARRL Conventions. ... 
Hamfest Calendar 


10 


Correspondence from Members. 
Operating News 

With the AREC 

Station Activities 

New Books......... Oesccesess 





Superlative AM-CW and SSB with the 
B&W MODEL 5100-B TRANSMITTER, 
be] o} = Me) b-) - Bl - Beh) - ie) 3 7 we) | 


Here’s unsurpassed performance on all three... 
AM-CW and SSB! The Model 5100-B gives you: 


@ high level push-to-talk AM telephony 
@ clean CW keying—break-in on all bands 


e sparkling SSB combined with the 51SB-B 
companion sideband generator 


Check all the features built into this fine trans- 
mitter: input power of 180 watts CW-SSB,* 140 
watts AM phone; bandswitched throughout with 
integral VFO or crystal frequency control; cover- 
age of 80 through 10 meter amateur bands; plus 
unitized construction, pi-network final, and inte- 
gral low-pass filter. Skillful layout and imaginative 
circuitry assure effective transmission of signal 
with minimum harmonic content. Functional de- 
sign within the r-f section, careful shielding, filter- 
ing, and by-passing are your assurance of the 
most dependable TVI suppression, 


*Peak envelope 


Trouble-free operation, ease of control and tun- 
ing, coupled with excellent quality of signal output 
with the Model 5100-B are sure to meet the exact- 
ing requirements of the most discriminating op- 
erator, 

FOR OUTSTANDING SSB PERFORMANCE 
on the same amateur bands, combine the 5100-B 
with the completely bandswitched 51SB-B com- 
panion sideband generator. Powered by the trans- 
mitter, the 51SB-B can edsily be hooked up to the 
5100-B in less than a half hour. Tuning and opera- 
tion are a breeze, with no test equipment required 
for installation or operation. And you'll begin 
immediately to enjoy such features as: voice oper- 
ated control, push-to-talk, speaker deactivating 
circuit, true unitized construction, and TVI sup- 
pression, 


*Net Model 5100-B Transmitter 
Price { Model 51SB-B SSB Generator... 


$475.00 
$265.00 





FOR SPARKLING SSB WITH YOUR PRESENT TRANSMITTER 
-+» THE B&W MODEL SiSB SIDEBAND GENERATOR 





Enjoy superb single sideband trans- 
mission just by adding the Model 
51SB generator to your present B&W, 
Collins, Johnson, or other commer- 
cial or composite home built trans- 
mitter. Using factory engineered 
modification kits and step-by-step in- 
structions, you'll find it easy to 
achieve outstanding SSB operation 


on all the amateur phone frequencies 
80 through 10 meters provided by 
your present transmitter. And the 
self-powered Model 51SB gives you 
all the advanced features of the 
Model 51SB-B generator. 


*Net Price: Model 51SB SSB a 
erator $27 


*All prices subject to change without notice 


ners — 





BARKER 


& WILLIAMSON, 


Bristol, Pennsylvania 


INC. 








ASSEMBLE THIS KIT 


IN MINUTES! 


PR’s New 100 Ke. Printed Oscillator Kit 





Why spend hours assembling your 
100 Kc. Oscillator? This PR printed 
circuit goes together in a few min- 
utes. All you need is a soldering 
iron and a pair of pliers. Every- 
thing plainly marked for quick in- 
sertion. Kit contains all necessary 
parts except 6BA6 oscillator tube 
and 100 Ke. crystal. Filament vollt- 
age and 150 volts B-plus comes 
from your receiver. The cost is 
LOW ...so low you just won't be- 
lieve it. THIS CIRCUIT IS GUAR- 
ANTEED ONLY WHEN USED 
WITH A PR CRYSTAL. 


See Your Favorite Ham Dealer! Be oy ; 
Actual size illustration. 





Amateur Net, $4.50 





INC. 
DWAY » COUNCIL BLUFFS. IOWA | 


EXPORT SALES: Royal National Corporation, 250 W. 57th Street, New York 19, N. Y., U. S. A. 


5 





Eastern Pennsylvania 


~ Tllinois 


8 Ar kansas 


~~ Kent ucky 


~ Alaska 


~ North C 





~ Alabama 


Section Communications Managers of the ARRL Communications Department 


Reports Invited. All amateurs, especially League members, are invited to report station activities on the first of each 
month (for preceding month) direct to the SCM, the administrative ARRL official elected by members in each Section. 


Radioclub reports are also desired by SC Ms for inclusion in QST. 


ARRL Field Organization station appointments are 


available in the areas shown to qualifie d League members. These include ORS, OES, OPS, OO and OBS. SCMs also desire 


applications for SEC, EC 


RM and PAM where vacanc 


exist. 


to join the Amateur Rz dio Emergency Corps (ask for Form 7). 


W3PYF 
Maryland-Delaware-D. C. 
Southern New Jersey 
Western New York 
Western Pennsylvania 


W3GJY 


WONTA 
W9ROM 


Indiana 
Wisconsin 
~WOKTZ 
WOFLP 
W9KLG 


North Dakota 
South Dakota 
Minnesota 


W5ZZY_ 
WSFMO 
WS5WZY 
W4SCF 


Louisiana 
Mississippi 
Tennessee 


“W4KKW 
Michigan W8RAE 


Ohio 


Eastern New York 

N. Y. C. & Long Island 
Northern New Jersey 
WOBDR 
WOICV 
WOGEP 
WOCBH 


lowa 
Kansas 
Missouri 
Nebraska 


~ Connecticut* NITY 
WIBPr y YA Allan D. Duntley 
ALP 


Maine 

Eastern Massachusetts 
Western Massachusetts 
New Hampshire 
Rhode Island 

Vermont 


WIHRV 
V 


W10AK 





oa! AGU 
W7RKI 

bak tt hd /WXI 
7ESJ 
WF IX 


Idaho 
Montana 
Oregon 
Washington 


KH6AED 
W7JLV 
W6YHM 
W6FDJ 
W6GGC 
W6JDN 
Wo6J PU 


la 
Santa Clara Valley 
East Bay 
San Francisco 
Sacramento Valley 
San Joaquin V aiicy 


arolina 
South Carolina 
Virginia 

West Virginia 


W4HMG 
eee 
wsP0QO 
KOCEN 


W7LOE 
W7PSO 


Colorado * 
Utah 
Wyoming 


~W4ML. 
K4KGJ 
W4MS 


Eastern Florida* 
festern Florida 
Georgia W4CFJ 
West Indies (Cuba-P.R.-V.I.) KP4D]J 
Canal Zone KZ5WA 
Los Angeles 
Arizona 
San Diego 
Santa Barbara 


W70IF 
W6LRU 
W6REF 


wn 


Northern 
Oklahoma 
Southern Texas 
New Mexico 


Texas 


sc | 
sess 
RA 


~ Maritime 
Ontario 
Quebec 


Alberta 

British Columbia 
Yukon 

Manitoba 
Saskatchewan 


~WOYIX ¢ 


“« jeorge W. 


“W4RRH iB. Riley Fowler Box 


~~ Joe 


WoJOB 


~ Ray A. 


D.E. 


ATL = TIC On te nies 
Clarence Snyde 7 Porte 
W. Gore 3707 Woodbine 
Herbert C. Brooks 800 Lincoln Ave 
Charles T. Hansen au Rosemont Drive 
John F. ‘Ne wicz 34 Glenwood Drive 
NTRAL DIVISION. 
239 S. Scoville Ave 
Seth Baker 276 West Sumner Ave. 
Reno W. oe tsch 929 S. 7th 
AKOTA DIVISION _ 


Gabel 


Ave. 


George Se sn ha 


Elmer J. 
Les Price 
Robert Nelson 
DELTA DIVISION. 

ae imon M. Goings P.O. Box 207 
Thomas J. Morgavi 3409 Beaulieu St. 
Julian G. Blakely . Main St 
Harry C. Simpson . Wellington St. 
GREAT LAKES DIVISION ‘ 
Albert M. Barnes 830 Third Ave 
Thomas G. Mitchell 409 Liberty 
Wilson E. Weckel 2118 Tuscarawas St., W. 
HUDSON DIVISION 

Tracy 138 North Country Club Drive 
Dannals 139 East Zoranne Drive 
1. Manamon 709 Se venth Ave 
MIDWEST DIVISIO 
~ Russell B. Marquis 807 North Fifth 
Ear! N. Johnston 1100 Crest Drive 
es W. Hoover 15 Sandringham Lane 
Floyd B. Campbell 403 W. 8th St 
EW ENGLAND wat Sy nee 
Crawford FD 5, Stadley “Rough Rd. 


“ 9K State Park 
. Box 425 


Harry 
Lloyd fi 


Ave. 


Victor L. 


Frank L. Baker, jr. 91 Atlantic St. 
Osborne R. McKe raghan 22 Mutter St 
John Arthur Knapp 15 North State St. 
Mrs. June R. Burkett 24 Roger Williams Ave, 
Mrs. Ann L. Chandler RFD 2 
A  RSTERN DIVISION __ 
Dave A. Fulton Box 103 
Rev. i rancis A. Peterson Box 66 
Vernon L. Phillips Box 971 
Edward F. Conyngham $1903 Powell Blvd. 
Victor S. Gish 511 East 71st St 
PAC IFIC DIVISION - 
; 0. Box 3564 
P O. Box 14 
P.O. Box 372 
3018 Berlin Way 
901 Grafton Ave 
1113 Elinore Ave 
3639 Mono St 
DIVISION ____ 
143 
ips almia Road 


~ Samuel H. 


Donald Eberiein 
Roger L. Wixson 
Walter A. Buckley 
Harold L. Lucero 
Ralph Saroyan 

ROANOKE 


aa7 


10 13 Belmont St. 


Bryson L. McGraw 
ohn Carl Morgan 
Albert H. Hix 
ROCKY pet NTAIN DIVISION 
~ William R. Haskin 1632 W. Cuhanas 
James L. Dixon 931 Childs Ave , P.O. 
James A. Masterson 851 Bon Ave. 
SOUTHEASTERN DIVISION 
A. Shannon 
John F. Porter 
Edward J. Collins 
William F. Kennedy 
William Werner 


Box 1045 


6890 S.W. Sist St. 
1003 E. Blount St 
459 Fairway Hill Drive, 
563 Ramon Llovet 


P. A White Box 82 
SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION_ 

‘Albert F. Hill Jr. 861 No. Millard Ave. 

Cameron A. Allen Maryland Ave. 

Don Stansifer 4427 Pescadero 

Mrs. Dorotey E. Wilson P.O. Box 1232 

WEST GULF DIVISION 

Thacker 4700 West Hanover. 

Ewing Canaday 919 Stanley 

Roy K. Eggleston 1109 Vernon Drive 

Einar H. Morterud 2717 Quincy St., N.E. 

JANADIAN pails 38° 

. Weeks 

Richard W. Roberts 

Gordon A, Lynn 


S.E. 


iio Norton Ave. 
R.R. 


10707-57th Ave. 
981 West 26th Ave. 
109-13th, N.W. 
1044 King St. 


Sydney T. Jones 
Peter M. McIntyre 


John Polmark 
Harold R. Horn 


* Official appointed to act temporarily in the absence of a regular official. 


11] amateurs in the United States and Canada are invited 


astc 

B: sittenok 7, Md. 
Palmyra 
Buffalo 21 
Ambridge 


~Oak Park _ 


Martinsville 
Wausau 


Hankinson 
Hermosa 
Dassel 


Osceola 
Metairie 
Greenville 
Memphis 


Dayton 
Buchanan 
Canton 8 


Schenectady 
Farmingdale, I 
Asbury Park 


Marshalltown 
Topeka 
Ferguson 21 
North Platte 


Danbury 

Casco 

North Quincy 71 
Easthampton 
Concord 
Rumford 16 
Barre 


Anchorage 
Preston 
Harlowton 
Portland 
Seattle 5 


Honolulu 


Reno 

Los Gatos 
Oakland 2 

San Francisco 12 
Dunsmuir 
Fresno 


mere 


Columbia 


Radio Station WFVA, Box 269Fredericksburg 


forest Hills, ¢ ‘hi arleston 4 
Colorado Springs 

Ogden 

Casper 


Cottondale 
Miami 43 
Pensacola 
Atlanta 
Urb. Truman, 
Rio Piedras ,P. R 
Gamboa 


Rialto” 


Phoenix 
San Diego 7 
Oxnard 


“Dallas 


Stillwater 
Corpus Christi 
Bel Air Albuquerque 


St. Stephen, N. B. 

WwW ag ale, Toronto, Ont. 

Ste. Genevieve de 
Pierrefonds, P. Q. 
Edmonton, Alta 

Vancouver, B. C. 

Portage la Prairie, Man. 

Saskatoon 








cL Orr. 


ON THE RIGHT FOOT~. 


SINGLE 
SIDEBAND 
ADAPTER 


COMMUNICATION 
ECEIVER 


. . 7 It was the joy and delight of the budding ham to take soldering 
gun in hand and tenderly sort, assemble and wire the latest model regeners 
ative ‘“‘two tuber" and tune around for some DX on the other side of town... 
and then came the “‘superhet’"’—a truly great construction accomplishment to 
be proud of,—we know. But, that was long, long ago and we've come a long 
way since then. Today it is the accepted custom to just as carefully choose a 
‘“‘houghten” receiver, with all the very latest features, because now, as then, 


2 the receiver is the very heart of the shack, the very life of radio. “You can't 
Rar 7s —~ «am work ‘em if you can't read ‘em.” 


Here are the main features of today’s newest and latest designed receiver, 
GSB 1 with its matching companion for the SSB enthusiast. 


@ Frequency Range — 452-458 kc. a 

@ Type of Reception — AM-SSB (upper or lower) CW. GPR 90 

@ IF Input Voltage — 0.3 Volts rms (normal) for 0.3 e@ Six Bands — .54 to 31 mc., AM, CW, MCW, FS. 
Volts rms Audio Output. @ Full Electrical Bandspread and Main Tuning. 


@ IF Input Voltage Range—0.1-10 Volts rms (with AVC) @ Antenna Matching with Ferrite Transformer 


75 ohm unbal. and/or 300 ohm bal. inputs. 
@ AVC Characteristic — with 40 db change in Input oe 
Signal, Output remains constant within 9 db. 7” pag nag or better for 10-1 Signal 
@ Input Impedance — High from IF. Selectivity in 6 Steps, Variable, 200 cy. to 5 ke., 
@ Output Impedance — To match Audio Grid. 5 crystal, one non-crystal. « 
P 4 wig. ee Hum Level — Better than 60 db down. 
« Input Power — 115 V, 50, 60 cy. 55 Watts. image Ratio — Average 85 db. 
@ Size & Style of Cabinet to match GPR-90. Exclusive Audio Selectivity Control. 
@ Complete story & details in Bulletin LM-194. Diaraity Gnetation eith GPR-&D _ 
HFO, BFO, IFO External Controls. 
@ Write for complete detailed Bulletin LM-179. 


There are many more reasons why you should compare care- 
fully before you buy—write for free Bulletins LM 179 and LM 194 


for complete details. Gud Luke 73 
The TECHNICAL MATERIEL CORPORATION 


ONTARIC MAMARONECK, NEW YORK 





THE AMERICAN 
RADIO RELAY 
LEAGUE, wc, 


is a noncommercial association of radio amateurs, bonded for 
the promotion of interest in amateur radio communication and 
experimentation, for the relaying of messages by radio, for the 
advancement of the radio art and of the public welfare, for the 
representation of the radio amateur in legislative matters, and for 
the maintenance of fraternalism and a high standard of conduct. 

It is an incorporated association without capital stock, chartered 
under the laws of Connecticut. Its affairs are governed by a Board 
of Directors, elected every two years by the general membership. 
The officers are elected or appointed by the Directors. The League 
is noncommercial and no one c cially engaged in the manu- 
facture, sale or rental of radio apparatus is eligible to membership 
on its board. : 

“Of, by and for the teur,” it numbers within its ranks practi- 
cally every worth-while amateur in the nation and has a history of 
glorious achievement as the standard-bearer in amateur affairs. 

Inquiries regarding membership are solicited. A bona fide 
interest in amateur radio is the only essential qualification; owner- 
ship of a transmitting station and knowledge of the code are not 
prerequisite, although full voting membership is granted only to 
licensed amateurs. 

All general correspondence should be addressed to the adminis- 
trative headquarters at West Hartford, Connecticut. 








Past Presidents 
HIRAM PERCY MAXIM, WIAW, 1914-1936 
EUGENE C. WOODRUFF, W8CMP, 1936-1940 
GEORGE W. BAILEY, W2KH, 1940-1952 


Officers 
President . . . . . + + » » GOODWIN L. DOSLAND, WOTSN 
Moorhead, Minnesota 


First Vice-President . . . . . WAYLAND M. GROVES, WSNW 
P.O. Box 586, Odessa, Texas 
Vice-President . . . - « » « FRANCIS E. HANDY, WIBDI 
38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 


Vice-President... .. i PERCY C. NOBLE, WIBVR 
37 Broad St., Westfield, Massachusetts 


Secretary . . . . « A. Ll. BUDLONG, W1BUD 
38 le Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 

Treasurer . . . . « . DAVID H. HOUGHTON 
38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Connecticut 


. A. L. BUDLONG, W1BUD 
Cc icati FRANCIS E. HANDY, W1BDI 
Technical Director . ay . GEORGE GRAMMER, W1DF 
Assistant General Manage: . . . . JOHN HUNTOON, WILVQ 
Assistant Secretaries . ... . . + «+ + LEE AURICK, WIRDV 


PERRY F. WILLIAMS, W1UED 
38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Cofnecticut 





General Counsel . . . + + « « « PAUL M, SEGAL 
816 Connecticut pee. Washington 6, ¢ 





DIRECTORS 


Canada 
ALEX REID VE2BE 
240 Logan Ave., ‘StL ambert, P. Q. 
Vice-Dir ner Willlam R. Sa VE6EO 
3 10th St. N., Lethbridge, Alta. 
Atlantic Division 
GILBERT L CROSSLEY W3YA 
Dept. of k.E., Penna. State University 
State College, Pa 
Vice-Dtrector: Charles O. Badgett W3LVF 
725 Garden Road, Glenside, Pa. 
Central Division 
JOHN G. DOYLI ‘ W9GPI 
4331 N. W ildwood Ave., Milwaukee 11, Wis 
Vice-Dtrector George E. Keith WIQLZ 
RFD 2, Box 22-A, Utica, Il. 
Dakota Division 
ALFRED M. GOWAN.. w hee 
1012 South Willow Ave — Falls, S 
Vice-Director Forrest Brya W <a DS 
6840 Harriet Ave., (1 Minn 
Delta Division 
VICTOR CANFIELD. W5BSR 
Box 965, Lake Charles, La 
Vice-Director: Milton W. Kirkpatrick W5KY¢ 
4914 Floynell Dr., Baton Rouge, La 
Great Lakes Division 
JOHN H. BRABB ‘ WSSPF 
708 Ford Bidg., Detroit 26, Mich 
Vice- pip Robert L. Davis WSEYE 
7 Highland Ave., Salem, Ohio 
Hudson Division 
GEORGE V. COOKE, JR W20BI 
88-31 239 St. Bellerose 26, N 
Vice-Director: Lioyd H. Manamon W2VQR 
709 Seventh Ave., Asbury Park, N. J 
Midwest Division 
ROBERT W DENNISTON 
Box 631, Newton, Iowa 
Vice-Director: Sumner H. Foste WIGQ 
2315 Linden Dr., 8.E., Cedar R: apids, lowa 


WONWX 


New ny Division 
MILTON E. CHAFFI WIEFW 
53 Homesdale Ave. " pvidiiiaa Conn 
Vice-D1 rector: Frank L. Baker, jr WIALP 
91 Atiantie St., N. Quincey 71, Mass 
North — Division 
R. sae ROBE R’ W7CPY 
7 Park Hil “Drive Billings, Mont 
iedsakanatin Howard 8. Pyle W70E 
3434 74th Ave., 8.E., Mercer Island, Wash 
Pacific Division 
MARRY. M. ENGWICHT .. W6HC 
70 Chapman, San Jose 26, C alif 
Vice-Director: Harold L. Lucero W6JDN 
1113 Elinore Ave., Dunsmuir, Calif 
Roanoke Division 


P. LANIER ANDERSON, JR 
428 Maple Lane, Danville, Va 


W4MWH 


Vico-p4 ector: Thomas H. Wood N4ANK 
1702 N. Rhett Ave., North ¢ aerate Ss : 


Rocky Mountain Division 
CL AUDE M. MAER, JR ° ... WIC 
40 Lafayette St., Denver, Colo 
Vice-Director: Car| L. Smith 
1070 Locust S5t., Denver 20, Colo 


WeOBWJ 


Southeastern Division 
JAMES P BORN, JR ...W4ZD 
25 First Ave., N.E., Atlanta, Ga 
Vice-/4trector: Thomas M. Moss W4HYW 
P.O. Box 644, Municipal Airport Branch, 
Atlanta, Ga. 
South western Division 


mae TER R. JOO .W6EKM 
1315 N Overhill Drive, Inglewood | 3, Calif 


Vice-Director: Virgil Talbott W6GTE 
9226 Alexander Ave., South Gate, Calif 
West Gulf Division 
GRADY A PAYNE.. 4 ‘ 
5103 Linden St., Bellaire, Texas 
Vice-Director: Carl C. Drumeiler EHC 
5824 N.W. 58th St., Oklahoma City 12, Wht 4 


W5ETA 





“It Seems to Us... 


MOBILE ACROSS THE BORDER 


It’s not yet time to take down the storm 
windows and put the red flannels back in 
mothballs, at least not around our QTH, but 
the occasional warm days are a reminder that 
the vacation season is getting closer. For many 
of us, that means a trip somewhere, and quite 
possibly mobile operation enroute. 

If you’re planning a trip into Canada, and 
want to continue your “mobiling”’ while 
there, it’s about time to fire off a letter to: 

Telecommunications Division 
Department of Transport 
Ottawa, Ontario, Canada 


Give your full name, address and call letters 
and outline briefly the nature of the trip and 
the approximate date. You will be sent two 
copies of a form which should be filled out 
carefully — preferably on a typewriter — and 
mailed back to Ottawa. If everything is in 
order, the duplicate will be authenticated and 
returned to you. It’s not a license in itself, 
but merely an extension of your FCC ticket, 
so the latter must be carried as well. 

On the application, the space marked 
“license number” does not apply to amateurs, 
and should be left blank. Where the form asks 
for “authorized communication service and 
area in Canada where station will be oper- 
ated,” fill in your route or location, the correct 
dates, and that the service is amateur. 

When you operate under the reciprocal 
agreement, sign your own call, followed by the 
country and area prefix (i.e. WIXXX/VE3). 
Once each QSO either phone or ¢.w., you must 
state your approximate geographical location. 

Don’t forget to notify your own District 
FCC Engineer-in-Charge if you’re going to be 
operating outside the U. 8. for more than 48 
hours. Only one notification is necessary for 
one continuous stay across the border. 

For VEs heading south, the procedure is 
about the same. The address to write: 


Authorization Analysis Division 
Federal Communications Commission 
Washington 25, D. C. 


As you (a VE) enter each U.S. district, send a 
notice to the District Engineer*, referring to 
your FCC authorization, and stating your 
name, call, date and route or location. A post- 


* Listed in the License Manual. 


April 1957 


card will do, and no reply is needed. If you 
“stay put” for more than a month, an addi- 
tional notification is required. 

In either country, the visitor is to abide by 
the rules set up for that country. In the main, 
this doesn’t create any hardship, for the 
privileges are quite similar. U.S. phone bands 
are a trifle smaller — see page 70, QST for 
March, 1957 — and Canada allows 500 watts 
in the antenna, based on a final-amplifier 
efficiency of 70 percent. 

Have a good time, fellows —and if 
come near here, be sure to drop in. 


ABBREVIATIONS 

The other day we received a letter from a 
brand-new League member, and will-be ham, 
who had nothing but praise for QST — but 
said he had difficulty, as a neophyte, in trans- 
lating the many abbreviations used freely in 
our pages. Shucks, we thought, this fellow 
wants his dope sugar-coated. He just doesn’t 
want to bother digging a bit for the informa- 
tion. Besides, we use only a very few abbre- 
viations and most of em ought to be obvious. 
To prove the point to ourselves, we skimmed 
through a copy of QST picked at random. 

It was something of a shock. The first sen- 
tence that caught our eye was, “In plain 
words, this simply meant turning off the a.v.c. 
and reducing the r.f. and i.f. gain until the 
peaks of the nearby s.s.b. signal didn’t over- 
load the receiver.”’ That’s four in one short 
sentence! Plain words they are indeed to those 
of us familiar with the jargon, and only com- 
mon sense to use in saving precious space. But 
maybe the guy has a point. We thumbed 
through the pages, jotting down abbreviations 
that are strictly old-hat from common usage 
but perhaps mystifying to the newcomer the 
first time around. The result is that we can 
think of no better purpose to be served by one 
of our pages than to run such a list. See page 74. 

The list doesn’t purport to cover standard 
symbols (such as ZL and C for inductance and 
capacitance), surplus equipment type numbers 
(such as BC-453), manufacturers (such as 
B&W), Q Signals, or ham slang (such as XYL, 
BCNU). But from an inspection of the texts, 
diagrams and charts of several QST issues we 
have compiled a list of abbreviations that are 
common, everyday jargon. 

We hope newcomers will find it useful. 


you 





OUR COVER 


As we write this, the weather here in West 


Hartford is anything but spring-like, yet by the 
time you read this there will (we hope) be balmy 
weather throughout the land. And balmy weather 
brings with it thoughts of new and better an- 
tennas. Perhaps this month’s cover will whet 
your enthusiasm to get up a new beam or two 
this spring. Don’t forget, things are really buzzing 
on the DX bands. The sunspots are gyrating and 
now’s the time to get with it! 

Our cover this month shows the antenna 
installation at WI1VRK, Swampscott, Mass. At 
the top, 85 feet above ground, is a Mosley VP20. 
Just below that is a Gonset 4-element for 6 
meters. And right below that is a 5-element 
Telrex on 10 meters. W1VRK obviously follows 
The Amateur’s Code and is balanced, for those 
other things in the picture are TV antennas. 
Also included on the tower are a pressure-type 
wind indicator and a red blinker (the latter to 
impress the neighbors). 

The tower itself is a Kuehne, while the top 
mast section is a 2314-foot piece of high pressure 
steam tubing 114” i.d., which weighs 
129 lbs. The rotator swings out of the way and 
a winch arrangement allows the top mast section 
to be raised and lowered in order to work on 
the antennas. 


o.d., 14” 





COMING A.R.R.L. CONVENTIONS 


June 1-2 — Oklahoma State, Tahlequah, 
Okla. 


June 7-8-9 — Dakota Division, St. Paul, 
Minn. 


June 15-16 — Rocky Mountain Division, 
Estes Park, Colorado 
July 27-28 — West Gulf 

Anto 


Division, San 


io, Texas 

16-17-18 — Southwestern Divi- 
sion, Long Beach, California 

August 30-31-Sept. 1 — ARRL National 
Convention, Chicago, Illinois 

September 21-22 — Midwest 
Kansas City, Kansas 


August 


Division, 


October 18-19 — Ontario Province, To- 
ronto, Ontario 











A.R.R.L. OREGON STATE CONVENTION 
Eugene, Oregon — April 13-15, 1957 


The Valley Radio Club of Eugene has again 
been sponsor the ARRL Oregon 
State Convention to be held at the Eugene 
Hotel, Eugene, April 13th-14th. Many activities 
are planned and pre-registrations at $7.50 will 
be accepted until April 1; thereafter, $8.00. 
Non-hams may register for $4.50. More than 
700 attended last year. Reservations may be 
obtained by writing L. J. Oswald, W7SPB, 751 
E. 14th St., Eugene, Oregon. 


selected to 


10 


HAMFEST CALENDAR 


Connecticut — The Tri-City Radio Council will hold 
its 13th annual hamfest at the Crocker House Hotel, State 
Street, New London, Saturday, May 4th. Attendance will 
be by reservation only, and tickets are $3.75 each, including 
a steak dinner. Also anticipated are a visit to the Submarine 
Base and a prominent after-dinner speaker. 

Florida — The Orlando Amateur Radio Club, Ine., will 
hold its annual Rock Springs near Orlando 
on Sunday, April 28. Registration fee, including dinne1 
is $2.00 in advance; children under 12 — $1.00. The closing 
date for advance registration is April 15th. Send reservations 
to the Orlando Amateur Radio Club, Ine., P. O. Box 2067, 
Orlando. 

New Jersey — The Twelfth Annual Old Timers’ Nite 
Round-Up and Banquet will be held on Saturday evening, 
April 20th, in the Grand Ballroom of the Stacy-Trent 
Hotel, West State Street at Willow, in downtown Trenton 
As in the past the party will be stag. 

A turkey dinner will be served promptly at 6:30 o'clock in 
the hotel ballroom, and the program will include personal 
ities prominent in early radio and wireless history. Bring 
along your oldest amateur and commercial licenses, as 
awards will be made to those holding the earliest dates. A 
special award will go to the “Grand OM,” whose radio 
operating experiences date back to the earliest days of 
wireless. W2ZI's now famous collection of old-time wireless 
gear will be on display. Tickets are $6.00 by reservation and 
may be obtained by mailing a self-addressed envelope by 
April 15th with your check. 
$7.00 at the door. Plan to bring along as many guests as 
you wish, everyone is welcome. Even the Novices come 
along to join in the fun. Tickets and special seating arrange- 
ments for twenty or more persons may be obtained from 
E. G. Raser, W2Z1, 315 Beechwood Ave., Trenton. 

New York — The Crystal Radio Club, W2DMC, Valley 
Cottage, N. Y., is holding its 26th annual dinner affair 
at Martens Falls Inn, on So. Pascack Rd., River 
N. Y., on April 27th, at 8:00 p.m. Tickets are 10 each, 
and limited. For all information, please Tony 
Maiorano, W2EHZ, 14 Peck St., W. Haverstraw, N. Y. 

New York — The Rochester Amateur Radio Association 
is sponsoring another of its now famous Western New York 
Hamfests this year. A fast-moving, interesting program 
is scheduled to start at 2:00 p.m., Saturday, May 4th, with 
something for everybody including the YLs and XYLs. 
There will be contests, exhibits, speakers, and lots of con- 
viviality. The place will be the Doud Post of the American 
Legion on Route 33 just west of the city line of Rochester 
Lots of space for parking and mobile activity. Advance 
registration is urged to assure a place at the banquet 
Price will be $3.75 which includes registration, the banquet 
ticket, and participation in all the parts of the program 
Advance registration may be obtained by writing to RARA 
Hamfest, Box 1388, Rochester, N. Y. 

Pennsylvania — The 12th Annual Banquet of the 
Lancaster Radio Transmitting Society will be held Satur- 
day April 27th, at the Arcadia Cafe, 27 West Orange St. 
Lancaster. Festivities will begin at 6:30 p.m. and entertain- 
ment has been planned for all. Registrations must be made 
in advance and may be obtained from Arthur C. Jacoby, 
W30Y, 136 Springhouse Road, Lancaster. 

Washington — The Amateur Radio Association of 
Bremerton will hold its anual Hamfest May 4th, at the 
Sons of Norway Hall, 1018 18th Street, in Bremerton. Regis- 
tration will begin at 1300 followed by mobile hunts, code 
competitions, and other activities. A banquet dinner will 
begin at 1900 during which there will be special entertain- 
ment. The rest of the evening will be spent dancing. Advance 
ticket price $3.50; $4.00 at the door. For further informa- 
tion, contact Ray McCausland, W7UWT, 3236 Wright 
Avenue, Bremerton, Washington; telephone ESsex 7-5440. 


hamfest at 


Late-comers will be assessed 


contact 


NEXT MONTH! 


In our May issue the feature story will deal 
with the most astounding do-it-yourself project 
in radiocommunications history. When you read 
it, you'll agree that it’s almost out of this 
world! 


OST for 

















Iu this article 


BY DAVID MUIR,* W9DZY 


you'll find a description of a 
high-power amplifier, designed 
both for c.w. 
s.s.b. or a.m., in which either 
4-125A, 4-250A or 4-400A tubes 
can be used. Making full use of 
the output of any **100-watt” 
transmitter for driving, it’s a 


and as a linear for 


FTER OPERATING a transmitter in the 100-watt 
A class for a few years, the desire for greater 
power became more pressing as the DX be- 
came a little more elusive and the competition 
keener. The particular transmitter, a B & W 
5100, was quite convenient to operate and so we 
wanted to continue to use it — as a driver for a 
higher power final amplifier if possible. But in 
order to avoid neutralizing and to minimize the 
possibilities of TVI, tetrodes were the natural 
choice for power tubes for the new amplifier. 
However, if the tubes were grid-driven in the 
usual way, either the output of the driver would 
have to be reduced, or some of its output would 
have to be dissipated in a dummy load. 

Neither of these alternatives was attractive, 
nor was the further thought of an 
high-Q grid circuit that would require tuning. 
Cathode drive, seemed to 
indicate, would require extremely high driving 
power for the tube types available, but with most 
of the driving power contributing useful output. 
However, there is some question as to the de- 


associated 


available statistics 


sirability of operating the tubes triode connected, 
because of the dissipation limits of the control 
grid. The most attractive solution seemed to be 
drive with the tubes tetrode 
connected and with d.c. voltages on the screen 
and the control grid to establish the operating 
parameters. 

C.w. operation was the prime requisite, with 
linear operation for single side band next in 
importance. At the time the final was being 
considered, operation as an a.m. linear at full 
input also seemed desirable, establishing a fur- 
ther requirement for roughly 660 watts of plate 


to use cathode 


*8942 Linder Ave., Morton Grove, Ill 





April 1957 


Grounded-Grid Tetrode Kilowatt 



















1-400As 


was 


dissipation. Therefore 
selected, although 4-125A or 4-250A tubes would 
have been equally adaptable without the a.m. 
requirement. 

In the interests of convenience and operating 
simplicity, we planned to attempt to devise some 
method of cathode drive that would not require 


a pair of 


tuning. Fortunately, before construction began 
B & W made available their ferrite-cored bifilar- 
wound filament chokes, one of which is incor- 
porated in the amplifier. No low-capacitance fila- 
ment transformer is required, and the input is 
untuned. The pi network in the driver loads 
noncritically over a wide range of frequencies on 
all bands from 80 to 10 meters, inclusive. As an 
example, v.f.o. operation across the first 100 ke. 
on 20 meters is possible without retuning the 
driver, and with no significant loss in excitation. 
With an antenna essentially flat over the same 
range, the amplifier does not need to be redipped 
either. This makes the system very desirable for 
DX and contest work, 


Results 

The operation of the amplifier has been ex- 
tremely satisfactory to the author. It has com- 
plicated station operation not at all, since band 
switching is almost as easy as with the small 
transmitter alone. No TVI difficulties have been 
encountered although a low-pass filter has not 
been used, but probably it would be well to add 
one as a precaution, particularly in those areas 
with low TV signal strengths. On-the-air reports 
have been indeed gratifying, and there is the ad- 
ditional satisfaction of knowing that a good per- 
centage of the driving power is getting into the 
antenna. 





1] 











Construction 

The amplifier is mounted on a standard 12 X 
19-inch aluminum rack panel and a 13 X 17 X 
{-inch aluminum chassis. The latter is spaced 
from the panel by six 4% X 2-inch spacers, tapped 
for 10-32 screws. Top shielding consists entirely 
of do-it-yourself aliuminum available at hardware 
stores. The framework is constructed from 34 X 
34-inch angle stock, the front and sides are sheet 
stock, and the top and back are perforated sheet 
stock. Four 5<-inch wide angles are cut from the 
angle stock to form mounting feet for the four 
7\%-inch uprights, which are butted to the top 
frame. The top frame is made from four pieces of 
angle stock which have been mitered. Four 114- 
inch pieces of angle stock are used to join the 
uprights to the top frame. Holes are tapped in 
the uprights and top frame to fasten the joining 
pieces, and also for attaching the sheet stock. The 
resulting frame is strong and rigid, and while 
the sheet stock may seem quite light in gauge 
compared to thicknesses ordinarily used in radio 
chassis work it affords a rigid shield with more 
than adequate strength, since it acts only as a 
shield and has no structural function. 

In order to reduce the over-all height of the 
shield by 1! inches, the B & W pi-network tank 
coil was modified slightly, with no detriment to 
its operation. The ten-meter ribbon inductor 
was carefully removed from the assembly and, 


looking at the rear, the left-hand termination 
of the coil was bent in the opposite direction from 
its original position. Thus the coil extends to the 
rear instead of above the assembly. An inch or 
so of the ribbon on the right-hand side was 
uncoiled and a right-angle bend made so that the 
coil terminates at the unused hole in the upper 
right-hand corner of the rear ceramic plate. It 
may be necessary to remove an inch or so of the 
ribbon and redrill the coil for a good fit. A jumper 
of half-inch brass or copper strip runs from this 
terminal to the switch point where the coil was 
originally connected. 

A continuous length of half-inch brass strip 
is used for the lead from the coil assembly to 
the vacuum tank capacitor and the plate blocking 
capacitors. The plate sides of the blocking ca- 
pacitors are mounted on a bracket attached to 
the top of the plate choke and extending midway 
between the tube plate caps. Connection is 
made to the plate caps by heavy copper strand- 
ing. The small bottom insulator on the plate 
choke was removed and replaced by the 500-yuf. 
The vacuum 
mounted vertically, and is driven by a right- 
angle drive over the chassis from the Groth 
counter dial on the front panel. The output coax 
connector is mounted above the chassis on an 
aluminum bracket, and is connected to the coil 
assembly by a short piece of half-inch brass strip. 
A connection midway along this strip goes 


by-pass capacitor. variable is 


R.F.OUT 

















pee---48> + 
ic 


1 











(a) 
aa, 











° 
NT VAC. ~HN. -105 +250 +585 


Blower motor (see text). 
Mica (20 to 50 wuf. satisfactory). 
ine. 500-uul. ceramic, 5000 volts (Centralab 
8585). 
5. one 500-uuf. ceramic, 20 k. v. 
20DK-1T5). See text. 
22. ine. O.01-uf. disk ceramic, 1600 volts. 
5, inc. — 0.001-uf. disk ceramic, 6000 volts. 
300-yuf. vacuum variable (Jennings UCS). 
1500-puf. variable, 0.03-inch spacing (Cardwell 
PL-8013). 
tiurns No. 12 spaced wire diam., wound over 


Ri and Ro. 


(Sprague 


Fig. 1 — Circuit of the 
parallel 4-400A amplifier. 
Capacitances below 0.001 
wf. are in pyf. 





HV.+ 

Ls — ‘Tapped tank inductor; 3.5 Me.: 13.5 wh. 7 
6.5 wh.; 14 Me.: 1.75 wh.; 21 Me.: 1 uh.; 
0.8 wh. (B& W 850). 

Ri, Re 100 ohms, 2 watts, carbon. 

Ry 2500-ohm 25-watt rheostat, 

REC) Special bifilar filament choke (B & W 
FC30). 


type 

RFCe2, RFCs 4 uh. (National ROO). 

RFC4-RFCz, ine. 2.5 mh. (National R100S). 

RFCs National RI75A, 

Si — D.p.d.t. wafer, separate ceramic section for each 
pole. 

T: — Filament transformer, 5 volts, 30 amp. 


OST for 





The tapped tank inductor and variable vacuum capacitor are becoming familiar sights 
in the “de luxe” high-power amplifier. The two 4-400As in this layout provide ample 
plate-dissipation capability for operation as an a.m. linear at a kilowatt input. 

The counter dial drives the vacuum variable. Controls at the left are (top) the band 
switch and (below) the pi-network loading capacitor. Control-grid, screen, and plate 
currents are measured by the three panel meters. The knob below them operates a “c.w.- 
linear” switch that « hanges grid bias and screen voltage according to the ty pe of operation, 





The knob at the center of the 


Some of the layout details are shown in this rear view 
operation. Plate 


chassis wall operates the variable resistor used as a grid leak in c.w. 
voltage is introduced through the high-voltage connector at the right. Other voltages 
go to the connection-blocks along the bottom edge. 


April 1957 








through a feed-through insulator to the loading 
capacitor under the chassis. 

Beneath the chassis, the Eimac Air-System 
sockets are mounted with their filament terminals 
adjacent. All element interconnections on the 
tube sockets are made with %¢-inch brass strip. 
The filament choke is mounted on the side of 
the chassis, and is connected to the tube sockets 
and filament transformer by short lengths of 
No. 12 wire. The blocking capacitors at the fila- 
ment end of the choke, as well as the by-pass 
capacitors at the cold end, are connected to the 
choke with leads as short as possible. The lead 
from the input coax connector is 34-inch brass 
strip, as is also the ground return from the by- 
pass capacitors. All r.f. grounds are terminated 
at a 2-inch wide piece of brass shaped somewhat 
like a “T,” with the arms of the “‘T”’ extending 
over the sockets. The foot of the ‘“‘T”’ is fastened 
under two of the mounting bolts for the vacuum 
variable, 

All d.c. leads are TV high-voltage wire, shielded 
with copper braid. Bypassing is used at the ter- 
minal strips for meter connections at the front 
of the chassis, and chokes and bypassing are 
used at all d.c. power terminals at the rear of 
the chassis. In the rear view, the terminal strip 
to the left (immediately below the r.f. input 
is for connecting 117/230 volts a.e. 
to the filament transformer, and to supply 117 
volts a.c. for the blower motor. The knob in the 
center is for 3, and the terminal strip to the 
right and below it is for the antenna relay coil. 
The terminal strip at the far right, below the 
Millen high-voltage connector, is for the two 
screen voltages, bias voltage, and common con- 
nections. 


connector 


14 


The use of brass strip 
for r.f. connections around 
the tube sockets makes 
for neat “wiring” as well 
as low-inductance ground 
returns. The filament choke 
is in the rectangular can 
mounted on the chassis 
wall next to the tube sock- 
ets. The variable capacitor 
is for control of loading. 


In the front view, the meters from left to right 
are for plate, screen and grid current, respec- 
tively. The upper left-hand knob switches the 
pi-network coil, and the knob below it is for the 
loading capacitor. The Groth counter dial in the 
center tunes the vacuum variable, and the re- 
maining knob is on the c.w.-s.s.b. switch. 


Circuit Notes 

When the amplifier was first tested, a potent 
190-Mc. parasitic appeared during operation as 
a linear amplifier. Its frequency remained un- 
changed regardless of the addition of parasitic 
chokes or traps in the normal positions in any 
and all element leads. A grid-dipper revealed 
that the grids, when disconnected from all cir- 
cuitry, seemed to be floating at the parasitic fre- 
quency, which could also be ‘‘dipped” in the 
screen and cathode circuits. An Eimac Engineer- 
ing Newsletter provided the solution. Briefly, 
the parasitic trap C,R,L, loads the parallel- 
resonant parasitic circuit formed by the screen- 
cathode capacitance and the lead inductances of 
the screen and cathode, while the 500-uuf. capaci- 
tor continues to function normally as a low- 
frequency bypass. No other means of parasitic 
suppression were needed, nor is neutralization 
in any form required. The amplifier is completely 
stable at all operating frequencies. 

Initially, disk ceramic capacitors were used in 
the cathode circuit for blocking and bypassing, 
but the driver loading was found to be critical 
in the 10- and 15-meter bands even though the 
capacitor leads were kept short. After replacing 
the disks with the specified capacitors, the load- 
ing was no longer critical, even with different 
lengths of coax between the driver and amplifier. 


OST for 





The length of the coax should be as short as 
practicable; a length of 6 feet of 72-ohm cable 
gives satisfactory operation. 


Tuning 


Tuning is much the same as in any conven- 
tional amplifier, although at least one important 
precaution must be observed: Full driving power 
should not be applied without plate voltage on 
the amplifier, or without an output load. The 
resultant high grid current would damage the 
tubes. Screen voltage may be removed for tun- 
ing, but a d.c. path from screen to ground must 
be maintained; otherwise the grids will be forced 
to dissipate the entire driving power. 

During initial tune up, it is suggested that 
reduced driving power and reduced plate voltage 
be used. On c.w., adjust the antenna coupling 
for maximum output, and with full plate voltage 
applied adjust the bias control, R3, and the driv- 
ing power for desired plate and screen currents. 
As a linear, adjust the antenna coupling for 
maximum output (with single-tone input), and 
then reduce the driving power until no grid cur- 
rent flows. The output of any of the 100-watt 
class transmitters is more than adequate to drive 
the amplifier to the maximum legal input on all 
bands between 80 and 10 meters. As a linear, 
the amplifier takes approximately 75 watts of 
drive. 

After initial adjustments, a simple tuning 
chart permits quick band change without a lot 
of key-down operation, since there are no crit- 
ically tuned circuits. 


The completed ampli- 
fier installed in the rack, 
with shielding and blower 
mounted in place. As sug- 
gested in the text, a smaller 
blower can be substituted 
to make the unit com- 
pletely self-contained, since 
there is ample space avail- 
able in the chassis. 


April 1957 


Power Supply 


Since little published information is available 
on screen and bias voltages for the type of opera- 
tion selected, the choice was made on the basis 
of highest efficiency on c.w. and best linearity 
on s.8.b. for the available plate supply of 2500 
volts. Higher efficiencies could undoubtedly be 
obtained with higher plate voltage, but at greater 
cost in power-supply components. Fortunately, 
a common fixed bias of 105 volts from an 0C3 
serves on both c.w. and s.s.b., with additional 
bias on c.w. furnished by 3. A screen supply of 
250 volts with this grid bias provides high effi- 
ciency on c.w. with full plate input, a screen 
current of 90 ma., and a grid current of 20 ma. 
for the two tubes. The bias cuts off the amplifier 
completely, and keying is accomplished in the 
driver. Reasonably good screen supply regulation 
is needed, because under key-up conditions plate 
current would flow if the screen voltage increased 
materially 

For linear operation the resistor bias is switched 
out and a screen voltage of 585 volts switched in. 
Resting current is approximately 180 ma., and 
no grid current is drawn under full peak-envelope 
input. Screen current is 36 ma. at peak input 
The screen voltage for linear operation is sup- 
plied from a VR string which is connected across 
the 2500-volt d.c. supply in series with a 50,000- 
ohm resistor. The screen voltage is established 
for the proper resting current by changing the 
VR tube combinations. Variation from 500 to 

(Continued on page 140) 





A Three-Band Cubical Quad Antenna 
System 


With Constructional Details of a Pipe Mast 


BY GLEN R. LEACH,* W4NNQ 





e A beam antenna for 10 and 15 meters, 
consisting of two 2-element antennas of 
the quad type on a single framework, 
was described by W8RWW in QST for 
May of this year. In the system described 
here by W4NNQ, a third pair of elements 
for 20 meters has been added. The 
unique mechanical design of the sup- 
porting framework permits the same 
spacing (in terms of wave length) be- 
tween all driven elements and _ their 
corresponding parasitic elements (in 
this case reflectors). 











AM A MAN nearly 70 years of age who is 
I interested in amateur radio as a hobby. I 

have been helped repeatedly by other ama- 
teurs and articles in QS7’, and have often wished 
to create something which would be of benefit 
to other amateur radio enthusiasts and I hope 
that this article helps in a small way to repay 
those who have helped me. 

The antenna system shown in the sketches 
consists of cubical quad antennas for 20, 15 
and 10 meters suspended in a single framework. 
There is nothing unusual about the circuitry 
of these antennas. However, the mechanical de- 
sign is, I believe, different from any that has been 
published to date. It is this mechanical design 
which I wish to pass on to those who are in- 
terested. The cost to me was very little; and to 
those amateurs who have to watch their pennies, 
I’m sure you will be agreeably surprised at the 
results you will get. 


Details of the Mast 


First you need something on which to mount 
the antennas and to those of you who already 
have a tower or mast, there is no reason why 
you should change, since the weight of the 
complete assembly is less than 40 pounds. 

I needed a mast on which to mount the unit, as 
I did not want to put it on the 83-foot mast which 
I have for other types of antennas. I built this 
mast similar to, but shorter than, the 83-foot 
mast which has proven to be very satisfactory. 
It consists of one 21-foot section of 24-inch, one 
21-foot section of 2-inch and one 21-foot section 
of 14-inch and one 9-foot section of 1-inch gal- 
vanitegs ipe. The mast can be assembied on the 
ground afid raised in the conventional manner, or 
as follows: The 24-inch section of* pipe was 
capped at the bottom ang lowered into the 
ground 11 feet, leaving 10 féet of pipe above 
~*R. R. #1, Nokoniis, Fla. . 


16 


ground. Be sure you get this section of pipe 
in a vertical position as it cannot be bent and 
still telescope the next section inside of it. 

Turn out on a lathe the inside of the 2-inch 
end of a 2!4- to 2-inch reducing coupling to slide 
over the 2-inch pipe, and screw the coupling on- 
to the 21-inch pipe. This will prevent side sway 
in the joint. Next, turn out the 114-inch end of 
a 2- to 1!4-inch reducing coupling to slip over 
the 14-inch pipe, and screw this coupling onto 
the 2-inch pipe. Paint a dark ring around the 
2-inch pipe, 18 feet from the coupling. This is 
merely an indication point so that when you 
raise the, section you will not raise it beyond this 
point. Raise the 2-inch pipe into a vertical posi- 
tion, and let it down inside the 2'-inch pipe. 

Next, turn out the l-inch end of a 1%- to 
l-inch reducing coupling, to slide over a I-inch 
pipe, and screw this onto the 1!4-inch pipe. 
Paint a dark ring around the 11-inch pipe, 
18 feet from the coupling. Place a guy ring 
around the 1!%-inch pipe. Raise the pipe to a 
vertical position and lower it inside the 2-inch 
piece of pipe which was previously lowered 
inside the 2!4-inch pipe. 

Next, place the 9-foot section of l-inch pipe, 
with a cap and a guy ring around the pipe at the 
top end, inside the 14-inch pipe to a depth of 1 
foot, and drill a 44-inch hole through the 1-inch 
end of the 114- to l-inch reducing coupling and 
also, the l-inch pipe. Place a 14-inch bolt in the 
hole so that 8 feet of the l-inch pipe is above the 
coupling. Connect four guy wires (galvanized 
solid No. 12 iron wire preferred) to the guy ring 
around the 1!9-inch pipe. The length of these 
guy wires will have to be determined by yourself 
to suit your local conditions. A guy wire at a 
45-degree angle from the pole is a safe guy wire. 

Raise the 1!9-inch pipe 8 feet and drill a 
\4-inch hole through the 1!%-inch pipe, place 
a 14-inch bolt in the hole. Be sure the guy ring 
is above this 14-inch bolt so that the guy ring 
cannot be less than 8 feet below the center of 
the cubical quad when it is installed and raised 
in position. 

You are now ready to raise the mast to its 
full height. Raise the 11-inch pipe so that you 
can see the painted ring and drill a 14-inch 
hole through the 14-inch end of the 2- to 1)5- 
inch reducing coupling and also the 1!4-inch 
pipe. Insert a 44-inch bolt. This places the top 
of the 1%-inch pipe 28 feet above ground level. 
Now raise the 2-inch piece of pipe to the painted 
ring and drill a 14-inch hole through the 2-inch 
pipe directly above the 2!4- to 2-inch reducing 
coupling. Place a 44-inch bolt through this hole. 


OST for 





This raises the top of the 1!4-inch pipe 46 feet 
above ground level, or full height. The mast will 
remain in the vertical position if no strong 
winds are blowing. 

Next, connect the four guy wires to their 
corresponding anchors, which might be trees; 
iron anchors placed in the ground, or whatever 
means for anchoring which you may have. Do 
not stretch the guy wires too tight. Now lower 
the mast to its fully-telescoped position or so 
that the top of the 11-inch pipe is 10 feet 
and a few inches above ground level. You are 
now ready to assemble and mount the three-band 
cubical-quad framework. 


The Quad Framework 


This cubical-quad framework does not have a 
boom for support. It is entirely supported from 
the mast as follows: Obtain eight pieces of 
144 X 1% X 3{¢-inch angle iron 20 inches long, 
and one 2-foot length of 114-inch pipe. (Note: 
Some makes of 14-inch pipe will not slide over a 
l-inch pipe. Make sure the piece you get will 
slide over a l-inch pipe.) Shape the ends of two of 
these angles (A and B, Figs. 1 and 2) to fit the 
pipe when they are in one plane and at a 55-de- 
gree angle to the pipe, and weld on at 6 inches 
from one end of the pipe. 

Now, below A and B, but as close to them as 
possible, fit and weld on a second pair of angle 
irons (C and D, Fig. 1) at the vertical 
angle (55 degrees) but displaced 70 degrees 
around the pipe from A and B. 

Next, turn the pipe end for end so that the 
bottom end is now on top. At 6 inches from this 
end, weld on four more lengths of angle iron of 
similar dimensions and in a similar manner, 
except that pieces C and D should be 
A and B. This is to keep the same vertical 
distance between similar pairs. Similarly-lettered 
members should be in the same vertical plane, 
of course. This gives us a framework 
will call the “spider”’ and it is the only part ol 
the entire unit which is difficult to construct. 

Obtain eight bamboo fishing poles approxi- 
mately 25 feet in length, and wind about four 
turns of copper wire midway between the joints 
of each pole. This will prevent the weather from 
cracking the poles between the joints. Solder the 
four turns of copper wire together and paint the 
poles with at 


same 


above 


that we 


least two coats of good paint, 
Obtain 16 hose clamps of sufficient size to hold 
the fishing poles in the groove of the angle irons. 

Remove the 9-foot section of l-inch pipe from 
the top of the mast and slip it through the pipe 
of the ‘‘spider”’ so that the pipe protrudes 12 
inches below the bottom of the “spider.’”’ Dig a 
12-inch hole in the ground so the “ 
set on all four legs on the ground. 

Set the “spider” on the ground with the four 
upper angles pointing up. Fasten four fishing 
poles with the hose clamps to these four upper- 
pointing angles, one hose clamp near the pipe 
and one clamp near the end of the angle away 
from the pipe. 


spider” can 


April 1957 


ANGLE ENDS 
SHAPED TO FIT PIPE 


Fig. 1 Top view of “spider” assembly. A, B. 
C and D are separate lengths of angle iron shaped to 
fit and welded to the pipe sleeve. C and D are displaced 
from A and B by a horizontal angle of 70 degrees. See 
Fig. 2 for vertical angle. 


The Antennas 
Referring as necessary to Fig. 3, stretch a 
length of copper wire about 68 feet long (I used 
No. 12 stranded) along the ground and string 
five ordinary small insulators numbered 1, 2, 3, 
4 and 5 (this will be the 20-meter antenna). 
Place insulator No. 5 on the end of the wire and 
fasten. Fasten insulator No. 1 8 feet 114 inches 
from insulator No. 5. Fasten insulator No. 2 
16 feet 9 inches from insulator No. 1 and insula- 
tor No. 3 16 feet 9 inches from insulator No. 2, 
and insulator No. 4 16 feet 9 inches from insulator 
No. 3. String the remaining wire through in- 
sulator No. 5, 16-foot 9-inch 
square loop, as shown in Fig. 3. Do not fasten 
this end of the wire until after tuning the loop. 
Construct another loop of wire similar to the 
above for the reflector, adding a 


completing the 


tuning stub 
of spaced wire about 6 feet long at the center 
insulator, as shown in Fig. 3. 

For 15 meters, construct another similar loop 
of wire, except that the sides and top shall be 
11 feet 
7'2 inches each side of center. Construct another 
similar loop of wire; the sides and top shall be 
11 feet 3 inches each, and the bottom 5 feet 7 
inches each side of center. A stub of 5 feet should 
be added. 

For 10 meters, construct another similar loop 
of wire, except that the sides and top shall be 
8 feet 3 inches each, and the bottom 4 feet 114 
inches each center. Construct 


3 inches each, and the bottom 5 feet 


another 
similar loop of wire; the sides and top shall be 
8 feet 3 inches each, and the bottom 4 feet 114 
inches each side of center. The stub should be 
about 4 feet. 


side of 


17 





PIPE SLEEVE-——— 


ANGLE IRON 





Fig. 2— Side view of “spider” assembly, showing 
upper and lower pairs of A and B sections shaped and 
welded to the pipe sleeve at a vertical angle of 55 
degrees. Upper and lower pairs of sections C and D 
(Fig. 1) are not shown, but are attached at the same 
vertical angle (55 degrees). 


Fastening Wires to Poles 


If you have followed instructions, you now 
have the spider on the ground with four fishing 
poles fastened to the “spider”? and pointing 
upward. 

Connect a length of nylon cord (about 44-inch 
diameter will do) to the upper end of each fishing 
pole approximately 15 feet from the large end 
of the pole. Connect the other end of the nylon 
cord to the guy ring around the 1-inch pipe. 
This merely takes the weight off the fishing 
poles and prevents their sagging. 

Fasten the 10-meter driven element to poles 
No. 1-U and 4-U so that the plane of the element 
is 3 feet 4 inches from the center of the mast. 
You will find that there will be a little sag in 
the wire until all four corners have been fastened 
in place. 

Fasten the 10-meter reflector to poles 2-U 
and 3-U so that the plane of the element is 3 feet 
4 inches from the center of the mast. This gives 
you 0.2-wave-length spacing, or 6 feet 8 inches 
between reflector and driven element. 

Fasten the 15-moter driven element to poles 
1-U and 4-U so that the plane of the element is 
4 feet 7 inches from the center of the mast. 
Fasten the 15-meter reflector to poles 2-U and 
3-U so that the plane of the element is 4 feet 


18 


7 inches from the center of the mast. This gives 
a 0.2-wave-length spacing, or 9 feet 2 inches 
between driven element and reflector. 

Fasten the 20-meter driven element to poles 
1-U and 4-U so that the plane of the element is 
6 feet 8 inches from the center of the mast. 
Fasten the 20-meter reflector to poles 2-U and 
3-U so that the plane of the element is 6 feet 
8 inches from the center of the mast. This gives 
a (.2-wave-length spacing, or 13 feet 4 
between the 20-meter driven element 
flector. 

Connect a length of nylon cord to pole 1-U at 
the point where you fastened the 20-meter 
driven element. Connect the other end of the 
nylon cord to pole 2-U at the point where the 
20-meter reflector has been fastened. Connect 
a length of nylon cord to pole 4-U at the point 
where the 20-meter driven element been 
fastened. Connect the other end of the nylon 
cord to pole 3-U where the reflector has been 
fastened. Tighten both nylon cords until most 
of the sag in the wires is removed. 

You are now ready to lift the “spider” and 
upper four fishing poles and connected wire to 
the top of the pipe mast. If, however, you are 
using an existing tower or mast which cannot be 
lowered, you should remove the nylon cords 
from pole 1-U to 2-U and temporarily mount the 
“spider”? about 10 feet off the ground so the 
lower fishing poles 1-L, 2-L, 3-L and 4-L can be 
fastened in place, and the wires connected and 
tuned. Reconnect the nylon cord from pole 1-U 
to 2-U and tighten as before. 

With the “spider” and poles 1-U, 2-U, 3-U 
and 4-U lifted to the top of the mast or to a 
temporary position by the side of an existing 
tower or mast, proceed as follows: 

Fasten fishing poles 1-L, 2-L, 3-L and 4-L to 
the bottom four angles with hose clamps in a 
similar manner to the top four poles. 

Connect the lower sides of the 10-, 15- and 
20-meter driven elements to poles 1-L and 4-L in 
a manner similar to the upper side, keeping each 
element in a vertical plane. 

Connect the lower sides of the 10-, 15- and 
20-meter reflector elements to poles 2-L and 
3-L in a manner similar to the upper side, keeping 
these elements in a vertical plane. 

Connect the stubs of the 10-, 15- and 20- 
meter reflectors as shown in Fig. 3, or some 
similar manner. Insulate stub from the 
others. 

Connect nylon cords from poles 1-L to 2-L 
and from 3-L to 4-L as shown in the drawing of 
Fig. 3. 

Drill a 14-inch hole through the pipe of the 
“spider” and the 1-inch pipe and put a 14-inch 
bolt in the hole. 


inches 
and re- 


has 


each 


Tuning the Quads 


Well, here is where I get into trouble with my 
fellow amateurs what I don’t know 
about tuning an antenna would fill a very large 
book, but, anyway, here is the procedure I 
followed for each quad. 


because 


QST for 





Fig. 3 — Assembled view of the 
three-band quad antenna. Bam- 
boo poles, clamped in the angle- 
iron section of the “spider” at the 
center, form a supporting frame- 
work for the three sets of quad 
elements. Spacing between ele- 
ments is given in the text. 

Excess bamboo at the “flimsy” 
ends are cut off after all elements 
are in place. 














~ 


1) Do not connect the coaxial cable until later. 

2) I Heathkit impedance 
bridge and a grid-dip meter. 

3) I connected the bridge to the driven ele- 
ment of the antenna on the bottom leg across 
the insulator with short a as I 
could get. 

4) I inductively coupled the grid-dip meter 
to the bridge. 

5) I tuned in my radio receiver to the 
quency which I wanted for the quad and turned 
on the beat oscillator. 

6) I then shortened the of 
element until a null was obtained at the irequency 


used a antenna 


connection 


as 


fre- 


wire the driven 
that the receiver was tuned to. 

7) Next, the reflector was tuned to a 5 per 
cent lower frequency than its associated driven 
element by moving the shorting bar. 

8) A connected to 
driven element, in my case it had to be about 75 


52-ohm coax was each 
feet in length. 

9) The coax was supported at the mast to take 
the weight off the driven elements. I used V 
wedge blocks similar to those used by the power 
companies for supporting their lead-in cables. 

10 
ultimate height. 

11 
transmitter end of the coax and I found that it 
did not tune to the frequency that the 
driven element was tuned to, so I cut off a few 


The entire antenna was then raised to its 
The bridge was then connected to the 


sume 


April 1957 














- FEED LINES 


inches of the coax at a time, until the entire 
system resonated at the desired Irequency. This 
may may have but I 
have received such wonderful reports on all three 
bands that I can’t help but believe that it was 
the correct thing to do. The meter on the bridge 
the desired frequency with 


ol not been necessary, 


returned to zero at 
the potentiometer in the 50- to 75-ohm position.! 


Conclusion 

The rotating mechanism is another story and 
you will have to figure out your own method of 
doing that. In my case, I rotated the entire mast 
from the top of the 2'4-inch piece of pipe and 
the rotating device consisted of a flywheel from 
a Cadillac motor, a to match the 
flywheel, a worm gear and a l 


Starter gear 
elt connected 8- 
h.p. motor with reversing windings. 
My various antennas, and I have a number, are 
matching network through a 


Continue 


connected to a 


ion page 146) 


change as the length of 


iif 
the line 


the impedance appears to 


antenna accurately matched 


affect the mis 


is changed, the S not 


line. Changing the line length will not 
natch. However, if difficulty is exper 
final amplifier, pruning the 
bring the impedance at the input end of the line to a value 
the of the network output 
The degree of indicated the 
author, but from of others with 
of this type, it is 
transmission-line 


Ed. 


to the 


enced in loading the 


line (or lengthening it) may 


within range transmitter’s pi 


system mismatch is no by 


the expenience antennas 


probably not so gre us to cause serious 


losses with lines lengt! 


customary 





V.H.F. Meteor Scatter Propagation 


Hints on Using Meteor Trail Ionization for 2-Meter DX 


BY WALTER F. BAIN,* W4LTU 





¢ If practical results mean anything, few 
v.-h.f. men are better qualified to write 
on the subject of meteor scatter than 
W4ALTU. Since he moved to Orlando from 
Ithaca, N. Y. (where he was W2WFB), 
Walt has providing first Florida 
contacts for station after station on 144 
Me. Almost wholly as a result of this 
meteor-scatter work, W4LTL has 
13 states in 6 call areas on 144 Me., 
ranging from Rhode Island to Wisconsin. 


now 


Here he tells us how he does it. 











YINCE 1953, when W4AO and W4HHK first 
S observed meteor-seattered signa!s on 144 
kh’ Me. while attempting a tropospheric con- 
tact, this medium of communication has been of 
increasing interest to serious v.h.f. amateurs. And 
well it might be, for it provides a means of making 
2-meter contacts over distances of 500 to 1500 
miles. Meteor scatter is no mode for the casual 
operator, however, for it requires some power, 
large antennas, sensitive receivers, and no small 
amount of patience and operating skill at both 
ends of the path. 

Other factors that have not received much at- 
tention to date are the choice of date, time and 
antenna orientation. If the material to follow 
can help in some small way to pin down these 
aspects of meteor scatter, and bring about in- 
creased and more effective use of the medium, it 
will have served its purpose. Anyone who is 
interested only in results, and is willing to take 
the information on faith, can turn right now 
to Table I, and pick his path, shower and time. 
Those who want to delve into the how and why, 
as well as the when, are encouraged to read on. 


Meteor Trail Structure and Properties 

As is generally known, the meteor signal is 
reflected, not from the particle itself, usually 
about the size of a grain of sand, but from the 
stream of ionization left by the meteor as it is 
heated and vaporized by friction with the atmos- 
phere. The density of this ionization determines 
to a great extent the type of signal reflected by it. 

Meteor trails divided between two 
categories, First is the underdense, so-called be- 


may be 


cause the ionization density is too low for com- 
plete reflection of the signal. The result is more 
of a scattering than a true reflection. The amount 
of signal scattered is proportional to the density 
at any instant, and as a consequence the signal 
tapers off gradually as the trail thins out and 

* &% Systems, Incorporated, 2326 Diversified Way, Or- 


lando, Fla. 


20 


diffuses away. The result is the familiar ‘“‘ping”’ 
that may last up to two or three seconds. This 
provides the majority of meteor signals heard on 
144 Me. 

The second form is the overdense trail. Here 
ionization is greater than the critical density, 
as with the ionosphere when you are working 
below the m.u.f. Reflection of most of the incident 
signal is obtained, and the signal strength is 
essentially constant until the ionization density 
drops below the critical value. These trails pro- 
vide strong signals of up to two minutes or more 
duration, but unfortunately, they are not too 
common in 144-Me. experience. Meteors giving 
such bursts are particles of roughly a quarter- 
inch or more in diameter. 

The signal strength from an underdense burst 
has been found to drop off as the third power of 
the wave length, while the duration drops off as 
Thus it can be that 
signals should be beth shorter and 
15 db.) than those obtained 


the second seen 
144-Me. 
weaker (by about 
on 50 Me. 


pow er, 


Trail Orientation 


We have no choice of overdense or underdense, 
but we do have some control over trail orienta- 
tion. Let’s see what effect it has on the signal. 


FROM 
RADIANT 
(A) 


FROM 
RADIANT ( Cc ) ( 8) ) 


FROM 
RADIANT 


POINT OF 
REFLECTION 


R 


Fig. 1 Meteor trail orientations for forward scatter. 
A trail parallel to a line between the two stations and 
parallel to the surface of the earth is shown at A. B 
shows a trail perpendicular to the line between the 
stations, but still parallel to the earth’s surface. The 
trail in C is perpendicular to the line between the sta- 
tions, but at a 45-degree angle to the earth. The opti- 
mum position is shown at D, Here a trail similar to C 
is displaced so that the antennas must be aimed 7 de- 
grees off the true heading. 


OST for 





The master equation for meteor scatter, a cum- 
bersome thing, indicates that the strongest signal 
should be obtained when the trail is along the 
line between the two stations, and parallel to 
the earth’s surface at the mid-point, Fig. 1A. 
This is all well and good, until we realize that 
there is very little chance of finding a meteor in 
that position, just grazing the atmosphere at 
exactly the right height! We must therefore look 
for good orientations that give us a more favor- 
able number of meteors. (Signal strength isn’t 
everything.) 

Considering meteor paths at right angles to 
the line between the two stations, Fig. 1B, we 
find the same situation Few 
would properly graze the atmosphere to give a 
trail. But if we tilt the trail so that it forms an 
angle with the earth’s surface, Fig. 1C, we have 


as before. meteors 


something. The nearer the meteor path is to 
vertical incidence, the greater is the probable 
meteor density per unit area. At the limit of 
vertical incidence we have carried a good thing 
too far. The trails are directly 
between the two stations, and would not be ex- 


coming down 
pected to provide signals, as the meteor equation 
also indicates that the signal must hit the trail 
perpendicularly. 

A compromise is In order, and we find that a 
trail about 45 
surface of the earth gives a 
signal strength per meteor and number of mete- 
ors. One further consideration remains. For beth 
stations to hit the trail perpendicularly they 
must beam toward trails that are off center from 
the path away from the direction of the meteors, 
Fig. 1D. (It is assumed that 
are travelling in parallel paths. 

For trails hitting the atmosphere at 45 degrees, 
the correction in antenna heading is only about 7 
degrees. This is likely to prove important only 
for very sharp beams, but for the perfectionist 
it is just the thing. If we agree that trails directly 
between contribute nothing, and that those off 
path by an excessive angle give little, then the 
only region of interest is that about 7 degrees 


orientation of degrees to the 


balance between 


all these meteors 


wide, centered 7 degrees off path. Our antennas 
need illuminate only this, so the beam width can 
be narrowed to 7 degrees in the horizontal 
plane if we W ish to construct such a behemoth. 
Narrower beams would give stronger signals, but 
fewer of them, a poor compromise in our opinion. 

What is the upshot of all this argument? If we 
agree that there is an optimum orientation for 
meteor trails, we only determine 
whether it is possible to set up practical circuits 
that will coincide more or less closely with this 
optimum. For the case of shower meteors, which 
are of this is indeed 


possible. 


now need 


greatest interest to us, 


Using Meteor Shower Information 


With information available as to the point in 
the sky from which meteors appear to come, the 
radiant, we need only time our tests to correspond 
to the proper radiant position in respect to the 
path we wish to work. The radiant will rise in 


April 1957 


(OVERHEAD) 


s s 


Fig. 2 Radiant paths and locations. The observer 


is lying on his back looking up at the sky, feet south. 
A flat projection of the sky from this observing position 
is shown at 2A. Optimum radiant positions for north- 
south paths (A and B) are shown at 2B. To be optimum 
for east-west and northwest-southeast paths the radiant 
would have to pass through points C and D respectively. 
In 2¢ 
for north-south 


we see a radiant path having no optimum point 
work. A and B would be the proper 
points. A radiant so close to the pole that it never goes 
below the northern horizon is shown in 2D. Point A is 
optimum for east-west werk. 


the east through the sky at a height 


determined by its angle from the pole star, and 


swing 
set in the west. Such conventional behaviour can 
a projection of the 


be plotted very easily on 
visible hemisphere of the sky, drawn as a circular 
area north at the south at the 
bottom, east to the left the right. 
( Kast their 


positions, as we must consider ourselves viewing 


with the top, 


and west at 


and west are reversed from usual 


with our heads north 
2A. The pole star is 
above the northern 


the sky on our backs, 
Such a plot is shown in Fig 
height 
that depends on one’s latitude. 

plot the radiant declination and right 
latitude and longitude) of 
construct a very simple slide- 
rule ty pe ol calculator that will trace the radiant 
a function of the time of 
From this we can obtain the times of radiant 
rise and set, and its height in the sky and azimuth 
at any Since will be 
enhanced when the radiant azimuth is at right 
angles to the desired path and above the horizon 


shown at a horizon 

If we 
ascension (celestial 
a shower we can 
path across the sky as 
day. 
meteor 


time propagation 


by between 30 and 60 degrees (a compromise 
with the 45 degrees mentioned previously) we 
can easily determine the optimum times for given 
This is 


done to derive the information in Table 1. 


paths and shower radiants what was 

tadiant positions that are desirable for various 
paths and times are shown in Fig. 2B. Fig. 2C 
illustrates a condition in which no radiant orien- 
tation is found for a certain path. In Fig. 2D we 
a radiant that is sufficiently 
close to the pole star that it does not set, but 


see an example of 


reaches a minimum height in the northern sky. 


21 





The information in Table I is largely self- 
explanatory. (If you followed what went before, 
you should have no trouble now.) The showers 
and their most probable dates of occurrence 
are listed at the left, followed by the times of 
rise and set of the radiant. Optimum times for 
north-south, northwest-southeast, east-west and 
listed. No opti- 
mum time is given for similar to that 
shown in Fig. 2B. The letters following or below 
each optimum time are the directions in which 
the 7-degree antenna bearing correction from true 
heading should be applied. Example: WIKCS 
wants to set up a schedule with WOWOK during 
the Quadrantids Shower, Jan. Ist-4th. This is 
path, so the information in the 


southwest-northeast paths are 


cases 


an east-west 
third column applies. The best time is between 
0800 and 0900, this being local time at the mid- 
point of the path. The time-zone boundary is 
well toward the western end, so EST should be 
close enough. The S below the time indicates 
that the antennas should be aimed about 7 
degrees to the south of the true bearing between 
the two stations. 

Major showers are marked with an asterisk, 
and for these showers we also have information 
concerning probable burst velocities in 
the atmosphere, periodicity of major peaks, and 
the years when they may next be expected to 
reach these peaks. Meteor streams the earth 


rates, 


encounters are debris of comets that have gone 
to pieces or are in the process of doing so. Thus 
meteoric material in the portion of the comet’s 
orbit where the comet is (or was) is much more 
dense than that through the re- 
mainder of the orbit. If the comet makes a full 
revolution in, say, 30 then at 
intervals we would expect to pass through this 


spread out 


years, 30-year 
dense portion of the orbit, and experience a 
spectacular shower. The best example of this 
in amateur v.h.f. experience was the Giacobinids 
Shower of October, 1946, which is expected to 
peak again in 1959. (See Note 2, Table I.) In 
intermediate years we get only a moderate shower 
when our orbit intersects that of the comet. 

Other meteor streams have had time to become 
almost evenly distributed throughout their orbits 
(Note 1) and give almost equal showers each 
year. Such a stream is the old reliable, the 
Perseids of August. Use of the information on 
hourly rates is self-evident; the showers with 
the highest rates are most useful for our purposes. 
This rate can vary considerably from 
year, and normally- 
good shower will not show up at all. 

Now we matter of meteor ve- 
locity. The previous discussion has (I hope) 
shown that 0600 is not necessarily the best time 
for shower contacts. It is optimum for sporadic 
meteors, but we will get to them later. 0600 has 
attained this undeserved reputation because of 
the classical knowledge that the greatest numbers 
of sporadic meteors are seen then. This is the re- 
sult of the earth’s moving through space at 31 

while the greatest meteor velocity 
space is 42 km./sec. Thus at 0600 


vear to 


however, occasionally a 


consider the 


km. /sec., 
through 


22 


overhead meteors are moving toward the on- 
rushing earth, and even those that are almost 
stationary in space are swept up. At 1800, 
however, only those meteors of velocity greater 
than that of the earth are able to catch up and 
enter the atmosphere. This results in a much 
smaller number of meteors at the latter time, 
the difference being about 3 to 1, according to 
measured distributions of meteor velocity. 

Note that what is affected by velocity is the 
number of meteors, not the intensity. Though 
it may be difficult to swallow intuitively, the 
density of meteoric ionization per unit length 
is dependent only on the mass of the particle, 
and is not affected by the velocity. In fact, 
it has been found experimentally that the slower 
meteors give longer-duration signals. Duration 
to half amplitude is proportional to 1/vel. There- 
fore, it is to be expected that, other things 
being equal, the lower velocity showers in Table 
I will provide better chances for 144-Me. con- 
tacts. (All due apologies to the high-velocity 
Perseids! ) 

The daylight showers in Table I 
covered recently by radio observation. Only those 
that have been found to be annual events are 
listed. Others have put in only one appearance 
and are not included. Burst rates for daylight 
showers cannot be compared directly with those 
of the night showers (measured by visual means), 
but it should be emphasized that they are all 
worth some attention on the part of 2-meter 
men. In faet, the daylight Arietids, June 8th, 
exceed the Geminid Shower, and rival the night- 
time Perseids. Better try these! 


were dis- 


Sporadic on Non-Shower Meteors 


great, but unfortunately, they 
are not in evidence continually, In between them 
there is a continuous background of meteors, of 
almost random direction and velocity, that can 
put across some signal if you wait long enough 
and satisfy other conditions. Optimizing the 
effect of the sporadics is fairly simple. The 
0600 peak mentioned earlier is essentially the 
best time, with 1800 the worst. Signals can be 
obtained on either side of the true bearing, but 
both stations should use the same side, of course. 

For paths with a north-south component it 
will be found that one side is slightly better than 
the other. More meteors are picked up when the 
earth is moving into them than away trom them. 
For the hours of darkness the antennas should be 
west of true, and for daylight work they should 
be east of true. For paths roughly east and west 
the antennas should be off true bearing to the 
north for both day and night. It has been found 
that there is a somewhat greater meteor density 
in the plane of the ecliptic, so the greatest 
number will be coming from the southern skv. 
With northwest-southeast or southwest-north- 
cast paths try to satisfy both requirements, if 
possible — or flip a coin! 

Burst rates on sporadic meteors are low. Re- 
ception of W4LTU by W3GKP, near Washing- 
ton, D. C., has shown monthly averages under 


Showers are 


OST for 





Shower 
ond Dote 
* Janvary 1-4 

Quadrantids 
January 17 
Cygnids 
February 5-10 
Aurigids 
March 10-12 
Bodtids 
March 20 
Como Berenices 
April 19-23 
Lyrids 
May 1-6 
Aquarids 
May 11-24 
Herculids 
May 30 
Pegasids 
June 2-17 
Scorpiids 
June 27-30 
Pons Winnecke 
July 14 
Cygnids 
July 18-30 
Capricornids 
July 25-August 4 
Perseids 
July 26-31 
Aquorids 
August 10-14 
Perseids 
August 10-20 
Cygnids 
August 21-23 
Draconids 
August 21-31 
Draconids 
September 7-15 
Perseids 
September 22 
Aurigids 
October 2 
Quadrantids 
October 9 
Giacobinids 
October 12-23 
Arietids 
October 18-23 
Orionids 
November |-7 
Taurids 
November | 4-18 
Leonids 
November 22-30 
Andromedids 
December 10-14 
Geminids 
December 22 
Ursids 
May 19-21 
Cetids 
June 4-6 
Perseids 
June 8 
Arietids 
June 30-July 2 
Taurids 


Table |— Meteor Shower Data for V.H.F. Use 


Time Visible 
Rise Set 


2300 1800 
0230 2130 
1200 0330 
2200 0830 
1800 0630 
2100 100 
0300 1200 
1800 0630 
2300 1200 
2000 

Does not set; 
min. at 0900 
1800 1000 
2030 0400 
2230 1430 
2200 0600 
Does not set; 
min. ot 1730 
1200 0700 
Does not set; 


min. at 0900 
Does not set; 


min. at 0700 
2130 1200 
2100 1230 
0500 0000 
0600 0300 
1900 0700 
2230 0930 
1900 0630 
0000 1230 
1300 0600 
1900 0900 
Does not set; 
min. at 2030 
0530 1430 
0500 1730 
0330 1530 


0500 1700 


Optimum Paths and Times 


Hourly Rote 





2330-0030 
0530-0630 
2130-2300 
0100-0300 
0230 W 
0530 E 


2130-2300 W 
0100-0300 E 
0300-0430 W 
0630-0800 E 


2130-2330 W 
0230-0430 E 
0000-0200 w 
0600-0800 E 
2100-2300 W 
0300-0500 E 
0300-0500 W 
0800-1000 E 


0800-1000 W 
1300-1500 E 
0600-0800 W 
1100-1300 E 
0700-0900 W 
1300-1500 E 


Moijor showers—Last four ore daylight showers. 


These streams are evenly distributed and little year to year variation is to be expected 


NW-SE 


0300-0800 
Sw 
0600-1100 
Sw 
1400-1730 
SW 
0330-0530 
NE 
2000-2130 
Sw 
2330-0100 
SW 
0830-1000 
NE 


2000-2130 
Sw 
0130-0300 
SW 
0100 
NE 
1500-1830 
SW 
2100-2330 
SW 
0100-0200 
NE 
0130-0430 
Sw 
0300-0500 
NE 
2330-030 
Sw 
1700-1930 
SW 
1500-1830 
SW 
1300-1630 
Sw 
0030-0200 
SW 
0030-0200 
Sw 
0900-1400 
Sw 
1100-1600 
SW 


0430-0600 
NE 
0130-0300 
NE 


1600-2000 
sw 
2130-2300 

SW 


1100-1230 
NE 


1130-1300 
NE 


E-W 
0800-0900 


0630-0830 
N 


1830-2330 
S 
1630-2130 


Ss 


0130-1530 
s 
0900-1 100 
N 


1030-1130 
N 


NOTES 


SW-NE 
0900-1 400 
SE 


1300-1800 


2330-0300 
SE 
2130-0100 
SE 
0700-0830 


9200-0330 
NW 

2300-0030 
NW 


2300-0300 
SE 
0500-0630 
SE 


0730-0900 
NW 


0900-1030 
NW 


Visual Radio 


35 45 


(Note 3) 
(Note 4) 
60 70 


13 13 
(Note 5) 


Next 
Mo ximum 


1960 # 


1957 
1965 
1958. 1959 
(Note 1) 


1958, 1959 


Very concentrated stream. Peok years give up to 400 meteors per minute but shower lasts for only 6 hours. During off years the count is negligible. See 
December, 1946, QST, page 43 
Peak years give 60/hour visual. in the peak years of the 1800s, prior to being deflected by Jupiter and Saturn, this shower gove 1200 per minvte. 

Before being deflected by Jupiter this stream gove peck yeor rates of 100/minute. No notable rates have been observed since, though the stream 


could return. 


Short duration shower. Peak yeors the radio rate is 165/hour 
This intense daylight shower begins June 2 and runs to June 14 with radio rates from 25 to 70/hour. 


April 1957 


23 





1 per minute. This is on an evening schedule, and 
doubtless early morning tests would yield higher 
counts.! During intense shower activity the short- 
time burst rate has run as high as 12 to 14 per 
minute. This was on WS8KAY, as received by 
W4LTU during the 1956 Geminids. The visual 
rate on sporadic meteors runs about 5 per hour. 
Visual and radio rates are given in Table I where 
they are available. The radio rates were taken 
at frequencies lower than 144 Mc., but with less 
sensitive equipment in general, so direct com- 
parison with 144-Mc. conditions is not accurate. 
An important point for the 144-Mc. DX enthu- 
siast: the percentage of the helpful overdense 
bursts is definitely higher in the showers than 
in the non-shower periods. 


Distance and Antenna Height 

The range of meteor-scatter signals is a func- 
tion of the meteor height and the wave angle. 
Most meteor trails are found at heights around 
100 km., which is roughly the height of F layer. 
Thus 2-meter DX by this medium is similar to 
that encountered in /£, and ionospheric-scatter 
work on 50 Me. The peak around 100 km. is not 
sharp, however. The Perseids, for example, 
range from 65 to 150 km. The number of trails 
at the extremes is about one-tenth that at the 
mean height of 100 km. In general, high-velocity 
meteors appear at higher altitudes, than those 
of lower velocity. 

On the basis of 100 km., the maximum range to 
be expected for zero angle radiation is about 
1500 miles, and this assumes that you are being 
helped by standard refraction in the atmosphere. 
Table Il shows the expected range as a function 
of wave angle, and gives the antenna height for 
this wave angle. Antenna height will 
the wave angle in this way only when there is 
flat reflecting ground in the direction of propa- 
gation. If you are fortunate enough to have 
this ground lobing effect, you can pick up as 
much as 6 db. effective gain, due to reinforce- 
ment of the direct by the ground-reflected wave. 

Choice of antenna height can thus affect the 
ranges at which you put down or receive maxi- 


control 


signal of W4HHK around 
0700 showed averages around 3 bursts per minute during 
non-shower periods at W1HDQ kd. 


! Daily observation of the 





Table II 


Antenna Height, Wave Angle, and Range 
(for 1OO-km. Meteor Height) 


Height Wave 
Fe 

Wave Lengths Meters Deg 

1 f 14.5 

2 

3 

4 

5 
6 
8 


Angle Distance 


12 











mum signal. If your free-space vertical pattern 
is broad enough you will have several lobes, 
placed at odd multiples of the angle of the first 
lobe. Even multiples of the first lobe angle will 
give a null, and should be avoided. Thus an 
antenna height of 40 feet over good ground will 
give a first maximum at 2.5 degrees, a minimum 
at 5 degrees, and a second maximum at 7.5 
degrees. From these we would expect maximum 
signals at 1125 and 700 miles, and no signal at 
875 miles. These calculations should be fairly 
accurate for 100-km. meteor heights, except at 
wave angles below one degree. Here the vari- 
ability of atmospheric refraction can foul things 
up. In locations where no ground pattern is ex- 
pected (cities and terrain with steep hills and 
valleys) the best thing is to get the beam high 
enough to clear obstacles and their diffraction 
effects, and fire away. 

During the 1956 Perseids W7LEE reported 
reception of W8SKAY and W2CXY, distances of 
1800 and 2200 miles. How could meteor signals 
cover A form of double-hop 
propagation from two overdense bursts is possi- 
ble, but highly unlikely. More 
the idea of a single overdense burst at extreme 
height. This would have to be around 300 km. 
for a 1-degree radiation angle, and 220 km. for 
zero angle. Such heights have been observed 
visually on rare occasions. 

So far we’ve considered only forward scatter, 
or propagation along the shortest path between 
the two stations. Back-scatter is mainly of 
academic interest for 144-Mc. purposes, but a 
few comments are in order. With the latter, 
signal strength should be the same as for forward 
scatter, but the duration drops off rapidly for 
small scatter angles. The information on a single 
burst is thus greatly reduced, but the mode 
might still be useful for short distances where 
obstructions limit other forms of propagation.” 
The two antennas would be aimed, not at each 
other, but at a common volume of space no 
more than 700 miles distant. The optimum time 
for such contacts (here we go again!) would be 
when the meteor radiant is directly overhead, 
the trails then being perpendicular at the point 
of reflection. The radiant position may vary 
within a plane that remains perpendicular to a 
line between the point of reflection and the mid- 
point of the direct path between the two stations. 
If it is out of this plane specular reflection will no 
longer be had, and the signals will drop. 


these distances? 


reasonable is 


Operating Techniques 

IXveryone who has worked meteor scatter 
seems to have come up with his own ideas on how 
contact may best be made, but the procedures 
boil down to two basic systems. Both involve 
cooperative work on a prearranged schedule. 

1) Station A spends 5 minutes calling and 

Continued on page 140) 


2 Such back-scatter has been observed on 50 Me. by 
several workers. WOCNM and W#FKY, Grand Junction, 
Colo., have had fairly good results with W7QDJ, Clearfield, 
Utah, with all stations aiming at the San Francisco area. 


va, 


OST for 








Variable Band Width Q Multiplier 


Continuously-Variable Selectivity for the Receiver 


BY RONALD L. IVES* 





® Since its appearance in one form or 
another in several kits and communica- 


tions receivers, the QO multiplier is no 
stranger to 
already using one to improve your re- 
ceiver perforn 








nost amateurs. If you are not 


nee, this article tells how 
to build and adjust one that is continu- 
ously variable in its band width. Some 





good construction hints are included. 











HE Q MULTIPLIER enjoys a well-deserved pop- 
TTuissis these days, for several reasons. It is 
an outrigger device that can be added to an 
existing with practically no 
modification, an important days 
when one must consider the resale value of re- 


receiver receiver 


factor these 
ceivers. In its most popular version it will provide 
either a “peak” for e.w 
for phone or ¢.w. 


a “null” 
work. The peak or null can be 
moved across the pass band of the receiver. As 
its name indicates, the Q multiplier is a device 
that “‘multiplies” or increases the Q of a circuit 
many times, and the high-Q circuit is then used 
as an equivalent parallel-tuned circuit 
or a series-tuned circuit (null) across an i.f. ampli- 
fier stage. It is an application of the principle of 
regeneration, but it 


recept ion or 


(peak 


is a stable and readily- 
controllable one. 

* 251 Lincoln Ave., Palo Alto, Calif 

! Villard and Rorden, “ Flexible Selectivity for Communi- 


Electronics, April, 1952. Villard also 


eations Receivers 


developed the well-known ‘‘Selectoject 










Black crackle finish on the 

° 4 
panel and the*generous use of 
decals dress up the Q multiplier. 
The panel is 6 inches square. 


April 1957 





Circuit 

The specific circuit described here (Fig. 1 
provides for the peak and null functions and, 
also, variable band width in the peak position. 
This is the basic circuit devised by Villard,' but a 
few minor changes have been made for operating 
convenience. 

To make tuning easier, a 10-to-1 electrical 
vernier, in the form of a 10-uyuf. variable shunted 
across the main tuning capacitor, is 
provided. This vernier ratio seems optimum for 
the writer’s tuning practices. Other operators have 
different to omit the 
electrical vernier and use a reduction drive on a 


75-tpl 


choices some may wish 


75-uyf. tuning capacitor. Regardless of the con- 
trol method used, the main tuning capacitor and 
vernier, if should be mechanically rigid, 
with a slop and end play in the 


used 


minimum o 
bearings 

As connected, the heater and plate circuits of 
the Q multiplier are always “‘live”’ 
ceiver is turned on. To indicate clearly what func- 
tion the multiplier is switched to, two pilot lights 
are used. One is lighted when the Q multiplier is 
switched to PEAK, the other when the multiplier 
is switched to NuLL. Both pilots are out when 
the switch is in “‘off’’ (center) position. 


when the re- 


To prevent intercoupling with other circuits 
in the receiver, the plate and heater circuits of 
the multiplier are isolated with some care. Plate 
isolation is obtained with a two-section RC filter 
consisting of two 10K resistors and three 0.01-xf. 


disk ceramic capacitors. Heater bypasses are 















used, and to eliminate hum modulation resulting 
from heater-cathode leakage and diode action, 
the heater center tap is biased approximately 
+40 volts with respect to ground.? The Q multi- 
plier will work excellently, however, with the 
heaters connected in any conventional fashion. 


Construction 

The case for this instrument is made from a 
Seezak 6 X 6 X 4inch expandable aluminum 
chassis. Rail tongues are backed with 34 X 349- 
inch strip brass, held in place with 3-48 flat-head 
machine screws, and the tongue bosses are drilled 
and tapped 6-32. This permits assembly and dis- 
assembly for servicing without either wrestling 
with the sheet-metal parts or stripping screw 
threads in thin sheet metal. The interior shelf is a 
piece of 4-inch wide Seezak rail, shortened to just 
under 6 inches long, and equipped with a flange 
on both ends. Both flanges are backed with brass 
strip, to increase strength and screw-holding 
capacity. 

The front panel is finished in black crackle 
enamel to reduce glare and reflections. Panel 
markings are made with decals (‘‘Tekni-cals’’), 
which are protected against wear by coating 
them with clear lacquer after thorough drying 
(24 hours or more). Small ventilating grilles are 
mounted in the centers of the top and bottom 
rails, in the upper center of the back plate, and in 

2 Mr. Ives has rewired all of his receiving equipment 
(SX-62, NC-88, Q5-er, homemade portable) to put a posi- 
tive bias on the tube heaters. He finds that it reduces hum 
and seems to extend tube life. — Ed, 





the front center of the interior shelf. These grilles 
are made from Seezak type MP-12 mounting 
plates by drilling out the holes to %-inch diam- 
eter and lightly countersinking to remove burrs. 
A handle (Stanley No. 3 door pull) is mounted on 
the top with 10-32 oval-head rack screws; and 
four husky rubber feet are attached with 6-32 
screws to the bottom corners. The ventilating 
grilles and rubber feet assure good air circulation 
no matter where the instrument is placed, so 
that thermal stabilization is rapid and frequency 
drift minimized. 

Mechanical assembly is quite simple, and the 
exact arrangement of parts is not critical. They 
must, however, be firmly anchored in place, so 
that pressing on the panel, or any other part of 
the case, will not change the tuning. 

To insure that the components stay in place, 
liberal use is made of tie points, and shielded 
leads are anchored by soldering to lugs. Wherever 
a lead passes through the interior shelf, the hole 
is protected by a rubber grommet. A tube shield 
is placed over the 12AX7 to act as a mechanical 
hold-down. It is not electrically necessary, and 
any other type of hold-down can be used if pre- 
ferred. Because of repeated unhappy experiences 
with the screwdriver slots in core screws of coils, 
each core screw is fitted with a 4—40 hex nut 
held in place with solder. This permits tuning the 
coils with a hex socket wrench, which stays in 
place, instead of a screwdriver, which not only 
tends to slip out of the socket but also usually 
splits out the slot in a short time. 











re ay 


75 “Tio 











=e 


Out 





oud 


ae 








} -6 ds 


6.3V. 250 
TO 300V 


Fig. 1 — Schematic diagram of the Q multiplier. Resistors are 44 watt unless specified otherwise. All capacitances 


are in uuf. unless specified otherwise. 
Cc ~ og Air trimmer (Hammarlund MAC.-20). 
- 10-yuf. variable (Johnson 167-1). 
5-uuf. variable (Johnson 167-4). 
- 6-volt pilot lamp. 
J; — U.h.f. cable receptacle, SO-239. 


L; — Adjustable cup-core inductor (North Hills 700A).* 


26 


L2— Adjustable cup-core inductor (North Hills Type 700 
form, close-wound with 45 turns No, 32 d.s.c.). 
2-gang 4-pole 6-position (3 positions used) rotary 
switch, 
*North Hill Electric Co., 
L. L., N. Y 


Si - 


402 Sagamore Ave., Mineola, 


OST for 





The power connector and the 
input jack are mounted on the 
rear panel below the shelf. Shielded 
leads are used between the band- 
width control, coils and switch. 
The shielded lead to the band- 
width control runs through the 
rubber grommet at the lower 
right-hand corner of the shelf. 


Using the Multiplier 

Theoretically, the Q multiplier can be con- 
nected across any coil of the receiver i.f. amplifier, 
and it will work after a fashion if shunted across 
any grid or plate coil tuned to 455 ke. (in this 
case). For best results, however, the Q multiplier 
must not be overloaded. This should be obvious 
when it is remembered that a tuning fork will 
vibrate at any frequency if driven hard enough. 
So will an iron anvil! 

The preferred electrical position for the Q 
multiplier is in the plate of either the mixer or 
the first i.f. stage. The connection can be made 
with a short length of shielded wire or, preferably, 
RG-58/U coaxial line. Connect 
0.0l-uf. disk ceramic to the plate of the mixer 
or first i.f. tube and connect the other side of the 
capacitor to the inner conductor of the coax. 
Ground the outer conductor of the coax to the 
receiver chassis close to the tube socket. Power 
for the Q multiplier can usually be ‘‘borrowed” 
from the receiver at the accessory socket, since 
the plate current demand is very small and the 
required heater current is only 0.3 ampere. 

Before connecting the Q multiplier to the re- 
ceiver, check the receiver i.f. alignment, so that 
the receiver functions normally with the Q multi- 
plier disconnected. The circuit the multiplier is 
to be connected to may require a slight touching 
up. 

When the signal cable and the power connec- 
tions are completed, and the receiver is known to 
be functioning normally, remove the top of the 
()-multiplier case, to make the alignment adjust- 
ments accessible. Set switch S; at “off”, tune in 
a steady phone signal. Center it in the receiver 
i.f. pass band, using the S meter to insure proper 
tuning. 


one side of a 


April 1957 


Now adjust the input coil, Z;, for maximum 
signal. This insures that the receiver will function 
normally whether the Q multiplier is connected 
or not. 

Next, center the center-frequency and vernier 
dials, set the null depth control to center scale, 
and turn the function switch to NuLL. Adjust coil 
Le for minimum signal (lowest S reading). Then, 
adjust the null depth control R; for lowest signal 
level, and reduce it still further, if possible, by 
fine adjustment of Lo. This adjustment removes 
the carrier and the low frequency side bands on 
each side of it, giving phone signals a tinny and 
overmodulated characteristic. Keep the BAND- 
WIDTH control at minimum resistance during 
these preliminary adjustments. 

Leaving the tuning unchanged, switch the 
function to PEAK, and advance the peak height 
control R until a squeal is heard. The oscillating 
@ multiplier is now beating with the incoming car- 
rier. Back off on the height control until the 
squeal stops, and then adjust trimmer C; for 
maximum signal, as indicated by the S meter or 
the ‘‘boomiest”’ bass response. The PEAK and 
NULL settings now coincide in frequency. 

After checking operation with a number of 
signals, replace the top on the cabinet, and the 
Q multiplier is ready for use. 

Troubles likely to be encountered in aligning 
a Q multiplier are few, and their correction usu- 
ally is quite simple. Other than wiring blunders, 
most common troubles are bad tubes and para- 
sitic oscillation. A bad tube is suggested when the 
maximum adjustments of PEAK and NULL are at 
widely differing settings of the null and peak con- 
trols. Replacement of the tube by one in which 
the two triodes are more nearly alike in charac- 
teristics will remedy the trouble. Parasitic oscilla- 


27 





tion is evidenced when signals are garbled at all 
positions of both controls. The oscillation is usu- 
ally at a high frequency, such as 75 to 100 Me., 
and is eliminated by inserting resistors in series 
with one or both tube plates. The 10-ohm resistors 
shown in Fig. 1 are usually adequate, but this 
value can be increased considerably, if necessary, 
without impairing any useful function of the 
device. 

The Q multiplier does exactly what is claimed 
for it in the original description.’ In the NULL 
position, it provides a slot of adjustable depth 
to about 30 db., with a 6-db. width of about 0.1 
per cent of the intermediate frequency. This slot 
is tunable across the i.f. pass band. It is a simple 
slot, not a combination of slot and peak as with a 
conventional crystal filter. 

In the PEAK position, with the BAND WipTH 
setting at a minimum (zero series resistance), the 
multiplier provides a peak, of approximately the 
same width as the null slot, with height adjust- 
able through a range of about 30 db. This peak, 
just like the slot, is tunable across the i.f. pass 
band. 

Increasing the band width, by means of the 
BAND-WIDTH control (not a part of Villard’s unit), 
broadens the tunable peak somewhat, increasing 
the intelligibility of phone signals by retaining 
more of the side bands. This control operates 
most conveniently when the resistor is quasi- 
logarithmic, and was made so by paralleling a 
50,000-ohm “logarithmic” potentiometer (Ohm- 
ite type CA) with a 47,000-ohm fixed resistor. 
With about 20,000 ohms in series, the Q multi- 
plier might as well not be there, as the broadening 
of the pass band due to the series resistor just 
about matches the sharpening contributed by Q 
multiplication. 

As preliminary tests will demonstrate, the 
@ multiplier tunes very sharply, even with the 
10-to-1 electrical vernier here provided. Operation 


28 


A top view of the Q multiplier 
with the top and side plates re- 
moved. The rear plate is a 6-inch 
square of aluminum, similar 


to the front panel. The shelf is 
mounted about 2 inches up on 


the panel. 


is logical, simple, and straightforward, but, like 
riding a bicycle, skillful operation requires some 
practice. 

Because there is no interlock between the 
controls of the Q multiplier and those of the re- 
ceiver, the Q multiplier can be used in conjunc- 
tion with other band-narrowing devices, such as 
a crystal filter, a Q5-er, or even one or more 
additional Q multipliers, which can be connected 
in other i.f. stages. A receiver with a Q multiplier 
in the mixer plate and others in the plate circuits 
of each of three following i.f. stages will be per- 
fectly stable, and all of the Q multipliers will 
function, but you will need more arms than the 
Hindu goddess Kali to operate them all! 


Other Frequencies 

The Q multiplier here described is designed for 
operation at 455 ke. Quite obviously, as the op- 
erating principles are sound, it can be made to 
work at almost any other frequency. Unfortu- 
nately, however, its utility is not the same at all 
frequencies. The Q multiplier is substantially 
a percentage band-width device, the effective 
percentage being very roughly 0.1 per cent of the 
intermediate frequency. 

If we make a Q multiplier to operate with a 
50-ke. i.f. svstem, we will have a tunable slot 
approximately 50 cycles wide. If we switch to 
PEAK at 50 ke., using commercially available 
tuned circuits, the resultant Q at maximum peak 
setting is in the higher thousands, and the cir- 
cuit rings so badly that we can’t be sure whether 
or not the carrier is being keyed. It is for these 
reasons, among others, that the Hallicrafters SX- 
100 uses a T-notch filter, in place of a Q multi- 
plier, in the 50-ke. i.f. amplifier. 

As we increase the i.f., the peak and slot width 
are increased proportionately, so that at 3.5 
Me. we can just about peak or slot an entire 
phone transmission. 


OST for 





A Compact All-Band Antenna 


Advanced Techniques for the Modern Amateur 


BY LARSEN E. RAPP,* WIOU 





¢ This article should be read carefully by 
all amateurs interested in the fine points 
of antenna design. The startling inno- 
vation disclosed here ‘for the first time 
is proof positive that nothing is impos- 
sible for an amateur with enough imag- 
ination and determination. 


1rH_ the ever-increasing complexity of 
\\/ contemporary amateur radio, as evidenced 
by available all-band transmitters and 
receivers for home and mobile work, has come a 
demand for packaging the gear in ways that will 
occupy 4 minimum of space. This process is often 
referred to as ‘‘miniaturization,” and _ great 
strides have been made in some directions. One 
notable achievement has been the introduction 
of the so-called ‘‘external-anode”’ vacuum tube, 
which saves space by eliminating the vacuum 
outside the anode and thus the need for an en- 
velope of some kind. Another good example of 
miniaturization has been the more widespread 
use of the higher frequencies, where smaller coils 
and capacitors can be used than on the lower 
frequencies. Transistors and other applications 
of semiconductor technique permit the design of 
compact equipment 

However, there is one area of amateur radio 
that still remains a fruitful field for miniaturiza- 
tion, and that is antenna design. Referring to 
such standard works as the ARRL Antenna Book, 
one finds that the same formula for a half-wave- 
length antenna! has been carried for years, with 
apparently no thought being given to its further 
development or simplification. Band-switching 
transmitters (made compact by the techniques 
outlined in the first paragraph) have increased 
the demand for suitable all-band antennas, 
preferably fed with coaxial line, but up to the 
present time the approaches to a solution to the 
problem have been rather primitive, to say the 
least. Increases in population over the past 
pentad have crowded the country to the point 
where many amateurs are forced to live in small 
dwellings and apartments that offer no room for 
the old-fashioned types of antennas or even for 
the newer all-band types, and something should 
be done about it. 

Something can be done about it. The present 
approach to the all-band problem is to use a 
multiplicity of half-wave-length antennas based 
on the old formula! and feed them with a common 
transmission line, or to use a single antenna with 











* Kippering-on-the-Charles, Mass. 
1 L(feet) = 468 + f(Mc.). 


April 1957 


“traps” in it. The trap idea is noteworthy but 


it has not been carried far enough. 
Ferrites 


Ordinary 
quencies between 535 and 


broadcasting uses the fre- 
1605 ke., and old 
timers may recall that originally large outdoor 
antennas were required for satisfactory reception. 
However, modern technique in broadcast recep- 
tion calls for a “ Loopstick”’ that can be 
installed receiver. The heart of the 
Loopstick is a core of high-permeability ferrite, 


a.m. 


small 
inside the 


and it is to the credit of the broadcast engineers 
that they immediately appreciated the potentiali- 
ties of the materis! and applied it to their 
receivers. Why no one but the writer has seen fit 
to apply it to amateur frequencies must forever 
remain a mystery.” 

A “trap” antenna using ferrite cores in the 
offers many interesting possibilities. The 
properties of the ferrite are such that the antenna 
is all coil; you can visualize this as a trap antenna 
exerting pressure at the ends. 
The sketch in Fig. 1 shows an all-band antenna 
(80 through 10 meters) based on this principle. 


1 
cous 


compressed by 


Ly 
f eap—loo 
erry 


* ~~ as 


i> ~ 


L |_| CORE 





L3 
| 


7 





LLL 








RG-8/U 





Fig. 1 — The compact all-band antenna uses a ferrite 
core measuring 3 inches in diameter and 3.6 feet long. 
Li 5 turns No. 10 Formvar, close-wound. 

Le, Ls 40 turns ‘44-inch copper tubing, 4 inch be- 
tween turns. Spacing between coils is lo inch. 


Including the weatherproof housing, the all- 
band antenna occupies a volume of not more 
than one foot in diameter and four feet long. 
Using a simple broadband matching transformer 
with the same ferrite core, a suitable match for 
52-ohm coaxial line can be obtained, with the 
s.W.r. running not more than 1.3 over the entire 
range and dropping as low as 0.77 at some points. 
Mounting the prototype ferrite all-band an- 
tenna at the top of a 50-foot flagpole brought 
Continued on page 136) 
true. The B & W TR Switch and 
the GPR-90 Receiver use ferrite-cored inductors in broad- 
band applications.—Adv. Mgr. 


This is not strictly 


29 





How Well Do You Know the Regulations? 


A Multiple-Choice Quiz on the F.C.C. Rules and Regs 


BY LEWIS G. McCOY,* WIICP 


General Class ham, you must, of course, be 

familiar with FCC regulations. The following 
quiz is designed to test your knowledge of some 
of the Let’s make one point quite clear 
before going further; the questions in the quiz 
are not necessarily the ones you’ll be taking in 
the General Class exam. However, they cover 
part of the laws you must know as a radio 
amateur. 

If the reader happens to be a holder of a higher 
class license than Novice, we have no objections 
if he takes the quiz. However, we realize that he 
will know all the answers! (“‘I don’t care if he is 
from the FCC. I’m not home to anyone.”’’) 

The correct answers and your rating are given 
on page 144. Don’t peek now — take the test and 
then see how you did. 


[ you are a Novice getting ready to become a 


laws. 


When operating portable or mobile the 
operator: 

a) Can use a photocopy of his operator’s 
license 

b) Must 
possession. 

) Doesn’t 


have his original license in his 
have to carry his license with 
him. 
2. When another 

tion he must: 

a) Get permission 
office. 

b) Have a photocopy of his operator’s li- 
with him. 
c) Sign your log. 


amateur operates your sta- 


from the nearest FCC 


cense 


Anyone speaking over your radiotelephone 
station must: 

a) Speak English. 

b) Sign the log. 

c) Be named in your log. 

4. A visitor whe does not hold an amateur 
license can make contacts from your radiotele- 
phone station if: 

a) You personally turn the carrier on and 
off. 

b) You make the initial call and the sign-off. 

c) You turn the carrier on and off and make 
the sign-off. 

Which is correct: 

a) “This is WIICP transmitting, go ahead 
W1DxX.” 

b) “This is WIICP, with W1DX to trans- 
mit, over.’’ 

ec) ““W1DX from WIICP.’’ 

In order to give the written portion of the 
Conditional Class license examination the exam- 
iner must be: 


* Technical Assistant, QS7’. a) 


30 





@ In these days of self-administered per- 
sonality and psychology tests, it is only 
fitting and proper that the amateur be 
given an opportunity to rise and shine. 
And here it is: Twenty questions com- 
plete with possible, probable and im- 
probable answers. There is a scoring 
system but, alas, no multipliers or cer- 
tificates. Despite these shortcomings, we 
trust you will enjoy finding out how 
much you know —or don’t know — 
about the regulations that govern your 
hobby. 











a) The holder of an 
General Class license. 
) The holder of an Extra, Advanced, Gen- 
eral Class, or Commercial Radiotelegraph license. 
c) Over 21 years of age 


Extra, Advanced, or 


7. Your log must be preserved: 
a) At least two years from date of last entry. 
b) At least one year from the date of last 
entry. 
c) For the duration of your license term. 
The FCC should be 
that portable or mobile 
home is, or may be: 
a) More than 24 hours. 
b) More than 48 hours. 
c) More than one month. 
9. Which is correct: 
a) “This is WORRX operating portable on 
Lake Michigan, 20 miles northeast of Chicago.” 


notified in the event 
operation away from 


1Say ITs 


\ 
MARITIME 
Sagi 


) “This is W9RRX maritime mobile on 
Lake Michigan, 20 miles northeast of Chicago.”’ 
) “This is WORRX mobile on Lake Michi- 

gan, 20 miles northeast of Chicago.’’ 
10. You are calling a mobile station; the fol- 


lowing is recommended FCC procedure: 


OST for 





a) “W1DX portable mobile, this is W1ICP, 
over.”’ 

b) ““W1DX mobile, this is WIICP, over.’’ 

c) “WI1DX, this is WLICP, cver.’”’ 

11. A Technician Class licensee is permitted 

to operate ¢.w.: 

a) In the 80-meter Novice band, if crystal 
control is used 

b) In the 11-meter band. 

c) In the 6-meter band. 


12. In order to renew your license you must: 

a) Have made at least 
three months, or a total of 5 contacts within the 
last year of the license term. 

b) Have a total of 5 operating hours in the 
last three months, or a total of 10 hours within 
the last vear of the license term. 

c) Have a total of 2 operating hours in the 
last three months, or a total of 5 hours within the 


3 contacts in the last 


last vear of the license term 


13. A Novice Class license holder: 

a) Can operate a Technician Class holder’s 
station. 

b) Cannot operate a Technician Class hold- 
er’s station. 

c) Can operate a Technician Class holder’s 
station if the Novice is ecrvystal-controlled, op- 
erates within the Novice bands, 
more than 75 watts input. 

14. In order to put 
over 170 feet high, you need: 

a) A lot of guys. 


and runs no 


up an antenna structure 





b) To fill out CAA Form 22-A-675b and send 
it to your local CAA office. 
c) To obtain permission from the FCC. 


15. In order with the Conelrad 
regulations when operating your station you must: 

a) Have a broad- 
cast station. 


b) Check a broadcast station at least every 


to comply 


a continuous monitor on 


five minutes. 
c) Check a broadcast station at least every 
ten minutes. 


16. When operating c.w. mobile or portable 
domestically, you must: 

a) Give the approximate geographical posi- 
tion. 

b) Sign your call with fraction bar and num- 


April 1957 


ber of call area you are operating in plus the 
approximate geographical position 
¢) Sign your call with fraction bar and num- 


ber of call area you are operating in. 
17. If 

exam: 
a) You must wait 60 days before trying it 


you fail a Conditional Class amateur 


again. 
b) You can try the Same exam again the next 
day. 
c) You can take the Ge neral Class exam the 
next day. 


18. If your company sends you temporarily to 
another city fer a six-month training course vou 
should: t 

1) Apply to the FCC immediately for modi- 
fication of your amateur license to the new, 
temporary address 

b) Send a notice to FCC in Washington and 
monthly notices to the engineer of the district in 
which you will be operating on a “portable” 
basis. 

c) Ask the district FCC engineer to endorse 
your license for tempcrary operation at the new 


location. 
19. When you pass the Amateur Extra Class 

examination at an FCC office: 

a) All papers have to go to Washington for 
issuance of a new license 

b) The FCC 
license for the higher grade and a new five-year 
term. 


engineer will endorse your 


\ ou have a choice of immediate endorse- 
ment without change in the expiration date, or 
sending papers to Washington for issuance of the 
new license and a new five-vear term. 

20. A 
amateur station aboard ship on Lake Michigan: 
a) Only on the 21- and 28-Me. bands. 

b) On any amateur band. 
c) Only on the 28-Me. band. 


‘a@--Strays $s 


Quite ippropriately, Al Johann, of the Mere- 
dith Publishing Co., which prints Better Homes 
and Gardens, received Novice call KNOINK. 


General Class licensee may operate an 





Another weird W5GWD and 
K5GWD are both named Hall and both live in 
Oklahoma. 


coincidence. 


K6RFE wonders if he is the most westerly 
ham in the U. 8S. A., since he knows he’s the 
farthest west in California. We wonder too, and 
also, who is the farthest east, north and south? 
Drop the managing editor a line. 

W4FIN reports that he knows of a phone man 
who ordered a steak dinner and insisted on A3 
sauce. 

W3DVB and W3BVD are members of the 
same club, 

(Now turn to page 144) 


31 





Simplified Design of Impedance-Matching 
Networks 
In Three Parts * — Part II, Pi and T Networks 


BY GEORGE GRAMMER, WIDF 


HE L secrion has the advantages of great 
[simcity and optimum efficiency, but it is 
an inflexible arrangement in that only one 
set of constants will give the required match. The 
circuit Q, for example, cannot be chosen at will 
because it is fixed by the ratio of the two resist- 
ances. When an amplifier tube is being matched 
to a load, it is often just as important to have 
the proper operating Q in the tank as it is to have 
the proper loading.® Also, there are cases where 
the presence of reactance in the load makes it 
desirable to use a more complex network. 
Two L sections can be combined to form either 
a pi or T network. Both the pi and T are useful 
arrangements for increasing the circuit Q and 
thus improving selectivity, and for increasing 
flexibility in adjustment. 
The design methods used for these — or any 
other practically identical. 
Basically there is just one method — the one used 


combinations are 


for designing the L section. 


The Pi Network 


Of all the possible configurations, the pi net- 
work is probably the one most familiar to ama- 
teurs because of its application as the tank circuit 
in r.f. power amplifiers. It lends itself to simple 
design when it is two 
“back-to-back”’ L networks constructed to match 


methods considered as 
an assumed ‘‘virtual” resistance at the meeting 
point.’ 

The principle is shown in Fig. 7. Rp; is the load 
(power-receiving device) to be matched to the 








Fig. 7— Development of the pi network from two 
back-to-back L networks. 


source of power, which requires a load Rpe. Rp, 
is the parallel resistance of the L section con- 
sisting of Xp; and —Xg), while # is the virtual 
resistance and corresponds to As in the circuits 
discussed in Part I. Using RP as the load, a second 
L section is formed by —Xge and Xpe to trans- 
form R to the desired value of resistance for the 

* Part I of this article appeared in March, 1957, QST. 

® For discussion of tank-circuit Q, see chapter on trans- 
mitters in The Radio Amateur’s Handbook 

7 Bruene, ‘“ Pi-Network Calculator”, Electronics, May, 
1945. 


32 





® In this second part it is shown how pi 
and T networks can be formed quite 
simply from the basic L network dis- 
cussed in Part I. 











power source to see. Each section is calculated 
separately by exactly the method described pre- 
viously. The virtual resistance R must be smaller 
than either Rp; or Rp, since it is in the series 
arm of each section, but aside from this may be 
will or determined from other circuit 
requirements. The principal one of such require- 
ments, in the case of an r.f. amplifier tank circuit, 
will be the desired operating Q. 

The design of such a circuit may be shown by 
continuing with the same resistance values used 
in the earlier example: a 52-ohm resistive load 
and a tube requiring a load of 2000 ohms. Let 
us now impose the requirement that the tank 
Q (Q2) be 12. From Equation 2B, 


ES 2000 = 
Xp. = = 167 ohms, 


chosen at 


and from Equation 3A, 
2000 
R= 


(12)? + 1 = 13.8 ohms. 
This is smaller than either of the two resistances 
being matched, and so is a proper value. Using 
quation 3B, 

Xs. = 12 > 13.8 = 166 ohms. 
This completes the design of the L section on the 
input side of the network. Note that since Qo is 
greater than 10, Xpo and Xge are practically 
equal (although they must be of opposite types), 
which simply means that this much of the net- 
work is identical with an ordinary parallel- 
resonant tank circuit of the same operating Q. 

We can now find the required Q (Q;) in the 
output section, since R and Rp; are known. Their 
ratio is 52/13.8 = 3.77, so from Equation 5 the 
required Q is 
Qi = V3.77 — 1 = 1.66. 

The same result could be found from Fig. 3. From 
Equation 3B, 

Xs; = 1.66 X 13.8 = 23 ohms 
and from Equation 2B, 
52 


Xp; = = 31.3 ohms. 


1.66 
The network design is now complete and is 
shown in Fig. 8A. The virtual resistance does not 


QST for 





+ 


Fig. 8 section 
elements into the pi configura- 
tion. 


Combining L- 


(8) 


actually appear in the circuit, of course, so Xs 
and Xge can be added together and only one 
physical component is required. In this example 
it has a reactance of 166 + 23 = 189 ohms. The 
minus sign in Fig. 8A is used only to indicate 
that the reactance is of the opposite type to that 
chosen for Xp; and Xpe.$ 


Reactance Combinations 
The design so far is quite general and we are 
free to choose types of reactance as we please, 
within the restriction that opposite types must 
be used in the two arms of each L section. There 
Fig. 9, each 
leading to a different-looking final circuit but all 
providing the proper match between the two 
resistances. Fig. 9A is the best one for matching 


are four possibilities, as shown in 


5 In particular, the use of the negative sign in this and 


confused with the use of 
method 


ibed here does not require such use of 


similar examples should not be 
the same sign to indicate capacitive reactance. Th 
of calculation descr j 
signs nor is it necessary to bring the operator j into the 
calculations 


IYYYLIYYY) 
1 r 232 





| 
EEE 





a tube to its load because it utilizes the com- 


ponents to best advantage in suppressing har- 
monies. Fig. 9B is a configuration 
and would be undesirable in a tank circuit. Note 
that in C and D the reactance of the connecting 


element in the practical circuit at the right is the 


high-pass 


diffe rence bet ween the reactances of the two series 


I 
elements of the individual L sections, 


since Oop- 
posite kinds of reactance are used in the series 
elements in these two cases 

to illus- 


different 


The four circuits are shown primarily 
trate the 


appearance In the 


networks, all of 
final 
formed from simple L sections having fundamen- 


variety of 
version, that can be 
alike only in 
52 ohms to 2000 ohms. In 


respects, such as 


tally the same constants. They are 
that each will match 
other relative Suppression ol 
frequencies higher and lower than the oper iting 
frequency, they are not identical. In some appli- 
cations one or another of them might be 
ble to Fig. 9A, but a decision cannot be 
this point 


known. 


preter = 
made on 


until the nature problem is 








Fig. 9 The four possi- 
ble combinations of L-sec- 








tions into pi networks. 
Drawings at the left show 
the basic L sections: those 
at the right show the final 
forms. 
2000 


OHMS 




















April 1957 








Summary of Pi Network Design 


1) Break the proposed network into two L 
sections as shown in Fig. 7. 

2a) If the input section is to have a specified 
value of Q, use Equation 3A to find R. The value 
of R must be smaller than either of the two re- 
sistances to be matched. If it is not, a higher 
value of Q must be used. 

2b) Or, if there are no restrictions on the Q of 
the input section, select some value for R that is 
than either of the two 
matched. 

3) Caleulate the constants of the input L 
section to match the desired resistance, Rpe, to R. 

4) Calculate the constants of the output sec- 
tion to match R to the other desired resistance, 


less resistances to be 


Rp}. 

5) Add the values of the reactances in the 
series arms of the L sections (Xs; and Xg2) to 
find the value of the series reactance in the pi 
network. 

6) Convert the final reactance values to in- 
ductance and capacitance. 


Covering a Band 

The reactance values obtained from the design 
method apply at any frequency, so it is a simple 
matter to determine the range of variation that 
must be supplied to cover an amateur band. For 
example, using Equations 7 and 8 with the right- 
hand cireuit of Fig. 9A for 3500 and 4000 ke. 
will give the following values for Z and C: 


3500 ke. 


1450 uyf. 


272 


4000 ke. 
1270 pf. 
238 uuf. 

7.5 uh. 


Reactance 
31.3 ohms (C) 
167 ohms (C) 


189 ohms (L) 


pu. 


8.57 uh. 


Note that all three tuning elements must be con- 
tinuously variable within these limits to produce 
a match at any frequency in the band while 
maintaining a constant Q of 12. 

Only two elements need be continuously vari- 
able to give a match if the consequent variation 
in Q is permissible. In this event the network 
should be designed for a minimum value of Q 
It is convenient to use a fixed value of inductance 
and adjust the capacitances to achieve a match, 
in which case the minimum Q will occur at the 


% Somewhat more complicated formulas must be used for 
finding the exact values when the series inductance (not 
reactance) is constant. They are 

— ReiX 
7 —<— 

Rei = V ReiRkp2 — X? 
= — RroX 
XpP2 = ; —— 

Rr2 + ~V/ RpiRp2 — X?2 


XPi 


where X is the total reactance of the series inductance, 
Fig. 9A. For Fig. 9A, use the plus signs in the denominators, 
in which event the minus signs in the numerators indicate 
that the shunt reactances are capacitive. In the general case, 
the same sign must be chosen for both denominators, but X 
may be either positive or negative. This leads to the four 
possible combinations shown in Fig. 9. For further details 
see W. L. Everitt, Communication Engineering, McGraw- 
Hill Book Co., New York. 


34 


high-frequency end of the band. The inductance 
should be chosen accordingly. In the example 
above this would mean that an inductance value 
of 7.5 wh. should be chosen. The problem then is 
to determine the capacitances required for match- 
ing at 3500 ke., in order to establish the necessary 
range. Although the simplified design method 
under discussion will not give an exact solution 
in this case,’ because there is no specific way of 
finding the individual values of Xs; and Xge 
when their sum is fixed, a close-enough approxi- 
mation will result if we assume that the Q of the 
network on the input side will be inversely 
proportional to frequency. Thus the Q at 3500 ke. 
will be 4000/3500 times the Q (12) at 4000 ke., 
or a Q of 13.7. Then 

Xpo = 2000/13.7 = 146 ohms; 

approximately. 

R = 146/13.7 = 10.6 ohms 

Rp;/R = 52/10.6 = 4.88 

Qi = V4.88 — 1 = 1.97 

Xp; = 52/1.97 = 26.4 ohms 

Xs; = 10.6 X 1.97 = 20.9 ohms. 
The accuracy can be checked by adding Xs; and 
Xgo, the sum being 167 ohms, and comparing 
this with the reactance of the 7.5-uh. coil at 
3500 ke. This is 165 ohms, which is amply close 
agreement. The capacitance values corresponding 
with 146 ohms and 26.4 ohms at 3500 ke. are, 
respectively, 311 wuf. and 1720 uf. These values 
differ considerably from those of the constant-Q 
network tabulated earlier. 


T Networks 


Fundamentally the same method is used for 
constructing T networks, the difference being 
that the two back-to-back L networks have their 
parallel-reactance sides joined together. This 
requires that the virtual resistance be higher than 
either of the two resistances to be matched. The 
T is often a convenient form when low values 
of resistance are to be matched, and when for 
some reason — e.g., Suppression of off-frequency 
radiations such as harmonics —a higher @Q is 
needed than would be provided by a simple L 
network. 

Fig. 10 is the basic circuit used for the T; this 
circuit may be compared with Fig. 7 for the pi. 


= Xx», 





Xs 


Rs: 


: 


Fig. 10 — T network formed from two L sections. 





Each L network is calculated in the same way 
as in the previous examples. As an illustration, 
suppose that the load, Psi, is 10 ohms and is to 
be transformed into 50 ohms (se) at the network 
terminals. Then R may have any desired value 
larger than 50 ohms. If we choose to make the 
@ (Q:) of the first L section 10, then Xs; is 


OST for 





S 


Fig. 11 Combining L-section ele. 
ments into the T configuration. Note that 
since the shunt element is formed from 
two elements in parallel the resultant 
reactance is less than either alone 


10Rs; = 10 X 10 = 100 ohms. From Equation 
2A, 
R = 10 (10° + 1) = 10 X 101 = 1010 ohms 
and from Equation 2B, 
: LOLO 
Xp, = 10 = 101 ohms. 
The Q required for matching FR to Ry2 is found 
from Equation 5 


LO10 = 


1010 


Xp2 138 ~ 231 ohms 
3 


and 
Xs2 = Qolts, = 4.38 X 50 = 219 ohms 
The elements of 
shown in Fig. 11, 


the complete network are 
which compares with Fig. 8. 
The choice of signs is again arbitrary, since the 
only requirement is that the signs be opposite 


(A) 














for the two elements of each L network. In Fig. 
11A the parallel or shunt elements have been 
chosen with the same sign, and so can be com- 
bined into a single element, as shown in Fig. 11B. 
If different signs are chosen for the reactances, 
there again result four possible combinations as 
shown in Fig. 12. As compared with the pi con- 
figurations in Fig. 9, the reactances that can be 
combined are in parallel instead of series, and 80 
the net reactance is not given by simple algebraic 
addition. However, it is easily found: it is equal 
to the product of the two reactances divided by 
their sum, if they are of the same kind (i.e., both 
capacitive or both inductive); or to the product 
divided by their difference, if they are of opposite 
kinds. In the latter case, the net reactance has 
the same sign as the smaller of the two; in Fig. 
12C, for example, the capacitive reactance, 101 
ohms, is smaller than the inductive reactance, 
231 ohms, and so the net reactance, 179 ohms, is 
capacitive. The opposite is true in Fig. 12D. 











(8) 


Fig. 12 Ihe four possible 








combinations of sections 
into T networks. The devel- 
opment is shown at the left; 
final forms at the right. 














April 1957 





e Recent Equipment — 


The Gonset G-77 Mobile Transmitter 


ia you react the way the writer does, your first 
comment on seeing the G-77 mobile trans- 
mitter will be ‘Heck! No one could build a com- 
plete mobile transmitter that small!’ Oddly 
enough, you would be right. At least, Gonset 
didn’t build a complete transmitter that small. 
Instead, they came up with one of those I-wish- 
l’d-tnought-of-that-first ideas and combined the 
audio section with the power supply, to be tucked 
away somewhere out of knee reach, leaving only 
the radio-frequency package to be mounted near 
the operator. The closest anyone ever came to 
this, in our was the ‘“‘ash-tray 
mobile” described about a year ago in QST’ 
But the G-77 is no ash-tray mobile; it’s good 
for a husky 50 to 60 watts input on the bands 80 
through 10 (excluding 11), a.m. or c.w. The fre- 
quency can be crystal-controlled (crystal socket 
on the front panel) but we suspect that most 
operators will use the variable-frequency oscil- 
lator and the convenience of its directly-cali- 
brated slide-rule dial. Each band occupies prac- 
tically the entire dial scale, and it takes 18 turns 
of the tuning knob to get from one end to the 


recollection, 


other of the 5'4-inch scale. 

The block diagram of the transmitter becomes 
a two-part affair, as shown in Fig. 1. The oscil- 
lator grid and plate circuit tuning is ganged with 
the multiplier plate tuning. The oscillator grid 
circuit is never on the same band as the output: 
it’s on 160 for 80-meter work, on 80 for 40, 20 
and 15, and on 40 for 10-meter operation. No 
oscillator plate tuning is used during 80- and 40- 
meter operation; here the oscillator plate is 
coupled to the multiplier grid via a common 
100-uh. choke. On the other bands the oscillator 
plate is tuned to the second harmonic of the grid- 


1 Pfost, “The Ash-Tray Mobile,”’ QST, Feb., 1956. 


circuit frequency. The multiplier triples for 15- 
meter operation and doubles for the other 
bands. The oscillator circuit is an electron- 
coupled high-C Colpitts; it is switched to the 
grid-plate circuit for crystal-controlled operation. 
The screen voltage of the oscillator is stabilized 
by the OA2 in the power supply. 

To maintain constant drive to the 6146 on each 
band, suitable screen-dropping resistors for the 
6CM6 multiplier are switched in by the band 
switch. A potentiometer accessible at the rear of 
the transmitter is used for setting the screen 
voltage initially; this is adjusted at the factory 
and would only need attention if you had ab- 
normally high or low battery voltage. 

The 6146 output stage uses a pi-network cir- 
cuit in the plate (what commercial rig doesn’t 
these days?). The familiar capacitive-bridge 
neutralizing circuit is used, a feature that any 
user of high-gain tetrode stages will applaud, and 
we suspect that you will see more commercial 
gear from now on using neutralized tetrodes. 

One meter is used to monitor the transmitter 
currents, switchable from the panel to read 6146 
cathode current, 6146 grid current and modu- 
lator cathode current. Two other positions on the 
same switch provide for ¢c.w. operation and os- 
cillator frequency spotting. On c.w. the 6146 
cathode is keyed, quite a welcome departure 
after all these years of oscillator keying of com- 
mercial transmitters. When the “meter” switch 
is turned to cw the oscillator and multiplier turn 
on, so the c.w. standby position is one of the 
current-indicating positions. Push-to-talk is used 
during phone operation. 

As indicated in Fig. 1. an antenna relay is 
provided. The relay is a 3-pole affair, and of 
course one pole is used for the obvious job of 


The oscillator and multiplier 
tubes are on the right-hand side 
of the G-77; the associated 
tuning capacitors can be seen 
in back of the two tubes in this 
photograph. The variable ca- 
pacitor at the right is the out- 
put stage plate capacitor. 

The drive for the tuning gang 
is a spring-loaded gear train; 
only the dial indicator is string- 
driven by the frequency tuning 
knob. 

That small switch at the 
lower right-hand corner of the 
panel turns on the heaters of 
the transmitter. 


OST for 





R.F. SECTION 


Fig. 1 — Block diagram of 
the G-77 mobile transmitter. 
The complete transmitter is 
two packages: the r.f. section 
mounts under the dashboard 
for easy access by the operator, 
and the audio and power supply 
unit mounts in the luggage 
compartment. Selenium recti- 
fiers are used in the power 
supply. 


switching the antenna from receiver to trans- 
mitter. A second pole can be used to disable the 
receiver during transmit periods, and the third 
pole cuts in a low-resistance bleeder across the 
power supply when the plate power is turned off, 
to hasten the discharge of the power-supply 
filter and reduce the time the oscillator might 
“hang on.”’ 

It was mentioned earlier that the audio and 
power supply section is a separate unit that can 
be mounted well away from the r.f. package. In 
the audio section, which is designed to work with 
a high-impedance dynamic or reluctance micro- 
phone, the cascaded triodes of the 12AT7 are 
resistance-coupled to the paralleled triodes of the 
12AU7 driver. The driver is transformer-coupled 
to push-pull 6BQ6-GA modulators. The modu- 
lator with the grids 
grounded and the signal applied to the screen 
grids, to give zero-bias Class B operation. For 
phone work, the screen of the 6146 is fed through 
a dropping resistor from the high side of the 
modulation-transformer when the 
G-77 transmitter is switched to c.w. the 6146 
screen voltage is obtained from the low-voltage 
power supply. 

The low- and high-frequency components of 


tubes are used control 


secondary = 


The output-stage inductors 
are wound on ceramic forms 
(left), and the oscillator and 
multiplier inductors are wound 
on phenolic forms (right). The 
string drive at the bottom 
center controls the output-stage 
plate tuning capacitor; the 
output loading capacitor is be- 
hind the output-stage inductors, 
under the 6146. A spring-loaded 
gear train on the output capac- 
itor provides a 2-to-] reduction 
drive. 


April 1957 


MULT. OuTPuUT 





AUDIO AND POWER SUPPLY 


+e) 


eu) 


speech are restricted through the values of cou- 
pling capacitors and shunt capacitors in the 
speech amplifier, to conserve audio power and to 
reduce the background encountered in 
mobile operation. A measure of speech clipping 
is obtained by a high plate-to-plate 
load to the modulators through the modulation 
transformer, and the consequent high-frequency 
components are attenuated by the transformer 
leakage and the shunt 
capacitance. 

The power supply uses a vibrator, transformer 
and four heavy-duty selenium rectifiers. To pro- 
tect the rectifiers from the initial charging-cur- 
rent surge, a relay in the power supply shorts 
out a series resistor to the rectifiers only after the 
power supply is up to voltage. The vibrator is 
one of the center-resting type with a separate 
armature coil. The power supply is energized by 
turning on this armature coil and, as a result, no 
heavy-duty relay is required to handle the heavy 
current in the battery circuit. With 6-volt opera- 
tion the standby current is 5 amperes and the 
operating current is 17; 
quires a standby current of 3 amperes and an 
operating current of 9. To change from 13- to 
6-volt operation, or back again, a few jumpers 


ne ise 


offering 


reactance secondary 


13-volt operation re- 





have to be changed in the power supply and the 
rs: package. 

A phone/c.w. switch and the audio volume 
control are mounted on the power supply unit, 
but not too many operators are continually 
changing microphones or flipping from phone to 
c.w. and back. 

If you have been wondering what good it is to 
have an audio section (and power supply) that 
can be mounted anywhere in the car when micro- 
phone cords are only a few feet long, have no 
fears; Gonset thought of that, too. They provide 
the necessary microphone extension cable, and 
all of the plugs, fuses and cables (except battery 
sxables) for mounting the audio and power supply 


20 feet from the r.f. package. This should take 
care of the extended-overhang cars for a few 
years to come. Mounting brackets for the r.f. 
package are also supplied. 

Over-all dimensions of the r.f. section are 44% 
inches high, 6% inches wide and 9 inches deep, 
matching the G-66 receiver dimensions. The 
modulator and power supply unit is 7 inches 
high, 734 inches wide and 10 inches high, and 
the manufacturer suggests that it be mounted in 
the luggage compartment. Mounting near high- 
temperature points is definitely discouraged, 
since operation at ambient temperatures above 
135°F shortens the life of some of the power 
supply components. - B. G. 





The Crosby Model 67A Single-Side-Band Converter 


IDE-BAND converters, or adapters, or “‘slic- 
ers,” are devices for improving the single- 
side-band reception of double  side-band 
(a.m.) or single-side-band signals. Used with a re- 
ceiver lacking in the necessary selectivity for this 
type of reception, the converter provides the 
requisite sharpness and usually a more appro- 
priate detector. The selectivity is obtained by 
either a band-pass filter or the ‘‘phasing”’ system. 
The 67A converter uses a Collins mechanical 
filter at 250 ke. for selectivity, and a product 
detector for effective detector action. The block 
diagram in Fig. 1 shows the tube line-up. The 
6BA7 converter tube takes the 455-ke. signal 
from the receiver and heterodynes it to 250 kc., 
the filter frequency. After the filter, audio is re- 
covered in the product detector and then ampli- 
fied in one of the triodes of a 12AU7 before being 
passed along to the audio amplifier, which can be 
a separate one or the audio section of the receiver. 
The operator doesn’t have to worry about the 
setting of the b.f.o. in this converter, because the 


« 


if “*~ 


ail 


Pl 


b.f.o. is erystal-controlled. Two crystals are used, 
one for each side of the filter pass band, and the 
crystals are switched when the converter-oscilla- 
tor circuit is switched. This is a variation of the 
selectable side-band principle described by Ehr- 
lich,! where both oscillators are shifted a few ke., 
in contrast to the selectable-side-band principle 
of McLaughlin,? where the b.f.o. remains fixed 
and the converter oscillator is switched to the 
high- or low-frequency side of the signal. The 
‘‘pass-band tuning”’ feature of the Collins 75A-4 
is a continuously-variable extension of the same 
principle. The advantage of the selectable-side- 
band principle is that, once a signal has been 
tuned in properly, it takes only a flip of a switch 
to examine either side band, if there are two. 
Both triodes of the b.f.o. 12AU7 are used, in a 
cathode-coupled crystal-oscillator circuit. 


1 Ehrlich, “Notes on a Specialized ‘Phone Receiver,” 
QST, April, 1953. 

2 McLaughlin, “ Exit Heterodyne QRM,” QST, October, 
1946. 

3 Electronics, May, 1945, page 234. 


Out of its cabi- 
net, the 67A will 
fit nicely into a 
standard 19-inch 
rack. In its cabi- 
net, a logical 
mounting place 
would be on top of 
the receiver. 





CONVERTER 


Fig. 1 — Block dia- 
gram of the 67A single- 
side-band converter. 


PRODUCT 
DETECTOR 


FILTER 





The regulator tube sta- 
bilizes the voltage for 
the 6BA7 sereen (oscil- 
lator anode), 


There are just two panel controls on the 67A. 
One is a toggle switch for turning the power on, 
and the other is a three-position switch that pro- 
vides for selection of the side band or straight- 
through operation of the receiver alone. 

The 67A can be used with receivers having an 
i.f. anywhere from 440 to 510 ke., as well as with 
receivers with an i.f. from 800 to 1000 ke. This 
latter feature permits its use with some of the 


250.04 


RECTIFIER VOLTAGE REG. 


(~) (a2) 


military gear, like the BC-348. The only modifica- 
tion when using the 67A with a high-i.f. receiver 
is to transpose the two b.f.o. crystals. 

L.f. signals up to 0.25 volts maximum can be 
handled by the O7A. The audio response through 
the unit is +2.5 db. from 250 to 3200 cycles, and 
audio up to 0.5 volt is delivered at less than 1.5 
distortion. The side-band rejection 1s 
B. G. 


253.4 


per cent 
better than 50 db. 





The Johnson Viking Pacemaker 


HE ‘‘Pacemaker” is a self-contained c.w.- 
Te. (with or without carrier) transmitter 

having a peak-envelope output of 60 watts 
in each of its communication modes. Except for 
such conventionally-external accessories such as 
microphone and key, it is complete and ready to 
operate when plugged into the 115-volt line and 
connected to an antenna. The bands covered are 
3.54, 7-7.3, 14-14.35, 21-21.45, and 28-29.7 Me. 
The r.f. output amplifier is a 6146 with a pi-net- 
work tank circuit designed for operation into 
50-600 ohm resistive loads. 

The single-side-band signal is generated by the 
phasing method, and the scheme used for obtain- 
ing output on the various bands is quite different 
from anything used previously in transmitters of 


Top-of-chassis view of 
the “Pacemaker.” The 
shield box at upper center 
contains the v.f.o. The 
erystal oscillator, buffer, 
and r.f. phase-shift net- 
works are on and under 
the elevated chassis at the 
upper right. Progressing 
down the right-hand side 
are the mixer, buffer, and 
driver r.f. stages. The 
6146 final amplifier is in a 
separate box at the lower 
center (top cover of this 
box has been removed for 
this photograph). Power 
supply section is at the 
left. The audio amplifiers 
and balanced modulators 
occupy the space on either 
side of the v.f.o. near the 
panel, 


April 1957 


this tvpe, so far as we know. In any frequency 
conversion system several alternative routes are 
available for reaching the same end frequency; 
one commonly-used method, for example, is to 
generate the s.s.b. signal at a fixed frequency and 
mix it with the output of a v.f.o. whose basic 
frequency range then has to be changed to cover 
the assortment of amateur bands. In the “ Pace- 
maker’”’ the designers chose to maintain the same 
v.f.o. frequency range for all bands, with appro- 
priate trimming for bandspread. This is more 
favorable for v.f.o. stability, but means that the 
s.s.b. signal has to be generated on a different 
frequency tor each amateur band. It is a fixed 
frequency in each course, and in the 
“Pacemaker” is crystal controlled. Using the 


case, of 





SP AMP 
(2 STAGES) 


V.EO. 
(A) 3-3.5 Mc 
(8) 3-4.7 Mc 


A-3.5 to 21 Mc. 
8-26 Mc, 


CUTOFF « 5Mc. 


ORIVER 








KE YING 








CONT. 





VOICE CONT. 
AMP. 





| RELAY J 
ANTI-TRIP 
AMP 


FROM 
RCVR. 


Fig. 1 — Block diagram of the “Pacemaker” r.f., audio and control sections. The single-side-band signal is gen- 
erated on a separate frequency for each amateur band covered, using the phasing method. 


v.f.o. ranges shown in the block diagram, Fig. 1, 
the crystal-controlled s.s.b. generator frequencies 
are 500 ke. (for 80 meters), 4 Me. (40), 11 Me. 
(20), 18 Me. (15) and 25 Me. (10). 

As indicated in Fig. 1, the crystal oscillator 
tube is a 6AU6. It is operated in a straight pen- 
tode circuit with a separate switch-selected plate 
tank tuned to each of the crystal frequencies 
listed above. Immediately following it is a 12BH7 
cathode follower which acts as a buffer and low 
output-impedance driving source for the rf. 
phase-shift circuits. These are the simple RC and 
RL type each giving a shift of about 45 degrees 
so that in combination the total phase difference 
between the two r.f. outputs is 90 degrees. 


Balanced Modulator and Audio 


The balanced modulator circuit will no doubt 
be of interest to those who build their own equip- 
ment, since it is of a type that has not had much 
attention in amateur gear. It is shown in Fig. 2. 
Two triodes —in this case the two sections of a 
12AT7 — are used, with the r.f. applied to the 
grids in parallel and the audio applied to the grids 
in push-pull. The plates are connected in push- 
pull so that the carrier voltage is balanced out 
in the output circuit; fine adjustment of balance 
is provided for by means of the 2000-ohm poten- 
tiometer in the bias circuit. 

One advantage of the circuit is that no audio 
output transformer is needed, especially when the 
r.f. and audio voltages are kept below the grid- 
current point in the modulator, since the modu- 
lator grids represent a high impedance for audio. 
In Fig. 2, the push-pull audio is obtained from a 
simple phase inverter. 

Depending on the modulator grid bias and 
r.f.-audio operating voltages, the modulator may 


40 


operate in much the same fashion as either the 
familiar grid-bias modulator, or as a Class A 
modulator of the old Van der Bijl type. As com- 
pared with diode modulators, this type of circuit 
will give a gain instead of a loss. In the “ Pace- 
maker” the modulator output circuit is band- 
switched along with the crystal-oscillator and 
phase-shift circuits. 

The audio section of the transmitter uses a 
12AX7 as a cascade preamplifier followed by a 
12AU7 section as the third stage. The latter tube 
has transformer-coupled output in order to obtain 
an impedance step-down for working into a low- 
impedance low-pass filter. The filter cutoff is at 
3500 cycles so that the audio is confined essen- 
tially to speech frequencies. The filter output is 
applied to the audio phase-shift network and 
from there the signal goes to the two sections of 
a 12AT7, one of which is shown in Fig. 2, for 
phase inversion to drive the balanced modu- 
lators. 


R. F. Section 

The precautions taken against the radiation of 
spurious r.f. components in the r.f. section are 
interesting. As shown in Fig. 1, the output of the 
v.f.o., a 6AU6 in the series-tuned Colpitts circuit, 
goes through a low-pass filter before being applied 
to the 6BE6 mixer. Thus the v.f.o. harmonics are 
attenuated before they have a chance to mix with 
the s.s.b. signal from the balanced modulators. 
The plate circuit of the 6BE6 is tuned to the out- 
put-signal frequency, and so also are the plate 
circuits of the following three linear amplifier 
stages. There are thus four tuned circuits between 
the output terminal of the transmitter and the 
point where the final frequency is created, pro- 
viding high over-all attenuation of any off- 


OST for 





frequency beats that may be present at the mixer 
tube. 

The driver and final amplifier both are neu- 
tralized by the capacitive-bridge method. 


Control Circuits 


The voice-control setup is shown in block form 
in the lower section of Fig. 1. The actuating audio 
signal is taken off after the preamplifier in the 
speech string, put through a separate amplifier 
and thence into a rectifier. The rectified d.c. is 
used to operate a relay-control tube. The relay 


“zeroing” without putting the set on the air. In 
this switch position the buffers are permitted to 
operate but the final amplifier remains cut off. 
The CARRIER INSERTION control, which is dis- 
abled when the mode switch is in sss, is cut in 
when the switch is set to ZERO, so a carrier (ad- 
justable as to amplitude by means of CARRIER 
INSERTION) is available for setting the transmitter 
frequency exactly on that of an incoming signal. 
Alternatively, the CARRIER INSERTION control 
may be left on zero, in which case the operator 
can “talk himself in” to the desired frequency. 




















° 
+300 











° 
+300 


Fig. 2— Balanced modulator circuit used in the “Pacemaker.” The audio driver circuit also is shown. 


has four sets of double-throw contacts; one set is 
used to turn the transmitter on and off through 
blocked-grid keying of the first buffer and final 
amplifiers, a second set switches a 115-volt circuit 
for an external antenna relay, the third set mutes 
the receiver during transmissions, and the fourth 
set is available for any use the operator wishes 
to make of it, such as to switch blocking bias on 
and off in a high-power linear amplifier. The con- 
trol system includes an antitrip circuit making use 
of an audio signal from the receiver for balancing 
out the effect of microphone pickup from the 
loudspeaker. 

Two “a.m.” mode-switch positions are pro- 
vided. On AmM-Lo, band is used with 
carrier, giving a carrier input of 35 watts. The 
AM-HI position is used only when the transmitter 
is used as a driver for a plate-modulated Class C 
amplifier, and simply makes the speech-amplifier 
output available at terminals in the rear. The 
audio output level is about 1 volt, so additional 
amplification is needed for driving an external 
Class B modulator. A separate speech amplifier 
having 10 watts output is available for this pur- 
pose. The 60-watt c.w. output of the r.f. end 
should be ample for driving a kilowatt Class C 
amplifier. 

For c.w., the same grid-block method of keying 
the first buffer and final amplifier is used. The 
two stages are keyed directly, not through the 
control relay. RC networks in the blocking cir- 
cuits provide shaping of the keying wave form. 

Among the operating conveniences built into 
the transmitter is a mode-switch provision for 


April 1957 


one side 


Power Supply 

The ‘‘Pacemaker” has three power supplies, 
one delivering 300 volts for the audio, balanced 
modulators, r.f. exciter sections, and 6146 screen, 
using a 5U4G rectifier. Voltage for the balanced 
modulators, v.f.o., and 6146 screen is regulated 
by v.r. tubes. A 750-volt supply with a 5R4GY 
rectifier is used for the 6146 plate. The third 
supply is for bias; it uses a 6X4 rectifier and 
delivers approximately 200 volts. All three sup- 
plies are from the same power transformer, which 
also handles all tube heaters. ‘ 

The “Pacemaker” has the TVI-suppression 
measures that characteristic of the 
Viking series of transmitters, including complete 
shielding with ‘“weatherstripping” around the 
cabinet joints, and filters on leads to external 
G. G. 


have been 


connections. es 


‘@ar-Strays 3s. 


In connection with the 1957 Jamestown Festi- 
val, the Richmond Amateur Radio Club offers 
the VA-JF certificate awarded for proof of two- 
way contacts with 25 different stations, phone or 
code, in the Commonwealth of Virginia during 
the year 1957. Send QSLs to the club at Box 
1985, Richmond, Va. 

Add odd coincidences. W5BKH and K5BKH 
are neighbors and fellow club members in Abi- 
lene, Texas. 








41 





Calibration of the Mark II Minitrack 


Using Radio Stars as Signal Sources 


BY ROGER L. EASTON * 





eA principal difficulty in installations 
designed for radio tracking of the Earth 
Satellite has been that of accurate direc- 
tional calibration of the antenna system 
or interferometer. The discovery that 
radio stars can be used for the purpose 
means that reliable calibration sources 
are available on a day-to-day basis. This 
article outlines the necessary require- 
ments of the receiving equipment and 
lists the stars that will be useful. 

Radio astronomy being somewhat out- 
side the experience of the ordinary ama- 
teur, it will be helpful in understanding 
this article to read the story on that 
subject in the May, 1956, issue of QST. 
It is necessary, too, to understand the 
basic principles of the Minitrack system 
as described by Mr. Easton in his article 
in the July issue of last year. 











Mark II Minitrack by means of aircraft- 

carried transmitters it is natural to look at 
radio stars as possible calibration sources. For 
best results this means of calibration does require 
some modification of the receiving equipment, 
but with these modifications it appears that with 
the brightest stars (Cassiopeia and Cygnus) cali- 
bration runs good to perhaps one-fourth minute 
of are can be made. With less bright stars the 
results will be somewhat poorer, perhaps ulti- 
mately to one-half minute of are. 

The modifications to the equipment are (1) a 
wider predetection band width and (2) a nar- 
rower postdetection band width. These modifica- 
tions are required because the radiation from 
radio stars is broad-band noise and is so weak 
every effort to improve signal-to-noise ratio 
should be made. 

The maximum modulation frequency appear- 
ing at the receiver output of a 50-wave-length 
interferometer is about 0.004 cycle due to the 
earth’s rotation in the star field.t This modulation 
appears on all of the broad-band star noise seen 


I view of the difficulty in calibration of the 


* U.S. Naval Research Laboratory, Washington 25, D.C. 
! Since most of us are accustomed to thinking of ‘‘ modu- 
lation 
with the signal itself, it is probably desirable to add that 


"as something of at least audio frequency associated 


the modulation considered here is the change in the noise 
level in the receiver as the antenna-pattern lobes sweep 
across the radio star as the Earth rotates. There will be one 
such cycle for each antenna lobe. The number of lobes is 
proportional to the separation in wave lengths between the 
two antennas comprising the Minitrack interferometer, so 
the wider the separation the higher the modulation fre- 
quency. A modulation frequency of 0.004 cycle per second 
corresponds to a period or time interval of 250 seconds 
between successive maxima (or minima) in the received 


Editor. 


noise 


42 


by the receiver. It can be shown that under these 
conditions the signal-to-noise ratio is improved 
by increasing the receiver predetection band 
width. The signal-to-noise ratio is also improved 
by using the minimum possible postdetection 
band width. However, to decrease phase shift the 
postdetection band width is usually set at about 
ten times the maximum detected frequency. 

While radio astronomers use band widths of 
several megacycles it is difficult to use such a 
wide band width for star tracking with the same 
equipment that must also have, for satellite 
tracking, a band width of only a few kilocycles. 
As a compromise, the Mark II receivers we have 
built are being modified to have predetection 
band widths of 100 ke. and 5 ke. The band width 
change is obtained by switching the L/C ratios 
in the tank circuits used in the 470-ke. inter- 
mediate-frequency amplifiers. 

Fig. 1 shows two product-detector outputs for 
the radio source in Cassiopeia, the most active of 
the radio stars, for the following conditions: an- 
tenna gain, about 50; interferometer spacing, 
about 50 wave lengths; predetection band widths, 
300 ke. and 10 ke.; postdetection band widths, 
0.03 cycle. The upper curve shows the output 
from the narrow band width receiver. The time 
marks at the bottom of the figure indicate seconds 
of time. 

Fig. 2 shows the product-detector outputs 
under the same conditions for the radio source 
in Taurus. The output from this source is down 
about 10 db. from that of Cassiopeia. (The bot- 
tom curve in both Figs. 1 and 2 is a low-gain 
presentation of the wide-band receiver output.) 

Fig. 3 shows Cassiopeia with a band width of 
100 ke. and Fig. 4 shows Taurus under the same 
conditions. Both curves in each figure show the 
same information, with the upper curve having 
the higher gain. 

For recording these stars a slow recorder can 
be used since we are trying to resolve time only 
to one second or so. For Cassiopeia one second 
corresponds to about eight seconds of are while 
for Taurus one second of time corresponds to 
about 15 seconds of are (50-wave-length base 
line). 

Before going further it would be well to discuss 
how the parameters of the systems used could be 
changed to improve the system. 


_— 


Typical recordings of radio stars as received on a 
Minitrack receiver. Each trace is approximately one- 
half cycle of the modulation frequency and shows the 
Variation in d.c. output of the receiver as an antenna 
lobe sweeps through the noise source. The figures (num- 
bered in order with Fig. | at the top) are identified and 
described in the text. 


OST for 





aN ———s 
eeeresnrH—. - enn <i 


Wr 
tw 
qe 


rt aE 
a odunay 


April 1957 


we 


han kes in eedbes’. Seti cabted 








One change that would 
improve the system is a 
longer base line. Dou- 
bling the base-line length 
would give double the 
postdetection frequency, 
and as a consequence 
the error in reading the 
time of transit could be 
reduced by nearly one- 
half as compared with 
the short base line. 

The other parameter 
change that can improve 


Source 

R.A, 
Dec. 
R.A. 
Dec. 
R.A. 
Dee. 
R.A. 
Dec. 
R.A. 
| dec, 


Cassiopeia A 23% 


Cygnus A 19% 
Taurus A 


Virgo A 


Centaurus 





Right Ascension and Declination of Radio Stars Useful for 


Position (1950) 


58° 32.1’ 


) 3]m 


Table I 


Calibration 

Yearly | 
Change in | Flux at 
100 Me. 


180 x 10-4 


Position 
+ 2.695 
+19.7” 
+2.08s 
+10” 
+3.618 
+2.44” 
+3.03* 
—19.8” 
+3.57 
—18.7” 


21™ 12s 
+().7’ 
45.35 +18 


+] 


+ ]8 
57™ 


35’ 


00’ 

28 
14’ 

22m 


16’ 





the system is antenna 
gain. A higher gain not 
only gives a higher signal but also decreases the 
effects of other near the calibration 
source. The antenna gain can be increased only 
by varying the east-west beam width, since a 
wide north-south beam width is needed so both 
a number of stars and the satellite can be re- 
ceived. Probably a gain of 100 over isotropic is 
about as high as is practical. 

One of the reasons a wide north-south beam 
width is needed is that the better sources for 
calibration all have northern declinations. Cas- 
siopeia, the brightest of the radio stars, is at 
N 58° 32’. By declination we mean that at a lati- 
tude equal to this declination the star transits at 
the zenith. If the observer’s latitude is 40°N this 
source transits 18° 32’ north of the observer’s 
zenith.? 

Table I* gives the positions of the sources 
which will be most favorable for calibration. 
Addition of the yearly change will give the posi- 
tions for any new date desired. From this table, 
one can see that radio stars are by no means 
point sources as are the visible stars. 


sources 





Table II 
75th Meridian Crossings for Radio Stars on 
March 1, 1957 (EST) 

44m 
21" 
53” 
530 


470 


28.58 1° 


30.8° 


Cassiopeia 
Cygnus +15 


Taurus 51.55 = 20: 


21.4 +2. 


30.9° 


Virgo 


Centaurus +4 











The time of transit for any of these sources 
can be calculated from Table II. Here the time 
of transit is given at the 75th meridian on March 
Ist for each of the principal sources. For each 
degree of longitude west of the 75th meridian 
the star transits 239.345 seconds later and for 


2 Groups interested in the tracking project would do well 
to establish contact with local astronomers, professional or 
amateur, for technical help on the astronomical phases, 
rhe “transits’’ when it the observer's 
meridian of longitude. The zenith is the point in the sky 
directly the Declination and right 
ascension are elements of an astronomical coordinate system 
for locating objects in the celestial sphere. Editor. 

3 Pawsey, J. L., “A Catalogue of Reliably Known Dis- 
crete Sources of Cosmic Radio Waves,” The Astrophysical 
Journal 121, 1955, pp. 1-5. 


star passes over 


over observer's head. 


44 


each day after March Ist the star transits 235.91 
seconds earlier. For long intervals after March Ist 
the corrections for Right Ascension of Table I 
must be added. 

Another source that has not been described is 
the sun. The reason for not including the sun is 
that the flux from the sun varies greatly with 
time and the center of flux varies about the sun’s 
disc. The flux from the quiet sun at 100 Me. is 
approximately the same as that from the bright- 
est of the radio stars‘ while during active periods 
it may radiate as much as one million times as 
much 100-Me. energy. Just how well the sun can 
be used as a calibration source by averaging its 
apparent transit over several days cannot be 
stated exactly but it may be measured in minutes 
of are. A very active sun may introduce an error 
in the Minitrack data if the satellite transits near 
local noon. To minimize this error the predetec- 
tion band width should be as narrow as possible. 

An error which enters all of these calibration 
sources is that due to the nonstratified charac- 
teristic of the ionosphere, the so-called “wedge 
effect.”’ According to Smith® this effect can be ex- 
pected tointroduce an unknown error of as much as 
30 seconds of arc and a calculable shift of as much 
as one minute of are. Since the satellite trans- 
mitter radiation will suffer part of the same shift, 
measurement of calibrating stars near the time of 
satellite transit will aid in calibrating out the 
wedge effect. for the satellite. 

Another source of error is due to lack of knowl- 
edge as to the exact positions of the centers of 
the radio stars. However, we can expect the ac- 
curacy of knowing these star positions to improve 
because of the large number of observations being 
made on them. 

Help in the preparation of this article has 
come from several people. George C. Kronmiller, 
jr., Ensign, USN, and J. H. Berbert aided in the 
calculations. The star traces were made by 
Victor Simas, William Moriarty and George C. 
Kronmiller, jr. E. C. McClain helped in providing 
background experience in radio astronomy. 


4 Pawsey, J. L. and Bracewell, R. 
published by Oxford University 
Chapter 5 

5 Smith, F. G., “lonospheric Refraction of 81.5 me/s 
Radio Waves from Radio Stars,’ Journal of Atmospheric 
and Terrestrial Physics, Vol. 2, pp. 350-355, 1952. 


OST for 


N., Radio 


London, England, 


Astronomy, 


Press 








The Governors-to-President Relay 


ANUARY’S inauguration ceremonies were also 

the occasion for amateur radio activity in 

the 8th ARRL Governors-to-President Re- 
lay. Messages originating with 25 state’s gov- 
ernors came successfully through to Washington; 
also one from the Canal Zone outside continental 
U.S. A. This one on 21 Me. was the first to arrive 
in the first 15 minutes of the relay. Message 
checks ran from 10 to 102 words. The plan for 
this Relay followed the historic lines. Each SCM 
in sections having a state capitol was asked to 
designate an active amateur and station to obtain 
from the Governor a message to the President of 
the United States on of his in- 
auguration. 

The Washington D. C. gang, as always, did an 
outstanding job of organizing and operating on 
all bands to get the incoming radio messages. 
Activity on the air started officially Monday, 
January 21ist at 1700 EST, continuing for a 
24-hour period. Herbert Hoover, jr., W6ZH, 
under secretary of state, arranged for official 
receipt of the messages and their transmittal 
delivery file to the 


the occasion 


as a complete 
President. 
Amateurs who took part were thrilled at a 
chance to handle a communication to the Presi- 
dent. Typical comments: ‘Thanks much for this 
opportunity to participate.” ‘I feel very proud 
to have had a part in the Governor-Presidential 
Relay.” “Ten other stations indicated readiness 
to help . may I for the Santa Fe Radio Club 
express my appreciation for the . relay. 
The publicity given here for this occasion was 
a great asset to all amateurs who participated.” 
Washington area stations, in addition to moni- 
toring the National Emergency and Calling 
Frequencies, maintained with all 
incoming networks. A Hq. bulletin announce- 
ment with full details explained the pattern, 
including net frequencies, and the Washington 
calls and centralizing plan put in effect by Route 
Manager W3WV. This was widely circulated via 
SCMs. Leo Young, W3WV and other net mem- 
bers covered MDD’s 3650-ke. frequency con- 
stantly. W3ECP QSYd to various nets in search 
of GPR traffic. W3AKB besides monitoring 3550 
ke. acted as the central collection point (shown 
as *) for the whole 24 hours; the staff here in- 


cluded W3AKB, W3CDQ and W3BWT. W3PZA 


message 


connections 


operated by W 3BHE used 3875 phone. The Md. 
Emergency Phone Net was active in the Relay. 
W3CVE brought in several via TCRN and gen- 
erally covered the 7 Mec. band. VN, VFN, and 
VSN were ably manned; W4IA says 7080 ke. 
was watched over by members of the Morning 
Watch; W3ZSX gave good ESN coverage. 
Radio conditions deteriorated swiftly on all 
amateur bands after direct receipt of the C. Z. 
message. KP4DJ’s filing from P. R., while being 
worked on by three Washington amateurs, was 
lost when under stress he made a move to another 
part of the phone band. Superlative operating, 


Meet some of the mainstays who made this °57 
G.P.R. a success (L. to Fran, W3AKB; Ep, 
W3BWT; Van, W3ECP; W3WYV; and Liz, 
W3CDQ. 


Leo, 


organization and teamwork brought in the GPR 
traffic. Characteristic comment was that condi- 
tions were extremely rough. “The bottom 
dropped out of the band.” “‘ Used a k.w. rig and 
needed every watt.”’ ‘The worst in years, signals 
were and fading badly with blurring of 
characters.” 

Several examples might be cited showing how 
tough conditions were. WI1BB had the Mass. 
message and hooked up with W3PZA, but with 
phone there was extreme relaying difficulty. 
W2AAO later attempted to take the traffic but 
again neither operator could be sure so at 2210 
the message was sent through W3MCG on c.w. 


weak 


The Maine message took a 5-station relay to get 
to Washington where it was telephoned direct to 
the White House. Conditions rugged. In 
K5HYX’s case (no previous arrangement) W4FB, 
Al Hart of W3WTE, engineer for the 
President’s communication system, 
tacted. The New 
direct on s.s.b. phone and an earlier routing via 
W 5KW R cancelled as unnecessary. 


(Continued on page 161 


were 


chief 
was con- 


Mexico message Was passed 


« 


The Indiana PAM, W9OSWD, starts the Indiana 


G.P.R. message! 


45 





General Operating With Mike or Key 


BY JOHN HUNTOON%*, WILVQ 


INNER is finished and the clatter of dishes in 
D the kitchen has subsided . . . the young- 

sters are in bed . . . the XYL has picked 
a good book and settled down for the evening. 

The old man? Headed for the shack, of course. 
Tonight is the night for some “‘ general operating” 

. rag chewing . . . just plain hamming. 

We warm up the receiver and switch on the 
transmitter filaments. A crisp light on the operat- 
ing table discloses log, scratch paper and pencil in 
readiness. A quick check shows the 100-ke. 
continuously-running standard and the shack 
clock right on the button with WWV.. . they 
always are, but since they’re used so often we 
check each time anyway. 

What’s doing on 80? We turn the receiver dial, 
finding out who of the gang are on and what they 
are working. Say, there’s Joe at W4—, an old 
crony, but he’s busy in a traffic schedule; maybe 
we can catch him later when he’s through. Here’s 
a CQ, with a nice fist —but shucks, it’s directional- 
west, so guess we can’t help him out. Let’s go up 
in the band a little further. . . . 

We're getting the “feel”? of the band. Good 
operating starts with the receiver. We’ve read 
somewhere that time-recording clocks placed on 
transmitters of proficient ham operators show a 
maximum of 20 per cent and as little as 5 per cent 
of total time in the shack is spent by them in 
actual transmitting. The rest? — in listening, to 
make operating time return the most pleasure. A 
guy who barges into his shack and starts calling 
CQ while his receiver warms up is a pseudo- 
broadcaster, hardly «a ham communicator. So 
we listen first. And then listen some more... . 


WE LISTEN — 
AND THEN LISTEN 
SOME MORE 


Zowie! What a signal that one is — clicks 20 ke. 
away. Why don’t some of these guys realize the 
importance of a clean signal? — to comply with 
the regulations, sure, but to go even beyond that 
so that copying is a real pleasure. Just as the 
neatness of a home tells a lot about the house- 
wife, so a ham signal is a reflection of the operator 

our calling card to the amateur world. When a 


* Assistant General Manager, ARRL 
This article is essentially a reprint of one that appeared in 
QST for Nov. 1950 


46 


new rig is finished it probably will produce a 
T9 signal right off, but a few extra minutes with 
soldering iron and Handbook on a simple keying 
filter will pay off many times; the other fellow 
wants to copy clean stuff as much as we do. 
Ah, ha! — no need to bust in and tell this guy 
about his clicks; the ham he’s working is doing 
a nice, friendly job of that... . 

Hey, there’s another CQ. Close enough to 
where the transmitter was last set that there’s no 
need to retune the final, but of course we’ll have 
to call him right on or next to his frequency or we 
won’t have a chance of raising him. Nice signal 
and fist, a W8 — don’t think we’ve worked him 
before. So we flip the v.f.o.-only switch and zer¢ 
in on the channel. Yes, v.f.o.-only. It’s bad enough 
to have to put full carrier in a crowded band even 
for the few seconds required to tune up, but high 
on the list of public enemies is the guy who 
“‘swishes”’ his v.f.o. with the rig on the air. The 
v.f.o, is a great boon to ham radio but improperly 
handled can be the greatest bane. Monitoring the 
v.f.o., we tap out a couple of diddle-de-dah-dits 
to get the feel of the bug and to make sure it’s 
set for about the same speed as the fellow we're 
going to call. There, he’s signed... the big 
switch goes on, a couple of quick calls and BK 

. yep, there’s his snappy break, and we sign. 

So now “the door is open”’ we’re face to face 
with another amateur. He can be just a set of call 
letters or a new-found friend. We can mumble, 


HE CAN BE JUST 
A SET OF CALL LETTERS 
OR A NEW-FOUND 


rand 


on our turn, that it’s nice to see him, remark 
what nice weather we’re having, and then shuffle 
off to “ring another doorbell”? and go through 
the same routine all over again if that’s what 
we want. Or we can develop the greeting into 
a new and warm friendship — the stuff of which 
true amateur radio is made — and spend a pleas- 
ant half-hour or longer chatting about anything 
under the sun. 

It’s up to us. 

Into the log goes the date, time, frequency and 
mode, and we wait for our signal report. Mean- 
while, we’re thinking of the more-or-less “stand- 
ard” rut into which many amateurs fall in gen- 


OST for 








THE R-S-T SYSTEM 
READABILITY 
Unreadable 
Barely readable, 
able 
Readable 
teadable 
Perfectly readable 
SIGNAL STRENGTH 
Faint signals, barely perceptible. 


occasional words distinguish- 


with considerable difficulty. 


with practically no difficulty. 


Very weak signals 
Weak si 


Fair signals 


gnals 


Fairly good signals. 

Good signals 

Moderately strong signals. 
Strong signals 

Extremely strong signals. 

TONE 

fussing note 

no trace of musicality. 
slightly musical, 


Extremely rough 
Very rough a.c. note 
Rough low-pitched a. ote 
father rough a.c. n 

Musically-modulated note 
Modulated note ht trace of whistle. 
Near d.c. note 
Good d. 
Purest d 


1oderately musical. 


ripple 
of ripple 


smooth 
note, Just a trace 
note 


characteristic steadiness of 
add the letter X to the RST report. 
the letter C may be added to so 
add K. The above 
and voice, 


If the signal has the 
crystal control 
If ther 
indicate 


e 18 a chirp 
Similarly for a 
system is used on both c.w 


click 
reporting 
out the “tone 


leaving report on voice 











eral operation, when on the first transmission 
they sa) something like: 
R R OK OM TNX FER CALL UR SIGS 
RST 579X HR IN EAST HARTFORD CT 
WX CLR ES WARM WL OM HW? W 


And on the 


R R OK OM 
WX WL OM 
QsO ES HOPE Cl 


next one 
rNX 


GESS 


FER RPT OK ON 
QRU HR SO T 
AGN VY 73 W 


| and unimaginative. 


Strictly impersonal 
fell into the routine 
self-conscious in our first contacts and so imitat- 
ing the scope of conversation the other fellow 
used in the thought that it must be standard 
amateur practice. And then came that fine day, 
after our first and very pleasant rag chew, when 
we realized that on the other end of the circuit 
was not just a collection of radio equipment but a 
real, live human being. We’d been in a rut and, 
as the saying goes, the difference between a 
rut and a grave is in the dimensions. Hope this 
WS isn’t like that. 

Oops, almost 


Yet we 


sume when beginning, being 


only 


signal report: RST 
189, and down it goes in the log; he says there’s a 
bit of interference locally. Mighty good op, that, 
who realizes every 58 signal is not automatically 
R5. Many of us have forgotten that the numbers 
have definition and meaning. R-Readability is a 
gauge of alnlity to the signal 

roughly, what percentage of material is actually 
being received as communication. S-Strength, 
an entirely separate measure, of course relates to 
strength of the signal. It is perfectly possible for 


missed the 


understand 


April 1957 


a weak signal to be 100 per cent copiable, 
which case the report might be Readability 5, 
Strength 3. Conversely, a hefty signal being 
messed up by even stronger interference might be 
reported as Readability 2, Strength 8. The 
tomary 579X can be an accurate report in an un- 
crowded band with average conditions, but is too 
often improperly used, strictly out of habit, 
under other conditions. Fairness in RST reports 
will ensure that the other fellow will do likewise 
and your log entry under “my will mean 
something, T-Tone is a particularly-abused 
measure; a T7 report won’t bust up a beautiful 
friendship if the guy at the other end is any kind 
of ham; he wants to know the quality of his signal] 
if it’s standard rather than being patted 
on the back with a false T9 so that he goes along 
blissfully in ignorance. ... 


cus- 


sigs 


too. 


below 


SOME OF 
THE Boys Hap 
BEEN TELLING Hi 

HE WAS TO 


= 


—, 

~~ HEGETS ANOTE | 
ae Fcc 
ef 


“HR IN MANSFIELD OHIO. Drove 
through there a couple of years ago headed west 
on vacation; must ask him if he’s ever had steak 
sandwiches at that little diner west of the city on 
toute 30N. His name — Bill, and we mark i 
in the log for future reference. Ho! says he’s 
just come in from planting early the 
garden. That means we can swap notes on sweet 
corn, varieties of winter squash (wonder if he’s 
ever had stuffed zucchini), and whether or not to 
stake tomato plants. Boy, this is going to be a 
swell chew! 

And it is. Gardening happens to be the opener, 
but it might have been one of a thousand other 
subjects, radio or otherwise. We hams have to 
have standard operating procedures in calling 
and signing for convenience and speed in com- 
munications, but what goes on between the BT 
That’s where we cease being only 


peas in 


signs is up to us. 
radio operators and become individuals. 

Contests are different. In an SS, for example, 
the idea is to make the greatest number of con- 
tacts in a given time and therefore each one as 
short and snappy as possible. That’s fair enough 
for a contest aimed at developing operating pro- 
ficiency and skill. But we’re talking about general 
operating . rag chew ing ‘ ‘ just plain ham- 
ming, where “hello-goodbye”’ contacts have no 
place, where we forget our secondary status as a 
bug-pusher or a mike-holder and become an 
individual 

That’s what 
Club) is for 


ARRL’s RCC (Rag Chewer’s 
to promote fraternalism in ham 


47 





radio and get away from stereotyped contacts. 
We’re mighty proud of that little blue certificate 
on the shack wall, signed by The Old Sock. A 


CONTESTS ARE 
SOMETHING ELSE 


half-hour rag chew reported to Hq. by postcard 
and confirmed by the other fellow, already an 
RCC member, was all that it required. It’s a 
pleasant reminder of the many enjoyable contacts 
of a half-hour or longer that have occurred since, 
like this one, and we hope that will continue 
long in the future. . . . 

And so we learn a lot about Bill of Mansfield, 
his garden, his rig, his family, and we in turn tell 
him about ours. The contact goes so smoothly we 
can’t help noting his expert use of abbreviations 
to save time, and Q signals when they fit. He’s 
not trying to break any speed records, though, 
and keeps his sending rate down to what can be 
handled on the bug with a minimum of errors. 
When there is a bust, it is corrected with the 
standard sign e« « « « « « « «(eight dits), the 
proper indication of error. He doesn’t use R at the 
beginning of a transmission unless he really got us 
solid. His sending is clean, and a pleasure to copy. 
We’re getting a mighty warm feeling for this fel- 
low Bill. Novel, too, though mighty logical, the 
way he uses periods (.__. __.__) at ends of sentences 
and the double-break (BT) to set off paragraphs 
of thought. Of course in rag chewing there’s a 
minimum of punctuation used, 

The contact is enjoyable, further, because we’re 
“reading” him and not copying down his trans- 
mission verbatim. Took us a while to break away 
from the solid pencil copy habit, but now we can 
sit back and take it easy, of course making notes 
on items that we specifically want to remember 
for comment when it’s our turn. In fact, once or 
twice we break in with a particularly pertinent 
comment, of course remembering that while it’s 
not necessary to sign a comment of less than three 
minutes’ duration, in a series of rapid exchanges 
we must sign at least every ten minutes. 

Yipes! — nearly 8:30 and time for the late 
session of the section phone net. Where’d this 
last hour go? Hate to bust it up but want to check 
into the net tonight. How about a schedule for 
Thursday, OM? Fine, we’ll be there, same time, 
same spot. A million tnx, Bill, and CU then. 73. 
No need for a drawn-out, flowery leave-taking, 
full of multiple 73s and dripping with insincerity, 


48 


Up gees the receiver diai. We swing the v.f.o. 
up, flip the “tune” switch for low power, and 
adjust the final, then kick in the modulator. All 
set. And just in time — there’s the net control 
station. We make final frequency adjustment to 
his channel with the v.f.o.-only switch. Listen to 
him handle that net call up — his push-to-talk 
system is a marvel, darned near as useful as 
break-in on c.w. Got to look up details and fix 
this old crusher the same way, or maybe even 
try voice control. Only have two switches now 
for changeover, but that’s one too many in com- 
parison to the punch this fellow gets into — and 
out of — his hamming. 

It’s so smooth it seems to “‘just come natch- 
erly,”’ but he sure knows his voice operating. To 
start with, there’s no confusing background such 
as a broadcast set running wide open in the next 
room. Most important, he says it with words. 
Funny, isn’t it, how we carry c.w. abbreviations 
into phone use when probably the reason we got 
on voice was to use words! When this fellow 
wants a net member to stand by, he says “‘please 
stand by,”’ not “please QRX a minute.’’ And 
none of the ‘“‘okay on this, okay on that’”’ sort of 
thing; when he says okay, he means okay on 
everything, without feeling obligated to recite a 
check list to prove it. 

Our turn, near the end of the list —at his 
“‘break”’ we make a quick check-in. Couple of the 
other fellows have traffic and while it’s in process 
let’s make out a QSL card to Bill so we can mail 
it first thing in the morning. ... Turns out 
there’s not much else doing tonight, so the net 
breaks up a little early. A few of the boys hang 
around for a round table. We listen a few minutes, 
noting their efficient sign overs: ‘‘W1AAA [next 
station to transmit] and the gang in the Blank 
Net, this is WIBBB, over.’’ No waste of time 
here. And there’ll be no questionable language or 
indulging in rumor-spreading or pseudo-broad- 
casting for the entertainment of SWLs in this 
crowd; while the appeal of ham radio to these 
fellows is the personal contact, they still maintain 
it on a high plane. 

Us? Headed for 20 phone. Need Oklahoma for 
WAS on that band, and maybe it’ll still be open. 
Hope we can find someone in the Sooner State — 
and hope he’ll be in the mood for a rag chew. . .. 

On the way down, though, let’s stop off on 40 
for a minute. Conditions seem pretty good, and 
the band is full, as usual. What’s this carrier? 
Oh, somebody testing. He’s signing . . . a new 
ham if his call means anything — and there he 
starts a CQ. Let’s get the rig on 40, quickly. 
Oklahoma will have to wait. We’ll never forget 
the courtesy and understanding shown us by the 
ham fraternity in our first contacts, and here’s a 
chance to repay it in part by extending the same 
hand of welcome. He’s a little shaky, but doing 
his best, and that’s all we can ask of a newcomer. 
In a few weeks he’ll be in there handling his sta- 
tion with the best of them. When he gets over that 
initial nervousness, he’ ll find ham radio as enjoy- 
able an avocation as it has been to the rest of us 
these many years. OK, OM, here we come... . 


‘ 


OST for 





1957 V.H.F. Sweepstakes Results 


Tenth Running Sets All-Time V.H.F. Activity Records 


UT THE STATISTICS on the 1957 V.H.F. 
P Sweepstakes through your Univac in any 

way you like and chances are that you'll 
come out with a record high. There never has 
been anything like it. Acceptable logs: 837, 
against last year’s record 753; club entries: 41, 
with 28 in 1955 as the previous high; top score: 
11,920 points, more than 5000 ahead of the best 
work heretofore; ARRL Sections: 53, up from 49; 
contacts by one operator: 339, a slight increase; 
high club aggregate: 69,575, a leap of 37 per cent. 
And so it goes. 

The graph tells the story; several stories, in 
fact. Growth in over-all participation is shown 
in the solid line. After passing through TVI Val- 
ley, in 1951, we put on steam steadily, and we’re 
still going up. Novices helped to pull us out of the 
doldrums, and 2-meter activity all but took over 
the yearly contests from 1952 through 1955. Use 
of 50 Me. dropped steadily until the Technicians 
appeared on the scene in 1955. The 1956 V.H.F. 
SS is the first in which they participated on 50 
Me., and the curve shot from a low of 12 per cent 
participation in 1955 to nearly 40 per cent. This 
year the 50-Mc. percentage swung up to 53 per 
cent, an all-time high. 

The sharp drop in the 144-Me. curve should 
not. be viewed with alarm by 2-meter men. There 
were more 2-meter entries in 1957 than in any 
of the contests prior to 1955. The band curves 
are for percentage of the total number of logs. 

Most of the leaders still work both bands, but 
not all. For the first time the country’s top com- 
petitive score was made on 50 Me. only. Helen 
Harris, WIHOY, operating under the call of the 
Waltham Amateur Radio Association, 

WIBU, ran up a record score of 9000 ' 
points on 6 only. Catching the several 
kinds of DX openings turned the trick for ° 
Helen. She worked 20 ARRL Sections 
and 226 different The record 
number of contacts, was amassed 
by W3KKN, Willow Grove, Pa. Ernie 


hooked only 12 sections, so his combined 


stations. 


339, 


Rising tide of V.H.F. Sweepstakes 
activity is shown in these curves of 
the 10-year history of the contest 
The Novice Class license triggered 
off a sharp rise in overall participa- 
tion in the years after 1951. Opera- 
tion on 50 Me. fell off steadily until 
the band was opened to Technician 
Class operators. They were largely 
responsible for the upswing in 6- 
meter interest in 1956 and °57. More 
than half the contestants showed 


50-144 total was 8136 points. WIRFU, Wilbra- 
ham, Mass., topped this score with only 272 
contacts, making 6 pay off for 15 sections and 
8150 points on 2 bands. Several 2-meters-only 
men did right well. W3ZEY and W3IBH finished 
one-two in this category, only one contact apart, 
and with the same section multipliers, for 3690 
and 3672 points, respectively. 

The 6-meter band offered many kinds of DX 
for the quick and able. Ionospheric scatter was 
used for V.H.F. SS contacts for the first time by 
W4IKK, WIHDQ and K2ITP. Back-scatter 
from Europe during Sunday morning made pos- 
sible several extra sections for the fellows who 
were set up to capitalize on it. Several short 
bursts of sporadic-E skip swelled the totals, and 
there was just a taste of F,2 transcontinental 
propagation, mostly between VEls, Wls and 
VE7s. VELEF and VE7ND were the stars of this 
part of the show. Something that never happened 
before in v.h.f. contest history: KL7VT, Summit 
Alaska, worked several Ws on 50 Mce.; 11 contacts 
in 5 sections. Not to be outdone in the territorial 
scoring, the Honolulu Amateur Radio Mobile 
Club organized its own private competition, turn- 
ing in 7 logs from the Hawaii Section. 

Club interest grew in many quarters, but it 
grew equally in that populous territory between 
New York and Washington. Result: the South 
fadio Association took another v.h.f. 
gavel, with a record club total of 69,575 points. 
To show that there is always a chance for an 
outsider, the Midwest V.H.F. Club put on a tre- 
mendous drive and rolled up 57,656 points for 
second place. This was the first time that other 


Jersey 


Pe 
4 





- . . . --“ y 
50-Me. activity in 1957. 1948 


April 1957 


T T T 
1949 1950 95! 





CLUB SCORES 


Club 
South Jersey Radio Assn 
Midwest V.H.F. Club (IIL) 
Mt. Airy V.H.F. Radio Club 
Hampden County Radio Assn 
Hartford County Amateur Radio Assn 
Dayton Amateur Radio Assn 
Waltham Amateur Radio Assn 
Morris Radio Club 
North Penn Amateur Radio Club 
Mobile Sixer’s Amateur Radio Club 
V.H.F. Institute of New York 7616 
Lake Success Radio Club a 7454 
Framingham Radio Club Conan nies 7240 
York Road Radio Club 5976 
El-Ray Amateur Radio Club 5276 
Mid-Island Radio Club 4496 
Keystone V.H.F. Club 4184 
IBM Radio Club (ENY 4028 
Connecticut Wireless Assn ; 3969 
MIC Amateur Radio Club Exatewes 3062 
Albany Amateur Radio Assn 2922 
Chesapeake Amateur Radio Club 
Cathay Amateur Radio Club 
Springfield Amateur Radio Club 
Seneca Radio Clut 
Rochester V.H.F. Group 
Motor City Radio Club 
Amateur U.H.F. Club of Jamaica 
Southeastern Michigan Amateur Radio Assn 
Stratford Amateur Radio Club 
IBM Amateur Radio Assn. (WN Y 
Aero Amateur Radio Club 
Nashville Amateur Radio Club 
Midwest V.H.F. Club (Mo. 
Bandhoppers Radio Club 
Totem Amateur Radio Club 
Harford County Amateur Radio Assn 
Mohawk Amateur Radio Club 
Honolulu Amateur Radio Mobile 


Agareg gate 
19,5 


13,029 
8558 


Club 


Certificate 
Winner 

W2TBD 
W9WOK 
W3KKN 
WIRFU 
WiIPHR 
WssVI 
WiBU! 
W2IDZ 
W3TDF 
W3HFY 
K2JLR 
K2JWT 
WIZWL 
W3GRY 
WIAQE 
K2IEJ/2 
W3DEX 
K2GCH 
WIFTX 
W3ZFM 
K2HPN 
W3LMC 
K6EOW 
WSEHW 
W8MVE 
W2UTH 
W8ssO 
K2LDK 
KN8AKQ 

VIRFJ 
K2ERQ? 
W3KLA 
W4RFR 
K@BVL 
WOGEP 
VE7ND 
W3QKC 
VE3BOW 
KH608 


logs from the Los Angeles and San Diego Sections. 
Where were the other 287? The return from the 


Bay Area was better. 
here, with 161 contacts on 6 and 2 
for 1932 points. In the Northwe 
Seattle was the leader. 

in 11 sections on 6 only, for 1177 


SCORES 


In the following tabulation, scores 


are 


W6RLB “Prey the way 


2 in 6 sections 


‘st, W 7V 


points. 


listed by 


OG ir 


Max worked 54 stations 


ARRL 


divisions and sections. Unless otherwise noted, the top scorer 


in each section receive a certificate 
scoring Novice and Technician 
each section where at least three 
valid contest logs; footnotes denote 
indicate final score, number of contacts, 
sections worked and the bands used. A 
B 144 Me Me. and D 420 Me 


also recei 


these 


ATLANTIC DIVISION 


Eastern Pennsylvanta 
Ww: . 8136 339 
W3TDF.. .5980-: 
Ww: 3.55 
V3TYX 


W3JNT, 

W3TF (9 

W3FZC 
V3CXU 

W3HFY . 5016 ; PaeS 

W3ZEY. . 3690-205- § W3WHK 

Ww: 3 

Ww: 

Ww: M 

We W3CGV 

W3TOM 

W: 

W: 

Ww: 

Ww: 

W: 

W3KL 

W3DMsli 

W3KMV 

W3: 

W: 

W: 


award 


The 


ves 


such licensees submi 


winners. ( 


represents 


highest- 


a certificate in 


tted 
olumns 


number of different 


50 Me., 


Multioperator sta- 
tions are shown at the end of each section tabulation 


3 (8 oprs) 
29-124 
oprs 
1704-142 


(W3s GCR ¥ 


1160-116 
CW Lod Xt 


7-AB 


6-AB 
IQ 

5-AB 

ONG) 


88 
Ww as F 10 WH) 
14- 


d.-Del.-D, C 


2317-168 
1750-125 
11S8- 99 


624 

616- 77 
600-— 60 
522- 87 
432— 54 
384- 48 


7 
ABCD 

7-AB 
6-B 
8-B 
S-A 
5-B 
4-AB 
6-AB 


W4ACY 
& WANHW 
K6HLQ 


Greensboro Radio Clut 


Silvergate Amateur Radio Club 
WIHOY, opr. ? W2YLM, opr 
29 other clubs mentioned, but with less than the required 3 logs. 


an Hast Coast club has made the Number 2 

and their aggregate was well above any 
previous winning total! Another newcomer, not 
even being a year the Mt. Airy V.H.F. 
Club of the Philadelphia area, put over 50,177 
points to land in third place. Long-time rivals for 
places in the upper brackets of club scoring, the 
Hampden County Radio Association, the Hart- 
ford County Amateur Radio Association, and the 
Dayton Amateur Radio Association, in that 
order, posted the only other club totals over 
20,000 points 

The country’s top Novice was a midwesterner, 
KN9EZN, with 117 contacts in 4 sections for 936 
points. must tune 145 Me., 
though we heard one lone KN1 on 146.5 Me. say 
that he called for four hours before making his 
first contact! Something of the activity available 
to the W9s can be judged from the total of 
W9WOK: 208 QSO’s on 50 and 144 Me., for 
3744 points, the Illinois Section award, and the 
club high for the Midwest V.H.F. Club. 

Too few logs came from West Coast sections, 
but there must have been somebody opérating — 
W6SDW,/6 made 297 contacts on 50 and 144 
Mce., in only 2 sections. We received a total of 10 


than 


spot, 


ag 
ago, 


Somebody above 


50 


Ww: . .336- 42 
W: 304- 38 
W3BYM 288- 36 
Ww i 2 < 
WwW: 

Ww: 

Ww: 

Ww: 

Ww: 

W3JX 

Ww: 

Ww: 


18 
. (W3s AUN 
700— 70 


Southern New Je 
W2TBD. .5357-244 
K2HOD 4086-228 

4004-182 
3736-234 
3660-183 
W2PAlI 3360 
W2BLYV é 
W2RE B 


W208SD 
W2FXT 
W2UC\V 
W2QBH 
W2YRW 
K2KIQ/2 
Ki 2BGO 


Ww 
WN3FLD 
W3BUC 24 y 
W3UKI (W, tert 1B} 
3504-220 


*}400 100 
366- 61 
348- 58 


WA meow wm nww aww mh WWW ROWHNWNOwWNOwWH om 


Ww AV 
K2WAO5.. 





John Chambers, W6NLZ, Palos 

erdes Estates, Calif., used 50, 144 
and 420 Me. to win the Los Angeles 
Section award. 


W2SDO....318- ! 3 W9rTT iS0— 80- 3 
iJ 310- I W9HXK 4180-— 60 
246 K/KN9CSS 

236-— 5 ] 480— 60 
W9ZEX 4960-115 
K9OBCJ 445-5 
W9PPA 
W9BUB 
W9QKE 
W9INI 
KN9EEC 
W9RON 400- 50 
K9A EC 390— 65 
W9GCH.. .384— 64 
webJ 378- 63 
I W9FPO 376- 47 
§-2 2 KN9DOK 72— 62 
W9GKD 
W9HPG 
K9OBDJ 
W9BUK 


“Isr 


WSMAH 8 

WSVYG/S 6 

KS8CFY (W8SWAO 
51 


W20X\ 
K2ITQ 


7 W9JAQ 

K2s I “W9GAB 
604 

Western 


1400 


Ohto 


5304-205 
1938-162 
1834-131 
W9ZBO 1736 
W9ORTZ/9 \ 1536 
W9QNM 5— | 1498 

‘ Gs 28 
W9ICT (W DS WSHOH 


212-1 WS8GEN 
WsJSW 
WSSDJ 
WSEHW 
WSTPI 


WS8LPD 
WSSVI 
WSNRM 


DAKOTA DIVISION 


WORSP 60- 15 


out 


WOOFZ 1222 
WeoGw S91 
WODXY 18 


WSLUZ 
WSKDW 
WSFPZ 
WSCWI! 
WSMVI 
KNSDOH? 
WSINQ 
WSJIRN 
WSDPW 
WSNEI 
WSRHA 


48-13-A 
42-11-A 
12 .-B 


2-1 


Cre ee 


DELTA DIVISION 


KNS5IPL 2 é 2-B 


ekel 


W3FPH 750 
W3KWH (W3s 
WHY ZUZ 
464 Ss 


W9HXH 

CENTRAL DIVISION = KN9DKG 
Iltinot 

W9WOK. .3744-208 

W9QKM.. 1848-154 

W9OBW 1760-176 

W9ROS 1750-12: 
W9YREM.. 1680 


2 
W4YRM 40 WSDSQ 


WSC JG 


W9KCW 
W9FRO 
K9GGI 
W9TRP 
KN9YDNG 
W9VGI 
K9AMG 
K9BEO 
W9PVZ 
K9AIA 
W9HKA 
W9KBP 
W9vGat 
W9DYX 
K9BDI 
K9BDK 
K9YDTI 
W9HXI 
WONLI 
K9ALR 
Wo Je 
W9RSI 
K9DO!I 
W9SLZ 
W9SEK 


GREAT LAKES 
DIVISION 
Kentucky 
W4VLA 750- 7 
W4KZI 328- 41 
KN4MEE. .120- 2 
K4HTO 108 


WSHTD 
WSLJI 
WSBAX 
WSIMK 
WSIGI 
WSQGT 
WSGNX 
KNSBSE 
WSBMO 
WSKSI 
WSPLQ 
W8ZSK 
WsJPQ 
WSGHX 
WSQFA 


oe dt nen nel kel 


Michi 
WSURO. .2064 
WSSDK 1512 
WSsP! 1176 
WSARR 930 
WsJXt S48 
WSSSO 780 
WsCVQ 750 
KNSBOL?. .700 
WSHJR 180 WSENH 
KSCZP 180 WsLé 
460 5 Wswit 
376 


WO9VNW 
KN9EZN?2 
W9YOI! 
W9EET 
WoM Y¢ 
W9ILIO 
KN9EZI 
KN9ESB 
W9QBJ 
W9YLY 
W9KZS 


ll hl a 
Ce roe er Oo eee 


W9ZIH 
W9AKR 
W9MVJ 
WIDEN 
W9PUW 
W9IMG 
K9AGI 
K9AN( 
W9BOZ 
Wa9cT 
W9KLD 
W9UMD 
K9EWYV 
WIONW 
W9HNXI 
W9SBBA 
W9AYM 
W9PPW 
WYALR 
WY9HQZ 
KN9YERI 


April 


Ww9vVX 
W9OZIV 


K9DPG/9 


W9SWH 
W9CAW 
W9HLY 
W9EP'I 
W9ORW 
W9MHP 
W9OVL 
woeyYtil 
KN9SEEK 


KYGFI 


de CN 200 GO RRND GO Go ae ae 


S 
W9ZIV K9E 
s00- 50 


3 oprs 
yo 


21 53 


oo 


368 

360 
KSAOY 352 
KNSCPO. .328 
WsJUV 288 
WSVRH 288 
KNSCWB. .280 
WSCBM 276 
WSCRY 264 
WS8EYJ 
KSA Y¢ 
WSDDO 


KNSBXP 

WSTIN 

WSGWA 2 
WSION j 30 
wsus -~ 20- 
WSNUE. F 9 


(Continued on page 148) 


WSAQ 
WSWRN 
WSTEX 
WSZOE 
WSSEL 


WS8QDI 
WSUDI 
WSFK¢ 
WSCUJ 
WSFV 
WS8OEI 
KNSBUG/S8. 94 
WS8ZKH 90 


Pe at ta Pat tN tt tee DOOD OO ND DDD CO de CODD RO GO CODD 


i 


Cre 


PUTT 


roe e CTO 


oo] 


owns) 


Ol 
— 





Field Day Statistics 


or many of us, Field Day is a carefree picnic- 
Pie activity. Each June we sashay out to the 

country with the X YL and harmonics in tow, 
or with the fellows in the club. The primary ob- 
ject is to get the emergency-powered gear alive 
and kicking, but we may manage to sneak in a 
fast round of golf or maybe a bit of swimming or 
fishing. We don’t knock ourselves out and we 
have a jim-dandy week end. 

For others, competitive incentives are fore- 
most. Clubs often pair up to wager dinners on the 
outcome, or strenuously strive to improve their 
own results from year to year. For those so in- 
clined, much skullwork is devoted to squeezing 
the last drop of efficiency out of transmitters, to 
use of better skywires, to development of infal- 
lible logging December QST’s final 
standings become an all-but-limitless source of 
idea material, a gold mine for trend-analyzing. 
Contact-per-hour averages and like data receive 
close scrutiny. Field Day is not a blood-in-your- 
eye grind even for such perfectionists, but you 
your that —at their setups 
anyhow — no op will be traipsing off on a golfing 
trip when the bands are hot and QSOs are to be 
made! 

On page 69 of QST for May, 1955, there appeared, 
via the good graces of WOLUB, statistics covering 
the nine postwar Field Days. These have been 
updated, in the figures below, to encompass 1955 
and 1956. 

Observe the many pace-setters new to the 
scene in the biennium. Among them W5EKK /5’s 
four operators, while high in New Mexico’s Man- 
zano Mountains, averaged a cool 2714 QSOs per 
hour to become undisputed champs in the club 
one-rig class. West Coast groups have seized rec- 
ords for five, nine, ten, 13 and 14 transmitters, 
including an all-time high of 3069 contacts by 
Pacifico Radio Club’s red-hot K6BAG/6. Cleve- 
land’s Westpark Radiops continue to zip along 
atop the club aggregate mobile listings, and 
K2OFQ and W3QQO have proved that sport is 
to be had even from the home station. Yet totals 
amassed by portables W2GSA /2 and W4KFC/4, 
and W6MBA 6’s mobile accomplishments have 
stood the test since 1950 and 1951. 


systems. 


can bet batteries 


Most 


Contacts 


Call Used 
By Club 
660 W5EKK 5 
983 W3BES 3 
1151 W4KFC 4 
1425 W6PD 6 
1305 W6CG 6 
1434 W4FU_>8 
1570 W4FU 8 
1593 W2GS8A 
2316 K6BAG 6 
}009 K6BAG 6 
2252 W2LI,/2 
1626 W10C /1 
2285 W6UF,6 
723 K6RXC_/6 


Simultaneous 


Transmitters 


Class of 
Entry 


Most 


Contacts Call Year 
One transmitter (unit or 
individual), 1 op 318 K6DQA/6 1955 
One transmitter (unit or 
individual), 2 ops 520 W6TSW /6 1953 
Two transmitters (unit or 
individual), 2 ops 


Mobile, 1 op 
Mobile, multiop 


W6AOA/6 
W6MBA/6 
W6MBA/6 


1951 
1950 
1951 
Home rig on emergency 
power, 1 op WITIA 1952 
Home ng on emergency 
power, multiop K20FQ 1956 
Home rig on commercial 
mains, 1 op W3QQO0 1955 
Home rigs on commercial 
mains, multiop W4KFC /4 1954 
Number of 


Participants 


Number of 

Log Entries 
1936 187 
2702 288 
46560 305 
4942 195 
5935 609 
6118 644 
6451 522 
7007 692 
8380 819 

10,190 1112 
9815 1053 


Year 
1946 
1947 
1948 
1949 
1950 
1951 

1952 
1953 
1954 
1955 
1956 


Largest Number of Participants: 
87, Northern N. J. Radio Assn., 1951 


Biggest Mobile Aggregate Score: 
95,948 points, Westpark Radiops, 1956 


The 1957 FD hovers on the horizon and al- 
ready the shop talk has begun. Peruse the figures, 
pick your target, set your sights. Then good hunt- 
ing June 22nd and 23rd. May all your breakdowns 
— whether equipment or nervous — be minor 
ones! — PS. 








Malibu and Morrill’s Landing 


Amateurs Perform Outstanding Service in Emergencies 
at Opposite Ends of the Nation 








¢ Within two weeks of each other, disasters struck at the northeast and southwest ex- 
tremeties of our country. Although greatly in contrast both as to distance from each other 
and type of emergency, the two operations had one thing very prominently in common — 
that amateur radio figured very heavily in each. The stories of the disasters you have 
seen on television, heard on the radio, read about in newspapers. This is the story of 
amateur radio’s part in them, related to us by amateurs who were on the scene. 








MALIBU FIRE 


HE yuletide season seems to be getting to be a 
(Tisvorit time for Old Man Disaster to hit Cali- 

fornia. In 1955 it was a flood. Last vear a quite 
contrasting type of disaster struck Southern Cali- 
fornia, Shortly before dawn on December 26, 1956, 
a fire of unknown origin began to spread through 
the dense and tinder dry brush of the coastal 
maountains behind Malibu, California. Within a 
week, 20,000 acres were blackened with the loss of 
sixty-seven homes and millions of dollars of dam- 
age to other structures and the watershed. 

The Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service 
of Los Angeles County played a vital role in the 
fire fighting. RACES was activated at 0400 on 
the 26th by W6EVL and K6AYJ. W6PNN, Dis- 
trict Radio Officer for Malibu was also notified 
and in turn called K6PCX, and the amateur 
effort was under way. K6CPT-10, RACES NCS 
for Malibu, went on the air on 1995 ke. and 
145.46 Me. This station remained in action con- 
tinuously for six days, eight hours and twenty- 
one minutes, and was operated by W6EVL, 
K6AYJ and relief operators at Pt. Dume. Flying 
cinders made operation continuously hazardous 
and heat from the fire made for shirt 
weather. 

W6PNN put the prearranged disaster plans 


sleeve 


This is the installation of K6CPT- 
10, Malibu District RACES Control 
Station, with operators W6EVL and 
K6AYJ on duty. Equipment is avail- 
able for operation on 28, 144 Me. and 
1995 ke. from left to right respec- 
tively. 


April 1957 


into operation and all RACES members in the 
Malibu area were picked up on the nets. Situation 
reports were relayed to the Malibu Sheriff’s Sta- 
tion by mobile units and specific jobs were as- 
signed as other disaster services were effected. 
A 2-meter RACES mobile communications unit 
was dispatched to Pt. Dume, manned by W6FIY 
and W60QA to establish communication with 
the Malibu Sheriff’s Substation. Once established 
this link carried all traffic to and from the sheriff’s 
patrol cars until the fire was controlled. At times 
there were over 100 patrol cars in the area so the 
importance of the job done by this RACES link 
cannot be over-estimated. 

By 0900 on the 26th, it became apparent that 
a major disaster was threatened. The entire Los 
Angeles County RACES was activated from con- 
trol station K6CPT in Los Angeles, some 40 
miles from the Malibu area. District Controls, 
representing all 14 districts of the county, spread 
over more than 4,400 square miles, responded, 
and in minutes District Nets on 2, 6, 10 and 75 
meters were checking in over 500 certified RACES 
operators. W6QJW, Deputy Los Angeles County 
Radio Officer accompanied by W6PCO, drove to 
the Malibu control station to assist the Malibu 
District Radio Officer and to provide for county- 








wide control. Their progress to 
Pt. Dume halted at one 
point by flames sweeping across 
the Pacific Coast Highway near 
Paradise Cove. 

In mid-afternoon of the 26th 
relief operators were requested to 
go on duty throughout the night. 
County NCS at Biscailuz Center 
arranged for these replacements 
by calling upon the other dis- 
tricts that were standing by. 
This procedure was repeated 
many times as the days passed 
and the response of the RACES 
group was extremely gratifying. 
At no time was any emergency PACIFIC 
circuit shut down for lack of saa 
operating personnel. Many non- 


was 


VENTURA 
COUNTY 





A rowr oume 
—MALIBU N.C.S. 


MALIBU FIRE AREA (956 
LOS ANGELES COUNTY 


rp eiscanuz 
CENTER 
KeCcPT 
COUNTY RACES 
N.C. 
SUBSTATION 


A 


7 








RACES amateurs volunteered to 
help, some of whom could be and 
were used, and did yeoman jobs. Other RACES 
groups, particularly the Los Angeles Civil Defense 
and Disaster Corps, remained on an alert status. 

In addition to the 145.46 Me. net dispatching 
the sheriff’s traffic, local nets were established on 
6 and 10 meters to provide communication for an 
evacuation center at the Webster School in 
Malibu. Also a two meter net included the Zuma 
Beach Fire Station, the control point for the fire 
equipment that was brought from all over the 
greater metropolitan area and from surrounding 
cities more than 100 miles away. Some RACES 
units were assigned to accompany fire apparatus 
which lacked radio equipment, thereby permit- 
ting the coordination of their activities. Early 
evaluation of the extent of the fire was obtained 
from W6PDL/AM. 

While communications were increasing in the 
fire area, W6ONC, Los Angeles County Radio 
Officer; W6UQL, Alternate R.O.; W6AEJ, Al- 
ternate R.O.; and K6VJU, C.D. Communications 
Officer, worked in shifts at the County Informa- 
tion and Control Center to speed replacements for 
defective equipment, to arrange personnel clear- 
ance and to assist in keeping frequencies clear for 
emergency traffic. W6ONC and alternate ROs 
W6ZGC and W6QYY provided on-the-spot as- 
sistance at Malibu as the fire emergency passed 
into its fourth and fifth days. 

At last the fire fighters gained the upper hand 
and the 7-day battle ended. Even before Presi- 
dent Eisenhower’s December 29th declaration of 


BOMBER CRASH IN 


ROM hot to cold, amateurs in Maine were pre- 
Pi ivitates into action when a B-52 bomber 

based at Loring Air Force Base near Lime- 
stone, Maine, crashed in the wooded hills of New 
Brunswick, Canada. Rescue and search opera- 
tions were conducted with the aid of amateur 
mobile operations and the Maine Sea Gull Net in 
twenty-below-zero temperatures. W1TZ provides 
us with the following details: 


54 


Malibu as a “major disaster area,” the RACES 
staff began to evaluate the strength and weakness 
of the radio plan in this type of disaster. Revisions 
are now being placed into effect so that the 
amateurs may render even more effective aid in 
the future. As it was, W6AEJ reports 3400 mes- 
sages handled by 68 operators, most of them in 
mobile units. 

A complete list of additional operators whose 
work should be acknowledged is not available 
before the deadline for this publication, therefor 
credit is due not only to the ealls below and 
above, but also to the many other hams who 
responded to the call: W6és AEP BME BRC 
BXJ BZN CAR CEE CYM DQO EOE FNE 
FTJ GBQ BHZ GTE BY HWM HX IKJ ILW 
JFJ KBA KMT LUZ MTI NHP NSE NSV 
ORS PFR POP PTE QDD QID RBW RMK 
RRL RUY RXH SNE SOF SRE SXJ TLI TPN 
TTN TTU TTW WKC WXR VDS VLN VON 
VVT VZA YSK ZDO ZGF, Kés AHH AMN 
BAW BAY BSW BXW CPF EFW EIA GCT 
GHJ GSM GVI HLZ HQQ IDJ IRY IVB JCB 
JDF JFS JKN KIX KLK KQS KVB KXI 
KXR LBA LBE LDR LGL LLY LOX LQL 
MVH VYF OLO OPV PDL PTE PXW QLK 
QPW QYM QZZ TFK TDN TRC VJW, KN6s 
QAB RIK RWX SYJ TEE TRW, VLC, 
W4LKW /6. 

We are indebted to W6QJW, Deputy Radio 
Officer for Los Angeles County, for the above 
account of this emergency. 


NEW BRUNSWICK 


The crash and explosion occurred at approxi- 
mately noon on January 10th, most of the wreck- 
age landing near a small farm community called 
Morrill’s Landing, N. B. Royal Canadian 
Mounted Police were notified by local residents 
and an immediate search party was organized 
consisting of the RCMP, French Canadian 
Guides, Air Force and Anti-Aircraft personnel, 
some 200 persons in all. One crew member had 


OST for 





parachuted to safety. Two were missing. The re- 
mainder had perished in the crash. 

As soon as the downed aircraft had been lo- 
cated, K6MPJ moved his mobile unit to the 
scene and established contact with WIECF at 
Loring and details of conditions and equipment 
and personnel needed were passed back to the 
base. Interference on the 75-meter frequency 
being used was so bad that WIVYA (Maine 
SCM) was contacted to make arrangements for 
possible relief. WIVYA contacted the Trans- 
continental Phone Net, where W1TZ gave him 
information on how to contact Boston FCC office 
for a declared voluntary emergency. At 2000 
FCC declared the frequency segment 3935-3945 
cleared for emergency operation on a voluntary 
basis, and W1TZ put a bulletin on 3950 to that 
effect. 

Traffic between K6MPJ/VE1 and WILECF 
resumed under continuing difficulties as the skip 
grew longer and stations farther and farther 
away had to be cleared off the frequency. Traffic 
had to do with dispatch of ambulances, wreckers, 
“weasels,” tank trucks, emergency power gen- 
erators for lighting, ete. At 0300, WLECF and 
K6MPJ/VE1 were still at it, although Rusty 
reported that his battery was getting weak 
whereupon one of the wreckers put a jumper 
cable to one of their batteries. At 0530, with the 
temperature at —22°, the Air Force tank trucks 
were ordered back to base for a refill as the 


» 


Once the necessary equipment ar- 
rived, KOMPJ/VE1 was installed in 
the rear of an Air Force bus, as 
shown by this rear view. Complete 
station equipment was installed for 


operation on 2 and 75 meters. 


April 1957 


weasels, searching the surrounding countryside 
for the missing airman, had not yet returned. At 
daybreak, helicopters took over the search and 
things quieted down, although amateurs all up 
and down the East Coast were guarding the 
emergency frequency, warning away unknowing 
newcomers to keep the circuit clear for the 
K6MPJ/VEI-WIECF circuit. By 1020, the 
helicopters were in contact with their base on 
Air Force frequencies and walkie-talkies at An- 
dover had established contact with the searching 
’copters, so the FCC voluntary declaration was 
terminated. Amateur operation continued on a 
“free-lance”’ basis, however, K6MPJ/VEI 
ting up equipment in the back of an Air Force 
bus. 

WITZ lists the following other amateurs as 
having participated in the emergency operation: 
Wis BBS BSL FMP FMT TBZ TGW UDD 
UTR VDM WRZ YYW ZYB, Wes AI FCQ 
IUX KHU LQL VHS, K28SCQ, W3s APK PLL, 
W4s CLH ISX YJE ZCL, W9SQH. Amateurs 
participating were officially complimented and 
gratefully thanked for their assistance both by 
Brig.-Gen. W. K. Martin, Commanding General 
of the 45th Air Division at Loring, and by Maj.- 
Gen. H. N. Ganong, New Brunswick Provincial 
Coordinator of Civil Defense. Said the latter, in 
a letter to ARRL: “Please express to your mem- 
bership the appreciation of the New Brunswick 
Civil Defense Organization for a job well done.” 


set- 


« 


Most of the operation from 
K6MPJ/VE1L took place from this 
mobile installation. Rusty, K6MPJ, 
maintained contact with WLECF at 
Loring Air Force Base for many 
crucial hours during the early stages 
of the emergency. The 20-below-zero 
cold did nothing to contribute to his 
comfort during this activity. 














CONDUCTED BY ELEANOR WILSON,* WIQON 


YL 1956 Edison Award Winners 

YLs everywhere can be proud of the two 
women amateurs who were accorded high honors 
in the 1956 Edison Radio Amateur Award. 
“For her efficient and continuing service in 
the amateur message handling field,’”? Mrs. Mary 
Burke, W3CUL, of Morton, Pennsylvania, was 
proclaimed award winner. A photograph and 
further details about W3CUL appear on page 
68 in this issue. 

A special citation was accorded Mrs. Martha 
Shirley, WOZWL, of Black Hawk, South Dakota. 
Her nomination for the Edison award was for 
operating twenty-four hours during a two-day 
sleet storm that isolated several South Dakota 
towns last April and for operating four days and 
three nights during the blizzard emergency which 
kept her snowbound alone in November. 

Heartiest congratulations to both YLs! 


* YL Editor, QST. Please send all news notes to W1QON’s 
home address: 318 Fisher St., Walpole, Mass. 





1956 Edison Award Special Citation winner Martha 
Shirley, WOZWL, is shown checking the temperature 
and amount of precipitation at a weather installation at 
her Black Hawk home. Since 1955, WOZWL has been 
conducting the South Dakota Weather Net, which 
meets each morning on 3870 ke. for the purpose of col- 
lecting weather reports for the U. S. Weather Bureau 
from sparsely settled areas in and around South Dakota. 
The XYL of W@YQR, Martha is the holder of six public 
service certificates and was the first amateur in her state 
to receive a BPL medallion. 


56 


Clarifying a Point 
After a few kind introductory remarks, an 
OM friend launches into the point of his letter: 


“There seems to be one disturbing thread of 
propaganda that runs through your writings which 
may border on the subversive. I refer to your sus- 
tained, active, and one-sided support of hams who 
wish to convert their wives to amateur radio. You 
have maintained this party line for so long that 
now you even have people writing you letters saying 
that every ham hopes his wife will someday get a 
ticket too. This comes pretty close to brain washing. 

Now I realize that a lot of women are successful 
and happy in ham radio. I know also that there are 
women who are excellent big game hunters. I have 
seen women on television acquit themselves quite 
creditably in Australian tag team matches. Now, in 
defense of my own sex, I want to point out that 
this ranging versatility is not confined to women. 
There are many men who can do a lovely job of 
decorating interiors and arranging flowers. Some 
men are quite handy at the kitchen stove and can 
whip up a very toothsome souffle. 

These are fine and noble endeavors, but I wonder 
if we should insist upon them. It seems to me that 
a man should be entitled to a position of respect 
if he wishes to smoke cigars and attend sporting 
events rather than cook and sew. It occurs to me 
that there should be some nicbe in our social struc- 
ture for the woman who does not want to be a 
radio ham, but would prefer to join a garden club 
and spend a little time bringing up her children. 
Furthermore, I might go so far as to feel that a 
certain degree of honor and dignity might be ac- 
corded her if we are to be truly tolerant people. 

You understand I am not trying to needle you 
or to be controversial, because these ideas may, or 
may not, represent my own personal viewpoints. 
I give you these thoughts quite timidly in the hope 
that you may foster a broader and more compas- 
sionate attitude on the part of those who must 
share the connubial noose.” — W9VOX. 


Never have we intended that all ham’s wives 
get their own amateur licenses. Such a “party 
line’? would be unreasonable and one we could 
never endorse. 

We agree that there is versatility in the abilities 
of the sexes. Some men sew and some ladies 
wrestle professionally, but these are the excep- 
tions rather than the norm. Up until now ama- 
teur radio has been primarily a man’s hobby. 
The fact that a few thousand women have be- 
come amateur radio operators during the past 
forty years, however, indicates that the hobby is 
not reserved exclusively for males. There has 
been no outstanding resentment registered by 
the men against the intrusion into their hobby. 
In fact, some OMs rather enjoy it, and a number 
have concluded that amateur radio makes a 
fine hobby to mutually share with their spouses, 
and, by one method or another, have succeeded 
in interesting their wives in obtaining their own 
licenses. These cases are still in the minority; 


QST for 





the majority seems content to let their ‘better- 
halves” pursue their own interests, without any 
lessening of marital bliss, and that is well and 
good. 

That there are women who are successful and 
happy in ham radio is a fact we advertise each 
month on these pages. But those women, married 
to amateurs who have no desire to follow their 
husbands into amateur radio, are happy too 
with other interests quite unrelated to radio 
communications. You must concur that a YL 
column in a radio magazine is scarcely the place 
Landowska’s latest Mozart 
evaluate progressive methods of education, or 
question the message of Dali’s newest abstract. 
These too are fine and noble endeavors, but our 
business is amateur radio, and campaigning for 
new recruits, whether they be Miss or Mrs., we 
feel is part of the job. 

Hence, the thread of propaganda you refer 
to we cannot deny, but it is not intended to be 
malign, and it stems from enthusiasm. While 
we proclaim the virtues of ham radio, we seek 
no goal of total conversion. Should interest be 
expressed, we'll do all we can to foster it. 

Thank you for airing the subject and prompt- 
ing a declaration of intentions, for surely we 
don’t wish to be responsible for strangulation by 
that connubial noose! 

All of which startles us onto a new question. 
Was there ever a woman who regretted getting 
her amateur license? To be continued, if there 


to discuss release, 


is response to this one. 


Keeping up With the Girls 
CLUBS: 

Young Ladies Radio League: Secretary W3VLX re- 
minds all members that 1957 dues are payable. Send two 
dollars to Lolly Keller, W3VLX, 3316 Unionville Pike 
Hatfield, Penna. Nineteen foreign Y Ls have been “‘adopted 
by the club thus far this year. K2DYE 
has been appointed second District Chairman, to fill a 
vacancy. The Wednesday C.W. net 9:00 p.m. EST 
3610 ke., WIYPH NCS —has chosen the name East 
Coast YL Net. 

Camellia Capitol Chirps, a new YL club in the Sae- 
Members felt their selection of name 


Jessie Learned 


ramento, Calif. area 
would be appreciated by the Chamber of Commerce 

for Sacramento is known as the camellia city of the world 

Nine YLs attended the charter meeting on Jan. 25th 
Officers elected were Pres. WO6ENK; V.P. W6HTS; Secy 
K6UZA; Treas. K6ENH; and Pub. Chairman K6HOI 
Meetings will be the fourth Friday of the month at mem- 


bers’ homes 


Some one hundred guests enjoyed 
the Los Angeles Young Ladies Radio 
Club’s annual YL-OM banquet in 
February. Gladys Eastman, W6DX1, 
with her committee of W6s CEE, 
JZA, KER, and TDL, chairmanned 
the affair. Guest speakers were Danny 
Weil, VP2VB, of Yasme fame; Mr. 
Bernard Linden, FCC District Engi- 
neer; and Mr. Walt Joos, W6OEKM, 
ARRL Southwestern Division Direc- 
tor. The fact that it was Valentine's 
Day may have had something to do 
with the display of friendship at the 
head table photo, left to right: 
WoUTZ, W6WRT, B. H. Linden, 
W6QGX and W6GQP. 


April 1957 


Mother and daughter teams are now common com- 
binations among our YLs, but Ruthella Reynolds of 
Messick, Virginia, has introduced a new one. Becoming 
KN4LXL shortly before her eighth birthday, Ruthella 
is the daughter of K4GKO and the granddaughter of 
KN4GUD! The third grade student has already worked 
a number of states using her small fist on 80 c.w. Photo 
courtesy of OM W4POB, who gave all three of the 
Reynolds YLs their novice exams. 


YLs: Presiding over the club's twenty- 
one members are Pres. W4VCB/3; V. P. W3ZCF; Secy. 
W3APT; and Treas. W3FTP 

San Francisco YLRC: K6HIW has offered her home 
meeting place for the club (2183 44th 
e third Friday of each month. New 


K6CUV; Secy. W6QMO, 


Penn-Jersey 


as a permanent 
Ave., San Francisco) th 
officers are Pres. K6HIW, Vp 
and Treas. KG6EEE 


Coming YL Get-Togethers 


Dayton Hamvention 
April 6th, Dayton 
column. A change in the program has been announced by 
Women's Activities Chairman WSMDK. Speakers in the 
YL Operators’ Roundtable will be W8s ABM, HPP, MDK, 

and W9s JYO and RUJ, instead of as previously listed. 


Ohio. For details see last month’s 


Orlando Hamfest 

April 28th, Rock Springs, Florida. The St. Petersburg 
Amateur Radio Club YLs invite all Florida YLs to meet 
at the hamfest for the p 
YL elub. A constitution will be adopted and offi 
Midwest YL Convention 

May 24th thru 26th, Autorama Motel, Flint, Michigan 
The Genessee County Radio Club is sponsor, with Esther 
Stuewe, WSATB, Chairman l 


irpose of organizing a statewide 


ers elected. 


Friday there will be a lunch- 

buffet supper and QRM Party; 
luncheon, and YL-OM Ban- 

dollar regis- 

tion fee should be sent to W8SATB, G-4098 E. Atherton 
Flint, Michigan, before May 10th 


eon, tour of local industry 
turday 


Sunday 


shopping tour 


tour of ham shacks. Two 


New Certificate 
he Texas YL Round-Up Net is offering 
akin to its YL-OM 10CC certificate 


Continued on page 162 


certin- 


rules for 





Navy Salutes WIBCR... 


N February 12th it was our pleasure to attend Incidentally, W1BCR has also received a Spe- 
( a most colorful ceremony at the Navy cial Citation in General Electric’s Fifth Annual 
Construction Battalion Center, Davisville, R. I. Edison Radio Amateur Award for outstanding 
Surely, few amateurs have had their efforts re- public service, as reported elsewhere in this 
warded with the receipt of a certificate and issue. — R. L. B. 
medal in the presence of three admirals and a 
correspondingly-large number of captains and 
commanders, a color guard, drill manuevers by 
three companies of bluejackets, and musie by a 
Navy band. The occasion was the presentation 
of the Navy Distinguished Public Service Award 
to C. Newton Kraus, W1BCR, for his work in 
handling traffic between the Sea Bees in the 
Antarctic and their families back in the States. 
The special citation and medal were presented 
by RADM Martin Kehart, Director of the 
Bureau of Yards and Docks’ Atlantic Division. 
RADM H. C. Bruton, who is W4IH and Director 
of Naval Communications, also spoke and ex- 
pressed his gratitude for the cooperation extended 
to the Navy by WIBCR and other amateurs. 
Besides a sizeable contingent of Navy brass, 
the ceremonies were witnessed by a number of 
W1BCR’s ham friends from around the eastern 
part of the country, a large group of civilians 
and Navy dependents, and members of the press. 
Included among the latter was the Channel 12 
news crew from WPRO-TV, Providence, who 
recorded the ceremony on film for their local 


newscast. 


...- and Other Amateurs 


CHIEF OF CIVIL ENGINEERS 
DEPARTMENT OF THE NAVY 
WASHINGTON 


19 February 1957 


American Radio Relay League 
38 Laselle Road 
West Hartford 7, Connecticut 


Gentlemen: & 


During the past year amateur radio operators in the United 
States have contributed much to the success of Operation 
DEEP FREEZE by giving their time and services to the men of 
Mobile Construction Battalion (Special) in the Antarctic. 
They have made it possible for personnel in the Antarctic 
to talk to their loved ones and friends back home and I 
know this has contributed immeasurably to the morale of 

the men and their families. 


So many of the amateur operators have been involved that it 
is not feasible for me to commend each ome individually. 
Accordingly, I would appreciate it if you would express, 
through your organization, my heartfelt thanks to all 
amateur operators participating in this effort. We are 
most grateful for their services. 


Sincerely yours, 


Cet Uwe te 


R. H. Meade 
Rear Admiral, CEC, USN 

















CONDUCTED BY ROD NEWKIRK,* W9BRD 


How: 

Regarding our January jabbering on T/L 
ratios, W7DET exhibits prima-facie evidence to 
corroborate our theory that DX men can be 
proud of their measly QRM output. “In my 
recently completed new layout I installed two 
hours-time meters, one on the transmitter fila- 
ment circuit and the other in the plate circuit. 
Readings at the moment: filament time, 281.4 
hours; and plate (transmitting) time, 35.4 hours.” 
This comes close to a transmit/listen ratio of 
1/7. Bill, a 170-country man, has been listening 
about 86 per cent of his operating time. 

Your ARRL DX Century Club made its own 
“DXCC” years ago, and now amateurs in well 
over 100 countries have qualified for such certifi- 
cation. Question: Has anyone amassed QSLs 
from DXCC members in 100 or more countries? 
Though nonendorsable, we could term this deal 
DXCC-DXCC or DXCC.? Nope, don’t ship us 
the cards; but we’re interested in clear black-and- 
white photos of the first DXCC? QSL collections 
called to our attention. Last December QST’s 
complete DXCC roster, plus Honor Roll ‘“‘New 
Members”’ listings then, will aid your 
research. 


since 


And while on the subject of bizarre DXCC 
work, how about DXCC-BL? Have you worked 
phonies ‘in’? 100 countries? This 
cinch because the commonplace come hardest 
Inasmuch as QSLs or lack thereof prove nothing, 
we suggest that the bootleggers themselves be 
referred to the nearest office of radio authority 
for proper primary certification. 


one 18 no 


Dust off your crystal balls, Ouija boards and 
planchettes, DROBs! Required DX regalia this 
time of year, you know. Definitely here to stay, 
the happy neologism DX pedition annually comes 
into heavy usage as the North American vacation 
season bears down upon us. Who? Where? 
When? 

Yes, make way for rapturous rumors of im- 
pending ham assaults on such out-of-the-way 
North American targets as Clipperton, Navassa, 
the Revilla Gigedos, Cocos, Saint Martin, Sint 
Maarten, Sandy Hook and lesser lights... . 
Europe will engender succulent scuttlebut con- 
cerning Vatican City, Albania, Andorra, the 
Alands, San Merino, Jan Mayen, Svalbard, 
Monaco, Crete, Rhodes and what have you. .. . 
Oceania lip and key service will be fervently 
rendered regarding the Kermadecs, Tonga, 
Nauru, the Tokelaus, Phoenix, Wallis and Bali- 





* 4822 West Berteau Avenue, Chicago 41, IIL. 


April 1957 


Hai. South America will encourage tan- 
talizing tidbits implying increased Aves, San 
Andres, South Sandwich, Easter, Galapagos and 
Brazilian Trinidad Africa’s 
gossip go-around will intimate imminent inva- 
sions of Ascension, St. Helena, Ifni, Tromelin, 
Seychelles, the Amirantes, Aldabars, Zanzibar, 
the Comoros and so forth. Asia’s wealth 
of DXpeditionary objectives will flap the grape- 
vine, including the Andamans & Nicobars, the 
Maldives, the Laccadives, Wrangel, Yemen and 
Nepal, to name a few. 

Come now, guys, just where would you like to 
go? It’s good clean harmless fun. Merely pick 
DXotiec QTHs they 
countries lists — and let your speculative cogita- 
tions radiate. Then sit back and count the many 
modified versions of your “‘plans”’ that 
back to you in no time at all. You may even find 
yourselves peremptorily provided with 
frequencies, on-the-air dates and QSL managers 
But it’s all part of the game. 

Like spring, this fever’s in the air! 


What: 


And it's likely that even if you don’t show up 
to grapevine specs, some screwballs will f 
in for you from their home stations. Anyway, we 
you till we clutch your QSLs (after DXCC certif 

. OM Ionosphere affably oozes equinoctial equanimity 
right now and DX bands rock ‘n’ roll. A record number of 
riders climb aboard your ‘“‘How’s’’ Bandwagon this mont! 
and we iterate its simple legend: Frequencies (in number of 
ke. above the lower band limit) a; in parentheses 
times without. E.g., (9 14,009 ke. if the paragraph treats 
on 20-meter work. Times are GMT using the nearest whole- 
hour figure such as 7 for 0720, or 0 for 2349. Space considera- 
tions invoke t rule that each DX-station suffix appear no 
more than once per band paragraph. We're off! .. . 


emanations. 


need not show on any 


come 


calls 


as rare 


ones according 


ear witl 


NOW, JEEVES, WHERE 
DO WE GET THEM A SNIFF 
OF THAT SATELLITE? 








10 phone used to be a whistle-stop but my! how the 
place has grown! Recent trophies down the line, at 
W0QGI; VQ3AC for No. 123 on voice. W9 ND N: KA2MA 
20, OQSRI 160) 18; and s.s.b.ers YUIAD (650) 14, 
ZL3AR (645) 1. W9RBI:; F9YP/FC (670) 14. W9OY YF: 
ELIC, GC2RS, MID, PILVKL, VQ2JN. W8 NOH: ELIH 
300) 18, FOBAK (224) 20, GD3GMH (300) 14, TF2WBG 
445) 12, VQ4FK (408) 18, ZD6JL (155) 17, GC VQ3. 
WSYIN: KR6AI 130) 0-1. KEBHM: CR5AC 110), 
now 84/45 with lots of ‘“‘easies’’ unaccounted for. W4ER) 
BV1US, CRs 7AH 9AH, EA8CF, EL2F, KTIAG, OE6DK, 
UAs 1AB 1BE, UC2KAB, UQ2AN, VK9DB, VS6AE, 
ZP5CG, 4X4AB, 5As 2TZ 5TE, KR6 VQ3. W5EY H: 
CN8JW, CR7DS, DU6GIV, HH2DB, KA2AD, KBO6BC, 
KM6AX, KR6KS, KX6BQ, K5HNY/KG6, BVI VP5 
VR2. W4HVH: puts B'ham on the "Bama DX map with 
DUILVVS, EA9EE, HPIBR, KA2s KS MR WK, VR2BC, 
TF ZLs. K4HNA: FF8AP, OQ5SEI, VQ4s DT KP, 
ZE2KL, ZP5AM, 5A5TD, EAS TF VQ3. W3QMG: CT2AH 
525), DULAP (520), EA8AX (510), ET2MZ (510), HEIRS 
550), HI6EC (505), KGs 1LH (850), 4AC (850), KW6CA 
850), KX6AI 580), MP4KAC (530), 0O5C J (540) 
OYIR (690), SVOWE (510), TF2WBH (700), VPs 2MY 
560), 3YG (550), 8BU (510), VQs 2AS (505), 4GF (510), 
J2EJ (525), WOBLV/KG6 (720), YO3AG (520), YS2AG 
YU3JN (515), ZC4IP (550), ZD4BL (600), 3 
540), 7C (600), 3V8AX (550), CR5 CRY UQ2, now 
W3RPG: MID, YO8VA (240). W2GBC: CR4AP 

, EL2LC 1, ET2US 0, KG6AGS (550) 0, OKIMB 
OQ5BK 18, OX3LD 17, VPIMA 23, ZLICG 1, CR5 
KG4 KX6 UAL VP5 ZD4 5A, now at 109 on voice 
K2KDM: s.s.b.d. with HZ1AB two-way (650), CN8GG 
EA9EH, VQ4DP. WiICP: reached 185/153, HE9LAA 
(450), UB5KAA (560), UC2, hears UNIAB (330), also 
Leningrad UAIs griping —— TVI! WIPNR 
KA8CY: most U. 8. call areas, VSs 2CR 
KZ5DX VOQ5GC ‘ ‘4X4BD VQ3 VR2 


hears 
Kuwait, UC2 
6AE 6CY, ZL2T\ 
YU 
10 c.w. was tapped at W0I UB: OEs 2KI 
SPs 2AP 6CB 8CK, TF2WBG, UALDG, 
4X4FS, 9S4s AL CM, now 119/94 (almost there!). 
WINDN: JA3AH (82) 1, OKs 1AJB 2KBE, UA3AA 
94) 13, YO8MS (45) 14, YUINM (80) 18, SP ZS 984. 
W9Y YF: OELHV, OKIVB, YUS8EU, ZC4VP. W8B UT 
LA8MC, other Euros. W8SCSK: XE2KF for No. 13. 
WS8IBX: OK1MB, more Euros. W8 NOH: FAS8RJ (39) 
15. W8YIN: UA3KAN (100) 14-15. W7DJ U: CX2FD. 
W4LDD: GD3UB (50) 17, KGILH (100) 18. K4H NA 
OHIRU, SP28SJ, OK3s ZC4. W38QMG: VK9DB (60), 
VQ4FI (75 K2GMF: ZE3JO (80). K20IL: OQ5RU 
ST2NG, UB5UW, 9S4AX, ZS. K2PSV: SP5AR. WiCTW 
first crack at 28-Me. c.w. since '39, VE8PB, 3V8AD on 
attic folded dipole. KL7BPK: UAOLA (150) 4. I/ER 


S1X Yank call areas all the way to California 
than heretofore, is 


20 phone, somewhat more lively 

highly esteemed at W0OQGI: HAS5SBI. W9RBI 
CE@AC (150) 2 of Easter Isle, CR9AH (148) 13, ET3RL 
200) 2, UAYCC (130) 3 caught calling CQ on voice 
Macquarie's VKOCJ (147) 13, VS4JT (183) 13, ZC4IP 
(197) 6, ZS8s I (143) 3, 0 (167) 4, nice haul! W9YSQ 
AP2Z, VS2DW, YO3VA. W8 NOH: HC8GI (114) 3 down 
Galapagos way. W8YIN: BV1IUS (165) 14, CRS5SP (175) 
21, SVOWK (195 4. Patol by FUS8AC and 
YJIRF around 7-9 ports VR3F shooting for 


5JK, OQSCP, 
YU3EU. 


he ars of 


7UVH: 


San Marino, the world’s smallest republic (3 


This tiny land nestles in the rocky fastness of Mount Titano near Rimini, 
single road. M1B, for some time San Marino’s only resident amateur, operates 7- and 14-Me. 
A v.f.o. exciter drives an 807 final, a BC-312 receives, and dipoles do the radiating. (Photo via OV SV’s OEM) 


at left. 


Gs. K6KY H: HRIEZ 3, KX6AF 7, YN4CB 5 
hears of VQ8AF, W4H KJ; CN2BD (180) 19-20, 

EL2L, FB8BC, HZ1AB, KA2KS, OQ#DZ, SP: 5KAB, 
SUIAS, VE8MB on Resolute Bay, ZE4JU, BV1. W2GBC 
EA6AR. WIP NR: FP8AP (185), YO3GM (155), now 
121/104. KA38C Y: JZOPC of Biak, VQ4s GB KRL, Marion 
Islander ZS2MI. AZ5DX: CN2AK, CTs 2AC 3Al, 
ET2US, KB6BD, KC6UZ, KJ6BR, ZD3BFC, 4S7WP 
BV1 CR5, passed A3 100-mark, will try s.s.b. SWL S 
Terry: notes Spanish-speaking CE9s AI in Grahamland 
AR of So. Shetlands, and s.s.b. fan CE9AO on Deception 


using English. 


20 nd 


form displayed last fall, 
here’s WINDN UAIAL 82). WO9NX U: 
13, VU2s CR 13, JG (70) 3, curious ZD9AF 
65) 13 to reach No. 84. W9P NE: FF8AP 
( 9, KA2YA (22) 9, UALKFA (90) :, UB5s KCA KEP, 
ZB2J (71) 9, 4X4BX (97) 7 for 142/125. W9 UBI: SP2CJ, 
UAs IKAK 6AQ, VQ6LQ. W9Y YG: “LU3ZS, PJ2ME, 
UC2KAB. WSNOH arog (97) 2, KR6US (35) 4, 
UALDG (23) 1, ZD2DCP (15) 3. W8WOJ: CE9AT, VK9XK, 
ZD3A pn one of those 108-ft. loaded dipoles ° : 
(40) 20-21, ISRAM (75) 20-21, UF6KAF (77) 14, 
(82) 13, VU2ZJA (60) 2 3, YAIAM (50) 1. W7DJU 
JA3AB. W7RVD: CRIC r, Vw 8, LZ2KBR, UAs 
9KCE 6KJA, UBSAI, U FoFF, UG6AB, 
UL7KBK, UP2AC be one ZK2AB, 
3V8A0, 4X4II, “The ( , on new 3-el. beam. 
W7DET: FO8AP/MM 2) % raft Tahiti- Nui who 
runs one watt, wending eastward toward Chile. Wé6CIS: 
ZD6BX for 197/165, protests excessive and _ill-timed 
CQ- DXing by W/Ks who should know better, also decries 
“GLAD CUAGN"” heard sent too often to super-rare 
DX. W6 KG: LIBLT/T (25) 23-0, KC6AK (40) 4, LZIWD 
20) 7, UAs 3KET (60) 7, OKHG (15) 1-2, UL7FA 
3, one VK8AJ (70) 9, VR3B (55) 3, YO3FT 
Wé6RLP: FO8AO (82) 7-8, TF5TP (48) 0-0, 
27) 3. K6BHM: LU2ZS, UA®s CD KJA, VP8BM, 
Maarten. K6ICS: Half Moon Islands LUs. K6AAW: 
those same LUs, EA8BC, ET3AF (60), SP8s CK ED, 
UAls KAG KAP KBD, UC2CB, UR2KAA, YV5HL, 
notes frequent nighttime 3000-mile skip when nothing 
but DX (no North Americans) rolls through. KéCEF 
CN8s FJ JX 23, CR7BN (63) 17, °Y7s YE (71) 0, YF 
(35) 1, GD3FBS (29) 15, HCILE HPI1LO (35) 4, 
HK3TH (26) 1, KC4USB (91) 2, KW6C ii 26 4, LX2GH 
93) 18, OA4FA (46) 2, ee 6, OYIR (7) 23, PZIAP 
28) 1, UR2AK (28) 2, VK9A 34) 5, VPIN7 LZ (11) I, 
VQ2GR (70) 17, ns JHC 52) 10 2FN (28) 17, VU2RM 
51) 2, ZE6JX (75 : SALTY 55) O, a fast 17 59 with 
400 watts to a 30st H grounded-grid final, 55-ft.-high 
twirler, 75A-3. K6KYH: CX2CO, KV4AA (80) 
2. W6YY: alerts us for LXIDX (65), MP4BBE (50 
, SVOWD/Crete, UM8BKAA, UO5AA, VQs 5GC 8AB 
, VU2s CR DR, ZD2GW. KSBGB: CT2BO, EAQ9AP, 
LU5ZC of Deception Isle, PJ2AW, SVIAB, 
UAICM, VQ6 ZD9 3V8 5A, QROd from 60 
500 watts. W4CYY: observes UL7s KAA and KBA 
hunting W/Ks pack style, KBA with QRP. W4E/P 
Y7 HC UA3. W4LDD: EA6AW (85) 1, KV4 VES. 
3/151 via UIBAG (59) 5, UQ2AG (28) 11, 
y 49 UA UBS UOS5 UP2 UR2 ZD3. 
HK3PC 
HPIBR 
UBSNG. W3LC 


reverts to the fine 


TI2BX, VP9CE, FY7. 
i KiHNA MP4BBL, 


one UB} A (50) 4, soviet antarctic 


UA6UL, 


38 square miles) also lays claim to being the oldest state in Europe. 


Italy, 


and its capital is accessible by a 
phone with the layout 





Last December's 


Suez flare-up saw MD5s DNQ, 
AMO and 


ADZ active on 20 c.w. from this Port Said 
hamshack. Here they are, left to right: G3s DNO, AMO 
and ADZ. Seventy watts seared up 302 QSOs with 
numerous countries during their hectic field 
day. (Photo via G3DNOQ, RSCB) 


nine-day 


post, now has 85 countries on indoor wire and BC-459A, 
W2CVW: FAQIO, ZES5JE, another attic-dipole man, 
W2HMJ: AP2Q (32) i 20) 13 J 
(56) 6-7, OQ#CZ ,U 7 
58) 3-4, UL7FA (61 2 
VU2RM (55) 3-4, ZC4GT (58) 2 
using the 20-watter of VQIJO fame 
VK9, UMS8, Alands, was frustrated by BERU-Testing 
MP4 again. W2 HQL: many of the preceding plus AP2AD, 
OY7ML, UD6AI, UH8KAA, UI8BKAA, UJ8KAA, VK9AU, 
EA9 UF6 UG6 UL7 UM8 UR2. K2BZT: FF8BX (40) 
22) 21, HSIVR (52) 0, LU8ZW (80) 0, 
2, UPOL4 (47) 22, UR2AO (59 
) 22, ZELJV (50) 1, SVOWS (44) 2: 
x , in Egypt, AP2 LX OY UD6 VR3 
ZD9._ K2GMF: EL28 (50), JA5AB (72), KA2YA (26), 
VESPB, 9S4AX (7). K2MGR: FB8CC, ISIGF, EA9 FY7 
OY UR2 ZC4. K2SLL: VOIT on w indow- -screen a. 
K2U0Y: KZ5PP, OH7PI, KA2 KV4 (BPW: made 
78 with KTIDM (3) 0, UB5UW (50) 21 
VP7. W1DBA: only five to go for 
EA8BK (60) 6, GC2FZC (30) 23, 
(60) 21, JAICJ, OA4FT (65) 2, 
3DG 4KAI, UAs IKAN 10OT rif 
(60) 23, ET3 SV1 UBS VR3 984 "{EOB;: VK®AB (20) 
12, needs info on TAIFA Wier. now closing in on 
200, UQ2KAB, Alands. Wi KRL: one MIA. WiMEG 
YUIKF, LZ1 4X4. VE1PQ: JA5AI (100) 10, KR6NI (90) 
10, UAés OM SK, ZDs 2DCP 8JP, FE8 ST2 UA9 UL7 
UR2, lost beam in 100-m.p.h. breeze but wasted no time re- 
raising it. VO1DX (ex-VO3X): that same ZD8, VP2LU, 
VQ2AS. I/ER: all Yank call areas plus VE6 VE7 VES. 
KA8CY: made big noise down East for LZs IKBL 1KSP 
2KAC 2KRS, TG9AD, TF38SG, UAs 3EG 
9DY 9KHA 9KOH 9VB LDI OKA OKAD, UBSs C: 
VQOZEW, VU2AJ, YO3FT, 4S7GE, UIS UL7 
KL7BP K: KZ5GH, KV4, Half Moon LU. KL7B UZ: : 
106/46 on CT3AB, EA6AZ, UNIAB, MP4QAC ZD9IAE 
of Gough, 5A5TH, FQ8 LX ST2 ZC43V8 _._N.Z. Ant- 
arctic’s ZL5 AA and one ZD7 AH are pani king the pack. 


13 of Papua, 
23, ZE3JO (79) 3-4 
antarctic KC4, Cocos 


"EAO LZ KA PAA 
CN8I 


J2 
YO8SK AN, ZC 4BD 


l phone say, how in the world did we ever get along 

without the 21-Mc. band before 1953? now is the 
principal route to A3 DXCC. Here and there, we find at 
WsQXW; CR4AH 215 18 available almost daily. 
wane N: KW6CL (260) 2-3. K8BL U: during first week 

a General achieved a 24-hour WAC with G3CVG, 
KA: 2MR, KH6CEX, KL7GL, LU6MR, ZS6XB. Wé6éYY: 
calls attention to CR4AS (232) 0, ZDIFG (200) 2. W6ZZ: 
is another who abhors persistent CQ-DXing by rookie 
DXers plus a few OTs regressing toward second lidhood, 
raised BV1IUS, HRIEZ, KA2WV, TF2WBR, VK9DB, 
VP6GN, other VKs, ZLs. K6BHM: got an impromptu 
18,000-mile relay to neighbor W9ZSZ via 4S7GE, also 
worked VS2DQ. K6ICS: K4LPB/VES, VPIEE. W4 USQ: 
sports QSL from ZD8SC, captured CPICJ (250) 20, CRs 
4AO (245) 23, 6AH (250) 20, CT2AC (230) 21-22, EAs 
8BV (200) 23, 9EE (200) 18, Deep-freezers KC4s USA 
(430) 4, USB (430) 0, TF2WBG (230) 23, VPs 2KD (100) 
0-1 of Leewards, 8CC (240) 0 of So. Shetlands, VQs 2DC 
(200) 22, 4DT (150) 19, 5EK (200) 19, ZB2I (240) 19, 
ZDIDR (250) 19, ZSIG 160) 20. K4DRO: YNIHF, batch 
of KZ5s to near KZ5-25 diploma, many /MMs. K4GIE: 
CNS8EU, EA8CF, EL: SA, FY7YE, HH2DB, OKIAJB, 
PJ2AV, TI2BX, VPs ISD 2LU, YNIBR, ZS3AB, CE HR 
TF. K4HMS: TGOWB. K4HNA: Capt. Carlsen of 
W: 27XM MM, VP2GC, EA8 VP8 VQ5 ZD1 ZS9. W3EVC: 
HPILO, HRILW, YN. K20ZY:; ODS5AV, SVO@WT, VPs 
2LH 5ML, ZE6JD, 4X4HK, CP EA8 HI VQ4 ZB2. 
K2SRA: YN4CB. W1MEG: KS4AX. WiPNR: SP8CK 
(200), ZD1. Ti/ER: all W/K areas save Nos. 7, 8 and 6, 
KA8CY: DUIGF, KR6s AW GT LM 8M, VS6CO. 
KA5ZS: JZOPC 3. KZ5DX; VP8BT, ZDs 6DT 8SC, CP 
CR4 ZD1. 


1 is preferred by AK@OALL: DU7SV, JAis ACB 

ADN. OE3VP, SP5KAB, VP8BS, PJ2ME, ZLs. 
W9P NE: said PJ2. W8IBX: numerous Euros including 
band-hopping OKIMB. WS8YIN: Sint Maarten, CPICJ 
(60) 20, UB5KAA (55) 16. W7DJ U: VP2LH, VKs ZLs 
Euros. W6RLP: HP1LO (28) 9-10. W6ZZ: GD3FXN for 
163rd country and 126th on 15 meters, Euros, ZS. W4EJP: 
KL7BZA. W4USQ: UAIDG (80) 15, UC2KAB (75) 16, 
Dutch St. Martin. K4DRO: EA8BO, ZEs 1JV_ 6JT. 
K4HMS: CE3RE, 9S4AX, ZE ZL. K4H NA: Sint Maar- 


April 1957 


ten. W3EVC: CN8GG, CR7LU, JAs 8AI 8AQ 9AB, 
a of Sweden's military, SP8CK, XEls H PJ, VQ2GR, 
3s EJ FK KN, ZC4CH, CE PJ2 UAI 984. W2 HQL 
VQ3TL. K2BZT: CT3AE (63) 23. K2E NO: SMIAPQ 
completing WASM requirement. A2GMF: Sint Maarten. 
K20IL: OY1R, 9S4AL, ZSs. K2SRA: OA4FA, Euros. 
KL7BP K: JATAD (60) 4 


ts this month from all mainland call 


15 Novice repor 
but Th and Seven. Luck down the list 


areas 4u 
K NODQI (now N-le EMA GM3UU, numerous other 
Euros. K N9DW K: found Ranger and long-wire good for 
LA3NE, OXIXQ (OK1XQ?), UC2CB, WL7BYA, has 46 
K N8BPM: E1I7D, more Euros. K N6SRM: nailed 
Canton Island's only Novice, WB6BE (155 K N6SQI 
after seven Novice months on 15 


nifty VQ6LQ. K N6éSED 
has WAC, WAS, a 40/33 record, and credits K6OPF for 
K N5HEW: aforementioned VQ6 and WB6, 


guidance. 

JA3BN, LUSBAJ, awaits necessary confirmations for WAC 
diploma. K N6GLH: CN8s FF JX, CT1IQ, MP4BL, 
PJ2ZAL, VQs 2GW 4DT 4RF, YO3LM, YU3FO, ZEs 3JO 
6JX, now registers a 53/30 recor K N4JFE: CE3AK, 
UAs 1KAC 6KAB, UB5s KBV, YNIAA, YO. 
KN4HPR: VK4FJ, ZLIGW (150 K N2SYN: four 
European countries. W Ni NQT: FA8CR, YU4NZ for Nos. 
15 and 16 Still no Novice DXCC claimants, fel- 


lows — the race is wide open! 


40°: . is wide open occasionally, too, and “ find at 
W: OZ WJ: KL7BSW 10 VESOW 5). 8CS K: 
several Euros. W8SQXW: F ae who QSLd in f days. 
W8YIN: SP3EV (17) 1, classy VOQ6LQ 

JAs 1BU 2JW 3PA 7BE 8FO, KA3CY 

KA2KS (20) 10, LA3YF, OKIMB, 

UA6s JE (13) 13 KJA (40) 17, XE 

2LS 5V both (25) 17. K6AAW: UA@ K6E q 

2LC 3ZT 3ZU OBR; then c.w.-to-phone for JAs 2BP 1HM 


states. 


SP6BZ accounts for some 80 countries and 30 states 
with this clean-cut homebrew 10-watt c.w. outfit in 
Wroclaw. W6ZEN, who contributes this photo of 
Wes in action, states: “The biggest problem for SPs 
is getting good receivers. Most Polish hams make their 
own but a few of the boys. _are lucky, having BC-348s 
and a few commercial sets.” 











5BI, plus JA3RG's s.s.b. KR6 YW (25), UAOKTG (20), 

VK6. K2DG7T/6; HH38DL }, UAOKKB (25 VSis | ‘E 

(40), HB (20), ZK2AD | 100): the *n vocalized for JAs 1AEO 

1AME 1AMZ 1EF 10N 2NG 20J 5BI 6AK 7EM 8DU all 

around (70-80). W4EJ P: VP5s BL (20), CP (40) both 12. 

Traflicker W3C UL: SM8AFL/MM out of Las Palmas. 

W2 HQL: GD3UB, UB5KBR, YO2KAB. W2/BL: HH2LR 

(1), PY7AEW (1), ZL2ACV, skeds XEIKD regularly on 

the low edge and welcomes XE-needers, hears VP5BL, 

‘V5 . K2BZT: LZis KNB KPC both (10) 1-4, 

5s AU HC WF (11-13) 2-5, YO6XU (11) 5, 

2, GD 4X4. K8GMF: OES5SD (24), UC2KAB 

LM (12), LZ. K2MGR: FP8AJ, OK3AL, 

, GD on 75 watts. K2QDI: KZ5NM, 

, VPs 3YG (15) 6, 6RG (10) 20, GD. 

YU6DZA, other Euros. WIAMY 

1T - W1MEG: PJ2AV (4). KN4ZHPR 

WH6BY M (182) 6. I1ER: Wrangel Island's UA®@KSI 

KA3CY: Yanks galore, JAs 1VR 2AQ 3BP, UA®FR, hears 
tabooed 3W8AA 


“V as 


80 c.w. DX now prepares to crawl down into the warm 
QRN for its usual estivation but the boys took a few 
parting shots at it. For instance, WIECH: PJ2s AN ME, 

sundry Europeans. K2BZT: KZSWU, OKs 1AEH 2BE K, 
a few Continentals. K2DGT/6: JA7BO (10), VP2LU (10), 
successfully skeds VSIGX (40) 15 almost daily. K2GMF: 
DM2XLO. K6PJT:; ZL3JT (5) on 50 watts ne Zepp 
What's a Zepp? Somehow sounds familiar... . 8YFJ: 
F8EL, KZ5EM, ZL3RK, PA# PJ2, and the phair it 
mentioned Sint Maarten specimen whose 3505-ke. CQs 
nightly go unanswered 


>.w. tapers off after a moderately successful season 

and the biggest splash was made by VP2LU. Fred 

. Lucia, Windwards, to Ws 2QHH and 1BB in that 

on February 8th. VP3AD hears WIBB, 

K2KWP and W9CVQ at good strengths, still searching for 

Yank QSOs around 1801 ke : age DX sta- 

tions getting across the pond up into March: G2s AGR 

DPP, G3s BBF DXJ ERN GGN HRW JEL vi KOR 

LOE PU, G5JU, G6s BQ GM, G8ON, GW3KS. DL2ZG 

and YNIAA were interested, and W1BB learns that YUs 

will return to 1.8-Me. action upon forthcoming authoriza- 

tion ql c —_ d ¢ °Q one evening and found him- 
self in QSO witl ‘5PN.” Nice “DX” for 160, eh? 


Where: 


Regarding 


more 


himself and fellow VR3s, VR3G comments: 
“None of us has cards at the moment but QSLS will be 
sent when they arrive. In some cases this may mean a delay 
until the return of the operators to the U.K. For incoming 
VR3 cards I am acting as QSL manager, Christmas Island 
only We note with interest that certain Russian 
amateurs have had the temerity to grouse about the effi- 
ciency, or lack thereof, at Moscow's Box 88 bureau. K2CHS 
relays the following suggestions from a prominent UA3: 
(1) Whenever possible use direct mailing addresses in ship- 
ping QSLs to U stations; and (2) do not use call signs and 
other radio lingo on the covering envelopes or they'll wind 
up in the Box 88 backlog. For UA1s in the Leningrad area 
you might try the UAIKBB ae to follow . From 
ex-ZD4CC (G3KFV) via WIWPO: “During the next few 
months 1 am determined to clear a the backlog of QSLs 
to be sent off. The response to my ZD4 sigs was re sally 
terrific, and having no cards on hand meant a big pile-up!” 
G3KFV's next post will be Singapore. _. WIRB re- 
ceived a ZA1AB card from Yugoslavia, of all places . 
“During the past few months I have been receiving a num- 
ber of cards for ZD9AF. I have no record of such a call sign 
having been issued, and ZD9AE on Gough Island informs 
me that to his knowledge his own call was the last ZD9 call 


62 


‘ 

Compact CR7BS, installed and operated by LREM 
personnel at Mozambique’s recent Economic, Cultural 
and Social Exhibition, collected a fat logful of QSOs 
on DX bands. Here CR7s AL, IZ, AR and AF confer 
during a break in on-the-air activities. (Photo via 


WI1YYM) 


« 


issued.”’ This from ZSIMU, SARL bureau chief; 
the following ZD9AF address at your own risk 
VPIAA lost certain QSL records by fire, so if your dese erved 
pasteboard hasn't arrived reapply with full QSO data 
.~ From W3CSW at KA2KS: “We receive numbers 
of cards bes aring no indication of the KA2KS operators who 
made the QSOs. This omission gives us, and I'm sure other 
club stations, one big headache. We could answer QSLs 
much faster if this one bit of information is included.’ 
.- W2QHH learns that a anal ex-VP9BM, will 
forward VP2AH QSLs to the VP2 bureau concerned, al- 
though Jules knows naught about him. Howy’s busy hunt- 
ing op ae of SVO@WN/Crete, now reported Stateside 
te gtes ist made out 720 QSLs for W2AIS/MM, 
W2AIS VK and KH6ARA. Any cards still due overseas 
and U. 8. hams will be found at their various bureaus."’ For 
further QSL inquiries Pat can be reached at the ex-ZC8PM 
address to follow . “ZD8SC, promising 100-per-cent 
QSL, ys most of his cards go via the ARRL and RSGB 
bureaus,” informs WO9WHM. John, who volunteered VP8 
QTH data some months back, desires it made clear that 
W9WHM does not handle QSLs for VP8s. Cour- 
tesy WH#QGI: VP6AM shut down for relocs ation last month 
and Barbados QSL matters now are in the hands of VP6L 
All VP6AM pasteboards have gone out via bureaus except 
where sufficient IRCs were receivec Jo direct reply : 
As indicated in the following, SWL Rice is assisting with 
LZ1KPZ QSL chores for North and Bo ith America contacts 
only, For Bulgarian tr: ansshipment he requests that an IR( 
accompany each QSL. .. From WIICP: “W4EMI 
KS4 writes to let the gang know that he is waiting for 500 
QSLs to arrive he will QSL.” ._. “Tell the boys 
who have worked VP3AD and who have not had replies 
to their QSLs not to be too worried’ I'm out of QSLs now 
as soon as stock arrives I shall forward same.’’ So writes 
Dad between 1801-ke. vigils. VS2DQ, via W9BEK, 
remarks that a single IRC does not quite cover surface 
route QSL return from Malaya to Uncle Sugar; five kewpies 
are required for reply by air. .—.— SP3PL, QTH to fol- 
low, requests direct QSLs with one IR( tos card 
W9DSO, back from a Caribbean tour, hears that ex-HISWL 
confirmed 800 of his 1000-plus Dominican Republic QSOs 
before running out of stock. Bill will finish the job shortly 
and can be reached at the address following 
SCDXC organ editor W6OUN is doing his best to clear up 
the long-standing H K@AI San Andres QSL jam-up 
This year’s Australian Antarctic ham complement includes 
VK@s AC AS DC DJ JP PK RR ZM at Mawson Base and 
VK@AB (ex-VKIAC-VK3IB) in Princess Elizabethland 
All can receive QSLs via WIA but cards for VK@s AB and 
PK can go as suggested in the following. VK@s AA and CJ 
hold forth from Macquarie no oe on Heard. The 
VK1 prefix thus indir ey A.C.T. wy ra Vicinity) ex 
a ‘ N} lists cS E 30K. ‘asilla 1234, San 
tiago, ; ‘QSL prese wd ative’ for CE9 ein CE® stations 
” The ‘sien directory results from contributions 
by Wis EOB RDV UED VG WPO YYM ZDP, W: 2s HQL 
JBL, K2ENO, W3s QMG RPG SWV, W4s LDD USQ, 
K4DRO, W5ERY, Wés ERC RLP YY ZEN, K6CEF. 
W7s DJU FBD UVH ZOH, W8s GLK NOH QXW WO), 
W9s CFT DMY DSO HIX KA, W#QGI, KA5ZS, KL7 
BUZ, ISWL, MARC, NNRC, OVSV, SCDXC, WGDX¢ 
WIA and WVDX(¢ 
AP2Q, M. A. Qureshi, 203, The 
Pakistan 
CN8EU, P. Owen, V . 24, Box 260, FPO, New York, N. Y. 
CN8FJ, M/Szt. M. J Le 3150 Maint. Gp., Box 337, 
APO 30, New York, 
CN8GG, NCF Box 60, 
CN8JW, U.S. Nav. 
New York, N. ¥ 
DL “ey SP-3, 569th Sig. Sup. Co., 
Y 


sessed 


Mall, Rawalpindi, W. 


Y 
4 ee 214, FPO 
Com, Fac., Box 60, 


New York, N. Y. 
Navy 214, FPO, 
APO 46 New York, 
to W6KG 

A. Esceuder, P.O. Box 313, 


ex- OL 4ZC 
EA6AW, 
Balearic Islands, Spair 


Palma de Mallorca, 


EA6AZ, L. M. Pons, P.O. Box 303, Palma de Mallorca 
Balearic Islands, Spait 
FG7XE, Raizet Airport 
FQ8HF, Box 819, Brazzaville 
G3KXN, B. M. Bonser, 51 
Albrighton nr. Wolverhampton, 
HH2OT (via W4HYW) 
HH2SKE (to W2SKE) 
HI8SKE (to W2SKE 
ex-HI8WL, Wm. Long, 


Guadeloupe, F.W 

French Equatorial Africa 
Virginia Rd 
England 


Newport Rd., 


5308 8. Delaware PI1., Tulsa, Okla. 


OST for 





HK5CH, P.O. Box 8, Cali, Colombia 
HKS5CR, J. B. Delgado C., Carrera 18, No. 5-75, Cali, 
Colombia 
HK5ER, B. 
Colombia 
HK®#AB (to HK3AB 
HPILO, L. O’Meally, P.O. Box 4864, 
K4LIB/FQ8/AM (via ARRL 
KA2KS, Box 14, Navy 830, FPO, San Francisco, Calif 
KA3BE, 8/Sgt. Robt. Eyester, jr., 849 ACWRON, Box 66, 
APO 47, San Francisco, Calif 
KA3CY, Capt. E. E. Worrell, 1st Com. Sq., Box 226, APO 
710, San Francisco, Calif 
KG6AGW, C. Robbins, jr 
Guam, Guam, M.1 
ex-KJ6AW (to W7GFA 
KRORY, RFD 1, ¢ 
KT1IUX, C. W. Cleveland 
York, N. Y 
KWOCN, L. W. 
Island 
LX2GH (va DJ2PQ 
LZIKPZ, « lain Dr., E. Hartford, Conn. 
MP4BCC, Carragher (ex-MF2AA), State 
Police Hq Bah rein, Persian Gulf 
OA4EY, Wim. Rog c/o U, § mbass\ 
OA4PA, J. I Rosent hal » 2181 
, P.O Box 


Consuegra O., P.O. Box 99, Buenaventura, 


Panama City, R.P. 


Qtrs. 22ib, NAVCOMMSTA, 


100ding, Ohio 
Box L, Navy 214, FPO, New 


Chamberlain, Weather Bureau, Wake 


Peru 
Peru 


Lima 
Lima 


; : : ns 
Hu ‘ sox 91 na, Per 
Box 195 ,orshavn, Faeroes Islands 
30x 1043, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil 
Jarzombek Poznan, Px 
SP5KAB, Box 122 
ex-ST2NG (to VS9AG 
ex-SUIMQ (to VR3G 
SVOWJ, Box 134, Salonika, Greece 
rF2WBM, J. Roslyn, APO 81, New York, 
TF2WGO, APO 81, New York Y 
TF2WHM, APO 81, New York 
TI5JAP, J. A. Pinto, Apartado 125 
UAIKBB, Leningrad A. R. ¢ 
U.S.8.R 


land 


N. Y. 
N. ¥ 
Alajuela 


Fondanka 7, 


Alajuela, C.R. 
Leningrad 


UA3CR, Leno buti Suscherskitupik 5, KW-9, 
Moscow 55 

UB5KAB, Box 27, Stalino craine S.S.R 

UP2KBA, Box 23 1unas, Lithuania S.S.R 

VK9AT, E. J. Roberts, No. 2 Donga 2nd St., Lae, T.N.G. 

VK9AV, P.O. Box 56, Port Moresby, Papua Territory 

VK®@s AB, PK (via VK2EG 

ex- -VO3X, H. W. MeNeill 


VOIDX, St. Anthony, Nfid., 


’ S. Cramer (ex-VP2J( St B.W.I. 

via W4ZHI 

ex-VP4LG (to VP2KD 

ex- -VOAEG-MI3TM, 3 108 ¢ 
ywrton Park ms.V i _ lan 


Mc 
VR3B, Dean Laws _ Malv ern, Melbourne, 


Kitts 
annon Hill 


Lane 


Mess, RAI 
via Honolulu 


160th 
Hawaii 
sraddell Hill Hostel, Braddell 
rshouse Sungei, Roya Estate 
Island, Kedak, Malaya 
VS2FI, Tham Yen Thin, 9 Concordia Rd 
VS2FN, 65 Kelaweis Rd, Penang, Malaya 
VS4JT (via VS2EI 
VS9AG, IAI o Aden Airways, Crate Aden 
bd en R. N. Ranga o Govt. El Dept 


Langkowi 


Malaya 


Penang 

Erode, 8 
In 

wsliN KG6, 96t! Sq 


ilif 
W8G ze 


APO 334 San Fr 


ancisco 


KL?, | q xander, Box 3, 433rd FIS, APO 
XE IPs. Arn id 
Angel, Me ) 
YNIBR, Sox 1869 gu 
YO3RF, P.O. Box 73 ich t, Roumania 
YU3LQ, A. Brauno, P ) Hrib om 44, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia 
ex-ZC8PM, Pat Miller, 2950 Pacific Heights Rd., Hono- 
lulu 13, Hawaii, T.H 
ZD4BL, E. Lloyd, P.O. Box 565 
ex-ZD4CC, P. Davis 


nals, Catterick Camy 


Kumasi, Ghana 
Royal Signals Wing, School of Sig- 


Yorks., England 
» 


of Selangor has picked off over ninety coun- 

firing up in °53. Operator Serin Singh, 28, 
specializes in radiography with Malaya’s medical de- 
partment and has recently earned a scholarship to 
further his studies. VS2EF prefers 20- and 40-meter 
action. 


VS2EF 


tries since 


April 1957 


ZD9AF, Box 3037, Cape 
text 

ZS3E, K. du Buisson, Box 66, Welwitschia, 8.W. Africa 

ZS30L, Box 999, Windhoek, 8.W. Africa 

3V8AO, Box 303, Tunis, Tunisia 

4X5RE (to 4X4RE 

5AI1TV, M/Sgt. H. E. Le Claire 
APO 231, New York, N. Y 

5A2TY, 542nd Engr. Co., APO 231 


Whence: 


Europe — Contests headline hz 
and we're in for a busy bunch of 
its concluding WAE 
(see p. 86, Dec. ‘56 Q 
French Contest with phone pril 13th-1 
p. 68, last issue). Then VERON Net herlands) invites 
world-wide participation in its 1957 PAC DX Contest, an 
affair to run (c.w.) from 1200 GMT April 27th to 2400 

h, and (phone) May 4th-5th, same hours. Non- 
vill strive to work as many Hollan ler 
per station per band, and the 
il RSTOO1, RSTOO2, et ymit t 
lads will append province 
DC, Drenthe; FR, Friesla 
Groningen; LB, Limburg; NB 
Holland; OV, Overijssel; UT 
and ZL, Zeeland. For a sho I a 
ship your log transcript and nts per band 
QSO all multiplied by total sand provir » PAOVB post- 
marked on or bef ine 957. Upon request PA#VB 
also will forwar co rning VI RON’s 7 ACC award 
&@ certification call onfirmed QSOs with 100 Nether 
lands amateurs Next month, concurrent with 
PACC Test's phone binge, EDR (Denmark) offers us thei 
yearly OZ-CCA DX Contest 2100 GMT May 4th to 
2100 May 5th, and take your pick « w. or phone or both 
wherein non-OZs will wor many f amateurs as 
possible. Exchanges will r RSTO2, 
ret ss on phone) and presumably each Dane 


orked once per b i 48 Will include with their 


Town, U. of S.A. (see preceding 


7272 AIO Sq., Box 164, 


, New York, N. Y. 


final scor 


can be 
exchanges unspecified 

at one or more 
meritorious T 

and score (band-QSOs 
Contest Manager OZ2N1 
postmarked no later t 
you might make 
jiploma Overs 
happy all the time 
rusty Iron Curtain 
QSLs, is informed th: 
Utah; UA6UT has fr 
the DX tr for Utah, Wyo. and Nev. ‘ t eight out of 
ten DX stations tell me I'm t t idaho QS ’s."’ Warren 
is curious about LA5Q/T ind you that 
Norwegian calls with alphe 
and all letters exc sept * ‘G 
and arctic portal les, res} 
Norway- proper ognition of the 
Aland Isl ands 1s a full-f ad gec e ARRL DXCC 
Countries List, OH1s RY and ST lost le time in paying 
2 return visit to OH@-land. On January 26th-27th they 
lugged an 807 40-watter, Geloso 14-tube , 
eral antennas into the Gulf of "Botht ula f 
with W/Ks) with 32 countr on all continents 
at the second —: the 
merry-go-round was 

for photos of OH1s 

to the Alands. OHIST 
from his h« 
to DLD, a cert 
many 
100 German | AmS5 in 8} " I 
to date after Januar 195 
99, Munich 27 


needs only 


39 states; ¢ itically shakes 


tables 
antarctic 


QTHs in 


iver and sev- 
535 QSOs (301 
Already 
and the 


VS seemed awake 


oO, October 


yme station 
ation of 


This one is base 





speaking of certificate-chasing, SP3PL tells W6RLP of a 
burning ambition to confirm all California counties. 
Oceania — ‘‘Authority has been given by the British 
Services for radio amateurs in the three services to operate 
amateur stations here on Christmas Island (near Fanning). 
As an immediate result three stations are being set up: 
VR3E (Les), VR3F (Jack), and VR3G (myself, Bob). The 
rigs for the part are lash-ups but a good deal of 
activity is expected. VR3F opened the ball yesterday and 
plenty of W/Ks appeared! Our operation is restricted to 
ham subjects and no discussion of outside matters can be 
entertained. Any break in this rule could result in the shut- 
down of all activity from the island. Operation will be 
mainly on 20 meters, phone and c.w., although trips up to 
15 may be possible. A look over the bands shows that U 
stations can be worked the day through.’ This Christmas 
present thanks to VR3G, ex-5A1TQ-SUIMQ-G3KDE. All 
the fellows call England home and they understandably 
request that the Stateside pack give them a break when the 
slot at VR3 is open to G-land KB6BC, through 
W7DJU, brings us up to date on Canton Island DX doings: 
“There are four other hams on Canton at the present time 
KB6s AQ (quite inactive), BD (on once in a while), BF 
readying rig _ WB6BE (on 15 ¢ ” KB6BC heads 
back to Honol ulu this month and “Haig ps ‘esibl ly Statesward 
F3AT, still pursuing Nevada for you-know-what, 
tells W8Y IN that FU8AJ is activating over New Hebrides 
we SWL W. Rice has Chile-bound raft ha ay 
I ‘OSAP MM frequencies as 14,333 and 21,152 ke. 
IRCs will get you a three-color map a this 
itinerary together 
details write 


most 


Ay. 
N ul ’s 
Sixteen (16! 
Polynesian scientific expedition’s Pacific 
with other features. For further descriptive 
F8TM at REF, B.P. 42-01, Paris R.P., France .: 
The real ZK2AB, QRT for several years, tells WSDSO he 
intends a return to DX action soon. 

Africa — ET2RH, formerly W3LBS and KL7AGA, 
illumines Eritrea’s DX picture in lines to WLICP: “ET2s 
have the usual trials and tribulations of foreign countries 

widely varying line voltages and frequencies, one dis- 
tribution transformer every ten blocks, etc, Legal input 
limit here is 150 watts and good thing, too; any more and 
all the lights would go out! Conditions seem very good 
except for the Far East and Pacific; have 96 countries 
worked. Most of the fellows here work phone, and 20 is the 
band with 15 meters running a close second. Have also 
picked up a few good ones on 40 when I could get through 
all the 7-Mc. propaganda stations. . .. I’ve heard much 
said pro and con about the courtesy of American hams. 
Believe me, the average W/K is muc h more courteous than 
the average in many other countries."’ ET2 tickets expired 
on the first of this year, so a gamut of renewal red tape is 
frustrating Yank hams in Eritrea. .. Acknowledging 
receipt of his A3 DXCC tapestry, FB8BC now concentrates 
on WAS with nine to go. Vic tells W1WPO he searches for 
1. H., Utah, Vt., 8. Dak., Wyo., et al., on 20 and 15 phone 

from 0300 to 0345 GM K4iLIB of TV, 
radio and recording fame sauntered about French Africa 
during March, signing /FQ8 or /AM aground and aloft. 
A mid-February bulletin from W1AW was the tip-off on 
Art’s safari ' WSNOH bumped into W7TAH at the 
key of CNSJW ..~ WGDXC informants specify an 
outburst of 7 activity around 1800-2200 GMT, a 
rockbound 20-watter near 14,020 ke. 

Asia — “I have been trying to get permission to operate 
in Turkey but so far the personnel I have been able to con- 
tact have indicated that there is absolutely no amateur 
transmitting authorized."’ So writes WOQOJ, and while Bob 
hasn't yet given up it does appear that new DX devotees 
will find TA credit hard to come by Afghanistan 
also still shuns amateur radio (officially, anyway) and 
YAI1AM tells WSYIN that his phone work is limited ac- 
cordingly. That new final at YAIAM really cuts a swath on 
C.W.. oo Aba H had a ball in the ARRL Test this 
year with a potent 25 watts on 7 through 28 Me. “The long 
path to the States hasn't been so good lately on 20. Nor- 
mally the path is almost due south, so I had a surprise when 
a W6 came roaring in at 1600Z a week or so ago and told 
me his beam was almost due north. His was the loudest 
signal I have ever heard on 14 Me. from W/K-land.”’ (Ray 
didn’t identify the Six.) “Still trying hard for WAS and to 
date have worked 37 states with 25 confirmed. Am due to 
leave Pakistan for the U.K. in July and am hoping that the 
guy who comes to take over from me here will be a ham 
willing to carry on the good work.”’ And speaking of rare 
DX, Ray never has heard an AP2 in East Pakistan, 1000 
miles across India . W2HMJ reports K2FC roaming 
such Far East spots as HS1, CR9 and VS6. W6VX is an- 
other Yank touring the Orient. UB5UB tells W2HMJ that 
UA®KSI still angles from Wrangel near 14,060 ke. around 
1800 GMT ._~ISWL has it that UP2AS and op 
Larry of UAIKAI hope to hit Turan City, Tannu Tuva, 
about the first of July to sign UAOTT and UA#TW around 
the clock on 10 through 80 meters. Five skywires will be 
fed with 100-watt phone/c.w. and 15-watt c.w. rigs. Turan 
is said to be 6000 feet a.s.l. ous oe ee from 
Yanks in Japan: KA5ZS, shooting for DXCC before sum- 
mer, knocked off 69 countries and 43 states in his first 90 
days of activity. Zane reports that KA5CL’s 14-Me. phone 


64 


daily 


CN8JX, erstwhile KR6LL and W7GGO, shoves 
solid signals Statesward with this Collins layout and 
ground-plane. Glenn’s forte is twenty and he’s bearing 
down hard for ARRL DXCC and WAS honors. 


is ever popes pas that VS6CY is due for repatriation to 
G3JJIK, VXZ, ARRL’s a North Carolina 
SCM, now A nied from KA2FEC: “DX very plentiful 
but don't have too much time for DX work as we handle 
loads of QTC from Honolulu and perform as NCS of the 
Far East Net . Newly-ticketed KA3BE 
with an SX-100 and Viking around 1 1,080 ke. 
“Our club station, KA3GG, needs seven more states for 
WAS where are Vermont and Maine? We have seven 
ops and the station usually is on the air about 18 hours a 
day. KA7EG has his Collins KWS-1 perking, mostly 10 
meters s.s.b KA2EB still plugs away on 10 . 
From KA3CY y active on 10 now as well as 15, 20 and 
10 meters. Just finished getting up a 3-element plumbers- 
delight on 28 Me. C me July I will be moving to Tokyo and 
will get my KA2CY call back, so I'm striking for DXCC 
before I leave K a3 Everett nears the 1000-QSO mark as 
KA3CY and his DX scorecard checks at 89/60. 
Hereabouts — VO3X, with a 175/160 DX record, sur- 
renders his 20-year-old call sign and becomes VOIDX this 
month. Other VOs change their spots, too, under official re- 
alignme —- of Newfoundland prefixes and suffixes. VOIDX’'s 
brother VE3PK is only 17 countries behind Horace in the 
confirmed category . HISWL’s departure from the 
Caribbean locale temporarily puts the Dominican Republic 
on the rarer side, although W2SKE dropped in for a batch 
of recent HI8SKE contacts. Bill was also spotted as 
HH28KE by W8QXW. .—In QSO W8MWZ recog- 
nized HI8SWL as the W5DUG he worked ’ way back in 1935 
K2MQP learns that HH8JK left Haiti in favor 
of Surinam, leaving his station in the hands of HH2DB 
ccording to W2HMJ, LU3DAB still pounds 
brass on Half Moon Island as LU3ZS._._._ W 310U 
reported by W8QXW at the mike of KG4AA with a 20- 
meter 600-watter and HRO-50T ._.—..~ YL W9HIX ob- 
serves that HC1WP’s two daughters, attending Missouri's 
Lindenwood College, er in touch with the OM via Satur- 
day skeds over WOTGB. Gosh, TV fringe areas 
extend ever outward. Here's W8G ZF/KL7 complaining of 
Channel Two difficulties in Fairbanks . W2WHB, 
recently KGIAX, gets a kick from a 15-watt 6L6 rig in 
New York. After a decade of feeding Arkansas to 
DXers i in 196 countries W5MET signs K6VUH in Downe y 
P , ‘Seems that the vast majority of KZ5 hams are 
traffic men and it is truly amazing the number of DX sta- 
tions who have never worked, let alone confirmed, KZ5- 
land.”’ That from_ KZ5DX (ex-DL4BY) now having a picnic 
with his 32V-3, 75A-4 and 3-element whirler down on the 
isthmus. DL4s ZC ZB and ZBD stopped off in 22 
countries on four continents during their trek back to 
California where DL4ZC quickly bought a lot, built a house, 
and raised a 70-foot-high beam as W6KG. “We 
cially enjoyable personal visits with CTs 1JS 3AN, 
3YG 4TE 6WR, PY8AB FY7YE, 5 AH, HK5ER, 
KZ5DG, YS1O and TISECH, traveling by railroad, bus, 
taxi, horse- and ox-dre awn carriage, seven ships, boat, plane, 
street car and afoot.” . K6ICQ, a Technician pro- 
tests somebody's unauthorized use of his call on 15 and 20 
.—.—~.—~ W2QHH, who spices his DXing with YL QSOs, 
now qualifies for YLCC-650 and has worked PJ2ME on 
five bands. VP6AM, previously VS6HR and 
G3CDR, closes shop in Barbados after being thwarted by 
Utah and Nevada in WAS efforts. _. DX men were 
numerous at the Grand Rapids, Mich., ‘hamfest in early 
March, according to W8NOH. And W#@QGI mentions a 
W8#-DXCC conference to be held in Kansas City on the 
13th of this month (check with W@LVA),. This year’s joint 
(Continued on page 154) 


goes to town 
Bud writes, 


QST for 





3218-1300 


CONDUCTED BY EDWARD P. TILTON,* WIHDQ 


NE thing about the 6-meter band you 
8) never really know what’s going to happen 

next! Over the years we’ve learned quite a 
bit about wave propagation in the v.h.f. range, 
but the 50-Me. band can still surprise the best 
of us. 

A classic example: Around February 17th, 
knowing 6-meter men were watching for some- 
thing to happen. The F2 m.u.f. had been running 
a little below 50 Mec. most of the time for the 
past month, but there had been two big auroras 
in January, on the 2Ist and 24th. If the m.uf. 
on North-South paths was due to rise in Feb- 
ruary, as predicted, the period around the 27- 
day recurrence of those auroras would be a good 
bet. There was plenty of checking done Saturday 
and Sunday, Feb. 16th and 17th, but all was 
quiet. The week-end watchers got nothing for 
their alertness then, but the 18th was another 
story! 

A few days previously, W8LPD, Cincinnati, 
Ohio, had worked ZE2JE, Southern Rhodesia, on 
28 Mc. As good 6-meter men, they were interested 
in the prospects for the first Africa-America 50- 
Me. QSO, so they decided to have a go at it each 
day at 1230 EST. At 1228 on the 18th, W8LPD 
started tuning the 6-meter band, in preparation 
for the schedule — and could hardly believe his 
ears when he ran across an S9-plus signal at the 
low edge of the band, signing ZE2JE! Contact 
was made immediately, with tremendous signals 
each way, for what is believed to be the first 
v.h.f. QSO between Africa and any point in the 
Western He ‘misphe re 

Word from ZE2JE, via WIJXM, lists W8LPD, 
WS8PKL and WS8PBU, all of Cincinnati, and 
K4CTB (location unknown, _but_ probably just 
~*V.H.F. Editor, QST ee ah asy all 


A fine example of home construction is the 
W7VMP and W7VMQ. 
in use at WOKLR, 
line. Tubes are 4X500As 


“Fenwick Kilowatt,” 
They brought it east with them when they came to Purdue University, 
Rensselaer, Ind. Grid circuit, bottom view, 
—a cool and efficient kilowatt on 144-Me 


Ohio River, in Kentucky) as the sta- 
worked, the band going out for him at 
1805 GMT. WSLPD, WS8PBU, K4IDX, Cooke- 
ville, Tenn., and possibly others, worked VQ2PL, 
Northern Rhodesia, shortly after. WSLPD re- 
ports that VQ2PL was in until about 1330 EST. 

teceiving this from WS8LPD by tele- 
phone sent your conductor scurrying for home 
as soon as the exigencies of a QST deadline would 
permit, but all was quiet at 1745, when we 
checked the band at Canton. Then just 
were gulping down the last bit of our evening 
meal, a phone call from WISUZ in Colebrook 
(Mrs. WISUZ handling the information) told us 
that the band was open to South America. A 
quick check caught LU8AE coming through S89, 
calling CQ. A short but solid contact was made 
at 1850, after which LUSAE promptly faded 
to about Sl to 2. He was audible from 1825 to 
1930, checks we’ve been able ta 
Two other unidentified DX signals were 


across the 


tions he 


news 


as we 


about from 
make. 
heard. 

South Americans on 50 Me. in New England — 
after dark? Who ever heard of such a thing? 
Not CRPL, judging from their monthly Fz Pre- 
dictions! All the work Northeastern 
U.S. A. and South America in the past, ne 
back to WIELP’s QSO with HC2OT, Feb. 22, 
1949, had been done in the morning hours. Trans- 
Multiple-hop 
K4JVX 


between 


equatorial scatter this far north? 


You tell us! W4AYV and 


sporadic-F 
(both in Florida) were audible atthe time, but 
were their signals F2 back-scatter or Es? Ques- 
tions like these may be cleared up a bit when we 
have the IGY reports for the 
but we'll lay a bet that it will be 
have all the 
signals play the tricks they do. 


period at hand, 
some time 
why v.h.f. 


before we answers on 


the work of the Fenwick triplets, W7VMO, 
and it is presently 
left, is half-wave line. Plate tank has a quarter-wave 


c.w. or phone. 





Would we like the answers if we had ’em? 
Isn’t a large part of the fun in working such DX 
derived from trying to outguess the ionosphere, 
or in making the best of the times when it throws 
us a fast one, when we were looking for a slow 
curve? 

The word got around fast, and many grand- 
mothers died on the 19th. Early-morning checks 
on 28 Me. showed that band all but dead, and 
few guessed that things would be hot again for 
at least a couple of days. But around noon 50- 
Me. back-scatter from the south and southeast 
began to show up. Stations all over the eastern 
part of the country were audible with beams 
Out of this came PZIAE, 


aimed southeast. 


W4UC8H.. 
W4QN... 
W4EQR ‘ 
W4FLW... 


WSNQD.... 
Ws8UZ... 


SD Wm ON 


WSNOH 


W9BRN 
W9ZHB 
W9QUV 
W9VZP 
W9RQM 
W9ALU... 
W9QKM 
WO9UIA 
W9UNS 
W9MHP 
W9MFH 
W9JEP 
W9JCI 


WORE 
WHQIN 
WYONFM 
WTKX 
WOKYF 
WOMVG 
WOJOL 
WPUSQ 
WOYJF 
WOURQ.. 
W0JHS 
WOIPI.... 
W0CNM 
WOFKY 


rales 


“+- 
Ne 


WwW 
Ww 
we 
ws 


ppp dee 
KN wBOONIs 


Dre me NS DD GO CO be de Oo 


WE6WNN... 

K~OBPM 
WOWNU 
WOYZZ 


oor 


V 
W2GYV 
K2HPN 


6ANN 
W6NDP 
K6GTG... 
W6GCG 
K6HYY 
W6ABN 
W6IWS 
W6CAN 


4044 K<4<44< 


em NORTON NW WW 
SAS ee ON SO 


OoNND 
ee 
FNS 

no 


<~<-<44<4S5 


Calls in bold 
face are holders 
of special 50-Mc. 
WAS certificates 
listed in order of 
award numbers. 
Others are based 
on unverified 
reports. 


mRyeean 


W3UQJ 


<aas 


NINN 


9 hm oh abn she ih a oe hn oh 


P-P-P PPP -P PPB PP 


W4EQM 
W4FBH 
W4LNG. WsCMS 
F4CP7 WS8OIN 


pa 
on 











Surinam, to work a long string of stations in 
Northeastern U. S. A. LU7PB joined the party 
shortly after and was a busy man for an hour 
or so, that we know of. This was more like it; 
the South Americans were coming in, not quite 
as early as we would expect them, but at least 
over an all-daylight path! 

This is a sketchy story, admittedly; the events 
happened too near the QST' deadline to permit 
obtaining more details. The examples show, how- 
ever, that we are unwise to rely too much on 
either predictions or past experience in determin- 
ing what hours we will spend watching the 6- 
meter band. The operators who catch the good 
stuff check often, and carefully. As far as Fe 
DX is concerned, the appearance of back-scatter 
is the best DX evidence, but remember that no- 
body hears back-seatter if everyone listens. 

Late reports, received after the above was 
written, show more of the extent of the Feb. 18th 
and later openings. VQ2PL was worked by 
K9GGF on the 18th, and on the 19th by KOBLD, 
Lakeville, Minn., at 1034 CST, and by WOAEH, 
Ogden, Iowa. He was heard by W#QVZ, Ft. 
Dodge, Iowa, at 1135 CST. W@QVZ worked 
ZE2JE on the 19th, at 1129 CST. WS8ESZ, 
Grand Haven, Mich., worked PZ1AE on the 19th. 
A first is reported for the 20th by W4FNR, Ft. 
Lauderdale. He says that CE1AH worked 
W4CQP. This would be CE1AH’s first 50-Me. 
work into the U.S.A. in ten years of trying. 
W4FNR also reports that OA4C worked W4CQP, 
K4KNA and K4CZW on the 20th. 


Here and There on V.H.F. Bands 


Chances to work into Africa may not come too often, 
but when fate does allow it we can be fairly sure that there 
will be someone at the other end to work. ZS2Y, V.H.F. 
Editor for SARL, writes that there are 50-Mce. men in every 
ZS call area, numbering nearly 50 all told. Southern Rho- 
desia is represented by ZE2s JD JE JR KM KO and KZ. 
VQ2PL has VQ2JN to keep him company in Northern 
Rhodesia. Peter, VQ2PL, is a veteran of 50-Mc. DX in the 
previous solar cycle. ZD6EF, ZD6DT, OQ5FM and CR7AU 
are some of the other choice ones now on 6. 

Though the work reported above took place after noon 
EST, the predictions indicate a possibility of the path being 
open much earlier. Over week ends there will be activity 
from 0700 to 1300 EST, at least, but other days most of 
the gang will be on by 1000 EST, or shortly thereafter. 
They use the low edge of the band as a DX calling frequency. 
Ws might bear this in mind before engaging in long rag- 
chews in the first 100 ke. of the band. 

If the reports now coming in to W1VLH’s IGY project 
office are any indication, plenty of fellows are watching 
the 6-meter band closely. The 2-meter reports also show 
encouraging awareness of the DX potential of that band, 
particularly in connection with aurora. From the file on 
hand Feb. 19th, we see that aurora DX was worked on 
Jan. 21st, 24th, 25th, 28th and 29th. The 2Ist and 24th 
were most widespread, being observed all the way from VE1 
to W7, and as far south as South Carolina and Tennessee. 

F2 DX was far down from the first reporting period, but 
transcontinental work was done on Jan. 17th and 22nd, 
and there was evidence of the path to England being open 
as late as Jan. 27th. Sporadic-E skip was more prevalent 
than most people would believe, having been reported Jan. 
17th, 20th, Feb. Ist, 3rd and 8th. 

We set tlie limit of possible 2-meter DX via meteors 
tentatively at about 1500 miles (see W4LTU's article in 
this issue) but there is nothing very definite about this. 
W4LTU recently received bursts from W5FAG, Albu- 
querque, N. Mex., 1550 miles. Of perhaps even greater 
interest is W5FAG’s situation, in back of a 5-degree obstacle 
(Sandia Crest) in the easterly direction. Walt figures that 


QST for 





this represents a meteor height of at least 160 km., which 
could provide signals out to 1900 miles in open terrain. 

With the boom in the world above 50 Me., v.h.f. clubs 
and nets are springing up all over. Here are some we've heard 
from recently. The Mobile Sixers of the Philadelphia area 
Net calling frequency, 
monitored regularly, is 50.55 Me. A secondary channel is 
51 Me. A net roll call is made each Sunday at 1000, with 
W3AMO as NCS and W3FQI alternate. As many as 46 
stations have participated 

A 6-meter net was organized in the Corpus Christi area 
in January. With K5EYL at the helm and W5ZDE as 
alternate, the group works out Mondays at 2000 CST. 
Frequency: 50.18 to 50.2 Me. 

Mondays at 2000 EST is the net time of the Six-Meter 
Nomads of the Cleveland area. WSRAY reports that the 
Nomads sponsored a 6-meter contest the first three week 
ends of February; results to be announced March 18th 

Two-meter interest is building up in the Denver area, 
according to W@ACA, who is on nightly at 1900 MST. On 
Monday, Wednesday and Friday he aims north at this 
time. Alternate nights his 12-element horizontal is turned 
to the south. Sundays at 1000 he tries in various directions. 
Wé@s MLH DMC TVV and UHD, KN6QJY/6, Lowry 
Field, and KN@DSW, Longmont, are among the regulars. 
An informal net is held each Thursday at 1900 MST. 

W5JXU, Pottsboro, Texas, wants to know if there is 
any variation in local v.h.f. coverage during a solar cycle. 
Sim says that the distances he covers regularly of late on 
6 seem to be greater than recent improvements in equipment 
can account for. Reliable range, even with moderate power, 
seems to be at least 200 miles. Good contacts are made 
regularly into Tulsa, Okla., 165 miles, and Ft. Smith, Ark., 
175 miles, though several stations run no more than 30 
watts. WOUTH, Seneca, Mo., 240 miles, is worked under 
what appears to be normal conditions. Since weather is 
presumably the only factor in varying signal strength over 
a given path, we'll have to leave it to the experts to deter- 
mine whether there is a correlation between weather and 
solar activity. If so, v.h.f. propagation should tie in. 

Nevada 50-Me. expedition: During Easter vacation, 
K6CNM and K6ILY will be hitting the high spots in Ne- 
vada on 50.25 Me. 

Our query in February QST about European 420-Mec. DX 
brought a reply, and much interesting information, from 
DL3FM, DARC V.H.F. editer. Karl says the report of 
contact between Hungary and Spain on 435 Me. is not 
true, but that the hop across the Mediterranean was made, 
in 1954, by FASIH and F9BG, a distance of 470 miles. 
V.h.f. activity is general throughout Europe, with emphasis 
on 144 and 432 Me. There is also appreciable interest in the 
application of high-stability techniques to the 1215-Me 
band. Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary and Yugoslavia 
have been worked on 144 and 432 Mec. by Western ama- 
teurs, and Russian stations are now using the same bands. 
So far no UAs have been worked, which may be due to the 
use of simple gear by most Russian v.h.f. stations. 

Cooperation between amateur societies in Western Eu- 
rope is excellent, a permanent v.h.f. committee having 
been arranged at the I[ARU Conference at Stresa last year. 
DL3FM is president and ON4BK is secretary of this group. 
A meeting is scheduled for May, 1957, in Paris. 


have 18 members working mobile 


V.H.F. S.S.B. News 


Particularly on v.h.f. paths where the going is roughest, 
s.s.b. is proving its worth, extending the reliable range well 
beyond that of conventional a.m. equipment of the same 
power level. 

A good example is the “ impossible”’ v.b.f. circuit between 
W6NLZ, Palos Verdes Estates, and W6LSB, Hood, Calif. 
This is a hop of more than 360 miles. The first 200 miles or 
so is open valley south from W6LSB’s location, not far from 
sea level. At the southern end of the valley, very high moun- 
tains intervene. From Bakersfield to W6NLZ’s 900-foot 
elevation the terrain is the sort that was deemed impassable 
to v.h.f. signals until recently. W6LSB and W6NLZ have 
been keeping c.w. skeds on 144 Me. for nearly two years. 
They have never been without a signal, but your conductor 
heard the circuit in operation last June, and can say that at 
minimum it provides only very marginal c.w. 

Good tropospheric propagation over this varied terrain 
is rare. From Hood to Bakersfield is good inversion country, 
but the rest of the way it is unlikely that a stable weather 
pattern will develop often. Propagation over the path is 


April 1957 


probably compounded of tropospheric bending in the valley 
higher levels, and 
measure of knife-edge refraction over the mountain peaks 
To sum up, it’s a good circuit to check out the worth of new 
techniques. Nothing but the best works at all! 

They have had few voice 
made their first two-way s.s.b 


tropospheric scattering at perhaps a 


contacts in the past, but they 
QSO Feb. 12th. It will be 
interesting to see whether s.s.b. gives a significantly greater 
proportion of voice QSOs than has been enjoyed heretofore 
works during auroral propagation is still 
a matter of conjecture. W2JJC says that the big 
of Jan. 21st did not give as 
tered early in the winter. Arny raised WS8DX on c.w. and 
Later two-way 


How well s.s.b 

aurora 

readable signals as one encoun- 

went to s.s.b., but with only partial success 

s.s.b. with W3HWN was tried, and again it was impossible 
Continued on page 156) 





2-METER STANDINGS 


U.S. 
Mtles State freas Mtles 
1175 W5FEK . 8 
1120 W5VY eee 
1020 
1150 W6NLZ 
1080 W6WSQ 
810 W6DNG 
750 W6AJF 
680 W6RRZ 
850 W6PJA 
650 W6ZI 
540 W6AJF 
810 W6BAZ 
800 W6MMI 
W60RS 
W6LSB 


States 
2 580 
1200 


1000 
1380 
600 
640 
360 
1390 
1400 
640 
400 
388 
365 
360 


DWWWWWWHOH OD 


NWNNNNNWHRNWWww 


W20RI y 1040 
W2NLY 1050 


1050 W7VMP 1280 


W2BLV 
w2DWJ 


Ww7YZt 
W7JUO 


holon we 


WSWXV 
WSRMH 
WSSRW 
WSSFG 
WSLPD 
WsDxX 
WSLOF 
WSILe 
WSSVI 
wsJwy 
WSBAX 
WSPT 
WSWRN 
WSEP 
WSZCV 
WSRWW 


1200 
SOO 


W2PCQ 


W3BGT 
W3RUE 


NNN DDD DMOWDNNIDE 


W9KLR.. 
W9FVI 
W9ZHL 
WoEQ 
W9GAB, 
W9EHX 
W9BPV 
W9WOK 
W9UCH 
W9UED 


NNAONDNNNOMORE 


W4HHK... 
W4HJQ.. 
74A0 
W4UMF 
W4MKJF 
w4JCJ 


ANNNIDWON IAW WOO 


PCO A~ys3¢ 


W9LF 
W9ALU 
W9IGA 
W9MBI 
WwoJsYI 
W9LEE 
W9DSP 
W9DDG 


ANN 
ANAS 
ANID 


Cans 


eee a ot 


W9EMS 8 
WOIHD.....26 7 
W0GUD 7 
We#UOP 
WIONQ 


1065 


6 

6 1000 
WOINI 5 &30 
woeusa... } 5 
W9OAC 

WOTJF 

WOSMJ 

W0ZJB 


W4MDA 
wa4GIs.. 


W5RCI 


ta ba buh bs to ot 
COSSKUME © 
te 


fo oT i=) 














Edison Award to W3CUL 


OR HER WoRK in handling amateur traffic, 
Pesrticutart for servicemen overseas, Mrs. 

Mae Burke, W3CUL, has been presented 
with the Fifth Edison Radio Amateur Award for 
publie service. The Award, a handsome gold cup, 
and a check for $500.00 were presented to 
W3CUL at a ceremony in Washington, D. C. 
on the evening of Feb. 28th. Representing the 
General Electric Company, sponsors of the 
Award, were Vice-President W. R. G. Baker and 
Mr. L. B. Davis, general manager of the Elec- 
tronics Components Division. The principal 
speaker was Rear Admiral H. C. Bruton, USN, 
Director of Naval Communications, whose re- 
marks were heard by 200 attending amateurs. 

Mae Burke’s traffic work has been outstanding 
for many years, and this Edison Award comes asa 
fitting tribute to the time and effort she has 
devoted to serving others. She operates daily 
in six ¢.w. networks, and has handled 312,000 
messages since 1949. Her longest stretch of op- 
erating without missing a schedule was 1825 
days — five years without taking a vacation or 
even a single day off. 

When they met in January to make their 
decision, the Edison Award judges (who included 
Herbert Hoover, jr., under-secretary of state; 
FCC Commissioner Rosel H. Hyde; Chairman 
E. Roland Harriman of the American National 
Red Cross; and Goodwin L. Dosland, president 
of ARRL) also named the following amateurs 
to receive special citation plaques: 


James P. Born, jr., W4ZD, Atlanta, Ga. 
Julius M. J. Madey, K2KGJ, Clark, N. J. 
Harry L. Fendt, W2PFL, Great Kills, N. Y. 
George W. Bailey, W2KH, New York, N. Y. 
Sam E. Baker, W3FIQ, West Springfield, Pa. 
C. Newton Kraus, W1BCR, Warren, R. I. 
Mrs. Martha Shirley, WOZWL, Black Hawk, 
8. D. 

The judges also awarded a group citation to 
the “Operation Deep Freeze’ committee of the 
Radio Amateurs of Greater Syracuse (RAGS). 

RAGS, W1BCR and K2KGJ received the cita- 
tions for traffic handling to the Antarctic; 
W2PFL received the citation for traffic handling 
in connection with medical emergencies; W3FIQ 
and WOZWL were selected by the committee for 
their communications assistance during blizzards; 
W4ZD received the citation for civil defense 
work; and W2KH was selected because of his 
long record of service to amateur radio. 

Because Admiral Bruton’s remarks are of 
interest to all of amateur radio, they are repro- 
duced in full herewith. We quote: 


Admiral Bruton's Address 


“T can think of no better way to commence my 
remarks than to pay a tribute to the General 
Electric Company and its officers for the concept 
and annual observance of the Edison Radio 
Amateur Award. Although instituted only five 
years ago, it has become one of the finest tra- 
ditions in all of amateur radio. That it has 

received national recognition is 
evidenced by the many deserving 
nominees from all parts of the 
nation, by the list of eminent 
men who have served on the 
judging panel, and by the wide- 
spread recognition afforded the 
winner. I take pride that the first 
Edison Amateur Award winner 
was Don L. Mullican, W5HP, 
of my home state of Arkansas. 
“‘T would like next to commend 
the distinguished members of the 
judging panel who selected the 
1956 winner from a list of some 
50 worthy nominees, all of whom 
have made outstanding contribu- 
tions in the fields of public serv- 
ice. As an officer of the military 
services, I am pleased particu- 
larly that the panel selected as 
the 1956 winner a well-known 
amateur, whose accomplishments 


« 


Admiral Bruton congratu- 
I 


. 


L as G.E.’s L. B. 
with the 


lates W3CL 
Davis stands by 
Edison Award cup. 

(U.S. Navy photo) 


OST for 





through the years, and especially during 1956, 
were highlighted by the handling of a very large 
number of messages for personnel of our armed 
forces. 

“The 1956 Edison Award winner is known as a 
highly dependable, able, and effective communi- 
cator. She has faced the finest kind of compe- 
tition and has been declared the amateur radio 
operator who performed the most outstanding 
public service in the nation during 1956. I extend 
to her my warm, personal congratulations. I also 
felicitate the recipients of the special citations 
on their meritorious performances. 

“Mrs. Mary D. Burke, affectionately known 
to so many as Mae, W3CUL, is the first woman 
to receive the Edison Award, but I predict she 
will not be the last, since the interest and accom- 
plishments of our ladies in the radio amateur 
field are increasing. I might state, in this connec- 
tion, that in our Navy and Naval Reserve we 
have many WAVE radiomen, small but growing 
numbers of WAVE Electronics Technicians and 
Communications Technicians, as well as a num- 
ber of WAVE officers who are valuable and 
unusually well-qualified communicators and 
cryptographers. So in the Naval Service, too, 
communications and electronics skills originally 
reserved for the male are being invaded — and 
very successfully, too — by the fair sex. 

“The accomplishments of radio amateurs in 
many fields of public service are well known. 
These include emergency communications in 
time of floods, hurricanes and other disasters, 
provided by such amateur organizations as the 
American Radio Relay League Emergency Corps, 
the Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service, as 
well as by many individual amateurs. The fine 
service provided by many radio amateurs in con- 
necting phone patches and in handling messages 
for members of all our armed forces and their 
families, represents a contribution to morale so 
great it is difficult to measure. It is, of course, 
in this important field of public service that we 
of the armed forces are so grateful to Mrs. 
Burke for her splendid performance. 

“But I would like to speak briefly of another 
vital contribution by the radio amateur to public 
service, i.e., that of active service in our armed 
forces. The record here is impressive. Of the 6000 
radio amateurs in the United States in 1917, 
approximately two-thirds served in our armed 
forces during World War I. More than 25,000 
radio amateurs saw active military service in 
World War II. Large numbers serve today on 
active military duty; thousands more are affili- 
ated with our inactive reserve forces. 

“The military services hold the radio amateur 
in high regard. His operating and technical skills, 
acquired while pursuing a peace-time hobby, 
are an invaluable qualification. We have found 
(and I know this from personal experience) that, 
in general, radio amateurs adapt themselves 
readily to military operational and _ technical 
procedures, and are unusually quick to learn in 
the fields of military communications and elec- 
tronics. Many times I have inquired into the 


April 1957 


More proof that W3CUL handles a bit of traffic now 
and then. 


background of a particularly skillful radioman 
or electronics technician, and learned, not to my 
surprise, that he was a radio amateur. All things 
considered, the radio amateur, in the military 
service and out, is an important national defense 
asset. 

“Because of the importance the armed forces 
place upon amateur radio, the military services 
are steadfast in their encouragement and sup- 
port of its operation. There are hundreds of 
U. 8. military-sponsored radio amateur stations 
throughout the world. For example, there are 
more than 500 radio amateur stations at naval 
reserve training centers and electronics facilities 
in the United States alone. Another now well- 
known group of Navy-sponsored amateur sta- 
tions includes the four in the Antarctic — at 
McMurdo Sound, Marie Byrd Land, Little 
America, and the South Pole later to be aug- 
mented by several more stations in that area. 
These polar stations are operated under recog- 
nizedly adverse conditions, but they have estab- 
lished and maintained an enviable record — and 
continue to furnish a vital link between our 
military and scientific personnel in the Antarctic 
and their families and friends in the United 
States. 

“The U.S. military services also lend strong 
support to amateur radio in obtaining and re- 
taining radio frequencies, the life blood of ama- 
teur operation. As many of you know, at all of 
the international radio conferences held during 
the past 30 years, the United States delegation 
has played consistently a leading role in the 
protection and acquisition of spectrum space 
for amateur service. This representation on be- 
half of the United States was due in no small 
part to Navy insistence in the preparatory work 

(Continued on page 162) 


69 





PRP—A Progress Report 


The Latest on ARRL’s World-Wide V.H.F. Propagation Project 


BY MASON P. SOUTHWORTH,* WIVLH 


uITE a lot has happened to the ARRL-IGY 

Propagation Research Project since its 

kickoff in last September’s QS7T.2 QST 

readers didn’t take us up on our 
invitation at that time may be interested in a 
progress report. Perhaps when you hear what 
we’ve been up to, you’ll want to join us. 

For those who missed the announcement 
article, PRP (Propagation Research Project) is 
a program to collect and study information on 
some of the more interesting varieties of v.h.f. 
wave propagation. This work is being carried 
on by a special ARRL staff under contract with 
the Department of the Air Force. It will con- 
tinue for at least the duration of the Inter- 
national Geophysical Year — that is, until the 
end of 1958. If you don’t know what the IGY 
is by now, just look back to the lead article in 
QST for July, 1956.2 


who 


Observer Recruiting 

In the closing paragraphs of the September 
article, we invited all interested in the 
project to write in for more information. In- 
quiries began to come in from v.h.f.- 
minded amateurs around the world. These fellows 
were then sent registration forms to be filled 
out and returned. About this time, also, a 
letter to the headquarters of the 
International Amateur Radio Union societies in 
each of the IARU countries. In it we asked 
for cooperation in publicizing our program 
abroad. 

Personal mail solicitation was also used to 
enlist observers for PRP, the mailing list being 

*ARRL-IGY Project Supervisor. Correspondence should 
be addressed to ARRL, 530 Silas Deane Highway, Wethers- 
field, Conn. 

1 Southworth, “The ARRL-IGY Propagation Research 
Project,”” QST, Sept., 1956. 

2 Berkner, “The International Geophysical Year,” QST, 


July, 1956. 
4 


those 


soon 


went out 


based on ‘‘World Above 50 Me.” columns, the 
OES list, and the VHF/UHF Directory. In- 
vitations to join PRP and registration forms for 
doing so were then sent them. Observers already 
enrolled were helpful in ‘‘fingering” their more 
prccrastinating brethren. 

These and similar were all part of 
PRP’s ‘Phase A” — building up a list of 
amateurs operating on, or interested in, our 
v.h.f. bands who had signified their interest in 
the work by filling in and returning a PRP 
registration form. 


steps 


Reporting 

You’re probably wondering just what these 
fellows (there are well over 800 of them by now, 
from almost all corners of the world) are needed 
for during IGY. We are asking that they send 
us, twice each month, reports of stations worked 
and heard via ionospheric propagation modes on 
the bands above 50 Me. We are also asking 
for reports of the times they were operating or 
listening, and noted no DX of the types we are 
interested in. These are known as “‘positive”’ 
and “‘negative”’ reports, respectively. 

The propagation types of interest were covered 
in the September article, but they are worth a 
brief review. One type is transequatorial scatter, 
involving long north-south paths crossing the 
equator, with openings at the “‘wrong” times 
of the day to be otherwise accounted for. Another 
is sporadic-E skip, a field where amateurs have 
already contributed a good deal of information. 
Auroral and meteor-scatter data are also being 
sought. Lastly we would like reports of Fe 
openings, both conventional skip and the back- 
scatter variety. All of these propagation modes 
involve the ionosphere in some way, and all 
have been treated in QST' at one time or an- 
other.2 Most of them were discovered through 

Continued on page 132) 


3 QST references for more information on the various 
forms of propagation follow: 

Transequatorial scatter: “World Above 50 Me.,” 
October and November, 1947; May, 1950. 

Sporadic-E skip and auroral reflection: “V.H.F. Why 
— How When?,” Feb., 1951. “Aurora and Magnetic 
Storms,” June, 1951. “More About V.H.F. Auroral Propa- 
gation,”’ Jan., 1955. 

Meteor scatter: “ V.H.F. Meteor Scatter Propagation,” 
Bain, this issue. 


Back scatter: ‘World Above 50 Mce.,” Jan., 1957 


¢ 
WIVLH and assistant, ex-W NICIE 


OST for 





Simulated Emergency Test—1956 


The Amateur Radio Emergency Corps Demonstrates 
Its Readiness in the Annual SET Exercise 


BY GEORGE HART,* WINJM 


1TH the increased interest in emergency 
\\/ preparedness brought about by the RACES 
boom, the 1956 SET showed a slight but 
decided improvement over the 1955 affair. If we 
count “‘hearsay”’ reports (i.e., indications by mes- 
sages received from AREC members that certain 
groups were active even though we received no 
word of it from the EC), the 1956 SET topped 
them all, with 215 reports. Even if we don’t in- 
clude such reports, last year’s affair was more 
extensive than any before or since the peak years 
of 1950 and 1951 when the initial civil defense 
fever was running high, with 196 reports com- 
pared with 213 and 214 respectively. 

So we’re pleased, but not satisfied. A total 
of 196 EC reports out of roughly 1700 ECs is 
still not a good percentage, especially when only 
140 of these took the trouble of sending in the 
SET report form with a calculated “score” to 
show our national effectiveness compared with 
former years. Score-wise, our 1956 SET ranks 
sixth in the seven years since we adopted a stand- 
ard scoring system, largely due to the fact that 
so many reporting ECs did not bother to compute 
their scores. 

But statistics don’t tell the whole story — 
not by a long shot. The 1956 SET was a lot 
better than the size of the score indicates. This 
could have been evident just by listening in 
during the October 13-14 week end. Traffic was 
flying thick and fast, both locally and nationally. 
In addition to passing simulated emergency 
traffic around locally, ECs solicited traffic from 
their Red Cross chapter directors or disaster 
chairmen and c.d. directors to be put into long 
haul circuits to regional or national headquarters, 
AREC members each were urged to originate a 
message to ARRL headquarters (over a thousand 
such messages were received here), and ECs 
themselves originated summary messages to 
headquarters indicating what they were doing, 
when they were doing it and who was doing it. 
Additionally, we received countless messages 
from c.d. directors, fire and police chiefs, mayors, 
governors, Red Cross heads, and what have you. 
Emergency communication is a traffic-handling 
activity, and don’t let anyone kid you about that. 
Some of it of necessity can’t be reduced to writ- 
ing in the duress of a bad situation, but a standard 
procedure to save time and increase accuracy and 
therefore efficiency is requisite, and we won’t 
approach perfection in this unless we practice it 
and practice it again, every chance we get and as 
often as possible. 





* National Emergency Coordinator, ARRL 


April 1957 


Red Cross Participation 


The usual cooperation of the American Na- 
tional Red Cross was very apparent. The regular 
team of W3PZA, W9DUA, W6CXO, and W2- 
CRD were on deck to handle RC traffic, and this 
year W4LXE of Macon, Ga., was designated to 
serve the Southeast Area with headquarters in 
Atlanta. W6CXO, through the Director of Dis- 
aster Services in the Pacific Area Office, sent out 
432 messages to virtually all major chapters un- 
der the jurisdiction of that office, requesting reply 
via radio during the week end — and over 100 re- 
plies came in to W6C XO and its supporting stations 
in the San Francisco Bay Area. Of the 314 mes- 
sages received at ANRC headquarters in Wash- 
ington, 232 were handled by the above-mentioned 
key stations and the remainder by others in the 
area. The routing to area heaquarters turned out 
to be a great improvement over the past. The 
Red Cross team also handled a great many mes- 
sages for ARRL and civil defense. 


Civil Defense Participation 

For the first time in the SET, an effort was 
made to channel some traffic into FCDA regional 
and national headquarters. We have no data on 
just how many messages were handled, but we do 
know that several FCDA stations were on the air 
for this purpose during the week end, including 
WS8DUA (and don’t think that didn’t cause some 
confusion with W9DUA on the same frequency!), 
W8LBM, WS8DGM, WS8CAU and WS8UTQ all 
holding up the Battle Creek end, and W@WBC 
representing FCDA’s Denver office. These sta- 
tions were, for the most part, operated by FCDA 
amateur personnel from their own stations and 
consequently were not able to be constantly on 
the air to receive FCDA traffic. 

On the local scene, c.d. of course played a 
major part in the SET. Most ECs rang in their 
RACES groups quite heavily, 26 ECs indicating 
that their SET drills were entirely RACES drills, 
34 more saying that their drills were partly on 
RACES frequencies. Many ECs whose groups are 
dedicated entirely to RACES did not put on an 
SET during this weekend because of the frequency 
with which they conduct regular RACES drills. 


ARRL Traffic 
The traffic for ARRL was a mere trickle on 
Saturday night (Oct. 13th) but became a torrent 
by Sunday night, and kept coming in in diminish- 
ing volume for the rest of the week. Several 
nets conducted special sessions for the purpose 


71 





The Eureka (Calif.) AREC conducted its usual realistic SET in the open air (left). That’s K6CXB on the key, 


while W6AEY kibitzes. An emerge 


*y generator supplied power. At right is the portable station at Camp Nootening, 


N. Y., in the Dutchess County SET. At the mike is EC K2GCH. Operation on both six and two meters. 


of handling this extraordinary volume of traffic 
occurring over a week end; probably more did so 
then came to our specific attention, but we want 
to acknowledge the special efforts of these: In 
Missouri, both the Missouri Traffic Net (MON) 
and the Show-Me Net; in Tennessee, the Tennes- 
see CW Net; in Virginia, both the Virginia Net 
and the Virginia Fone Net; the New York City- 
Long island Phone Net. The Mike Farad Traffic 
Net, under W3ZSX, handled much SET traffic. 
The Fifth and Tenth Regional Nets of the ARRL 
National Traffic System were active over pro- 
tracted periods to expedite traffic flow. United 
Trunk Lines routed plenty of ARRL traffic via 


WI1EFW. All in all, a very good job of traffic 
handling was done on long haul circuits. 

If the exercise did nothing else (but it did!), 
it gave some of the headquarters people and 
local amateurs a workout. W1AW delivered the 


most ARRL traffic, 490. Next came W1YBH 
Connecticut PAM and manager of the Connecti- 
cut Phone Net, with 300. WINJM delivered 253, 
W1YYM 95, WIBDI 39. Some traffic was mailed 
in, some telephoned, some delivered in person. 


Dignitaries 


Lacking space to reproduce texts of traffic 
from important personages who sent us messages 
commenting on the work done by local amateurs, 
we want at least to acknowledge them. Congratu- 
latory messages and pledges of support were 
received from the Governor of Georgia; state c.d. 
directors of Kansas, South Dakota and North 
Dakota; deputy c.d. director of Nebraska; direc- 
tor of FCDA Region 6 (Denver); mayors of 
Decatur, Ala., District Heights, Md., Miami 
Springs, Fla., Springfield, Mo., Rouge River, Ore. 
Bremerton, Wash., San Angelo, Texas; city man- 
ager of Springfield, Mo.; ¢.d. director of Jefferson 
Parish (New Orleans), La.; and countless police 
chiefs, fire chiefs, red cross directors and disaster 
chairmen, civil defense communications officers 
and other civic officials. Receipt of so many such 
messages indicated promotional efforts on the 


72 


part of ECs to bring their activities to official 
attention, in addition to the support and recogni- 
tion which these efforts produce. Nice going, gang. 


Publicity 


Public attention and official attention go hand 
in hand to bring us the recognition and support 
we need. The former is best brought about by 
newspaper publicity, and in this aspect ECs par- 
ticipating in the 1956 SET did an outstanding 
job. Nearly every SET report we received at- 
tached clippings, some of them having appeared 
on the front pages, others prominently elsewhere 
in the paper, often with pictures showing the 
various layouts set up by local amateurs in co- 
operation with civil defense, the Red Cross, or 
other agencies. The SET is an admirable time 
to mend or maintain public relations fences, 
and the gang last year did an admirable job of it 
with or without the help of our suggested news- 
paper release. 


Summary 
For the first time, this year, we are including 
in the summary the coverage areas of AREC 
groups known to have participated by “‘hearsay.”’ 
We think they should receive at least this much 
recognition for their efforts, and wish that spe- 
cific information had been submitted by their 
ECs. In some cases the amateur reporting sum- 
mary information was not the EC, in which case 
his call appears in the “Station Reporting” col- 
umn. Otherwise, if no summary information avail- 
able, only the coverage area is included. But first, 
some overall statistics, with 1955’s comparative 
figures following in parentheses, 
Total Reports of activity — 215 (145) 
By Mail 140 
By radio 134 
By “hearsay” 19 
AREC members in areas reported (by mail) — 
Total known participation 2276 (1631) 
Mobiles & portables 615 (561 
Fired stations on emergency powe 85 (98) 
AREC member messages to ARRL 1117 (1189) 
EC radio reports to ARRL 134 (88) 
Total points (based on mail reports only) — 15, 984 (14,618) 


OST for 


- 3688 (3086) 





Area Covered 
Abitibi, Que. !. 
Albany Co., 
Asheville nr 
Ashiand, V 
Au & Richmond . 


NC! 


ia. 
Baititnore. ned. 
Bathurst, N. 
Belleville ine, ‘Ont. 
Berkeley, Aseeay, El 


Bloomfield, C onn.5 

Bonita Area, La...... 

Bozeman, Mont.. 3 

Bristol, 2 a Be cccee 

Bristol, 

Bronx © ie 

Broward Co., 

Brown Co., 

Brownfield, Terry Co. 
Texas 

Brownwood, Brown 


Xas 
Burlington, Iowa, & 
Butte, Mont.i 
Calgary Area, 
Calhoun Co 
Calvert Co., } 
Cambria Co., 
Campbellton, 
Cape breton Island, 


Cc arlabad, Eddy Co., 
Cc enroll Co., Masi 
Cass & Crow Wing 
Cos., Minn. . 
Chambers Co., Ala 
Chambly-La_ Prairie- 
Vercheres Cos., 
Que.! 
Cimmaron Co 
Cleburne, Texz 
Cleveland Co., 
Commanche Co., 
‘ook Co., 
Cookville, 
Coos Co., . 
Cuy sae 0., Ohio. . 
Dade Co., Fla.'9 
Danbury, Conn.‘ 
Danville & » Lecpaaagenl 
nia Co., Va 
Dauphin Co., Pa. 
Delmar, r #, 
Dennisport, Mass 
Deschutes Co., Ore. 
Jewey Co., 8S. Dak... 
Duluth, Minn.. 
Duncan, Okla. 
Dutchess Co., N. Y.5! 
East Central Nassau, 


’ OKla. 


am. 


East Volusia, Fla.*-! 
ElPaso, Texas 
Erie Co., Pa.® 
Etowah Co., Ala.'9 
Eureka, Calif. 
Evanston, Lil. oe 
Everett, Mass.!®!. 
Falmouth, Mass 
Falls C hureh Area, 
Vat! oes 
Fall River, "Mass.. 
Fayette Co., Ky. 
Fond du Lac & Green 
Cos. . 
Forsyth Co., N. C 
Framingham, Mass 
Franklin Co., Iowa '* 
Fredericksburg, Va.. 
Fredericton, N. B 
Fulton- Dekalb Cos., 


1 Bettered last year's score 
3 Report by radio only. 
® Oct 


mail. 
7 Oct. 8.5 Sept. 14 
13 Oct. 26-31. ' Oct 
18 Oct. 17 
but no summary 
Co., N. Y., W2FI 

Miscellany 
Argentina, 


28 Me 


Statton 
Reporting Pot nts 


K6EDN % 
WIiNLM 


KOA 


w 9W LZ 
W5NFO 
W5YKT 2 
WPQVA?2 
W7LER2?2 
VE6WL 
Ww3wG? 
W3LXQ3 
VEIAEB 


VEIFH? 
K5DAA2 
W3FVK2 
WeTUS 
Ww4CHO? 


WIADW 


W4BYZ?2 
W30GD2 
W2GTI2 
WIMKW 3 
W7HHH 
WOIYN ? 
WHEJG 2 
K5ACI 3 
K2GCH 
W2ZAI 
w4RWM? 
W5KOK 
W3QN 
W68SLX 2 
W9MCS 
WIPJ 
WIQLT 3? 
w4o0P 
WIiYHyY? 
W4JSH 2 
W9MPO 
w4TQu ? 
WIMEG#? 


Ww4KMS8S3 
VEICS 


9. © Oct 
20. Oct. 4. 


20 Score 


mobiles from (¢ 


* Oct. 19 


‘algary, 
New Zealand and Nicaragua without difficulty, 


Area Covered 

Garfield Co., Okla.'. 

Gaston, Cleveland & 
Lincoln Cos., N.C.. 

Glen Cove, 

ve Harbor Co., ; 
Was 


Greater Ww orcester, 


Greene, Jersey & Cal- 
houn Cos., Ill ae 
Groveland, Mass... 
Halifax Co,, N. C 
Hamden, Conn. '4!,.. 
Hamilton, Ont.'..... 
Henry Co., Ind. ee 
Herkimer Co., N. Y.. 
Howard Co., Ind. 5 
Huntsville & Madison 
Co., Ala 
Jefferson Co., Ala.19 
Josephine Co., Ore 
Kansas City, Kans. 19 
Kingfisher Co., 
Kings Co., N. Y. 
meters)..... 
Kings Co., N. Y. (2 
meters) P 
Kitsap Co., Wash 
Knox, Blount & Sevier 
Cos., Tenn 
Knoxville, 
Lake Co., 
Lauderdale Co., Ala 
Laurel & vic., Mont.'*. 
Lawrence Co., 8. Dak. 
Lexington, Ky.!* 
Lincolnton ( 0. Ga. 
Linn Co., Ore.! 
Louisville Area, i. 
Mangum, Okla 
Manitowoc, Wis.'* 
Mankato, Minn 
Mansfield, Conn.!* 
Marathon Co., Wis. 
Marion Co., Ore. 
Marion Co., Fla 
McKean Co., Pa.... 
Meade Co., 8. Dak 
Mellette Co., 8. Dak. 
Memphis, Tenn. 
Menlo Park, Calif.!* 
Milan, Ill 
Missoula, 
Mitchell, 
Mobile, ‘xia. 
Monroe Co., iL, 
Monroe Co., N. Y.15 
Monroe Co., Pa 
Montgomery Co. 
Montgomery Co., 
N. Y 


Mont. , 
Dak. 


. Md. 


Montgomery Co., Pa.' 
Montreal, Que. (South 
Shore)! ‘$a 
Morgan Co., Ala 
Multnomah C 0., G reg. 
Nassau Co., N. Y. 
oo Co., (Area ®. 
Natrona Co., Wyo 
New Bedford, Mass.. 
New Orleans, La. 

(Westside).... s 
New York Co., N. Y.. 
Newington, Conn.! 
North Adams, Mass. 
N. St. Louis & N.W. 

St. Louis Co., Mo.. 
Northampton Co., 

Pa 


Norwich, Ohio 

Nueces Co. & Corpus 
Christi, Texas 

Oak Ridge, Tenn..... 

Oglesby, Ill...... 

Okeechobee Co., Pa... 

Omaha-I Jouglas Co., 

r! 


Onondaga Co., N. Y.. 


2 Reports by both radio and 
5 Oct. 15 
11. !! Sept. 13 
16 Oct. 12 

19 Participation indicated by 
available. 


® Oct. 21. 
12 Oct. 25. 
17 Oct. 24. 


messages received 


included with Nassau 


Ont., reached 


but had plenty of trouble getting into Ontario and Connecti- 


“Was a lot of 
nationwide 


cut. 
another 
them experts.” 
Minn. 


fun 
test to 
cannot make this gang any 

WOTUS, EC 
“Even though we got a late start, it was the best drill 


have 
more 


Cass 


April 1957 


and don’t think 
another 
perfect, 


we will wait for 
drill 
but it can make 
Crow 


Practice 


Wing Cos., 


Statton 


Reporting Potnts 


W5MFX? 
W4DRC? 
W2WUQ 
W7AVM 
WISPF? 
W9IFA 


WIMRQ 
Ww 9QNI/ 4 
Wi 


W9HUF? 
W4YFN? 
W7ZQM 2 


2JCI 
W7UWT? 


Ww4TYU 2 
Ww4TZJj?2 


Wi LBK 
W9DQK 


w4DbDy# 


W4BAZ? 
W5SVR2 


WOPBY 3 


VOZWL 
WYNEO? 
W4BAQ?2 
W9RYU 3 
W7COH 
Ww ie p3 
K4EEH 
W9ICF?2 
w2QyYy?2 
W3YAZ2 
W3YAE3 
W2ZZG?2 
W3CNO?2 


215F 3 
WINJM 
WI1ZEO2 


WaMNW 
W3NNT? 
W8RVU 

W5LOW 2 
w4cxy? 
W9ZEN 3 
W4PZT? 
WIQMD 

W2CYbD? 


of the year 
A fire occurring at ( 
local SET 
to supplement their SET with the real thing! “ 
done for the past several years, our SET was again 
wherein the AREC 
policemen to 

WINFG, EC 
emergency 


AREC 


of the 


tion Goblin,’ 
auxiliary 


ing 
pranksters 
stimulate 


atmosphere of the 


RACES.’ 


123 
134 
18 


too smoothly.” 
California's Missicn Trail Net assisted W6C XO, 


Feeley 
arroliton, Ill 
drill 


Area Covered 
Orange Co., 
Pacific Area, ( 
Pasadena, C 
Phoenix, Ariz 
Pocatello & Besiianh 

Co., Idaho 
Portage Co., hice 
Porter Co., Ind. 
Prince Georges Co., 

1 


Mc 
Pueblo, Colo. 4 
Queens Co., N. % 
meters) 
Racine, Wis. ‘ 
Reno, Sparks, Washoe 


. v 
Richmond Boro, 
N. Y.! 


Rock Co., Wis 

Rockland Co., 

Roswell, N.M 

§ Cag ramento Vv alley, | 
al 


N. Yi. 


Saline-Gail atin, Ill.... 
San Diego Area, 
Calif 

Santa Fe, N. M.'4 

Sarnia, Ont. 

Schenectady Co.,N 

Scotts Bluff, Nebr. 

Seneca Co., Ohio 

Seward Co., N 

Sheboygan Co., 

Sheridan Co., 

South Brevard, 

Southern York ¢ 0., 
Me 


Springfield, Mass 
Springfield, ae 
| 
> Mo. 


area 
(Over- 
Mary’s County, 
Md 


St. Stephen, N. B. 
Stearns & Benton 
Cos., Minn 
Suffolk Co., N. Y 
Sumter & Schley C 08., 


Swampscott, Mass 
Taylor Co., Texas! 
Tamaqua, Pa rf 
Tillamook Co., Ore 
Timmins Area, Ont i” 
Tom Greene Co., 

Texas T 
Tompkins Co., N. Y.. 
Toronto, Ont. oe 
rurner Co., 8. Dak. 
Tuscaloosa Co., Ala.!9 
Vallejo, Calif 
Vanderburgh Co., 

1 1 

Wabash Co., Ill 
Wabash River Basin !. 
Wakefield, Mass.! 
Walla hd alla Co. 

Ws 


ast eee 
Ww aithani, Mass.5-!. . 
Warren-Henderson 
Co., TH.t7+t 
Washington Co. 
Md.!! 
w ashington Co., 
Okls os 
w ASE 0., Ore.. 
Wayne Co., N Y. 
Waynesville, Mo 
Webster, Mass.'9 
Wheatland Co., Mont. 
White Co., Tenn.... 
Whittier, Calif 
Wichita Co., Texas. 
Will Co., 
Winona & Houston | 
Cos., } oe 
Winthrop, Mass 7h, 
Wood-Ridge, N. J.'8.. 


Total Points 


WIADW, 


enabled the 


limit damage 
Hamden, 
communications in 
then 


EC Danbury, 
, just after the conclusion 
AREC 


Conn. 


‘hand pick’ 
Donald L. Perry, W7 PC, EC 
** All concerned profited by their experiences 

operation went according to plan 
W9VSX, EC 


in fact it samy 
Warren-Hende 


Statton 
Reporting Potnts 
W9QY a 3 ees 
RSeBV 82 

6NT N3 eee 
Ww 7QNO3 
W7BDL 
W9BCC?2 
W9EHE 2 
W3CVE? 
The nie Q 

W2IAG 
W9SZL3 
Ww7PC2 
W2VKF?2 
W9KLL? 

Ww 22) TZ 
W5 


W6IJEQ3 

W9BLO 

Ww 6KU U2 
5F 


W3BUD23 
VELJP 
WORVO? 


W4UFD 


. WIVRK3 


W5ANL? 
W3ZRQ? 
W7PPG?2 
VE3D8X 
W5SHN * 
K2GQU 3 
VE3DWL3 
WOEUJS? 
W6ZZF 
W9KEP?2 
W9AMA3 
W9TT? 
WIZNG? 
W7QHR 
Wi1J8SM 2 


woevsx 
W30YX2 
W5MQV?2 191 
W7HJU 5 
W2VEY2 75 
WPVPQ3 

. WHINM 

K4HJA 3 
W6LVQ 
W5DWS2 
W9REA 3 
W9LUX? 
WIBB 

W2DMJ 


Conn. 


gang of W9ICF 
As we have 
“Opera- 


patrolled the streets carry- 


Halowe'en 
“TI expect to 

less formal 
members for 
Re no, Nevada 
Amateur radio 
almost 


son Co., Ill. 


from 


the 


73 





Some QST Abbreviations 


A. — amperes 

a.c. — alternating current 

a.f. — audio frequency 

a.g.c. — automatic gain control 

a.m. — amplitude modulation 

amp. — amplifier 

ant. — antenna 

AREC — Amateur Radio Emergency Corps 

aux. — auxiliary 

a.v.c. — automatic volume control 

bal. — balanced 

BC — broadcast 

BCI — broadcast interference 

BCL — broadcast listener 

b.f.o. — beat-frequency oscillator 

BPL — Brass Pounders’ League 

cath. — cathode 

c.d. — civil defense 

CD — Civil Defense (agency); or Communica- 
tions Department (ARRL) 

c.f.m. — cubic feet per minute 

ckt. — circuit 

coax — coaxial cable 

conv. — converter 

CP — code proficiency 

c.p.8. — cycles per second 

c.t. — center tap 

c.w. — continuous wave (radiotelegraphy ) 

cy. — cycles 

db. — decibel(s) 

d.c. — direct current 

d.c.c. — double cotton covered 

d.p.d.t. — double-pole, double-throw 

d.p.s.t. — double-pole, single-throw 

DX — distance 

DXCC — DX Century Club 

EC — Emergency Coordinator 

e.c.o. — electron-coupled oscillator 

el. — element 

e.m.f, — electromotive force 

fax — facsimile 

FCC — Federal Communications Commission 

FCDA — Federal Civil Defense Administration 

FD — Field Day 

fil. — filament 

f.m. — frequency modulation 

gnd. — ground 

h. — henry 

h.f. — high frequency 

htr. — heater 

h.v. — high voltage 

hy. — henry 

i.f. — intermediate frequency 

K — thousand 

ke. — kilocycles 

kw. — kilowatt(s) 

IGY — International Geophysical Year 

1.f. — low frequency 

l.u.f. — lowest usable frequency 

l.v. — low voltage 

m. — meters 

ma. — milliamperes 

max. — Maximum 


74 


Mce., meg. — megacycles 

mh. — millihenries 

mic., mike — microphone 

mix. — mixer 

m.u.f. — maximum usable frequency 

m.v. — millivolts 

n.f.m. — narrow-band frequency modulation 

NTS — National Traffic System 

OBS — Official Bulletin Station 

o.d. — outside diameter 

OES — Official Experimental Station 

OO — Official Observer 

OPS — Official Phone Station 

ORS — Official Relay Station 

osc. — oscillator 

PAM — Phone Activities Manager 

p.p. — push-pull 

pri. — primary 

p.t.o. — permeability-tuned oscillator 

pwr. —- power 

RACES — Radio Amateur 
Service 

rec. — receiver 

rect. — rectifier 

reg. — regulated, regulation 

r.f. — radio frequency 

r.f.c. — radio frequency choke 

RM — Route Manager 

RO — Radio Officer (civil defense) 

RST — Readibility-Strength-Tone 

RTTY — radioteletype 

8.c.c. — single cotton covered 

SCM — Section Communications Manager 

SEC — Section Emergency Coordinator 

sec. — secondary 

sig. — signal 

s.p.d.t. — single-pole, double-throw 

s.p.8.t. — single-pole, single-throw 

SS — Sweepstakes 

s.s.b. — single side band 

s.w.l. — short wave listener 

8.w.r. — standing wave ratio 

t. — turns 

temp. — temperature 

tfe. — traffic 

t.p.i. — turns per inch 

t.r. — transmit-receive 

t.r.f. — tuned radio frequency 

TV — television 

TVI — television interference 

u.h.f. — ultra high frequency 

v..— volts 

v.f.o. — variable frequency oscillator 

v.h.f. — very high frequency 

v.o.m. — volt-ohm-milliammeter 

v.t.v.m. — vacuum tube voltmeter 

w. — watts 

WAC — Worked All Continents 

WAS — Worked All States 

w.p.m. — words per minute 

xtal. — crystal 

pf., uh. — microfarads, microhenries 

pul. — micromicrofarads 


Civil 


Emergency 


QST for 





Happenin 


L) 


wer 


the Month 





NATIONAL AMATEUR RADIO WEEK 


As readers of QST' will recall, bills proposing 
a National Amateur Radio Week have been intro- 
duced in the Congress for several years, but so 
far have died in committee without action. This 
year, Congressman Ludwig Teller of New York, 
responsive to a request of Joseph R. Lebo, 
W2O0KU, has introduced the following joint reso- 
lution in the House of Representatives: 
Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives 
of the United States of America in Congress assembled, 
That the President of the United States is authorized 
to designate one week in June of each year as National 
Amateur Radio Week, and to issue a proclamation in- 
viting the people of the United States to observe the 
week with appropriate exercises to further and stimu- 
late interest in amateur radio in the United States. 
This resolution has been referred to the Com- 
mittee on the Judiciary, to which the League 
has written urging favorable consideration. In- 
dividual amateurs and clubs who are interested 
can help by writing similar letters, requesting 
favorable action, to: 
Hon. Emanuel Celler, Chairman 
Committee on the Judiciary 
House Office Building 
Washington 25, D. C. 


“THAT DERN 405-A” 

Every five years most hams must wrestle with 
the FCC’s dandy little Form 405-A — ‘ Applica- 
tion for Renewal of Radio License (Short Form).” 
Although information on how to tame it is in 
the License Manual and periodically in QST, 
many hams still find it confusing as indicated 
by the continuing correspondence (and phone 
calls) received at Hq. Let’s try once more, this 
time with a photograph, to see if a picture is 
really worth a thousand words. 


Form 405-A may be secured from any FCC 
district office. It is used for straight renewal (no 
modification involved) of your combination 
operator-and-station license — and also to renew 
station-only or operator-only tickets in the few 
cases where those exist. If a change of address is 
involved, forget about 405-A and use the old, 
familiar Form 610.) According to regulation, you 
may apply for renewal any time within 120 days 
of expiration of your license; in the case of 405-A, 
however, FCC won’t act on your application, 
no matter when received, until about 30 days 
before expiration, so there is no point in applying 
with this form more than about 60 days in ad- 
vance of expiration. 

Actualiy, the form isn’t so bad if you bear in 
mind that it covers many radio services in addi- 
tion to amateurs. The illustration, which shows 
the top third of the form, indicates how it should 
be filled out; the left sides of all three sections 
of the form are filled out identically. Note that 
(d), File No., is left blank in the case of an ama- 
teur applicant. Item (e) is the expiration date of 
your ticket being renewed. Of course the form 
should be notarized. On the reverse, be sure 
check the space indicating that you meet mini- 
mum renewal requirements (at least 2 hours op- 
erating time in the last three months of the license 
term, or 5 hours in the last year, and ability to 
handle code at the speed required for class of 
license held). And address the third (bottom) sec- 
tion of the form to yourself. Send the application, 
when completed, to FCC in Washington, D. C. 
Do not include your present ticket. Note in your 
log the date of mailing application; this fulfills 
the requirement in Instruction 3 that the appli- 
cant must ‘post a statement”’ certifying that 


to 


(Continued on page 160 





FCC Form 405-A-1 
February 1956 


United States of America 
FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 
APPLICATION FOR RENEWAL OF RADIO LICENSE (SHORT FORM) 
(Use only in accordance with instructions on reverse side) 


Form Approved 
Budget Bureau No. 52-R131.3 





1, Name of licensee 


John #. Doe 





2, Mailing address (number, street, city, zone, and state) 


13S Pleasant Sf 
LodunkK Hollow, Coan 





3. Transmitter location 


433 Pleasaa7 JF 
Fadenk Holtow, Gan. 


5. For renewal of Amateur license, see Item Sa 
reverse side. 

6. Applicant certifies that there have been no changes in the 
station location or specified radio equipment, and that there 
have been no changes in ownership or control, either by 
transfer of stock ownership, changes in partnerships, or 
other changes of the licensee organization, as contained in 

the applicant's most recent application embodying this 
information. 

7. Applicant waives any claim to the use of any particular {re 
quency or of the ether as against the regulatory power of the 
United States because of the previous use of the same, whether 
by license or otherwise, and requests renewal of station 
license in accordance with this applicagsep . 


on the 








4, (a) Nature of Service Ama teur~ Statiog- 
and-Qeerator 
(b) Class of Station encral 
(e) Call Sign RM 
(@) File No. 


(e) License term ending May le, 19S 7 


Class 








@EMCHATE APPROPRIATE CLASEOE ATION BELOW 
wmrrmual ArruK ant Cre OF APPLICANT CORPORATION 
orvaee MBER OF APPLIC ANT 
(CL) samen ge separ OF FICIAL OF GOVERNMENTAL 
Ttaseer UNDER THE /UREEDK THOw TO 5) 
SUBSCRIBED AMD PORN TO BEFORE APPLICANT 
<r Dav or ” 


mOTARY PUBLIC 
(CR RAME AMD TITLE OF OTHES PERSON COMPETE HT TO ADMENETE® On Tem) 


fy COnneSrOw EXP@ES 








April 1957 








‘ar-Strays% 


A reminder. The RSGB now charges a fee of 
$1.00 for issuance of the WBE award to non- 
members, 50¢ to members of the RSGB. ARRL 
Hq. continues to certify U. 8. and Canadian ap- 
plicants but please be sure to include the appro- 
priate fee with your application and cards. 

WS8WOJ sends in a newspaper headline reading 
“Long Range Ban Sought on Grid Bias’’! 

The N. Y. Times recently reported that a 
Berk Kaufhold, call unknown, was given the job 
of pepping up attendance at the North Texas 
State College radio club. He made numerous 
phone calls and personal contacts, and the result 
was a large crowd. But when the club officers 
looked for Kaufhold in order to congratulate him, 
they discovered that he had slept through the 
meeting! 

W6CVW is rather proud of his QSLing record 
as a Novice. He sent a QSL to every one of his 
Novice contacts, and received a QSL from 
every one in return. Yessir, all three of ’em! 

Although W6FZA is only 34 years old now, he 
broke into ham radio just 25 years ago. When he 
received his amateur license at the age of nine 
in 1934, he was the youngest ham in the world. 
Postwar, he has been active on v.h.f. almost 
entirely. His father is W6GCA, his sister was 
W6MGP, and his wife is in the process of getting 
her ticket. 

By pure coincidence, W4GSP and K4DWF 
worked each other on two occasions exactly one 
year apart — same date, time and frequency. 

You’ve heard of a fellow with a “big signal’’? 
Well, K2DFP really has got it. He’s a fireman 
on the Pennsylvania railroad, operating between 
N. Y. C. and Washington, D. C., and whenever 
he spots a beam he toots a 73” or “CQ” on the 
diesel horn. Daytimes only, of course. 

Again by pure coincidence. WSALK had his 
first phone and first c.w. QSOs with the same 
station — W9KWC —a year and a half apart. 





IGY Jobs 
There are openings in connection with 

the IGY ionospheric research plans at a 

field station in northern Quebec. Necessary 

qualifications are as follows: 

a) A good background in the practical 
techniques of maintaining transmitting 
and receiving equipment of conven- 
tional circuitry operating in the fre- 
quency range below 30 Me. 

Thorough knowledge of antenna im- 
pedance measurement and impedance 
matching practices. 

An adventurous but stable personality 
for whom a period of 18 months in a 
small isolated community in a sub- 
Arctic climate would prove an interest- 
ing and challenging experience. 

Those interested should contact Dr. 


Millet Morgan at Dartmouth College, 
Hanover, New Hampshire. 











One night a stranger wandered into the meeting 
room of the Houston Amateur Radio Club 
in the Chamber of Commerce room and took a 
seat in the rear next to W5LI. A couple of 
12-year-old amateurs were in the front of the 
room. 

The stranger turned to W5LI (who assumed 
the visitor was a ham) and asked, ‘Are those 
young fellows members of your organization?” 

“They sure are,” replied W5LI. 

“They start rather young in Houston, don’t 
they,” said the stranger. 

Still thinking he was talking to a ham, W5LI 
replied, “‘We have several even younger than 
those two boys.” 

The stranger sat for a few minutes with a 
puzzled expression on his face and finally blurted 
out, “This is the Alcoholics Anonymous 
meeting, isn’t it?” 

W5LI directed him to the proper meeting 
room! 

— Adapted from the HARC News 

To the high claimed 1956 Sweepstakes scores 
(page 73, February QS7)), add these phone totals: 
K5EXZ—71,820-514-70; W4FGH—59,902-491- 
61. 


« 


W7KX writes to say he’s got troubles. He just got 
himself a model 26 teletype machine, hooked it up to 
one of his transmitters, and can’t seem to raise a soul. 
The equipment looks okay — perhaps he needs a com- 
pact all-band antenna. 


OST for 








The question this month 





was suggested by Clarke 
Redfield, K2DIG. The box 
in the sketch doesn’t quite 
behave the way you would 
expect it to. Disconnected 


o— 
5 Vv AC. ? 
° 


o———1 














from the circuit, the resist- 
ance from A to ground and oi 
from B to ground are equal. 

The resistance from A to B is twice this value. 
Connecting the box into the circuit and applying 
a.c. to the left-hand terminals, the d.c. ammeter 
and d.c. voltmeter give indications. “Aha!” you 
exclaim. “‘The box contains an ordinary center- 
tapped transformer.”’ We hasten to point out 
that under these conditions the a.c. voltmeter 
reads 0. Problem: What is in the box? 





LAST MONTH’S 


If you answered “50 ohms’’ to last month’s 
Quiz, as so many people do when they first look 
at the problem, you were wrong. It takes a 100- 
ohm resistor to give 25 ohms across the terminals, 
since the two halves are in parallel. 





CX 


¢ 


25 Years Ago | 


this month 


— 








April, 1932 


. Unless you were interested in “ Fundamental Crystal 
Control for Ultra-High Frequencies,"’ or “ Stabilizing Super- 
heterodyne Performance,"’ or the records established in 
“The December Transcons,"’ or “Simplified Remote Con- 
trol for Amateur Transmitters,’’ you might not have found 
much of interest in the April, 1932, issue of QST 


. On the other hand, you might have liked “Some 
Notes on Message Handling,’ by Paul Segal, or “The Old 
‘Peaked Audio’ Receiver Rebuilt,’’ or “The Economical 
Design of Smoothing Filters."’ Then again, you might have 
enjoyed the piece of fiction entitled “‘ Here's How.” 


. However, if you are Capt. Basil Cutting, of the N. H 
State Police, you might be interested in the description of 
W1APK in 1932, owned and operated by Basil Cutting 


. . . And by golly, here's a piece on “ Traffic Handling” by 
W3NF some fellow by the name of George Hart. 


. The editorial twenty-five years ago dealt entirely with 
the five-meter band. K. B. W. pointed out that the average 
range of the gear was about 25 miles and thus again offered 
the incentive of developing a system of short-distance, high- 
speed relaying of messages. He further pointed out that the 
TV people were asking for frequencies between 30 and 80 
Me., and that it was high time we got some occupancy up 
there in the five-meter band. K. B. W.’s visions of the tech- 
nical progress to come, plus the article on crystal control 
for the ultrahigh frequencies, plus the announcement of 
some special five-meter tests with airplanes, were indicative 
of the interest in that part of the spectrum 


. Incidentally, those December Transcons got quite a 
play in this twenty-five-years-ago issue. Ev Battey, then 
assistant communications manager and now W4IA, 
authored nine pages of text and charts which covered the 
subject in great detail. 


April 1957 





Silent Keps 


T Is with deep regret that we record the 
passing of these amateurs: 


W1AZJ, George E. Martenis, Putney, Vt. 
WI1DJ, Arthur E. Ridley, Winthrop, Mass. 
W1MUM, Joseph C. Botelho, New Bedford, Mass. 
W1ZNO, George L. Fay, jr., Tewksbury, Mass. 
K2GBV, Edward F. Sullivan, Livingston, N. J. 
W2GNI/K2SYX, James B. Chupp, Smithtown, 
L. I., and Saint James, N. Y. 
W2NA, Edward P. Kingsland, Herkimer, N. Y. 
W2UIC, Robert C. Whitlock, Amsterdam, N. Y. 
W3YRK, Melvin L. Gelow, Hagerstawn, Md. 
W4BZG, Hassell O. Phillips, Bessemer, Ala 
W4HRA, Harry I. Anderson, Ft. Myers, Fla. 
W4LJE, William I. Browning, jr., Norfolk, Va. 
W6PMS, Andrew Anderson, Artesia, Calif 
W7NGO, David L. Rempel, Dutton, Mont. 
W7QEB, Louis Talen, Edmonds, Wash 
W7SJH, John C. Schabel, Dutton, Mont 
W7ZYV, Richard M. Hall, Ft. Huachuea, Ariz. 
W8EDW, Ralph E. Armbruster, Blacklick, Ohio 
W9HOG, Harry M. Wilson, DeSoto, Ind. 
W9MDS, Daniel R. Zunker, Fifield, Wis. 
W9UJR, Clarence A. Schroeder, Chicago, Ill. 
W6FWU, Harold T. Gallaher, Kansas City, Mo. 
KL7EKH, Harold W. Bales, Eielson, AFB, Alaska 
VE4FU, R. F. Bonnett, East Kildonan, Manitoba, 
Canada 











BE ON THE WATCH FOR! 

Two National NC-183D receivers have been 
reported as stolen. One, serial number 11,416, 
was taken from the Endicott IBM ham shack on 
Feb. 22. Any info on this one should be given to 
the N.Y. State Police in Vestal. The other re- 
ceiver bore serial number 202-0865 and was taken 
from K6HJN, Lawndale, Calif. A DX-100 was 
also stolen from K6HJN. 


77 





S oa Kinks 


For the Experimente 





(givin 





USING AUDIO FEEDBACK FOR 
CONELRAD WARNING 
gene average a.c.-d.c. broadcast receiver can be 

quickly and inexpensively converted for au- 
dible conelrad monitoring by the addition of 
three small components. Modification of the re- 
ceiver is not difficult, and the normal entertain- 
ment value of the set is not impaired by addition 
of a feed-back circuit that causes the receiver to 
“sound off’? whenever the control signal —a 
broadcast carrier — leaves the air. 

Fig. 1 shows the diagram of the 2nd-detector 
and Ist-audio stage of a typical a.c.-d.c. receiver. 


2nd DET.-AV.C.-A.F AUDIO AMP. 


Te 








qt 











TY j 
Lake 
fat 
i. 








AUDIO REMOVE 
GAIN See Text 
ONTROL 





q 


A 











O.lpt. 





(B) 


NORMAL + Ss, ————> ALARM 








Fig. 1 — Circuit of the W6DCQ conelrad alarm sys- 
tem. Section A shows the 2nd-detector and Ist-audio 
circuit of a typical a.c.-d.c. type broadcast receiver. 
Section B shows the wiring of the alarm components. 
Ci — 500-yuf. 500-volt ceramic or mica. 

C2 — 0.1-yf. 400-volt paper. 

S;: — 3-pole 2-position selector switch (Centralab PA- 
1007 or PA-35 wafer mounted on PA-300 
index). 


Section B of the circuit shows how the feed-back 
components, Ci, Cz and Sj, are wired into the 
main circuit. Notice that the original audio- 
input lead to V; is replaced with connections 
terminated at S;. This permits feed-back voltage 
obtained from V2 via C; and Sic to be routed 
through the audio-gain control before being ap- 
plied to the control grid of the Ist audio tube, 
thus providing a convenient means of controlling 


78 


feedback in the circuit. Ce is an a.f. bypass used 
in the “alarm” position of S;. Using C2 and the 
a.f. gain control as a separate a.v.c. filter resulted 
in more bias for V; than was obtained from the 
normal a.v.c. filter. 

The converted receiver is made ready for alarm 
use by tuning clear of all broadcast signals and 
then adjusting the gain control for the desired 
feedback or output level. The receiver used here 
at W6DCQ exhibits the following three charac- 
teristics dependent upon input-signal strength. 

1) A strong input signal creating approxi- 
mately —3 volts a.v.c. provides complete silenc- 
ing of the alarm tone and other audio output. 

2) Moderate values of signal input silence the 
alarm, but allow some ‘‘muffled” broadcast mod- 
ulation to leak through to the speaker. The 
muffled effect is caused by the a.f. filter capacitor, 
Cy. This mode of operation is desirable because it 
is not a fail-safe system. 

3) Weak value of signal input silences the 
alarm tone, but permits considerable audio 
(broadcast programs) to ride through the re- 
ceiver. 

— Louis Borne, W6DCQ 


bane audio-feedback principle may be easily 
applied to an a.c.-d.c. receiver for conelrad use 
by adding C), Rk; and S; to the detector-audio 
section as shown in Fig. 2. This modification does 
not provide for convenient control of the feed- 
back voltage, but it does provide a cheap and 
effective means of monitoring conelrad without 


2nd DET.-AV.C 





Vv, 
il 


‘a 
ae 








TO AUDIO GAIN CONTROL AND ANV.C. LINE 


Fig. 2 — Cireuit of the feed-back arrangement as ap- 
plied to an a.c.-d.c. receiver by W3KKO. S; is shown 
in the normal-operation position. Closing the switch 
completes the feed-back circuit for alarm operation. 


Ci 50-puf. 500-voit ceramic or mica. 
R; — 100K, % watt. 
S$: — D.p.s.t. selector or toggle switch, 


need for tearing out any of the original receiver 

wiring. Audio-circuit wiring not shown is to be 

left intact when installing the alarm components. 

One word of caution: To prevent hum pickup 

during normal use of the receiver, keep the new 
(Continued on page )152 


OST for 





Correspondence 
From Members- _ 





The publishers of OST assume no responsibility for statements made herein by correspondents, 


HARMONIC ANTENNAS 


660 West Polo Drive 
Clayton 5, Missouri 
Editor, QST: 

W8YFJ stated (Feb. QST, p. 49) that he thought a good 
solution to the harmonic problem was the use of one-band 
antennas. Perhaps this is the most direct path of attack to 
the problem. But one must realize that the way contests and 
general operating are set up, most hams on the hf. bands 
must be set up for multiband operation. And this means 
multiband antennas for the average ham, who has neither 
the space nor the money for an “antenna farm.” I believe 
a better solution to the problem is harmonic traps and inter- 
ference suppression within the transmitter. Concentrated 
effort in ridding the ether of harmonics is necessary, but 
let us not, in our zeal, handicap the ham of limited means. 

Douglas Dodds, Jr., KN@HGZ 


715 South Pine Street 
York, Pennsylvania 


Editor, QST: 

I agree with WSYFJ and I think ARRL can clear 
this up by doing just what he requests. 

Have had lots of experience during my past 30 years as 
3AQN, and I know it takes an antenna for the band you 
want to work. 

The all-band antenna is just getting the gang into more 
hot water, and making more guys dull on getting the 
proper match, 

— Paul L. Stumpf, W3AQN 


Box 403 
Lemon, South Dakota 
Editor, QST: 

The arguments against all-band antennas presented by 
WS8YFJ show a complete lack of consideration for all the 
commonly-known antenna principles. It may interest him 
to know that his “good dipole or folded dipole"’ will radiate 
odd harmonics of the carrier frequency just as effectively 
as will any commercial all-band system. The reason his 
40- or 80-meter dipole does not “ radiate harmonics on other 
amateur frequencies” is that these frequencies are, with 
the exception of 15 meters, located at even harmonies in- 
stead of odd ones. 

The recurring current loop at the center of an antenna 
fed at an odd harmonic allows the antenna to radiate quite 
well, until the harmonics become fairly high, when mismatch 
in the system will discriminate against them. It is on this 
principle that all multiband antennas are designed. The 
problem, then, lies mainly in our transmitters and antenna 
tuners; not the antenna. 

— Robert D. Dyson, W7TYC/6 


NOVICE HARMONICS 


226 Linden Place 
New Milford, N. J. 
Editor, QST: 

Re your February editorial on Novice Harmonics. An- 
other common interference condition exists, namely, Novice 
sub-harmonics. Some Novice stations on the 21-Mec. band 
are radiating strong signals on the 14-Mc. band. In a few 
days of c.w. operating near 14,100 ke., I logged Novices 
from all U. S. call areas except the 6th and 7th 

Incidentally, this spurious signal transmission is certainly 
not confined to Novices. The Novice call letters are readily 
recognized on frequencies like 14 Mc. where there is no 
Novice operation while General Class stations are not as 
readily noticed. 

— Philip J. Reich, W2HUG 


April 1957 


Berlin Rd 
Haddonfield, N. J. 
Editor, QST: 

I fully appreciate the wonderful job being done in QST 
to warn the newer Novices as to the dangers of excessive 
harmonic radiation. However, I feel one point is being 
neglected. This is the e of the Novice using an 80-meter 
crystal in the range ‘ 3600 ke., and not getting his multi- 
plication. During the past several weeks, I have noticed 
all too many Novices in this 80-meter range. . . . 

— Bob Weiman, K2EWR 


8SACF HEARD 


Buckhannon, W. Va. 
Editor, QST: 

The December issue of QST was a nostalgic one. The 
article, QST, Volume V, and the first Transatlantic tests 
How well I remember the morning we got the telegram that 
8ACF had been heard by Godley! Not that we were so sur- 
prised! We blew out every condenser in the rig that night! 

8ACF in Washington, Pa., was owned by Tom and Char- 
lie MeNary. Charlie is now dead. Other operators were 
Russ Hall, Hodge and Lot Alexander, and yours truly. 
Most of us were in college at the time and the gang broke 
up soon after. Wonder what has happened to the reat? I 
was 8LJ at the time. Hodge Alexander was 8JQ and he had 
some enviable records of his own in those days 
It would really be great to see and hear from any of that 
gang at 8ACF. 
— William A. Hallam, W8J/KN 


TWO-HEADED OPS 


Tulsa, Oklahoma 
Editor, QST: 

I was most interested in W9YLD's explanation of the 
two-headed, we/our type phone operator. (Feb. QST, p. 
140) For all these many years I was under the impression 
that Yenudi or Kilroy was standing at his (their) right 

Do you suppose the “we/our” operator questions his 
(their) ability to face the air waves alone and is bolstering 
his (their) courage through the belief that in numbers there 
is strength? 

Here's looking for more “I/my” 
courage to stand on their own feet. 

—Robert Rychel, W5PHN 


operators with the 


P. O. Box 283 
Warrenton, Va. 
Editor, QST: 

The letter from W9YLD solves a long-standing mystery. 
Now I understand why phone operators say break break 
rather than just break. Each head must have its say. 

— Ev Battery, W4IA 


196 Lyons Avenue 
Newark, N. J. 
Editor, QST: 

We (about seven of us) have done something about 
it. Through the leadership of K2PSW (Please Stop We), we 
(again plural) have established the “I’’ Net. For the past 
six months, we (still plural) have been holding a nightly 
roundtable in which the only qualification for membership 
is the proper use of the first person singular pronoun J, 
when referring to oneself or station. A member using “we” 
at the wrong time must pull his switch. It’s a good habit 
of course and we (oops) find it to be good training. The net 
is in operation nightly at 28.624 Me., from about 10:00 p.m. 
to ? a.m. If you are in our area, drop in. We (the net mem- 
bers) have an “I” certificate which we send to any ham 
who, when in QSO, avoids the “ we's,’’ and uses the “I’s”’ in 
their proper places. . 

— Marty Feins, K2RXH 


(Continued on page 164) 


79 





F. E. HANDY, WIBDI, Communications Mgr. 
GEORGE HART, WINJM, Natl. Emerg. Coordinator 
PHIL SIMMONS, W1ZDP, Asst. Comm. Mgr., C.W. 


Getting Contest Know-How. In Short Skip, 
bulletin of the Manchester Radio Club (Conn.), 
WIAMY suggests the following: ‘‘Let’s get into 
a few contests before the Field Day. The Novice 
Round-up (see Jan. ’57 and June ’56 QST) 
toughens an operator for work in any QRM;; the 
DX competitions (whew) are for ops in the know 
and the dough; if you’re an appointee there are 
CD Parties quarterly; the next one in April has 
both a phone and c.w. period. Was anybody 





A.R.R.L. ACTIVITIES CALENDAR 


Apr. 3rd: CP Qualifying Run — W60WP 
Apr. 13th-14th: CD QSO Party (c.w.) 
Apr. loth: CP Qualifying Run — WIAW 
Apr. 20th-2Ist: CD QSO Party (phone) 
May 2nd: CP Qualifying Run — W6OWP 
May 15th: CP Qualifying Run — WIAW 
June 5th: CP Qualifying Run — W6O0WP 
June 8th-9th: V.H.F. QSO Party 

June 20th: CP Qualifying Run — WIAW 
June 22nd-23rd: ARRL Field Day 

July 3rd: CP Qualifying Run — W6OWP 
July 19th: CP Qualifying Run — WIAW 
July 20th-2ist: CD QSO Party (c.w.) 
July 27th-28th: CD QSO Party (phone) 


OTHER ACTIVITIES 


The following lists date, name, sponsor, and page 
reference of QST issue in which more details appear. 


Apr. 6th-7th: 6th Vermont QSO Party, 
Tri-County Amateur Radio Club (p. 108, 
April, Station Activities). 

Apr. 6th-7th: European WAE DX Con- 
test (2nd c.w. week end), DARC (p. 86, 
December 1956, How’s DX). 

Apr. 13th-l4th: 1957 French Contest 
(phone), REF (p. 67, March, How’s DX). 

Apr. l3th-l4th: Belgian Contest 
(phone), UBA (p. 67, March, How’s DX). 

Apr. 13th-l4th: Ohio Intrastate QSO 
Party, Ohio Council of Amateur Radio 
Clubs (p. 96, April, Station Activities). 

Apr. 27th-28th: PACC Contest (c.w.), 
VERON (p. 63, April, How’s DX). 

May 4th-5th: PACC Contest (phone), 
VERON (p. 63, April, How’s DX). 

May 4th-5th: OZ Cross Country Con- 
test, EDR (p. 63, April, How’s DX). 

May 18th: Armed Forces Day Receiving 
Competition (c.w. and RTTY), Dept. of 
Defense (next month’s issue). 

May 18th-19th: 1957 Helvetia-22 Con- 
test, USKA (next month’s issue). 











80 


ROBERT L. WHITE, WIWPO, DXCC Awards 
LILLIAN M. SALTER, WI1ZJE, Administrative Aide 
ELLEN WHITE, W1YYM, Asst. Comm. Mgr., Phone 


locally besides me in the N-R? . Knowledge 
of contest operating can be obtained only by 
contest operating. Many fellows think the knack 
of good operating can be picked up in a few min- 
utes, but I find it takes almost a year to learn 
what bands to operate at what time, what fre- 
quencies are best within a particular band, and 
other techniques that mean the difference be- 
tween a poor and a spectacular score. Some Sav 
too that phone operating is easier than c.w. 
operating, but not so in a contest! Unless you're 
a real phone man with a sharp receiver you won't 
make half as many QSOs on phone as some 
make on c.w. I dare any 2-meter phone man in 
town who can do so to go down to 75 meters 
during a contest and make a sizeable number of 
contacts. You have to be really good. Anyone 
who wants to help our WIKKS Field Day score 
will be sharpening up his fist and code speed 
and getting some contest know-how in the best 
way by operating in each contest. Another way 
to get sharp: call into a traffic net such as CN, 
it’s on 3640 every night at 6:45 p.m.” 

On Amateurism. This month let us quote an 
overseas item applicable to our own amateur 
purposes and operating behaviors. Broadly 
speaking, it’s about getting the most from our 
Amateur Radio. We quote from a presentation 
by L. Aubry, F8TM, in a recent issue of the 
French society’s Radio REF: 

“The permanent Secretary of the Academy of Sciences 
has affirmed that the Amateur has a fundamental and indis- 
pensable role in all activities. From our point of view in radio, 
electronic theory has no meaning unless applied electronics 
follow. The experiments tried and the experiences considered 
exist only with the view of immediate application. The re- 
sults obtained ought, in effect, to be put at the service of 
humanity as soon as possible. Whether he be aware of it or 
not, the individual lives by means of a continual exchange 
of services with this large family of humanity. If he attempts 
to isolate himself, he nevertheless profits from the work of 
others: if without giving anything in exchange, he becomes 
a@ parasite. 

“The spectacular aid that the OM performs sometimes in 
the case of an emergency should not make us forget his 
permanent and modest utility. This resides in all of his 
activities to the extent that he makes them known. One 
does not expect a flood of brilliant results of him, but rather 
the gentle stream of news which comes from his patient 
daily experience. It is in this manner that techniques are 
perfected, and the frontiers of the unknown are slow'y 
pushed back. It is pure egotism to hide in one’s station and 
never communicate one’s ideas, schemes, contacts or trials 
of things. It is also to deprive one’s self of the light of that 
friendly cooperation which makes amateurism so charming. 

“Thus, your work, experiments, and research should be 
made public at meetings, expositions and at national and 
international conferences. It is necessary to know the results 
obtained even if they are not brilliant. Another OM will 
know perhaps how to use them in a better manner. Do not 
be too personally occupied, and look at the results objec- 
tively. Whether you like the lower frequencies or UHF 


OST for 








NATIONAL CALLING AND 
EMERGENCY FREQUENCIES (kc.) 


3550 7100 
14,050 14,225 21,050 
28,100 29.640 50,550 


7250 
21,400 
145,350 











VHF, remote control whether you be young or 
not so young and more or less a slave of routine; 
becoming a robot. Think, work and make 
known. It is only under these conditions that 
will develop.” 

ARRL SCM members espe- 
cially will find the remarks on immediate appli- 
cation of our amateur radio to services to others 
refreshing from 
efforts and experience. 
challenge to take hold of our opportunities, 
whether through living up to appointment- 
recognition, an AREC-RACES registration or by 
collection and reporting of IGY-v.h.f. data, for a 
few examples. There is much for careful thought 
and for some to take to heart in this translated 
expression. The amateur who sticks by himself to 
a mere collecting of DX cards or casual contact- 
ing is enjoined not to live unto himself but 
to communicate his ideas freely in the compan- 
ionship of other amateurs. Isolation deprives one 
of social and productive exchanges a gentle 
hint that there is virtue and fraternalism perhaps 
in Affiliated Club Membership. Best of all the 
thought that greatness and true value are not the 
exclusive property of the brilliant, but lie within 
the capabilities of us all through sharing and 
personal activity in all the mechanisms of our 
amateur radio and our societies. F.E.H. 


RESULTS, JANUARY CD PARTIES 


ARRL appointees 
and officials during the course of the CD Parties of Janu- 
ary 12th-13th and 19th-20th num- 
ber of contacts, and number of different sections worked. 
Final and complete results are scheduled for the April 
CD Bulletin. 


antennas 
avoid 
your efforts 
A mateurism 


appointees, net 


continuing 
This is a 


results do 
patient 


come 
daily 


alone 


Here are the highest scores claimed by 


Figures indicate score, 


‘J Official Bulletin Station W2VCZ rolled up the 
January CD Party’s leading phone score at this well- 
appointed operating position. Gear includes a kw. 
final and modulator, Ranger, NC300, Viking I and 
v.f.o. These are intermittently tied to 10-11 and 15- 
meter rotaries, and to fixed arrays on 40 and 80. 


April 1957 


C.W. 


W6JVA 199,302-372-59 WS8SVL 
WILEOB 197,275-600-65 W4BZE 
W6BIP 196 481-354-61 WOEEE* 
W3VO8 185 is 

WITYQ 184,3: 

W4ROQR 

W6YHM 

W3TMZ 

w sad NI 

VE6NX 
w SPW 
W9KLD 
W3JNQ 
W4PNK 
W3MS8SR 
K4LPW 
WIWEF 
w 3KL A 
Ww: [1B 


79, 170-270-£ 


»50-504-6 L 

2,200-474-63 
340-5 19-57 

)- 458-63 

435-460-61 
050-450-62 
500-458-60 W4MI 
900- acs w7Jc 
57 W4iwWKQ 
W9SZR 390-414 62 

W9MAK 300-405-60 

K4HOt 590-396-59 

W9YZA 560-4 10-57 

wowwr 100-380-60 

WwoP ah ,300-38 1-60 

WIJY! 765-366-6 | 

we Ka 715-358-61 

V3NF 800-378-56 


WIiCMH 
WOIA 
W2MHE 
WOBQJ 
W2LRO 


600-290- 4s 
310-232- 
5, 800-23: 


W4kF¢ 


605-350-53 

930-3 13-58 

690-340-53 

260-33 1-54 
> 


W3MCG 

w2Cvw 

W9FNX 

WiBPW 

-32 K2EDH 
270-294-54 

PHONE 

5,875-172-41 
},040-161-31 
985-109-33 


W5DEJ 


W2VCZ 
WIJYH 
WS8NYH 
W3KLA 


W2MHE 
WITYQ 
K6BWD 


010- 91-22 
10,005- 63-29 


1WI1WP R. opr. 2 WOWDW., opr 
*WOVFY, opr 


W3ADE 


3608 5- 5 


3 Multiple operator. R 
> W2AIP, opr 


CODE PROFICIENCY PROGRAM 


Twice each month 
enable you to qualify 


special transmissions are made to 
for the ARRL Code Proficiency Cer- 
tificate. The next qualifying run from W1AW will be made 
on April 16th at 2130 EST. Identical texts will be sent 
simultaneously by automatic transmitters on 1885, 3555, 
7080, 14,100, 21,010, 50,900 and 145,600 ke. The next 
qualifying run from W6OWP only will be transmitted on 
April 3rd at 2100 PST on 3590 and 7128 ke 

Any person can apply. Neither ARRL membership nor 
an amateur license is required. Send copies of all qualifying 
runs to ARRL for grading, stating the call of the station 
you copied. If you qualify at one of the six speeds trans- 
mitted, 10 through 35 w.p.m., you will receive a certificate. 
If your initial qualification is for a speed below 35 w.p.m., 
you may try later for endorsement stickers. 

Code-practice transmissions will be made from W1AW 
each evening at 2130 EST through April 27th; after that 
date they will be at 2130 EDST. Approximately 10 minutes’ 
practice is given at each speed. References to texts used on 
several of the transmissions are given below. These make it 
possible to check your copy. For practice purposes, the order 
of words in each line of QST’ text sometimes is reversed. To 
improve your fiat, hook up your own key and buzzer or 
audio oscillator and attempt to send along with W1AW. 


Date 
Apr. 2nd: 
Apr. 5th: 
Apr. 8th: Ten Watt 
Apr. llth: 
Apr. 17th: 
Apr. 23rd: 
Apr. 25th: 
Apr. 29th: 


Subject of Practice Text from February QST 
The Snoop-Loop, p. 11 

A ?- to 30-Mc. Presele ,p. 16 

Mobile for Twenty Bucks, p. 22 

A Novice Three-Band Antenna System, p. 25 
Transistor Operating Characteristics, p. 27 
Combined Keyer and Control Circuit, p. 45 
eat Traffic by System, p. 50 

F.C.C.’s Amateur Service Group, p. 54 


81 








Two or three Section Emergency Coordinators have com- 
plained to us that they feel EC Annual Reports ought to 
be submitted through them rather than being sent directly 
to ARRL headquarters by the EC that headquarters is 
bypassing them and therefore making it impossible for 
them to do the best possible job for their sections. 

There is something to be said for this viewpoint. We 
wish we could do it that way. In fact, if SECs will take 
the responsibility for collecting these reports each year 
and see that they reach us, we would be glad to have them 
do so. There is no intention here of bypassing any SEC 
function; in fact, we would like to tend in the other direc- 
tion — to decentralize more headquarters functions to the 
SECs. It would save us time, work, and a lot of headaches, 
and thus enable us to do our other innumerable jobs more 
efficiently and thoroughly 

But even more important than the work loaded on us 
and its consequences is the aspect of being assured that all 
EC reports submitted reach us. We know that many SECs 
can be trusted to forward these reports (or a detailed sum- 
mary of them) to us in good season. We also know, from 
sad experience, that there are some SECs who do not per- 
ceive any value in “paper work” and would probably 
ignore annual report forms if sent them, or else delay for- 
warding them so long that they would not reach us in time 
to be of much value. 

We do agree, most heartily, with the thought that SECs 
should be kept informed of AREC doings in their sections. 
On the first of each month, each EC should submit to his 
SEC a Form 5 monthly report, along with other informa- 
tion of interest, which the SEC can then summarize in 
his monthly report (Form 8) to headquarters. Now obvi- 
ously, if all 1700 of our ECs sent in such a report each 
month, and if all 73 SECs reported their resultant summary 
information to headquarters each month, we would have 
a month-to-month picture of our AREC total strength 
and status. Ah, sweet dreams of Utopia! The fact is that 
if an SEC gets reports from 20% of his ECs in any single 
month he feels he is doing very well, and if we get reports 
from 20 of 73 SECs it well-nigh establishes a record 

The AREC member to EC to SEC to NEC relationship is 
not a “chain of command.”’ They are simply levels of cen- 
tralization. Your EC is not your “boss"’ in the AREC, he 


The Phil-Mont Mobile Radio Club of Philadelphia 
and environs remodeled a bookmobile into this com- 
pletely-equipped communications van. W3VVS_ is 
shown at the 10-meter operating position. Console 
includes (I. to r.) 10-meter walkie-talkie, power control 
panel, 6-meter operating position, 10-meter remote 
control position, low frequency operating position. 
A 30-watt public address system is on the top shelf. 
Some setup, eh fellows? 


82 


is the man who centralizes and coordinates your efforts 
(assuming you make some) for the best public service. In 
participating in Emergency Corps activities you are not 
working for or serving your EC, your SEC, or ARRL 
headquarters, but rather the opposite: they are working for 
and serving you. But they cannot do so if you volunteer 
nothing. They cannot serve you if you will not be served. 

During a fire in Kankakee, Ill., on January 3rd, the 
power company was forced to shut off power in a certain 
section of the city due to snapping transmission lines. This 
left the police communications system without communi- 
cations, so the Kankakee RACES-AREC group went into 
action. Mobile units were manned by W9GIQ, W9QAY, 
W9VQC and W9LCH (EC), with fixed stations operated by 
W9KLD, K9DDP, W9WZV and W9IBU. Communications 
were carried on until the situation was in hand. — K9DDP. 

The Oswego County, N. Y., RACES network was acti- 
vated on January 15-16 when a gas line break precipitated 
an emergency condition in Fulton, Oswego, Watertown and 
all villages and towns in between, with the temperature from 
10 to 25 degrees below zero. Communications points were 
established at the Mayor's office, at the state armory and 
at the gas co. pipeline pressure station. K2GEG, W2PDJ 
and K2BFH operated six hours. W2SPE served as relay 
station. — W2ZHU, EC/RO Oswego Co., N. Y., & W2WLR. 

As K6LRX was mobiling on 40 meters through Pacoima, 
Calif., in the San Fernando Valley, his attention was at- 
tracted to a severe air explosion ahead of him. Asking 
K6MYC, with whom he was in contact, to stand by, he 
investigated and found that a DC-7 had collided with an 
F89 Scorpion jet in mid-air. The crew of the former, which 
had landed in a school yard, were killed, as was the pilot 
of the jet, although a civilian radar observer in the jet had 
parachuted to safety. A network of amateur stations repre- 
senting 17 cities quickly accumulated on the frequency to 
offer assistance, and K6LRX was able to handle emergency 
traffic for the Civil Air Patrol and the Mutual Broadcasting 
System. — K6PTQ. 

Hearing on the radio that his mother had been severely 
injured in an auto crash on Christmas day in Gary, Ind., 
an Army sergeant in Honolulu, finding telephone contact 
impossible due to Christmas traffic, appealed to MARS 
station KH6QU for assistance in getting further informa- 
tion. Contact was made with W4ELU in Florida, who tried 
to telephone Gary but also was unsuccessful due to the 
Christmas jam. However, the call was heard by W9GDM 
of Wheaton, Ill., who made contact with KH6QU and then 
called Wheaton police. Within seconds, a report on the 
lady’s condition was obtained and relayed to KH6QU. 
K6DKI and KH6ABA also assisted in relaying for this 
successful emergency operation. — W9GDM. 

A hapless automobile thief picked the middle of a Pueblo, 
Colo., AREC drill to steal a car from in front of a local radio 
store. The drill, participated in by six mobiles and four fixed 
stations, was for the purpose of determining the reliability 
of 75 meters within the county, but right in the middle of 
it the net control station announced the stolen car and the 
hunt was on. W@NIT spotted the car some 30 miles west of 
Pueblo. W9MJR/§@ then joined him and they gave chase. 
The thief eluded W9MJR by turning into a dead end road, 
but was spotted again by W@NIT, who was following at a 
distance, as he emerged. Realizing he was hemmed in, the 
thief abandoned the car and fled to the hills on foot. The 
highway patrol was called and a search of the area began 
All six mobiles met at the scene, were photographed for 
KCSJ-TV and interviewed by the local newspaper. The car 
was recovered in approximately one hour. — WONIT, SEC 
Colorado. 

Without doing research, we are confident that the 24 
SEC reports received for December activities is a new high. 
It is very gratifying to see this continued upward trend. 
Total AREC members represented was 6031. Comparable 
figures for 1955 are 17 and 5750 respectively. The only new 
section in the 24 reports was Arkansas. Other reports were 
received from the SECs of the following sections: Ala., Ga., 
San Joaquin Valley, Iowa, Los A., E. Fla., Santa Clara 
Valley, NYC-LI, Tenn., Wash., W. N. Y., N. Mex., Ky., 
Conn., Minn., E. Pa. 8. N. J., Santa Barbara, Wis., Ore., 
Mont. Md.-Del.-D. C., Colo. 


OST for 





During the 1956 reporting year, we received reports from 
36 different sections (33 in 1955), and a total of 230 reports 
(189 in 1955). We salute the SECs of the following sections, 
who did not miss a single report during the year: NYC-LI, 
W. N. Y., San Joaquin Valley, Ala., Wis., Santa Clara 
Valley, Md.-Del.-D. C., E. Fla. Special congratulations 
go to the Eastern Florida and Western New York sections 
whose SECs have reported 100% for five straight years; 
to Wisconsin, which has four consecutive years to its credit; 
and to NYC-LI, which has three 

Follows a breakdown of number of reports received from 
each section under 100%: Oregon; ten — Nebr., 
E. Pa.; nine Mont.; eight Minn., Santa Barbara, 
Wash.; seven Mo., N. Mex.; siz — Tenn., Ont.; five — 
Ga.; four N. C.; three — 8. Tex., Los A., Conn.; two — 
Ind., Vt., Ky., 8. C., Iowa, 8. N. J.; one — N. Dak., N. Tex., 
Ohio, Ark. 


eleven - 


RACES News 


A recent conference was held in Battle Creek between 
representatives of the United States Civil Defense Amateur 
Radio Alliance and FCDA to discuss several questions 

relative to RACES use, to wit: (1) ways 
and means of obtaining additional fre- 
quencies for RACES use; 
the USCDARA Standard Operating 
Procedure manual (for the third time); 
(3) reissue and revision of the FCDA 
frequency allocations chart for RACES 
operation on 6 and 2 meters. FCDA 
and USCDARA work very closely to- 
gether on all these matters, which will 
be of great interest to RACES amateurs 

The matter of frequencies has been an urgent one, par- 
ticularly on the lower frequencies. Need for additional 
RACES frequencies for medium and long distance operation 
has been evident for a long time, but getting them is a con- 
tinuing problem. It should be noted that it is not intended 
that such frequencies be taken away from general amateur 


(2) reissue of 


usage prior to outbreak of war. 

The USCDARA SOP has received widespread usage since 
its formulation several years ago. Your state civil defense 
should have copies available for distribution. The reissue 
is for the purpose of making additional copies available and 
revising it in a few minor respects 

The FCDA frequency allocation chart for 6 and 2 meters 
has long been in need of revision in view of changes in 
specifications to include a.m. gear and “utility portable” 
units on those bands. Both the USCDARA (NSCDARA) 
and FCDA plans were discussed in QST for May, 1953 (pp. 
60-61). 


TRAFFIC TOPICS 


We think we should take note in this column that the 
1956 Edison Award has been won again by a traffic operator 

this time W3CUL, who has probably handled more 
traffic in her comparatively short tenure in this activity 
than any other operator alive. Mae first made BPL in 
August, 1949, and for 89 consecutive months never a 
month went by that she wasn’t in that column. On 46 
different months, she was tops in the field of single-operator 
stations. A truly remarkable achievement, and one de- 
serving of the recognition that comes with the Edison 
Award presentation. 


Orchids are due the regional nets of the National Traffic 
System who supplied representatives from all ten U. 8. 
regions to handle the replies to the Governors-to-President 
Relay messages (see details elsewhere in this issue). Un- 
fortunately, the replies never materialized due to conditions 
beyond our control, but NTS was girded and ready to do 
the job promptly and efficiently, as usual, and deserves no 
less credit. 


We have been severely unbraided for neglecting to men- 
tion the work of Bertha, W9LGG, in the February QST 
list of YLs active in traffic work. Well, the item did con- 
clude with the phrase “ just to name a few,” which 
was meant to imply that there were many more; but we 
do agree that W#LGG has been one of the outstanding YL 
traffic handlers and should have been mentioned as manager 
of Iowa's Tall Corn Net and a member of the NTS Trans- 


April 1957 





BRASS POUNDERS LEAGUE 


Winners of BPL Certificates for January traffic: 


Call Ortg Recd. Rel Del 
164 1026 1 
975 596 3: 
° 7 760 
WOBDR 56 777 
WOSCA.. 
WINZZ 
w9Do.. 
W7BA... 
WOLGG... 
W9CXY... 


Total 
2205 
2064 
1597 
1545 
1083 
1067 


oe) 


x) 
© wye wm Soto 
DOM Oh mend 


W5UBW/5 
KPBCQ... 
W6EOT.... 
W2KFV 
WSELW 
W9MAK 
WOZWL... 
W9GAR 
K6DYX 


C2 Crs ¢ 


oon 


Waon 


Late Reports 
K6SLB/6 (Dee 
W6EOT ( Dee.) 
K9BBO (Dec 
W3CVE (Dee 
WIDYE (Dec.) 28 


More-Than-One-Operator Stations 
Oall Recd. Rel Del 
f6IAB f 1146 350 
5WAB s 24 

PBN 28: 24: 16 
<7FEA . ¢ y i 11 
Late Reports: 
61AB (Dec.). 65 3531 2519 1012 
6 (Nov.) 69 1078 1404 326 
6YDK (Dee.). .35 563 459 104 


BPL for 100 or more ortgtnattons-plus-deltvertes: 

KH6BQS 199 W3RV 117 W7AHV 

w9sYO 185 115 K2DEM 

W5BJIR 71 112 K4BXV 

W4BZE 166 Late Reports: 
KP6AK 21 WSW XO (Dee.) 
W9SWD 118 K6CGA (Dec.) 
WONIY 118 WIiCRW (Dec.) 


KL7USA 110 
WIBPW 108 
WSGFE 107 
WOKJZ 107 


More-Than-One-Operator Stations 
W5VTZ 150 W3YDX 144 K3WBJ 101 
WiAW 134 
BPL medallions (see Aug. 1954 QST, p. 64) have been 
awarded to the following amateurs since last month's 
listing: W3UE, W8PHA/9#, WSUPH, W9YYG, W#CZ, 
WOKLG, KH6BQ8 


The BPL ts open to all amateurs in the United States, 
Canada, Cuba, and U. 8. possessions who report to their 
SCM a message total of 500 or more, or 100 or more 
originations-plus-deliveries for any calendar month. All 
messages must be handled on amateur frequencies with- 
in 48 hours of receipt, in standard ARRL form 











continental Corps in the Central Area 


cherry pie, too! 


Besides, we like 


== coc am 

Miscellaneous January net reports: Interstate Side Band 
net reports 345 messages, 23 stations participating. North 
Texas-Oklahoma Net had 31 sessions, 1230 check-ins, 239 
Early Bird Transcontinental Net handled 612 
Eastern States Net had 27 sessions, 65 stations, 
413 messages. Dragnet had 15 sessions, 327 check-ins, 484 
Transcontinental Phone Net reports 
1170; fourth 


messages 


messages 


messages 
area, 1076; second call area 
call areas, 367; total, 2614 


First call 
ninth and tenth 


National Traffic System. Time was when our traffic 
activities were built around the “iron man”’ traffic tradition. 
If a fellow couldn't be on deck every night to handle his 
schedules, he didn’t amount to beans as a traffic man. 


Time and diversification of amateur interest have changed 


83 





that somewhat, and NTS was built to accommodate the 
occasional traffic man as well as the every-day enthusiast. 
Few of us nowadays can get on the nets every night, but 
those few who do so are beginning to be annoyed by the 
constant changing of their counterpart stations with the 
resultant never-knowing whom they are keeping a schedule 
with, what his code speed is or whether his signal is going 
to be up to the mark. 

NTS needs both the iron men and the occasionals, but 
sometimes it’s hard to reconcile one with the other. We 
hope we never have to between them, because 
it would be an impossible choice to make. A daily traffic 
man naturally takes a big load of responsibility upon him- 
self, and discharges it admirably as long as he is able. 
The nets in which he participates come to depend on him, 
its members look up to him, follow his example in their own 
operation, except that they can’t maintain the daily grind. 
But NTS cannot put its administrative or operating re- 
liance on any one single person. Each limk must be not 
only one man, but several of them working together, be- 
cause a one-man link that breaks can disrupt the entire 
system. And who is to say when" our iron man will get 
across the high voltage, or break his arm, or have a heart 
attack, or just plain get fed up with knocking himself out 
and quit? Much as we admire them, and much as we need 
them in NTS, we drag our feet like the dickens when it 
comes to placing complete reliance for any one NTS function 
on one operator. The policy is to spread the load. As long 
as there are qualified operators available among whom the 
load can be spread, we'll keep trying to effectuate this 
policy. Where they aren't, we have no alternative but to 
rely on the iron men, and we do so with full appreciation 
of their worth to the system. 


choose 


January reports: 

Repre- 
sentation 
96.1% 
100% 
100% 


Net Sessions Traffic 
EAN ree 26 979 
ae 31 1192 38.0 
3. a 30 1017 33.9 
410 7 9.1 
5 6.3 
6.3 
9.6 
14.4 
10.0 


A verage 
37.6 


Rate 


23 
9 
7 

51 


Sections? 

TCC (East 
TCC (Central) 
TCC 1553 


Pacific) . 1) 


11.0 
12.1 


16,010 
16,010 


1154 
1154 


Summary 

Record 

Late Reports 

4RN (Dec.) 27 520 0.33 22.0 71.4%! 
1 Regional net representation based on one session per 


100% 


night. Others are based on two or more sessions. 

2 Section nets reporting: MJN (Minn.); WSN (Wash.); 
CN (Conn.); QKS, QKS 8S & QKN (Kans.); Tenn. C.W.; 
WVN (W.Va.); AENB, AENP & AENT (Ala.); NIN & 
NJN-AM (N. J.); KYN (Ky.); GSN (Ga.); OSN (Ont.); 
SCN (Calif.); ILN (Ill.); TLCN (Iowa); 8. Dak. 40 
phone; 8S. Dak. 75 Emerg.; Minn. Phone. 

3 TCC schedules kept, not counted as net sessions. 

The “summary” may be the total of the column, an over- 
all average, or the highest net in that particular category, 
whichever is applicable. The “‘record"’ refers to the past 
highest record for the particular month in question, and 
when the “record” is the same as the “summary,” it 
means that the present month equaled the past record or 
set a new one. Note that in recent months we have nearly 
always broken records as concerns number of net sessions 
and total traffic 

CAN Manager W9DO congratulates W9YYG 
fine work in conducting the Saturday and Sunday night 
CAN sessions; W9YYG and W9ZYK have earned their 
CAN certificates. W7APF has resigned as PAN manager; 
the Pacific Area NTS Staff will recommend his successor. 
W2ZRC says that “no news is good news" on 2RN, W3UE 
bemoans the inability of 3RN to get into Delaware, and 
the origination of amateur messages soliciting funds. 4RN 


will try an early session at 1830 EST. W8DSX says 8RN 


84 


for his 


voted against the 1700 regional net session only because 
he could get no support for it in his region, not because they 
thought it was not a good idea. W4KKW recently sent us 
a copy of a very FB 9RN Bulletin outlining January 
activities and requesting opinions concerning the desira- 
bility of including Tennessee in 9RN. TEN Manager 
W6KJZ compliments KOCNC and W@SCT for their work 
in increasing the representation of North and South Dakota 
respectively; Manitoba is still missing. 

Transcontinental Corps: W3WG reports a 100% increase 
over traffic and schedules from last month. Eastern Area 
TCC roster: WIAW, WIBDI, WIEMG, WINJM, 
W2HDW, W2ZRC, W3COK, W3WG, W4ZDB, WSIBB, 
W9CXY, W9DO. WSCA bawls us out for singling out the 
work of any one or two Central Area TCC stations, says 
they all deserve the same credit. Central Area TCC roster: 
W9CXY, W9DO, W9JUJ, WOBDR, WODQL, WHKJZ, 
W#LGG. WSCA. WOKQD says she is going to pin a rose 
on every one of the 19 different stations who kept the 155 
schedules for the Pacific Area TCC in January. Pacific 
Area TCC roster: W6és ADB BPT EOT GJP HC IPW 
IZG PLG REF RFW VPC VZT YHM, Kés DYX GZ 
ORT, W7s APF DXV FRU GMC, W#KQD. 


CURRENT FILM ADDITION 


Our Training Aids section announces the addition of a 
16-mm. film produced by the Phil-Mont Mobile Radio 
Club under the direction of William Bornmann, W3VXN. 
“Every Single Minute’ (ARRL coded F-34) describes how 
a typical group of organized amateurs swing into action 
in time of disaster. Many types of amateur equipment are 
used, from fixed and mobile stations to walkie-talkies 
Scenes from a recent Field Day are shown, explaining the 
amateurs constant preparedness, alertness and ability to 
use what equipment is available when tragedy 
flood of °55, strikes. 

This is a black and white sound film which runs approxi- 
mately 30 minutes. It is available to any ARRL-affiliated 
club. At least one month's notification should be given this 
office prior to a scheduled showing. 


such as the 


ELECTION NOTICE 


(To all ARRL members residing in the Sections listed below.) 

You are hereby notified that an election for Section Com- 
munications Manager is about to be held in your respective 
Section. This notice supersedes previous notices 

Nominating petitions are solicited. The signatures of five 
or more ARRL full members of the Section concerned, in 
good standing, are required on each petition. No member 
shall sign more than one petition. 

Each candidate for Section Communications 
must have been a licensed amateur for at least two years 
and similarly a full member of the League for at least one 
continuous year immediately prior to his nomination. 

Petitions must be in West Hartford, Conn., on or before 
noon on the closing dates specified. In cases where no valid 


Manager 


nominating petitions were received in response to previous 
notices, the closing dates are set ahead to the dates given 
herewith. The complete name, address, and station cal! of 
the candidate should be included with the petition. It is 
advisable that eight or ten full-member signatures be ob- 
tained, since on checking names against Headquarters files, 
with no time to return invalid petitions for additions, a 
petition may be found invalid by reason of expiring member- 
ships, individual uncertain or ignorant of their 
membership status, etc. 

The following nomination form is suggested: (Signers will 
please add city and street addresses to facilitate checking 
membership.) 


signers 


Communications Manager, ARRL. [place and date] 
38 La Salle Road, West Hartford, Conn. 
We, the undersigned full members of the 
ARRL Section of the 
Division, hereby nominate 
as candidate for Section Communi 
Section for the next two-year term of office. 


Elections will take place imraediately after the closing 
dates specified for receipt of nominating petitions. The 
ballots mailed from Headquarters to full members will list 
in alphabetical sequence the names of all eligible candidates. 

You are urged to take the initiative and file nominating 


OST for 





petitions immediately. This is your opportunity to put the 
man of your choice in office. 
— F. E. Handy, Communications Manager 


Present 
SCM Term Ends 
W. R. Williamson Mar. 17, 1949 
Samuel H. Lewbel Feb. 3, 1957 
Edward F. 

Conyngham Mar. 1, 1957 
John Polmark Mar. 2, 1957 
Julian G. Blakely Mar. 8, 1957 
Harold R. Horn Apr. 15, 1957 


Section Closing Date 


Yukon * Apr. 10, 1957 
Hawaii Apr. 10, 1957 
Oregon Apr. 10, 1957 


Manitoba * Apr. 10, 1957 
Mississippi Apr. 10, 1957 
Saskatchewan * Apr. 10, 1957 
Eastern Penn- 

sylvania Apr. 10, 1957 
North Dakota Apr. 10, 1957 
San Joaquin Valley 10, 1957 
Connecticut Apr. 10, 1957 
South Dakota } 10, 1957 
New York City 

Long Island May 10, 1957 
San Francisco June 10, 1957 
Southern New 

Jersey June 10, 1957 
West Virginia July 10, 1957 


June 15, 1957 
June 15, 1957 


Clarence Snyder 
Elmer J. Gabel 
Ralph Saroyan June 15, 1957 
Milton E. Chaffee Resigned 

Les Price July 2, 1957 


Harry J. Dannals July 31, 1957 
Walter A. Buckley Aug. 14, 1957 


Herbert C. Brooks Aug. 26, 1957 
Albert H. Hix Sept. 18, 1957 

* In Canadian Sections nominating petitions for Section Managers 
must be addressed to Canadian Director Alex Reid, 169 Logan Ave., 


St. Lambert, Quebec. To be valid, petitions must be filed with him 
on or before closing dates named. 


ELECTION RESULTS 


Valid petitions nominating a single candidate 
Manager were filed by members in the 


as Section 


following Sections 


completing their election in accordance with regular League 
policy, each term of office sta 
Michigan Thomas G. Mitchell, WSRAE Feb. 17, 1957 
Missouri James W. Hoover, WOGEP Mar. 1, 1957 
British Columbia Peter M. McIntyre, VE7JT Mar. 13, 1957 
Western 

Pennsylvania John F. Wojtkiewicz, W3GJY Mar 1957 
Santa Barbara Mrs. Dorothy E ~~ W6REF Apr. 12, 1957 
Los Angeles Albert F. Hill, jr., W6JQB Apr. 18, 1957 

In the Eastern Florida Section of the Southeastern Divi- 
sion, Mr. John F. Porter, W4KGJ, Mr. Wesley E. Marriner, 
W4HSJ/W9AND, Mr. John W. Hollister, jr W4FWZ, 
and Mr. Lloyd W. Warren, K4AZM, were nominated. Mr. 
Porter received 204 votes, Mr. Marriner received 126 votes 
Mr. Hollister received 113 votes, and Mr. Warren received 
84 votes. Mr. Porter's term of office began Feb. 21, 1957 


WIAW OPERATING NOTE 


A complete new schedu 
tive at WIAW on Apr 
Time 
detail in next mont! 1 iti pril 28t 


rting on the date given. 


peration will become effec- 

he start of Daylight 
Saving in som i “dule will appear in 
WIAW will 
continue to operate « on page 82, 


March QST. 


DXCC NOTES 


In view of the present status of Saarland and Triesté 
effective as of Apr 


longer be counted as separate for 


1 1, 1957 these two countries ill m 
DXCC purposes. All con- 
firmations dated April 1, 1957 and after, from Saarland 


and Trieste l 


onsidered as Germany and Italy 
dated prior to April 1, 1957 


will still count as separate credits 


respectively. Confir ions 





HONOR ROLL 


WONDA... .262 
WSNBK 
WSKIA 
W6DZZ 


W6AM 
WIFH 
WSHGW 
W6ENV 
W6MxX 
W68SYG WSBRA 
PY2CK 263 iT W6MEK 
W3GHD W7AMX 


Radiotelephone 
W8GZ 239 
CN8MM 238 
WSHGW 237 
W9ORBI 237 


PY2CK.... 
VQ4ERR 
WIFH 
ZS6BW 


W3INN 
WINWO 
W6AM 
WO9NDA 





From January 15, to February 15, 1957, DXCC certifi- 
cates and endorsements based on postwar contacts with 
100-or-more countries have been issued by the ARRL 
Communications Department to the amateurs listed below 


NEW MEMBERS 

W9GDH f ; 107 
W1i1QMM I 106 
WSPWH... 2E 106 
W9UNG d <6EY 106 
W3ByY! : WPBAL 106 
W6SUQ OH301 106 
WP9DMA.. ib 105 
ON4DM ‘ 4 104 
W6FLT 7 103 
wé6Tc Q p 103 
DL3AC 


W6AGO 
W6CBE 
W9AMM 
EASDF 
G3KAA 
LAIRD 
OY3ML 


DL3BL 
WONWX 
ET2US 
W7QON 
VEINH 
W6DLX 


Radiotelephone 

WSPWH WOYMH.,...115 
WILSZ LU3FAQ 115 
W5VU - 422 % J 106 
3 EA7E 104 

ON4DM.... ; ; 104 
W7GUV.....11 W2ESG 103 


ENDORSEMENTS 


W7HXG 
W6UHA 
W6PYH 


ZLIHY 


W6BPD 


W6GPB.... Ww: oS 





DX CENTURY CLUB AWARDS 


W6NGA 191 
W7AC 191 
W5DML 190 DL6MK 
bak 190 WIRB WIBRX 
190 ISiFI¢ WiPFA 

190 WIJMI g W3ILA 

5 W9ROT 
KH6WW 


WIiICP 
W7IQI 


WIRYJ 
W4HKJ 
WOPGI 


W4HVQ 
W3AYS 
W5VIR 
W2CR 
W6CG 
W9UIG 
W9VIN 
W4IMI 
WS5CFG 
CXIBZ 
YV5BZ 
W6EFR 
K6EWL 
W2HQL 
WIOJR 
WOFNN 
W6S8QP 
DLIGU 


W2MZB 
W3MZI 
W4JII 
W7BGH 
WSMR(¢ 
PY3QX 
W4JAT 
WONGIE 
VK5L( 


WILQQ 
W3TVB 
K6EC 
WeDSP 
VEIDB 
K2PI¢ 
W3KFQ 
W9ZTD 
G3FKH 


Radiotelephone 


PY4API 161 
ZS1DO 

KZ5DG 
WIHKK 
WSNWO 
W4ADY 
WeCPM 


KH60R W2MFS 
PYINC 

W5KBI 
MP4KAC 
W4ESP 
W6CHV. 


W4NYN 
W4EBO 





W/VE/VO Call Area and Continental Leaders 
Ww4TM 249 < 210 VESAW 
WeYXO F 118 VO6EP 
VEING.. 5 B 140 ZS6BW 
VE2WW i 152 4{X4RE 


224 
Radiotelephone 


W2BXA.. WOAIW 213 VE7ZM 

W4HA 120 ZL2GX 

W5BGP 118 OD5AB 

W7HIA.. 7 ‘ 163 EA2CQ 
j 101 








April 1957 





oS 


a eT OPR—=—E Pal —=—CLUB' 





* All operating amateurs are invited to 
report to the SCM on the first of each 
month, covering station activities for the 
preceding month. Radio Club news is 
also desired by SCMs for inclusion in 
columns. The addresses of all 
SCMs will be found on page 6. 


these 











ATLANTIC DIVISION 
EASTERN PENNSYLVANIA—SCM, 
der, W3PYF—SEC: NNT. PAM: TEJ. RM: YAZ. EPA 
nets: 3610, 3850 and 3997 ke. The sincerest congratula- 
tions are in order tor CUL on her election as the winner 
of the General Electric Edison Award for 1956. Mae, 
with her consistent traffic-handling, is definitely deserv- 
ing of this great honor. LJA is conducting code classes 
at YDX. New officers of the Lehigh Valley ARC are 
KL7AZC, pres.; TEB, vice-pres.; ICQ, secy.; and 
EWN, treas. TDF has 21 states on 2 meters and 35 on 
6 meters to lead both sections of the V.H. Contest 
sponsored by the North Penn ARC, ABT, the radio 
club of the U. of P., is playing around with RTTY, 
according to word received from l secretary. The 
Philmont Mobile club presented certificates of merit to 
QZO, SAI, QQH and DSG for their work in club 
activities. SMA has a new QTH at Media. The Harris- 
burg Radio Amateurs Club is having a 6-meter trans- 
mitter hunt in April with the prize a complete mobile 
rig. There are 17 licensed amateurs employed at Harris- 
burg WHP. CSP has repaired the club sta- 
tion at Harrisburg. BJG is now at the Navy Electronic 
school at Memphis, Tenn. JXQ worked G6UT on 10 
meters on Dec. 18th for the second time. Their first 
contact was made Dec. 17, 1937. New officers of the 
Northeast RAC, PKV, are CLC, pres.; VOC, vice- 
pres.; DAO, secy.; DOB, treas.; DWR, DYL, HTR, 
BYX and TYX, board of directors. The Northeast Club 
has received TYU as the club call as a memorial to a 
former member. K8AWC has just moved to the Scran- 
ton Area from St. Louis., Mo. TEC is active in the 
Philadelphia Area with a Viking Ranger, a_ three- 
element Telrex beam, and an S-53A with a DB-23 
oT ey AFF is a new ORS. FMU now has RCC. 
AYW has a new DX-100. Ten months of work on 10- 
meter phone (130 watts) netted BNU (Hatboro) 177 
contacts with 50 countries. Oscar uses an NC-183 and a 
three-element beam. BUR has a new three-element tri- 
band beam. ZSX is manager of the Eastern States Net 
(ESN) which meets at 1730 EST on 70860 Mon. through 
Fri. JNQ won a new 4-400A at the Potomac Valley 
Frankford RC joint dinner at Washington. VNM has 
raised his antenna. ZRQ has a new mobile under con- 
struction. New TARC officers are ZRQ, pres.; RZV, 
vice-pres.; ELJ, treas.; J. Latenzi, secy.; WN3LDV, 
act. mgr. BBS is now on s.s.b. New officers of the Car- 
bon ARC are AMC, pres.; vice-pres.; AIW, 
secy.-treas.; COW, act. mgr 4 "has a new SX-100. 
Traffic: W3CUL 2205, ZSX 788, YDX 386, AFF 366, 
TEJ 129, BFF 115, ZRQ 95, NF 5 , BNR 46, 
OGD 41, PDJ 39, PYF 30 Bl R 18, 12, YVX 11, 
NQB 5, JNQ 4, ADE 3, EAN 2. 


Clarence Sny- 


Station 


WQL 


MARYLAND-DELAWARE-DISTRICT OF 
LUMBIA—SCM, John W. Gore, W3PRL—BWT, 
AKB and CDQ, manned BWT continuously 
Mon, evening until Tue, evening for the 
ceiving messages sent to the President on the Governors- 
to-President Relay at the time of the President’s In- 
auguration, BPE operated PZA. ECP and WV, working 
in several nets, also participated in the G.P.R. QDI was 
comimunications control for the Red Cross during the 
Inaugural celebration. He had a net of 15 stations at 
first-aid tents, ambulances and other strategic points, 
Ethel, K4LMB, ex-SMI had a mobile unit on the 
plaza in front of the Capitol. RV, who had deactivated 
his station, is now back with a Valiant and plans to 
get a 75A-4. HWZ and PRL are on the air with a 
Pacemaker and PRL is feeding his Pacemaker into a 
Viking I KW. The area also wishes to welcome 
K4DKG/3, who is presently located in Rockville. The 
CARC held an election on Jan. 28th and LZZ was 


86 


co- 
with 
from 
purpose of re- 


SHR 


ee Rca 


elected pres.; LZM, vice-pres.; FQQ, secy.; UYJ, 
treas.; and NQC, sgt. at arms. A number of stations 
in this area checked into emergency nets handling traf- 
fic for the Kentucky and West Virginia flood area the 
latter part of January. Those heard on the air were 
EOV, KDV, PRL, PKC, PZW, JNU, ECP and NNX. 
ZSR is building an electronic bug but he and ZME are 
presently planning to join the Marines. GNQ has passed 
his exam for General Class and now has a DX-100. The 
has increased its membership, now approaching 
50 mark, and at its Dec. 18th meeting 8WZD/3 
gave a most interesting talk on s.s.b. with a demon- 
stration. The BARC, at its meeting on Jan. 11th, dis- 
cussed the planning for the 1957 Field Day. The WTVI 
at its meeting on Jan. 11th, heard Mr. Borzage, of 
PEPCO, give an interesting talk on the power com- 
panies’ problems with respect to radio and T.V. inter- 
ference. BWT has installed an emergency-power system 
as a back-up to his normal power supply. OQF is re- 
modeling the shack. NL has been maintaining code 
practice transmissions week-day evenings from 2000 to 
2100, also Sat. from 1000 to 1200 EST. It is planned to 
continue — April. Traffic: (Jan.) W3PZW_ 678, UE 
503, K3WBJ 258, W3RV 141, UCR 97, WZL 71 
BWT KB 65, ZGN 62, WV 58, TN 52, ECP 51, EOV 
46, PQ 45, ZSR 44, ENU 26, COK 20, JZY 17, DNW 13, 
K4DKG/3 10, W3BUD 6, FAP 6, BKE 4. (Dec.) 
W3CVE 711, WZL 131, PKC 91, ZSR 36, K4ADKG/3 10, 
W30YX 9. (Nov.) W3WZL 182., 


SOUTHERN NEW JERSEY—SCM, Herbert C. 
Brooks, K2BG--SEC: YRW. PAM: ZI. Appointment 
of the month: YRW as RM. VDE, asst. manager of the 

J. Phone Net, has issued a very fine net bulletin. 
Another DV RA Old-Timers Nite is planned for April 
12th at the Hotel Stacy-Trent, Trenton. Contact the 
chairman, ZI, for details. K2EWR is building a new 
rig which will be of considerable more power than the 
old one. Official Bulletins are heard several times weekly 
from JRO on 2 meters. K2CPR, K2ERC, TBD and 
K2BG attended the 8th annual meeting of the Potomac 
Valley-Frankford Radio Clubs, held in Washington. 
SVV, Mercer County EC and Radio Officer, has ap- 
pointed the following assistants: HX, KVJ, RMJ, UAE 
and K2IIW. A very fine program of class instruction 
and regular drills is being held. Eleven new applica- 
tions for AREC-RACES membership were received in 
the Mercer County Area. Hamilton Twp. Radio Club 
members are assisting with the White Horse c.d. effort, 
operating from the Township headquarters. K2KTS is 
conducting code classes at the Delaware Twp. High 
School. Harmonics, the SJRA paper, continues to grow 
in size, as does the club membership. VIS, Atlantic 
City, is back on the air after a layoff of five years. 
Johnny has a three-element beam on 15 meters. A new 
club has been organized in Maple Shade devoted to 
emergency communication. Officers are DBP, pres.; 
KHW, vice- ot EE, treas.; K2KPF, secy.; 

FQ, K2MJQ and K2MES, directors. ZI did a fine 
handling the Governor-President Relay message. T 
W2YRW 315, RG 210, HDW 177, K2JGU 135, 
K2EWR 55, PTJ 33, W2BZJ 23, K2DSL 


W2Z1 77. 
16, KN2THX 


WESTERN NEW YORK—SCM, Charles T. Hansen, 
K2HUK—SEC: UTH/FRL. RMs: RUF and ZRC. 
PAMs: TEP and NAI. The NYS C.W. Net meets on 
3615 ke. at 1900; ESS meets daily on 3590 ke. at 1800; 
NYS Phone on 3925 ke. at 1800; NYS C.D. on 3509.5 
and 3993 ke. at 0900 Sun.; TCPN 2nd Call Area on 
3970 ke. at 1900; SRPN on 3980 ke. at 1100; ISN on 3970 
ke. at 1600. Congratulations to K2IYP, who has made 
BPL for the second month in a row. K2KNV received 
his WAS. The Ithaca Mike and Key Club is holding its 
annual hamfest Sat., April 6th, reports K2GQU. 
K2CUQ is adding an audio frequency meter to the 
shack for greater accuracy in OO work. ZHU reports 
that Oswego County RACES was activated Jan. 15th 
for emergency communications on account of a gas- 
line break. The net operated in sub-zero weather from 
1145 to 1800. EMW is budlding a “Q” multiplier, 50-ke. 
if., and a product detector to improve his receiver. 
K2GWN received the A-1 Operator award. GBX has 
worked 101 countries, 96 on 10-meter phone, since April, 
56. WDX is on 2-meter K2KXE has built a 2- 
meter pre-amp with two 6AJ4s to go in front of his 
8-102. BKC is putting up a 75-meter doublet and is 
building a monimateh. K2DCX finally received his 

(Continued on page 88) 


s.s.b. 











No. 27 of a Series 


THEY ALWAYS COME BACK FOR MORE 


7 was a time in amateur radio when the great majority were 
teen-agers. Ham radio was regarded as a young man’s game; we grey- 
beards were few and far between, and it was generally assumed that when 
an amateur became old enough to go away to college, enter business, or 
get married he would drop out. A great many did exactly that and only 


a minority continued their interest into adult life. 


Gia the years the picture has changed until today the age of the 
average amateur is around 35 and the youngsters are now in the minority. 
Probably one of the biggest factors contributing to this increased maturity 
is the gradual return to the amateur ranks of many who did drop out in 
earlier days. They have found that with increased leisure and the means 
to enjoy themselves, no other avocation offers the interest and challenge 
of amateur radio. To say this group of old timers is a welcome addition 


to our ranks is surely an understatement. 


rie MEMORY of youthful achievements and good times undoubtedly 
impels many a former ham to investigate today’s amateur radio. How- 
ever, the tremendous improvements which have taken place, and the 
almost unlimited possibilities with modern equipment are no doubt the 
principal reasons they are becoming active once more. Today’s single 
side band operation offers a type of reliable phone communications never 
even dreamed of in the early days; and if you want to hear patriarchs 
renewing their youth, just tune in to the high end of the 20 meter phone 


band any afternoon — two letter calls are practically “‘a dime a dozen.” 
7. You are among those who are now active in amateur radio, or con- 
template returning to this wonderful hobby, please accept this advice. 
Whatever you do, don’t ever throw out any of your log books, QSLs, or 
old licenses. You may feel that these items have no future value and 
probably won’t be needed, but it isn’t so. As an old greybeard, I can 
speak from experience in saying these records of your earlier activities 
may well prove invaluable time after time in the days ahead. And you 
can be sure that Hallicrafters will be ready for those future operations 
with new rigs better than anything you ever had before. 
Vy 73, 


Cy Reap, W9AA 


(Ban Lfattrg~ fy Wd. Wes-aocn WING forhallicrafters 


ADVERTISEMENT 














WAC and WAS after changing his QTH a couple of 
times. WZR has incorporated a 417A and a 404A in a 
new 2-meter receiver, especially for the IGY project; 
he also soon will be on 2-meter tTTY, along with 
K2JMI and FXT. UFI is back on 6 meters. UIT and 
K2DBS will have a 145.26 FM Net. K2TKJ mobile, 
running one watt to a 12BH7 on 6 meters, has 
worked California, one Oregon, and one Alabama 
stations, 28ZM, also running one watt on 6 meters, 
has worked a W6. TBQ has a new beam on 6 and 
RHQ has returned to 6 meters. YIK is on 6 and 2 
meters. The Syracuse V.H.F. Club had a fine Roundup 
and members plan a DXpedition to Vermont. The 
Greene ARC participated in a recent c.d. exercise, pro- 
viding emergency power and communications, JVZ re- 
ceived his DXCC; he now has 110 countries. K2GEK is 
ain with his p.p. 807 old faithful. JZG is back 
mg a marine operator and can be heard on 15 
meters. K2HW W uses a pair of 807s on 80 and 40 meters. 
KN2TLQ has worked 26 states. K2PLT has a new AF- 

67 and an SX-43 and has worked 35 states. RAWNY has 
sponsored K2YCU, a club station in the Buffalo Veter- 
ins Hospital. The V.A. has purchased a KWS-1 and a 
75A-4. ICZ tathered the project. RAGS is receiving na- 
tionwide publicity for its excellent job of maintaining 
communications with Operation Deepfreeze in Antarc- 
tica he Noontimers’ pienic is scheduled for June 30th 
at the QTH of K2ISO. Glad to hear RUF on the bands 
gain. Traffic: (Jan.) K21YP 514, W2ZRC 129, K2KIR 
112, W20E 73, K2KNV 62, GWN 56, W2BKC 43, K2DSR 
37, W2QHH 36, K2GQU 26, W2EMW 25, DEX 18 
K2DG 15, W2FEB 15, COU 13, GBX 10, K2PJU 10 
W2BLO 4, ZHU 4. (Dec.) K2KNV 130, GWN 38. 


WESTERN PENNSYLVANIA—SCM, R. M. 
W3NCD—Asst. SCM: Anthony J. 
SEC: GEG. RMs: NUG, NRE and G EG. 
The McKean County Amateur Radio Club has a train- 
ing program under way, meeting in the publie library 
with code classes followed by theory. At a special meet- 
ing the Allegheny Kiski Amateur tadio Association 
drew up an activities plan for the first half of the year. 
In conjunction with regular meetings there will be a sale 
of surplus club gear, movies, guest speakers, transistor 
equipment displays, a family picnic and Field Day. 
UHN attended a fine ATA meeting in Pittsburgh at 
which the main discussion was s.s.b., then went to the 
Westmoreland County c.d. meeting held by Radio 
Officer UVD. UHN says he hears the Uniontown Ra- 
dio Club on 10 meters with its new WRL 500B with a 
good signal. The Bellowers and Chirpers Society went 
to VKD’s shack for the first week end of the DX Con- 
test. The Breeze Shooters Net, via UJP, announces that 
its Annual Hamfest will be held May 12th. UJP, in a 
QSO on 160 meters, was questioned about BSN. SHF 
has a new beam and is getting a new all-band antenna 
TWT and LVU are the latest NCSs. SHT is on 6 
meters for variety. Seventeen netters chec ked in on 
Christmas Eve and ten on New Year’s Eve. SIR was 
the first NCS of ‘57. HEA has a new beam. TVW's 
XYL recently was in the hospital. UEM, the new editor 
of the Washington County Amateur Radio Club Bulle- 
tin, says club meeting attendance is good. In the club 
contest just completed the YL-XYL phone winner was 
KHY, with HWU and GYZ tied on ec.w. The c.d. 
operate on 80, 10 and 6 meters. At a recent meeting 
the Cumberland Valley Amateur Radio Club announced 
the formation of code classes to be conducted every 
Tue. at 7 p.m. in the Recreation Center, These classes 
are open to all interested in amateur radio or the com- 
fields. The key stations in the RACES 
given complete. The club also 
interference CVARC is plan- 
ning another mobile test with a fixed control station in 
Chambersburg. LZK, from Kane epee that the area 
active mostly on 20 meters. ctive thereabouts are 
LZK, NQ, RZN, BRJ, PWN, PMY and JGV. P6MN, 
the Pittsburgh 6-Meter Net, has been in operation for 
six months and meets every Mon. at 7 p.m. The club is- 
sues a nice certificate to any amateur station working 
any six-member stations. Contact Frank A. Mihm, 1409 
Jefferson Heights Road, Pittsburgh 35, Pa., for more in- 
formation. The Radio Association of Erie, via QN and 
FIQ, received honorable mention in the Edison Award, 
meg ZWK, NNZ and RHJ are newcomers on 10 me- 
te Also to be found there are MS, NMP, MED, OTH, 
LKJ, NXK and mobiles BOW, TLA, TMK, BVM, 
AQY, MMI and BFB. KVB works 20-meter DX. PIY, 
MMI, TXZ, QMY and QN are on 40 meters. Traffic: 
W3WIQ 1597, EPM 111, YUL 82, BZR 62, KUN 48, YA 
27, LSS 14, UHN 12, KNQ 11. 


CENTRAL DIVISION 
ILLINOIS—SCM, 


oe 


is to 


munications 
plan were 
formed an 


lorms to 
committee. The 


George T. Schreiber, 
SEC: HOA. RMs: STZ and MAK. Cook County EC: 
HPG. Section nets: ILN, 3515 ke. Mon. through Fri.; 
IEN, 3940 ke. The National Convention scheduled for 
Chicago next Labor Day week end is past the or- 
ganization stage and is taking solid shape, reports 


88 


wosYIx— 


Some of the committee chair- 
men are FUJ, finance manager; QCR, hotel arrange- 
ments; HPG, program; LOY, YLRL; K9AXK, food 
functions; K9APQ and JGL publicity ; and VTV, legal. 
Other committee chairmen will be named from time to 
time. GDI, one of our most active OOs, writes, ‘‘Some- 
thing must be done to clean up this second harmonic 
thing, 7400 to 7500 ke.’’ FDI expects to be out of the 
service and back on 40 meters about the time you read 
this. OCB plans a new 7-over-7 beam on 2 meters in 
the near future. New officers of the Chicago Suburban 
Radio Assn. are DWD, BPW, FBP and IDO. SWANI 
(Southern Wisconsin and Northern Illinois Radio Club) 
now is conducting a code and theory class in Harvard. 
Members teaching are NZ, TPA and YUN. The club 
meets the last Mon. of each month. CNT has fun with 
his QRP 6146 and works 160 through 40 meters. JGL has 
been appointed the new editor of The Beam, official 
newspaper of the Midwest V.H.F. Club, and he does a 
fine job. GOB does the printing. Officers of the club are 
K9APQ, SEK and BOZ. Congrats to BRD and his 
XYL, Carol, on the birth of Elizabeth Carol on Jan 
14th. MAK has qualified for a Traffickers 5,000 Club certi- 
ficate. VHD reports he is the victim of a _ bootlegger 
who gets him QSL cards from bands he never works. 
GSB writes he likes his new GPR-90 receiver. A new 
General Class licensee in the section is K9CSP. New 
officers of the Greenville College Radio Club are KN9- 
DWM, KN9DNZ, KN9BTS and K9EWB. The North 
Central Phone Net handled 155 messages in January, re- 
ports CSW. The St. Clair Amateur Radio Club's new 
eall is K9GXU. The club will be active in c.d. work. 
GME has been appointed to act as trustee for YL-WAS 
and issued certificate No. 17 to KA, The LARK cele- 
brated its fifth anniversary Jan. 26th and entertained 
great crowd. The Tri-Town Club celebrated its 25th an- 
niversary Feb. 15. Illness kept your SCM away so we 
can't give you a personal report, but IBC filled us in. 
DSO has returned from a two-week air trip to the Car- 
ibbean, where he visited a lot of the DX he has worked. 
LNQ reports that after 20 years of hamming he finally 
worked his first DX on 80 meters. K9ACS writes that a 
radio club for teen-agers interested in becoming hams is 
being organizfied in Carlinville. The Kankakee Radio 
club is starting its vode and theory classes with teachers 
QAY and EWQ/9, writes OUI. Those of you interested 
in AREC registration, please send your applications to 
your local Emergency Coordinator, not to the Section 
Communications Manager. If you don’t know who he is 
drop us a card for the information, giving your county 
we will tell you. This cuts down on the paper 
and expedites your card. Traffic: (Jan.) W9DO 
MAK 583, YYG 384, IDA 169, YRH 132, CTZ 82, 
. 79, OYL 57, BUK 53, STZ 52, VHD 42, OCB 39 
) , K9AXL 10, W9MHC 9, i 8, EDH 7, YFO 
, BQC 3, YGG 3. (Dec.) W9PHE 15 
INDIANA—SCM, Seth Lew nies 
SCM: George H. Graue, 9BKJ. 8S 
DGA, TQC and TT. PAMs: CMT, 
UXK. New appointments: FVI, 
UBF, K9AQP, BEH and GGC as OESs. DGA 
and SWD have received appointments as / . Dir. for 
the Central Div. SVL was reelected vice-chairman of 
TCPN. TQC has an A-1 Operator certificate. KTX re- 
signed as State MARS director and ZHL is the new 
director. DGA received a Traffiker 10,000 certificate. 
DPT, MVZ and K9GGC have new DX-100s. DOK won 
the Muncie contest with 565 points and DED was second 
with 526. JYO is making a _ wonderful record in 
MARS. New calls: KN9s, GXJ, GOC. GVW, EEM, 
DXO, DXP, ECV, CQS, ETR and DZR. K9GPQ is a 
new call in Peru. 9LBD/9 now is located at Laporte. 
Seymour has an emergency net on 3750 ke. at 1500 CST 
Club elections: Clark Co. ARC—EAO, pres.; 
, vice-pres.; DKC, secy.; and ANV, treas. Dune- 
ARA—LEF, pres.; LXZ, vice-pres.; PQQ, 
VAY, treas. Indianapolis RC—SWD, pres. ; 
vice-pres.; JZ SUN, treas.; CJT, 
op.; DNQ and Western Elec.’ ARC 
pres.; HUB, vice-pres.; Al Larson, secy.; and 
Spannuth, treas. Circle City RC—UTL, pres.; LV 
vice-pres.; Don Stephanoft secy.; and VPN, treas. 
VZF is on s.s.b. ZVS is mobile on 2 and 10 meters, 
KN9CQS has a DX-35 and an NC-98. PFO has re- 
signed as editor of the Bison and Mrs. Doris (Butch) 
Singer is the new editor. Send all items for the paper to 
her at R.R. 2, Box 185, Indianapolis. IRCC clubs 
are asked to send delegates to the April meeting in 
Indianapolis. Visitors from other clubs not yet affiliated 
with IRCC are always welcome. Traffic from the Gov- 
ernor to the President was handled by SWD and TQC. 
UXK is getting a Valiant. The Evansville MS drive 
was assisted by FJI, YZO, SWN, MZE, KEP, ABW, 
VSD, OG, NYK, K9AYH, W8WQQ and SWL/9, Don. 
SWD reported IFN morning traffic as 175 and evening 
325, total 500. TQC gives QIN as 442. RFN had 106, as 
reported by TT. EHZ gives CAEN traffic as 64. Those 
making BPL were NZZ, TT, K9BBO, W9JYO and 
(Continued on page 92) 


QKE, general manager. 


W9NTA—Asst. 
QYQ. RMs: 
SWD and 


‘KOY, 
FJR as OO; 


Bob 
VN 





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work output coupling provides for matching various 
antenna impedances. Employs 12BY7 oscillator, 
12BY7 buffer and 6146 final. Speech amplifier is 
a 12AX7, and a 12AU7 is employed as modulater. 
Panel control provides switch selection of three dif- 
ferent crystals, reached through access door at rear. 
Panel meter indicates final grid current or final 
plate current. A perfect low-power transmitter both 
for the novice or the more experienced amateur. 
A remarkable power package for the price. The 
price includes tubes, and all other parts necessary 
for construction. Comprehensive instruction man- 
ual insures successful assembly. 


MODEL DX-35 
Shpg. Wt. 
$56” 24 Lbs, 
$5.70 dwn., $4.78 mo. 


Phone or CW—80 through 10 
meters. 

65 watts CW—50 watts peak on 
phone—6146 final amplifier, 


Pi network output to match various 
antenna impedances. 


Tremendous dollar value—easy to 
build, 


HEATHKIT D =x. ve 2 O 


CW TRANSMITTER KIT 


BRAND NEW 


Designed exclusively for CW work. 
50 watts plate power input—80 through 10 meters, 


Pi network output circuit to match various antenna 
impedances. 


Attractive and functional styling—easy to build. 


MODEL DX-20 


$35 


$3.60 dwn., $3.02 mo. 
Shpg. Wt. 18 Lbs. 


Here is a straight-CW transmitter that is one of the most efficient 
rigs available today. It is ideal for the novice, and even for the 
advanced-class CW operator. This 50 watt transmitter employs: 
a 6DQ6A final amplifier, a 6CL6 oscillator, a SU4GB rectifier 
and features one-knob bandswitching to cover 80, 40, 20, 15, 
11 and 10 meters. It is designed for crystal excitation, but may 
be excited by an external VFO. A pi network output circuit is 
employed to match antenna impedances between 50 and 1000 
ohms. Employs top-quality parts throughout, including “potted” 
transformers, etc. If you appreciate a good signal on the CW 
bands, this is the transmitter for you! 


HEATH COMPANY BENTON HARBOR 9, MICHIGAN 
A Subsidiary of Daystrom, Inc. 





HEATHKIT 


Ueivennt 


HEATHKIT VFO KIT 
MODEL VF-1 
Covers 160, 80, 40, 20, 15, 11 and 10 meters 
with three basic oscillator frequencies. Better 
than 10 volt average RF output on fundamen- 
tals. Requires 250 VDC at 15 to 20 ma, and 
6.3 VAC at 0.45A. Incorporates regulator tube 
for stability and illuminated frequency dial. 
Shpg. wt. 7 Ibs. $1.95 dwn., $1.64 mo. $19.50 


HEATHKIT GRID DIP METER KIT 
MODEL GD-1B 
Continuous coverage from 2 mc to 250 me with 
prewound coils. 500 ua panel meter for indica- 
tion. Use to locate parasitics, for neutralizing, 
determining resonant frequencies, etc. Will 
double as absorption-type wavemeter. Shpg. 
wt. 4 lbs. $2.00 dwn., $1.68 mo. $19.95 


HEATHKIT ANTENNA IMPEDANCE 
METER KIT 
MODEL AM-1 
The AM-I covers 0 to 600 ohms for RF tests. 
Functions up to 150 mc. Used in conjunction 
with a signal source, will determine antenna 
resistance and resonance, match transmission 
lines for minimum SWR, determine input im- 
pedance, etc. Shpg. wt. 2 Ibs. $1.45 dwn., 
$1.22 mo. $14.50 


() HEATHKIT “Q’ MULTIPLIER KIT 
MODEL QF-1 
Functions with any receiver having IF fre- 
quency between 450 and 460 kc that is not 
AC DC type. Operates from receiver power 
supply, requiring only 6.3 volts AC at 300 ma 
(or 12.6 vac at 150 ma), and 150 to 250 vdc at 
2 ma. Simple to connect with cable and plugs 
supplied. Provides extra selectivity for separat- 
ing signals, or will reject one signal to eliminate 
heterodyne. Effective Q of approximately 4000. 
Shpg. wt. 3 Ibs. $1.00 dwn., $.84 mo. $9.95 


This receiver covers 550 ke to 30 mc in four bands, 
and is ideal for the short wave listener or beginning 
amateur. It provides good sensitivity and selectivity, 
combined with fine image rejection. Amateur bands 
are clearly marked on the illuminated dial scale. 
Features transformer-type power supply—electrical 
band spread—antenna trimmer—separate RF and 
AF gain controls—noise limiter—headphone jack— 
and AGC. Has built-in BFO for CW reception. 
} , 
MODEL AR-3 Shpg. Wt. 12 Lbs. 


CABINET: Fabric covered 

$9) 9” cabinet with aluminum panel 

as shown. Part 91-15A. Ship- 

sit incisal ping Wt. 5 Lbs. $.50 dwn., 
(less cabinet) 

$3.00 dwn., $2.52 mo. 


$.42 mo. $4.95 








HOW TO ORDER... 
It's simple—just identify the kit you 
desire by its model number and send 
your order to the address listed below. 
Or, if you would rather budget your 
purchase, send for details of the Heath 
Time Payment Plan for orders totaling 
$90.00 or more. 











HEATH COMPANY BENTON HARBOR 9, MICHIGAN 
A Subsidiary of Daystrom, Inc, 





SWD. K9BBO also made BPL in December. Certificates 
must be sent to the SCM for endorsement on the due 
date. Traffic: (Jan.) W9NZZ 1067, TT 533, K9BBO 511, 
W9JYO 431, EQO 372, ZYK 365, EHZ 302, SWD 

», TQC 18, AB 150, NTA 118, LDB 8, WUH 

, DGA 77, DHJ 76, SVL 75, EJW 64, CMT 55, BKJ 

a 39, KOY 30, OFW 27, ZSW 27, RTH 23, VNV 

, VPJ 21, AZF 18, EJC 16, BDP 15, BUQ 14, SVZ 14, 
WHL 14, DZC 13, WAU Il, C j , CYZ 10, EZW 
10, PQZ 10, UXK 10, YVS 10, YYX ‘LY 9, EHY 
9, HRW 9, HST 8, bgt? 7, LG * i 3, STC 6, 
K9AOM 5, W9URQ 5, CTF 4, F. HUF 4, KLR 4, 
PLB 4, QR 2 g¥Q 2, OWZ 1. (Dee. ) K9BBO 979, 
W9CLY 10, HUF & 

WISCONSIN—SC M, Reno W. Goetsch, W9RQM— 
SEC: OVO. PAMs: NRP and AJU, RMs: KQB and 
KJJ.. Nets: WIN, 3535 ke. 7:15 p.m. daily; BEN 
3950 ke. 6 p.m. daily; WPN 1215 Mon.-Sat., 0930 Sun. 
Wisconsin mobile and ec.d. frequency: 29,620 ke. KQB 
says the new WRL VFO is working FB. KJJ is in the 
market for a 100-watt all-band rig. K9AEQ has WAS 
and 25-w.p.m. certificates and a new Vibroplex. Net 
certificates (WIN) were issued to SZR and DKH. L 
is working on a T-R switch. wr a has a new BC- 
342N receiver, and added ORS and CP-20 certificates. 
SZR has returned to U. of W. at Madison. ODC is 
enjoying a new mobile. RUJ and RNH are new ECs 
in Waukesha and Outagamie Counties, respectively. 
SQM has added a phone patch. JEF added a combina- 
tion antenna sw., balun, r.{. voltmeter, audio monitor and 
LP filter to his station. K9ASH now has 120 watts to a 

r of 1625s. New officers of the Waukesha Club are 

T, pres.; CWK, vice-pres.; MMA, treas., HIF’s 

, Secy. IKY is back at WFRV-TV and having FB 
results with tri-band beam and G66 mobile receiver. New 
officers of the Racine Megacycle Club are KZZ, pres. ; 
TAD, vice-pres.; NVK, secy.-treas. New officers of the 
FLARC club are LJR, pres.; FMI, vice-pres.; RUB, 
secv.; HCR, treas.; and MBF, KN9ELK and LAA, 
directors. FLARC members provided communication for 
the ‘“‘percheree’’ on Lake Mendota. WIN had a_ busy 
night with FZC as NCS with 53 messages offered and 
46 cleared in a 2-hour session. JWK is sporting a new 
Volkswagon, a KWS-1, and a 75A-4! KLJ authored 
an article on the DX-35 in CQ. Results of the Wisconsin 
QSO Party: (Composite) Ist RQM, 2nd LGR, 3rd SZR. 
(Phone) Ist GYA, 2nd SAA, 3rd FMI. (C.W.) Ist DIK, 
2nd K9AEQ, 3rd RKP. (Novice) KN9DKW. We regret 
to report AZN as a Silent Key. TCJ is discontinuing 
his RTTY OBS schedules until further notice. DP! 
has gone DX-minded with such stuff as SP9, G, ZS, 
PA# and DL. CIZ has a new KWS-1 and 75A-4. A 
new NC-300 adorns the shack of VWX. UJ8KAA makes 
No. 194 for KXK. EIZ has the RACES plan approved 
for Langlade County, and has been responsible for 4 
new licensees in Antigo. The M & M Club held its 
charter party Feb. 9th at Marinette. MIN is getting 
equipment ready for RTTY. Traffic: W9CXY 828, 
KQB 209, SAA 155, KJJ 76, K9AEQ 75, W9DKH 39, 
FZC 24, K9AQT 17, W9SZR 15, OVO 14, SQM 12, 
EIZ 11, RQM 10, MCK 9, FFC 8, JEF 7, YOS 7, 
KWJ 4, YZA 4, GIL 3, K9ASH 2. 


DAKOTA DIVISION 

NORTH DAKOTA—SCM, Elmer J. and. WIKTZ 
—SEC: CAQ. PAM: HVA. RM: K#CNC. The James- 
town Radio Club elected the following officers : K#OCNC, 
pres.; W8EOZ, vice-pres.; and K#CMX, secy.-treas. 
WIQ has a new tri-band beam. How’s DX, Jack? 
SWB/7 contacted 21 North Dakota stations on 10 meters 
from Tueson, Ariz. GJJ has moved to Williston. DNJ 
is looking for more fellows to join the Screw Ball Net. 
So you fellows within 75 miles or so from Fargo, fire 
up the rigs on 1992 ke. each day except Sun. at 1230, 
Minnesota stations may check in on 1820 ke. Appoint- 
ments: K#CNC as RM, FVG as ORS and YCL as EC. 
Traffic: (Jan.) K#CNC 106, W#FVG 18, K#HLT 12, 
W#PHC 12, 11, K#APX 8, WS#YCL 4. (Dec.) 
WOSDNJ 20, FVG 17 

SOUTH DAKOTA—SC M, Les Price, W§FLP—Asst. 
SCM: Gerald F. Lee, #YKY. S assistants: HOH, 
FKE, APL, GQH, NEO, TI, MZJ and GDE. SECs: 
YOB and GDE. PAM: ULV. M: SMV. The S.D. 
C.W. Net had 13 sessions, QNI 75, high 7, low 3, 
average 5.7; QTC 37, high 10, low 0, average 3.1. SMV, 
the NCS, is now active on 2 meters. The 8.D. Weather 
Net had 26 sessions, QNI 449, high 22, low 12, average 
17; QTC 389, high 22, low 8, average 15. ZWL, the 
NCS, was very happy with her special award. The S.D. 
160-Meter Net, FKE as NCS, had 30 sessions, QNI 480, 
average 15 check-ins, 12 formals, 22 informals. The 
S.D. 75-Meter Evening Net, GDE and UVL as NCSs, 
had 26 sessions QNI 449, high 22, low 12, average 17; 
QTC 389, high 22, low 8, average 15. The S.D. 40- Meter 
Noon Net, EXX as NCS, reports QNI 376, high 23, 
low 8, average 14.5; QTC 19, high 3, low 0, average .6. 
RSP reports 2-meter activity good because of aurora 


(Continued on page 94) 














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. Must a vertical antenna be mounted at any special 
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V40 vertical for 40, 20, 15, 10, 6 
OOS. cdc vecsacccnnccncmenene 
V80 vertical for 80, 75, 40, 20, 15, 10, 
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V160 vertical for 160, 80, 75, 40, 20, 
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_ 











93 





conditions. The Signal Hill Amateur Radio Club met 
Jan. 7th and elected APL, pres.; EQV, vice-pres.; 
DVB, secy.; LBO, treas.; Henry Allen, activity; and 
Mary Frances Fredrickson, publicity. On Dec, 14th, 
George and Dorotha Adams went to Rapid City to at- 
tend a special meeting of the BHARC. Al Gowan was 
the guest speaker. The Prairie Dog ARC met for its 
Jan. meeting in the north dining room of the Evergreen 
Cafe in Vermillion, Jan. 8th. MMQ and his XYL 
Helen, received their No. 2 son on Jan. 6th. Additional 
Sioux Falls 2-meter news: SIR, DIY, HON, and 
K#HRR, ex-K4GEU, are on 144.9 Me. and KNSDKV is on 
145.38 Mc. CJ retired from the mail route as of Dec. 1, 
1956. Four of the five Turner Co. hams, EUJEC, 
KN#GDS, K#EWH, and SCT, met Jan. 3lst, with the 
county c.d, director. The GDE’s third child, a girl, was 
born Jan. 22nd. K#AZD is active at Garden City, 
KDLO-TV, with a Viking Ranger and an HQ-129X. 
2-meter operators on 144.9 Mc. at 12-12:30 p.m., 7 and 
10 p.m. in Sioux Falls include KN@DKV, K#HRR, Wos 
SIR, SMV, DIY, HON and soon BLZ. The Mitchell 
y Guard station, K#WBW, operated by WCN and 
has been supplying hospital 
MeMullin. Traffic: WOZWL_ 577, 
DVB 50, NEO 28, RTD 22, CTZ 21, 
SMV 18, GWS 14, YKY 14, BQS 8, y ‘ 
AZD 7, DIY 7, GDE 6, K6BMQ 4, ARC 3, W6OFP 3, 
NPV 2, WKM 2, BQR 1, K#HSW 1, WSNIK 1, RSP 1. 
MINNESOTA—SCM, Charles M. Bove, W6MXC— 
Asst. SCM: Vince Smythe, 6GGQ. SEC: GTX. RMs: 
RLQ, DQL and KLG. PAMs: JIE and LUX. PEV has 
a new KW S1 s.s.b. rig on the air. IRM has been ap- 
pointed Official Observer, so watch your sigs, fellows. 
7EJZ, of Missoula, Mont., visited the Twin Cities and 
is on his way to Superior, Wis., to take the job as 
City Manager. He formerly was City Manager of Hop- 
kins, Minn. Twenty-two members of the St. Paul 
Mobile Amateur Radio Corps have ordered new uniform 
jackets with their insignia sewn on them. The local sin- 
gle sidebanders have been working Arthur Godfrey, 
K4LIB, on 15 and 20 meters. WDY has a new 10-meter 
beam and has worked all continents on 10-meter phone, 
KN#DUQ passed his Technician Class exam. TQQ is 
on another one of her jaunts around the country. My 
term as SCM for Minnesota is at an end and all records 
have been turned over to Bob Nelson, KLG, at Dassel, 
Minn., who has been elected as your new SCM, All 
appointment reports, renewals and traffic reports should 
be mailed to him. I want to thank everyone for the 
wonderful cooperation I have received. I also want to 
thank GTX, your SEC, for the swell job he has done in 
building up the AREC in this section. We now have a 
larger AREC organization than at any time in the past. 
I, too, want to thank the RMs and PAMs for their 
excellent work in keeping our traffic and emergency nets 
in such fine shape. WMA is bragging | again. He says he 
has worked 94 countries to date. WSKJZ 392, 
RVO 156, KLG 131, UNG 110, WMA 46, 
RLQ 38, QVR 34, VJS 34, BUO 29, 
OJG 29, UMX 29, LUX 16, a , BUD °. 
ECZ 12, CWB 11, CVD 10, EMz T , AEE 
MXC 8, PBI 7, QDZ 5, IEA 4, EUD 2, EKR 1, GLU t 


DELTA DIVISION 
ARKANSAS—SCM, Ulman M. Goings, W5ZZY— 


We want to commend all amateurs who participated in 
the emergency communication during the ice storm in 
Northeast Arkansas. Communications were carried on 
very nicely. We want to thank the amateurs from all 
sections who helped us to handle the traffic. A new ham 
in Van Buren is KN5IMI. FPA assisted in handling the 
traffic from Gans, Okla., after the storm. KRO is now 
on the air single sideband driving a pair of 813s with 
a 20-A. VKE gradually is getting ECs set up through- 
out the State. The Arkansas Emergency Net meets on 
3885 ke. each Mon. The Arkansas EC Net meets on 
3885 ke. each Tue. All amateurs in the Arkansas section 
are invited to the EC Net. Be sure to send in your 
appointment certificates for endorsements. DAG, South 
liss. County EC, has started a local county net each 
Sun. on 3850 ke. at 1400 as an AREC preparedness 
program. RACES finally has been approved for Arkan- 
sas. TIE is working very hard to put it into operation 
in the State. WSM/5 gladly handles traffic for students 
at Arkansas Tech. College. He is on 7290 ke. at 1300 and 
3960 ke. at 1730 daily. Traffic: W5VTZ 300, BJR 276, 
K5EED 235, W5DZK 83, EMN 83, KRO 60, HEE 39, 
bh rag ~ DAG 34, WSM 15, ZZY 6, FMF 5, VZL 4, 
FI P 

LOUISIAN A—SCM, Thomas J. Mergavi, W5FMO— 
K5BES, our SEC, held a special meeting at the Greater 
New Orleans ARC with C.D. Coordinator Lt. Col. 
Numa Avedano, C.D. Deputy Director Maj. John 
Bush, both with the taolaies National Guard, C.D. 
Communications Officer Maj. Wilbur Golson, Louisiana 
State Police and Training and Education Director John 
Dunn. Also attending were BUK from the Westside 
ARC and amateurs from the Greater New Orleans 


94 


reports to Bob 


Area. K5BES outlined plans for AREC, ed. and 
RACES programs showing the state divided into 7 
sectors with Radio Officers who also are ARRL Emer- 
gency Coordinators in charge of each. Special plaques 
were presented to Col. Avedano and Maj. Bush for the 
help and cooperation they have given the amateurs. 
New ECs include AZM, K5ALK, K5CWQ, K5EAY and 
VAR. K5BWZ is active on 40 meters running 35 watts 
to an AT-1 and a Super-Pro receiver, K5DMA, active 
with an all-band doublet, has 35 states. UXE is trying 
to build up code speed while converting surplus gear. 
K5AGJ_ reports Jefferson ARC’s recently-elected of- 
ficers are EPC, pres.; EKL, vice- pres.; K5GGK, rec. 
secy.; and K5HEK, treas. CWC is pounding away at 
AF MARS, Delta 75, Ark. Emer. Net and Nucklehed 
Net. EA got the BC-669 going as well as an RAL-7 
receiver. FMO gave his RAL-7 away to a deserving 
ham. MXQ may have difficulty with the new equip- 
ment but still handles lots of traffic. K5DDH now 
has an SX-99, a DX-100 and a Q Multiplier on 40 and 
15 meters. SIW now has a two-letter call, TL. NYC is 
up to 11 w.p.m. trying to renew his expired license, Get 
in touch with your SCM if you wish an ARRL CD 
appointment. Traffic: W5iMXQ 154, EA 23, UXE 19, 
C 


y 4. 

TENNESSEE—SCM, Harry C. Simpson, W4SCF— 
Asst. SCM: Richard A. Crowell, 4WQW. SEC: RRV. 
PAM: PQP. RM: IV. K4LPW is now trying for DXCC 
from his new QTH. UWA is converting his Adventurer 
to 6 meters. His XYL is now Technician K4JNI. WQT, 
busy with construction for his many friends, has fin- 
ished a Valiant, and now is working on a 20A. K4DNU 
writes about the many activities of the outstanding 
Whitehaven ARC. The club station is HZB, under the 
trusteeship of LRO. WQW tersely reports, ‘‘Antenna 
iced and fell... power failed ... emergency generator 
took over... antenna fell again... jolly good 
show ...’’ The usual fine BPL report was received 
from PL. PFP is busy installing an Elmac in the new 
Ford. HHK, our 2- and 6-meter wizard, reports on 
auroral propagation during January and says that 18 
Memphis stations now are on 6 meters, with 15 mobiles 
expected before summer, The Feb. Ist 6-meter statewide 
test was not able to bridge the gap between Nashville 
and Memphis via Dresden, but ZZ expects better re- 
sults on the next attempt. DMU, who has done such 
a fine job with the Davidson County 10-meter Emer- 
gency Net for the past two years, has turned the reins 
over to SWU. K4DIZ, who occasionally lends out her 
microphone, is now 4th Call Area TCPN Director. IRI 
has a new 35-w.p.m. certificate and uses a BC-696. 
K4ADX, from Dalton, Ga., now a student at McCallie, 
Chattanooga, uses a DX-100. Very nice bulletins are 
being received from the Athens ARC. The editor is 
UVU, also president. K4DSI, KA4BMC, HSX and others 
demonstrated various Conelrad systems at the recent 
Memphis ARC meeting. GFV, an E.E. student at 
Vanderbilt, reports working 15 UA, UB UC and UD 
stations on 20 meters using a DX-100. He is now build- 
ing a cubical quad for 10 and 15 meters. Traffic: W4PL 
769, K4DIZ 128, W40GG 90, UVS 77, VJ 64, PQP 62, 
SCF 42, IV 34, WQT 31, K4GFL 29, W4AEWC 26, UVL 
26, IRI 23, PFP 23, UIO 22, SZI 20, K4BMC 17, W4GFV 
17, ZZ 14, K4ADX 9, W4WQW 7, DMU 6, K4LPW 6, 
W4HUT 4, HSX 3, K4DNU 1, W4HHK 1, PVD 1, 
RRV 1, UWA 1, YRM 1. 


GREAT LAKES DIVISION 


KENTUCKY—SCM, Albert M. Barnes, WAKKW— 
SEC: JSH. PAMs: VJV and SUD. RM: QCD. The 
Kentucky Flood Disaster will be covered in a future 
QST. I want to thank every amateur who helped dur- 
ing this emergency and I am recommending that a 
Public Service certificate be issued to those whose work 
is reported, after so noted in QST. I hope the public 
officials of Kentucky, from the Governor on down, will 
realize the need for better emergency and civil defense 
communications than we now have. K4AIS heads the 
top of the list with the highest traffic total MWR did 
an excellent job during the flood. VJV and SUD are 
doing a wonderful job as PAMs. QCD, our RM, kept 
the c.w. nets going and turned in a fine report. ZDA 
and ZDB were on long hours during the flood on both 
phone and c.w. SBI, our former SCM, did wonderful 
work with KPN. 5GOH/4, at Ft. Campbell, received 
his 35-w.p.m. certificate. _— and HJI are new OPSs 
and did fine work on the Governor to President Inaugu- 
ral Message Relay. DAF is carrying on_ interesting 
experiments in radio astromony. CDA printed an ex- 
cellent report of flood amateur activities in the KYN- 
KPN Bulletin and completed a report to ARRL. JSH, 
the SEC, and the ECs of Kentucky were on the job 
where needed. K4JGN has a new all-band doublet. 
KKG would like to swap 35-mm. color slides of beam 
arrays. JUI says s.s.b. is the only way to work through 
QRM on 75 meters. KACHK got his fingers frozen to the 
beam while adjusting. KZF experimented with folded 

(Continued on page 96) 








Each by itself... 
or together as a 
team... unexcelled! 


G66B, compact, 
conveniently accessible, 
is widely used and ac- 
claimed for mobile 

reception..... performs in an equally outstanding 

manner as a multi-band communications receiver for 

fixed stations. Separate power supply /speaker combination 

unit operates from 6 and 12 volts DC (specify) and 115 

volts AC, makes either operating mode possible. 


G77 typifies the finest in modern mobile transmittet 
design, offers multi-band operational flexibility, 


Operated together as Mobile Twins, G66B and 
G77 point up the effectiveness of GONSET 
forward thinking, coordinated designs. 


FREQUENCY RANGE: 80-40-20-15-10 meters. VFO or xtal,. switchable, 


Highly stable VFO, each band spread over most of slide rule dial. 

FULL BANDSWITCHING: Exciter ganged with VFO, pi network output. 
POWER INPUT: 50-60 watts, modulated. CW provisions, 6146 tube in 
output, New modulator has integral speech clipping. High gain speech 
for PA-type dynamic, reluctance or xtl mikes. 

POWER SUPPLY: Heavy-duty, vibrator, 6 and 12V DC. Output voltage 
500-600V full load, Selenium rectifier, low drain both on standby and 
transmit. Power supply is a separate compact unit. 


G77 with power supply...(less microphone and crystal) 


6 BANDS: 540-2000 kes. 3500-4000 kes, 7000-7300 kes, 14,000-14,350 kes. 


21,000-21,450 kes. 28,000-29,700 kes. 


STEEP SKIRT SELECTIVITY: 265 ke 2nd I.F. 8 high Q tuned circuits, 
3.5 ke 1.F. bandwidth at 6 db down. 


AM, CW, SSB RECEPTION. Highly stabilized HF and BF oscillators and 
xtl controlled 2nd conversion oscillator. 


DOUBLE CONVERSION ALL BANDS: 2050 ke I!st 1I.F. Double input tuning 
(3 tuned circuits) on high bands for high image rejection, 


AVC—Noise limiter—Panel § meter—antenna trimmer—BFO pitch—Audio-RF 
gain control—slide rule dial—3 watts audio. F 


G66 RECEIVER... (less power supply) (#3046)......net 189.50 
“3 way” (6V-12V-115V AC) Universal power supply/speaker....net 44.50 


GONSET 





dipoles. W4WNH operated with the Kentucky CAP 
during the flood from Louisville and Vine Grove. 
Traffic: K4AIS 332, WAMWR 219, ZDB 170, QCD 166, 
SUD 164, KKW 145, NBY 106, W5GOH/4 87 waHsi 
82, RPF 78, VJV 76, K4DTI 63, BVT 59, HOE 
W4CDA 54, JSH 53, ZDA 51, KQU 49, K4JGN 42. 
W4KKG 32, TQD 30, K4HBF 17, W4SZB 17, JCN 14, 
HJI 11, OMW 10, K4DLI 5, AGY 3, CHK 2, JUI 2, 
K4KIN 2, W4NGZ 2, KZF 1 


MICHIGAN—SCM, Thomas G. Mitchell, W8RAE 
Asst. SCM (phone) Bob Cooper, 8AQA; Asst. SCM 
(c.w.) Joe Beljan 8SCW. SEC: GJH. BPL certificates 
were issued this month to ELW for January traffic and 
to WXO for December traffic. Under the heading of 
“Story of the Month’’ we might well report the 50-Me¢ 
QsSO between TIN and KL7VT, which took place on 
Jan. 3rd. It was a “‘first’’ for both. TIN used a Gonset 
Communicator with a four-element beam and the KL7 
used an 829-B with 150 watts input. This ought to be 
some sort of a record, at least for our section, and 
should provide the inspiration for more of us to delve 
into the fascinations of v.h.f. activities. Visitors to 
Lansing will be glad to know that they may see FX’s 
old wireless gear nicely displayed in the Michigan 
Historical Museum. Tate says that more may be added 
later. Cos (HSG) has introduced an amendment to the 
Public Acts of 1931 which will legalize the installation 
of FCC-licensed radio receiving equipment in automo- 
biles. When adopted, situations as reported in this re- 
port in January 1957 QST will be eliminated, Apprecia- 
tion for this action also is extended to LKM for his 
part in preparing the legislative work. Several of the 
Oakland County amateurs have completed basic ec.d. 
and RACES training courses conducted by the Area E 
and RACES Radio Officer. EGI is busy revamping his 
20-year-old SX-11, which is probably older than many 
of the persons reading this report. FGB is operating 
144 Mc. with a Gonset Communicator II and BPY is 
working on pedestrian mobile units with the Blossom- 
land gang in Benton Harbor and St. Joseph. OCU is 
active again on 7 Me. and hopes to return to QMN as 
soon as a suitable antenna can be rigged. The Holland 
Area Radio Club has been assigned the call K8DAA 
for the club station, which boasts an AT-1 with modula- 
tor, a Viking Valiant, and an RME-4300 with a pre- 
selector. Traffic: (Jan.) W8SELW 593, GKT 163, ILP 97, 
NOH 90, YAN 82, FX 81, ZLK 80, KSNAW 77, NUL 63, 
FGB 54, DAP 48, NTC 39, FWQ 34, SCW 29, TBP 235, 
OGY 23, RAE 22, WXO 21, QIX 20, HKT 18, RVZ 17 
AUD 16, DSE 14, OCC 14, TIN 9, LIM 8, K8NRD 8, 
W8SJF 6, UCN 3, TIC 2, HSG 1. (Deec.) W8WXO 163, 
GKT 122, RTN 88, TBP 31, IUJ 30, OCC 18, TQP 17, 
OGY 16, TIN 9. 
OHIO—SCM, Wilson E. Weckel, W8AL—Asst. 
J. C. Erickson, 8DAE, and E. F. Bonnet, 80VG. SEC: 
8UPB. RMs: DAE and FYO. PAMs: HPP and HUX. 
GRG has his General Class license. 1957 officers of Ohio 
U. RC are UMH, pres.; ODS, vice-pres.; SES, secy. 
MSL, engineer. This club has a new 
ovices, Santa brought MXO a multi- 
analyzer. MYV moved to Rochester, N. Y. 
ments are K8BXG as OO, RLR, SVL and 
ORSs, SDZ and K8CSI as OBSs and HZJ 
as OPS. PLQ runs 100 watts on 2 and 6 meters with 
a new Viking 6N2 and worked Florida, Texas and 
Oklahoma. The Quaker Radio Assn. of Salem’s officers 
are CJG, pres.; FAU, vice-pres.; and OZW, act. chair- 
man, with K8BTP as the club call and new Novices 
KN8s AZZ, BAB and BAC. SPF marched in the Iaugu- 
ral Parade as a trombone tooter. CJG has a new Mor- 
row mobile rig. OZW has a new DX-100 and a cubical 
quad on 10 meters. PWH has 165 countries confirmed. 
The Massillon ARC showed three films. KJE has a 
20A exciter preparing to go on OKC has WAS. 
TWO is mobile on 10, 6 and 2 meters. FBE has a new 
NC-300. 2 has a DX-35 and K8BML has a new 
DX-100 AZW and BMM have a SX -99s. 
KN8BMO is on 15 meters using a DX- The Six 
Meter Nomad group of the 5th Corps Area - the Ohio 
Civil Defense Corps has been activated as the official 
roving communication group and has over forty mem- 
bers. Columbus ARA’s 1957 officers are °E, pres.; 
AAU, secy.; GKQ, treas.; 

, printer. ABM broke about 

the book while operating as a 

and top-scorer in the SS and Nevins 

has a new home and 10-meter beam, 
a couple of weeks in Florida. GGG and MOX have 
new Viking 6N2s. AAU has a new Valiant. DWP made 
WAS and WAC. K8BVB received his General Class li- 
cense. BUQ is the new ec.d. Radio Officer for Cuyahoga 
County. HXB relayed messages for President Eisen- 
hower from the Governors of California, Oregon and 
Washington. SVL is working some DX. GFE has a 15- 
meter quad, BN, an old-timer, is Toledo’s ham of the 
month. It is with regret I report the passing on of 
CVZ. SQX has a new Viking Ranger. KN8GJS has a 


96 


SCMs: 


LLY, treas.; and 
DX-20 for its N 


phase r.f 
ew appoint 


K8BEW as 


Roundup, 
ZCQ spent 


new baby son. HWX received certificate No. 2 for 
working 1000 OMs. DN runs six watts on 6 meters. 
‘he stork brought a baby girl to JEX and a baby 
son to VEK. HNY has a new three-element 20-meter 
beam, Viking II, VFO, 75A-3 and V.H.F. 152A. The 
Springfield ARC bought a panel truck to convert into 
mobile — ition center. IXA is mobile ex- 
TCT has a vertical ground plane for 6 meters 
put an Sol and product detector in his HRO-60 
PLQ’s 6N2 is working fine. SWT, in Madison County, 
answered our plea for ECs, GFE made BPL in Janu- 
ary. The Hocking Valley RC’s picnic and hamfest will 
be held on July 14th at Lake Burr Oak, so mark your 
calendar and make plans to attend. More later on this 
event. K8BBI received his General Class license 
runs phone patches daily for KL7FAR. HQK 
s.s.b. rig. Traffic: (Jan.) W8UPH 491, VIP 320 
189, GFE 173, DAE 153, SZU 140, HXB 133, AL 
QLJ 64, SVL 60, VYU 52, W9VBV/8 21, W8PLQ 
HZJ 14, ARO 8, RO 6, EEQ 5, LZE 5, QIE 4, BEW 
2, LMB 2. (Dec.) W8SZU 210, ZAU 63, LZE 37, WAV 
27, PLQ 26, MXO 15, PBX 14, UMH 6. (Nov.) W8PZS 
10. 





FIFTH ANNUAL 
OHIO INTRASTATE QSO PARTY 
APRIL 13TH AND 14TH 


The Ohio Council of Amateur Radio Clubs will sponsor a 
QSO Party, open to all Ohio amateurs, which will be held 
from 6:00 p.m. EST Saturday, April 13th, until 6:00 p.m 
EST Sunday, April 14th. All Ohio amateurs may take part. 
In one county, ten contac ts only, phone or c.w., may be 
counted. 

Any and all amateur bands and any mode of emission 
may be used. There will be no power restrictions. Scoring 
multiply the number of Ohio stations worked by the number 
of Ohio counties contacted. Each station may be worked but 
once regardless of band or mode of emission used. Logs 
should include calls of stations worked, time, date, and the 
county in which the station is located. Operation near the 
following frequencies is recommended: 3550, 3740, 3860, 
7100 and 7250 ke. On the other bands, take your pick. The 
call ‘CQ Ohio’ should be used on both phone and c.w. A 
cup and four appropriate certificates will be awarded to the 
highest scoring stations. Certificates will also be awarded to 
Novices, the number of certificates being contingent upon 
the degree of activity. 

All contest logs must be postmarked no later than May 1, 
1957, and should be sent to the contest manager, Hamlin 
King, W8EQN, 353 8S. Arlington Ave., Springfield, Ohio. 











HUDSON DIVISION 


EASTERN NEW YORK—SCM, George K. Tracey, 
W2EFU—SEC: KGC. RM: BXP. PAMs: GDD, WG 
and NOC. Section nets: NYS on 3615 ke. at 1900, 
NYSPTEN on 3925 ke. at 1800, SRPN on 3980 ke. ¢ 
1130, IPN on 3980 ke. at 1530, MHT on 3716 ke. Sat. at 
1300. K2HPQ is the new asst. mgr. of Second Call 
Area TCPN. K2PIC made DXCC and got a new KWSI 
in December. HF reports 2-meter activity on week ends 
from Putnam Co. using a Gonset linear and four-over- 
four beam. K2E spoke on antennas Jan. 17th at the 
Ulster County Mike and Key Club. K2BCU is con- 
ducting a theory class for the Ulster Club. While work- 
ing 80-meter c.w. and 2-meter phone, K2PRB is becom- 
ing interested in traffic. ZHI spoke on receiver sensitivity 
at the February meeting of the Schenectady Club. 
Prinied circuits was the February subject at the Har- 
monic Hill Radio League. WAC in two hours and fifteen 
minutes on 20-meter c.w. is reported by FBS. K2RUU 
is now running 150 watts on 6 meters. To reduce 
RTTY drift, K2DRN had to shock-mount the receiver, 
with much better results. We apologize to EWO and 
VDX; they will not leave Poughkeepsie for Owego 
until October. ZBY and JZK represented G.E. during 
the Edison Award judging in Washington, D. C., Jan. 
24th. We are proud of the winner, 3CUL. Ex-member of 
NYSPTEN, KUD, is now signing 7KUD from Phoenix, 
Ariz. Endorsement: AAO as EC. Also transferred to 
Phoenix is new OO FZW. K2RDI is feeding his Gonset 
into a twenty-element beam on 2 meters. Several clubs 
recently have incorporated. We suggest you have an 
attorney describe the advantages and procedures to 
your group. SZ, at R.P.I., is heard with a new linear 
amplifier using low-level modulation. Traffic: (Jan.) 
W2BXP 391, EFU 166, NOC 117, PHX 9, K2HPQ 

(Continued on page 98) 





New, Compact 


Vibrapacks to 


Power Your 


Mobile Rigs... 


Before you start working over your battery- 
powered gear for the outdoor radio activity 
that will soon be in full swing, stop in and see 
your Mallory distributor. He is prepared to 
introduce you to a new Mallory Vibrapack 
vibrator power supply that you can fit into 
almost any type of mobile equipment. 

So small that it fits into the palm of your hand, 
this new power supply puts out plenty of 
wattage. It embodies design principles that 
Mallory engineers have learned in 25 years’ 
experience in building vibrator operated power 
supplies for communications equipment. You'll 
find that our designers have used techniques 
formerly reserved exclusively for commercial 
mobile equipment. 

Here are some highlights. The same communi- 
cation-duty, series drive vibrator found in 
taxi, police and utility two-way transmitters 
and receivers is used. High stability ceramic 





Heart of the New Vibrapack..; 


is the new Mallory 1700 series vibrator, 
using a new design that eliminates contact 
buttons. New leaf spring contacts give far 
greater area, much longer life, and end 
sticking and slow starting. The 1700's are 
available separately, as replacements, or 
to build your own supply. 











P. R. MALLORY & CO. Inc. 
P. O. Box 1558 
INDIANAPOLIS 6 INDIANA 


oer 
Mattory 
VIBRAPACK a 
yipRaTor POW: > i 


MODEL 
NOM. OurPuT 
VIBRATOR 


€ 
RECTIFIER 


- 0. 
pa matioay & CO OY 
gianarotls © 
mace 


4 a 


wus 


capacitors are used in critical parts of the 
circuit. Heavy gauge steel protective cover and 
bottom plate snap on and off in an instant, to 
make replacement of vibrator and rectifier tube 
a few seconds’ work even on field location. 
When you remove the bottom plate, all wiring 
is exposed and accessible for trouble-shooting. 


Special attention has been given to hash filter- 
ing in the “A” and “B” power leads. A separate 
external connection to the rectifier heater saves 
your battery during standby, and provides 
instant return to operation. 

The Vibrapack has been designed to let you 
provide whatever low frequency filtering is 
necessary for your particular equipment... . 
without paying for parts and wiring that you 
may not need. You can connect the output 
**as is” to a transmitter or receiver that already 
has its own filter system. Or, if you want to add 
a filter to the Vibrapack, the chassis has been 
punched and space allowed for the installation 
of a Mallory multi-section FP electrolytic 
capacitor. 

Power ratings are conservative, to assure you 
of higher efficiency, peak conservation of bat- 
tery power and long operation between charges. 
Ask your Mallory distributor to show you the 
new Mallory VP (6), (12) and (24) Series 
Vibrapacks, and to give you their electrical 
characteristics. Or, just drop us a letter and 
we'll send you complete details. 


P.R. MALLORY @ CO. inc. 


ALLOR 





73, EDH 56, W2ATA 47, K2LKI 32, HNW 22, QIX 12, 
i. “ye 1, W2TYC 1. (Dec.) K2CXP 42, W2MHE 
TYC 


1 NEW YORK CITY sa LONG ISLAND—SCM, 
Harry J. Dannals, W2TUK—SEC: ADO, PAM: OBW. 
RM: WEL. Section Nets: NLI, 3630 ke. nightly at 1930 
EST and Sat. at 1915 EST. NYC -LIPN, 3908 ke. Mon, 
through Sat. from 1730 to 1830 EST. NYC -LI AREC, 
3908 ke. Sun. at 1400 EST. Our section traffic nets are 
handling many messages but much of the traffic travels 
its last legs by mail because inadequate coverage exists 
in Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx, Our net managers 
request your assistance—a few munutes each evening 
will help very much. OBW announces the beginning 
of a regular weekly AREC Net on 3908 ke, Sun. at 
1400 EST. KEB has been reelected national secy. of 
TCPN and KFV has been returned to office as 2nd 
call area director of TCPN. DEM passed his radio- 
telephone 2nd-class exam. KN2VNI is a new Novice at 
AEE. K2s JYD, RCG, STF and MAU dropped the 
“N,.” After active duty with the Army, KH6BPZ re- 
turns to the station at AEE. K2LTI runs a Viking II 
and has worked 47 states and 69 countries. K2LUM re- 
ceived his WAS certificate. K2KXZ worked 17 stations 
in 7 countries on 40 meters one evening before his an- 
tenna came down! It’s a new daughter at K2RJO and 
a new son at UXY. A new KWS-1 has added the 
modern touch at PF’s station. Mobiles caught in snow- 
storm traffic jams made use of their rigs to notify 
families of their delay. KGN has a ‘‘Match-stik’’ ver- 
tical K2UOY made WAS. K2CUI is hoping that his 
newly-acquired 75A-3 will help him find Utah for that 
elusive 48th state. K2JQO has a new mobile rig on 10 
meters. K2BTT added a new two-element 10-meter 
beam. An s.s.b. rig is under construction at DID. HQL 
received his DXCC-160 sticker. EBZ is copying FSK 
RTTY on 3620 ke. with an FRA converter. SMX has a 
new DX-100 and is equipped for RTTY. K2AED has a 
new AF-67 ready for mobile work. The latest total at 
K2BSM is 143 countries. K2DDK is preparing for 220- 
Me. operation. A Globe King, HRO-60 and three-ele- 
ment 10-meter beam have accounted for 25 new coun- 
tries at K2RCO. New officers at the AMPS RC are 
K2RBS, pres.; K2GXL, secy.; and JUN, treas. K2TTA 
is working on a 435-Me. transceiver. 1957 officers of the 
Babylon RC are K2KES, pres.; K2KHU, vice-pres.; 
K2IQA, secy.; and K2AAN, treas, The Stuyvesant 
HSRC, CLE, with K2LTI, pres.; K2IBY, vice-pres. ; 
and K2LWT, secy.; is on the air with an HT-9 and an 
NC-98. VVZ moved to Oceanside. KN2s YAL and YAK 
are father and son. The L.I. 6-Meter Emergency Net, 
on 50.25 Me., boasts 40 active members, Hidden trans- 
mitter hunts are held on the Ist Fri. of each month, 
Higher power is the watchword on 6 meters as the 
band openings provide more DX. K2s ACD, AZT, 
QNY and RKL are in the 100-watt class, while K2s 
MBY, MXT and PWH run Communicators and linear 
amplifiers and AZA, JZT and K2IEJ run_ Johnson 
6N2s. New members of the 6-Meter Net are K2s LXM, 
OTO, VIX and YEA. K2JHK now signs K4LPP. 
K2ODE joined the Marines. New officers of the Levit- 
town ARC are K2HZC, pres.; HQD, vice-pres.; MZN, 
secy.; and K2LUR, treas. New officers of the V.H.F. 
Institute are AOC, pres.; K2JLR, vice-pres.; AUF, 
treas.; K2DDK, corr. secy.; and K2UHF, rec, secy. 
K2UQX has now worked 35 states. The Amateur Radio 
Association of Flatbush, K2VSS, is now running 500 
watts with K2s PZH, RCO, TRJ and UAQ operating 
the rig. New members of the NYRC are CAT, JZX, 
NNC, K2s ISK, QOT and KN2s UZG and VDS. Our 
Official Observers are reporting many cases of out-ot- 
band operation, Check your receiver calibration and 
watch out for drift in your v.f.o. Traffic: (Jan.) 
W2KEB 2064, KFV 602, K2AMP 261, DEM 232, W2WFL 
205, K2PHF 104, GHS 75, W2AEE 62, K2QZS 59, 
W2TUK 52, GP 50, K2LTI 49, W2DRD 44, K2KSP 41, 
W2UGF 39, K2BH 38, W2HAC 37, JOA 387, K2LUM 
34, RKL 31, W2JGV 30, K2CRK 26, W20BW 25, K2KXZ 
23, PSE 18, RJO 18, SCY 16, GLP 16, W2PF 15, LGK 
14, KGN 12, EC 9, K2UOY 9, JZR 8, CUI 7, UQX 4, 
CMV 3, W2DUS 3, JBQ 3, K20BO 3, AAW 2, W2YBT 
2. (Dec.) W2PEQ 22, K2BH 18, W2PDU 16. 

NORTHERN NEW JERSEY—SCM, Lloyd H. Mana- 
mon, W2VQR—SEC: IIN. PAM: VDE. RMs: BRC, 
CGG and NKD. Section Net certificates were issued to 
the following stations during January: AGD, PIG, FIK, 
VC and KAK and K2GVB, OAM, HHU and GIF. New 
ORS appointments went to K2MMM and CSC, VDE 
is doing a fine job on NJFN in getting member stations 
to apply for OPS appointment. NJN report for Janu- 
ary is as follows: Evening net—27 sessions, attendance 
469, traffic 262. Morning net—26 sessions, attendance 97, 
traffic 52. In addition to daily morning and night ses- 
sions, NJN is running Sun. night sessions on 3695 ke. 
at 1930. New stations on NJN during January were 
QND, QLF, ISZ and K2RRH. The NJN RM has a 
goodly supply of Section Net certificates and will issue 
them to all stations earning them. BRC has a new 
DX-35 and a new v.f.o. The GSARA has just issued 


98 


volume 1, issue 1 of The Scope, the new elub paper. 
The first_issue contains a message from the club presi- 
dent, CQB, outlining a very interesting program for 
the year ahead. The club meets on the 2nd Wed. of each 
month at 2000 in the Red Cross Bidg., Broad Street, 
Shrewsbury. The 4th Wed. meetings are held at Mc- 
Guires Grove, Middletown. JTJ was visited by an XE 
during the holidays. VCZ is building a crystal 
rig. Bob worked 41 sections in the last CD party. 
officers of the Ridgewood Amateur Radio are 
CGJ, pres.; VCZ, vice-pres.; MQF, treas.; LAN, secy. 
The Club net meets every Wed. at 2100 on 29.254 Me. 
except on the club meeting night, which is the 2nd 
Wed. of the month. GNQ is net control. Our thanks 
to LAN, club secretary, for keeping us so well in- 
formed on club doings. The RBRA officers are K2BEV, 
pres.; K2DDM, vice-pres.; K2DSW, treas.; K2KFE, 
act. mgr. LRO is active in OO work again. All new 
hams in Teaneck are requested to contact HXU so that 
delivery of QSL cards will reach owners when the 
street address is not given. CVW is on 2 meters. Ed had 
his highest score yet in the recent CD Party, all because 
of the new Valiant. A card has just been received from 
DXD, who is in Mexico on a trip. He has visited XE1A 
and XEIRE. K2SKK is chasing TVI. K2EQD is on 2 
meters with an s.s.b. rig. K2RJD is building an 826 
linear for 2 meters. K2POH has a new 75A-4. K2LBN 
has a new DX-100. K2DSW will graduate from RCA 
Institute soon. K2RGS is active in the Interstate and 
2nd, Reg. Phone Nets. ZEP got a good break-in system 
working. K2KHZ changed his QTH to E. Orange. Dave 
has been active with the mobile rig, working a total of 
24 states on 15-meter phone while traveling to and 
from work. K2EMJ is a new OPS. K2IBF is doing fine 
with his v.f.o. hooked to the antenna in the absence 
of a high-power rig. VMX has been promoted to Class 
I OO. He has been working with transistors and re- 
ports very favorable results. K2BHQ is revamping the 
rig for 15-meter operation, K2JGU has been appointed 
treasurer of the NJFN. K2OYJ is a new member of the 
high-power class with a new 250-watt linear final, YLS 
and BTG have a new 40-ft. tower in the back yard 
complete with 10-over-20 beams. WSN and MWW are 
heard on 2 ~— K2TLI is on 2 meters with a pair 
of 4-125A tubes. K2DHE was host to the state RACES 

Tech. ooatene oly a the County Control Center, Free- 
hold. Traffic: W2MLW_ 381, K2EB 185, W2VDE 149, 
K2EQP 123, BHQ 73, W2BRC 65, RXL 59, FIK 46, 
FNT 46, VMX 30, ZVW 23, K2MFF 20, MMM_ 17, 
W2OXL 16, K2RGS 16, W2DRV 14, K2GIQ 12, EMJ 7, 
SKK 6, BWQ 5, OYJ 5, W2CJX 4, ZEP 4. (Dec.) 
K2HHU 80, W2DRV 24. 


MIDWEST DIVISION 


IOWA—SCM, Russell B. Marquis, WS§BDR—New 
appointments: MJH, LBK, ZPM and CZC as 
Endorsements: HWU, LAC and QVA as ECs; 
as ORS; and CZ as OPS. New officers of 
Moines Club are ULV, pres.; YEH, vice-pres. ; 
secy.-treas. Sioux City Club officers are WWM, 
K#AAU, vice-pres.; GXQ, secy.; TNX, treas.: 
JKT, sgt. at arms. Fort Dodge’ Club officers: 
pres.; K#ARA, vice-pres. and treas.; W8NGS, secy.; 
ZCN, BTX and ZPM, directors. GQ was appointed 
RACES Radio Officer for the Cedar Rapids Area, with 
GIM as alternate. LGG got a new 75A-4. SCA has a 
NC-300. Doc is getting longer ears these days. Paul 
Hamilton, FCC examiner, was guest speaker at the Des 
Moines Club meeting. KVJ has a 10-meter cubical quad. 
DO, EHH, CSP and SMW vacationed in the Southland. 
EEJ has a KWS-1. K#KTG received a KWS-1, 75A-4 
and a beam from the XYL as a Christmas present. 
ARN has gone to Alaska and hopes to get on from 
KL7-Land. NWX passed traffic directly to Iowa by 
80-meter c.w. mobile while on the Pennsylvania Turn- 
pike. K#CLX received a WAS certificate. WHE is a 
new member of TLCN. Traffic: (Jan.) W#BDR 1545, 
SCA 1083, LGG 871, LCX 827, PZO 786, BJP 287, KVJ 
222, CZ 216, BLH 152, UTD 149, GXQ 141, LJW 54, 
JHE 45, KOAAH 42, WOQVA 42, BTX 28, NGS 25, 

/¥ 24, KOCLS 23, W#YI 22, K#DZX 2, BEC 16, 
WAD 13, W#ZPM 11, ATA 10, GQ 10, RQW 10, BQJ 
8, EHH 8, MG 8, YUA 8, KJN 7, KBRE 6, me 6, 
WSFMZ 6, K6AHZ 5, WOCGL 5, FDM 5, HNE TX 
5, EEG 4, K§DBW 3, DYJ 3, WOéDJY 2, K6G 09 2, 
PTL 2. (Dec.) WTIU 13, KDHQ 6 

KANSAS—SCM, Earl N. Johnston, W6ICV—SEC: 
PAH. RM: QGG. PAM: FNS. Salutations to newly- 
formed Mike and Key Amateur Radio Club of Parsons. 
Officers are K@III, pres.; EYD, vice-pres.; (also Radio 
Officer for local c.d.); K@#ESF, secy.-treas.; K#GZP 
publicity; and George Murphy, USNR training super- 
visor. The Air Capital ARA of Wichita elected the fol- 
lowing officers: K#AQJ, pres.; CRN, vice-pres. & 
treas.; KNO#GIA, secy. According to Ground Wave, the 
club paper, the 2-meter project is completed. This 
should increase 2-meter activity in Wichita. The N.W. 

(Continued on page 100) 


8.8.b. 


New 





What's New With The Electron...1957 


Eimac unveils new ceramic tubes 


at 1957 I.R.E. Show in New York City 


One of the highlights on last month’s I.R.E. 
Show was Eimac’s display of tubes that can 
take it... they range from a giant klystron, 
taller than any man, to receiving tubes barely 
larger than grapes... 


tetrode prize package 


Among the Eimac tubes on display was the 
new Eimac ceramic 4CX5000A ... a ceramic 
and metal all-purpose forced air-cooled tet- 
rode, only 414 by 9 inches in size. . . it deliv- 
ers 16 kw of Class B audio power . .. is highly 
recommended for CLASS AB, SSB where its 
output is a conservative lO kw... 


Eimac turns on heat 


Further proving the claim that Eimac tubes 
can take it was the display featuring a small 
transmitting tube overloaded to more than 
three times its normal rated input... this is 
the 4CX300A, a ceramic prize package that 
has almost incredible ratings up to 500mc... 
two 4CX300A’s will take a kilowatt in SSB 
... another tube featured was the 4X250B... 
with a ceramic plate-grid seal ...a tube use- 
ful for amateur application in all services... 


the long fellows 


Serious-minded engineers looked over the dis- 
play of new ceramic klystrons...some de- 
signed for industrial application . .. powers 
range from a few watts to a megawatt in UHF/ 
microwave service, 


add foctnote 


Interested persons may obtain a copy of 
“What's New With The Electron ... 1957” by 


writing our Amateur Service Bureau. 


o 
b 
i 





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hist ater - an ieee Kane 4 


Bill Eitel, WOUF, and Jack McCullough, 
WO6CHE, measure the world’s largest elec- 
tron tube, the Eimac X626 UHF klystron, 
which delivers 1,250,000 watts peak power 
and 100,000 watts average power. 


EITEL-McCULLOUGH, INC. 


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ground rating. 

Also available in 90° indexing for 
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Get Centralab ham switches from 
your Centralab distributor. And send 
coupon for Catalog 30 showing 
Centralab’s complete line of quality 
components. P-1258 


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912D E. Keefe Avenue, Milwaukee 1, Wisconsin 


Send me Centralab Catalog 30. 


Name. 





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Zone State... 


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Leeeeeee eee eee eee eee 


100 


Emergency Net (in Northwest Kansas) held an AREC 
drill with 14 of the 17 stations reporting. EC LOW says 
drills will be held each month. I would like to hear 
of more AREC or c.d. activities, fellows! ZUX, of Scott 
City, reports of an ideal TVI committee composed 

TV-set owner, a TV service man, and an amateur 
MI (chairman). K#DIP’s nephew, KN§#IFI, a newcomer 
has a new DX-35 and AR-3 receiver. The High Plains 
Club held an FB Christmas Party at 5PHM’s Dec. 16th 
KL7AN received high praise for his portrayal of Santa 
Claus. PAH, our SEC, and I had a wonderful time at 
the CKRC Banquet Jan. 18th. TWU, of McPherson 
has started a code, theory and study course scheduled 
each Tue. at 1930. IFR, of Topeka, really is giving 
his Elmac a workout keeping skeds on KPN and QKS 
K#GQP, of Topeka, received his General Class ticket 
and has a DX-100 completed. Traffic: (Jan.) W#BLI 
387, OHJ 315, FNS 233, NIY 194, QGG 155, TOL 131, 
SAF 81, UOL 37, KN#HSF 35, W#ABJ 34, K#BXF 34 
WSFDJ 25, QQQ 17, IHN 15, TSR 15, KOBIX 14 
WOONF 14, ICV 12, K6AHW 11, WODEL 9, LIX 8 
WWR 7, DHR 6, VZM 6, WFD 6, FHU 3, HL 3 
K#HVR 3, WOTNA 3, K#IGF 2, WHASY 1 
Wé6LOW 1, LQX 1, UAT 1. (Dec.) KN#HSF 11, 


K#GZP 1 
W#IFR 


11. 

MISSOURI—SCM, James W. Hoover, W6GEP—OUD 
reports that DE is improving slowly after an eye opera- 
tion. KIK has received a Traffikers 5000 certificate, and 
ECE received a 1000 certificate. MHS has received WAS 
and TEN Net certificates. Two who recently 
moved from Arkansas have received their § call—K#IHY 
Joplin, and K#IIC, Branson. Traffic activity was ham- 
pered at WYJ by receiver trouble. KODEX has worked 
both coasts with 4 watts on 40 meters. LLU and NXG 
have a reliable schedule on 6 meters between Rolla and 
Salem. The Rolla Amateur Radio Association has a net 
on 29 Me. each Wed. at 8:30 p.m. A Civil Defense Net 
has been established in Cass County and meets Mon 
through Fri. on 3504 ke. at 7:30 p.m. All interested 
Missouri stations are invited to report. HVW is hos 
pitalized with a broken leg. New officers of the South 
west Missouri Amateur Radio Club are K#CCL, pres 
SPU, vice-pres.; QWS, secy.; BHC, treas.; SZT, act. 
mgr. The club bulletin for February lists 
ing stations on 2 meters at 8 P.M. daily 
MMZ, Slater; BQV, Columbia; J Warrensburg 
INI, Pleasant Hill. IBL has 27 states confirmed 
meters. The Midwest V.H.F. Club installed the follow- 
ing new officers at a dinner meeting with 38 in attend 
ance; K#ABA, pres.; K#EXG, vice-pres.; K#DGG 
secy.; K#DCQ, treas. Traffic: (Jan.) WOCPI 759, GAR 
572, GBJ 176, UXT 166, VPQ 160, OUD 134, BVL 123 
K§DEX 93, W#OKIK 71, MHS 66, CKQ 55, EEE 53 
WAP 47, RTW 40, K6AQO 35, WOKA 29, WELQC 22 

PF 17, EBE 12, K#IHY 12, W#EPI 11 

8, ’ 4, GEP 3. (Dec.) W6VPQ 248, K#FC'T 

, W6IJS 191, EBE 12, EPI 3. (Nov.) W#IJS 4. (Oct.) 
WOLJS 3. 

NEBRASKA—SCM, Floyd B. Campbell, W#CBH 
SEC: JDJ. PAM: MAO. RNH is back on the air 
with a DX-35, an NC-98, and a quad antenna and 
worked 37 countries with 85,000 points in the SS and 
50,000 in the CD Party. K#@DFO has a_ wonder-bar 
beam. The Scottsbluff Club is on 28,560 or 29,000 ke 
Thurs. after 8 p.m. MST. NIK has joined Air Force 
MARS. The Dawes County Amateur Radio Club 
(Chadron) is setting aside the first Sun. of June each 
year for its annual picnic. It will be held at Chadron 
State Park 10 miles south of Chadron on Highway 19 
Join them for an eye-ball QSO. New officers of the Soo 
Radio Club at Sidney are QKR, pres.; UOB, vice 
pres.; DQN, secy-treas. The club meets on the 4th 
Wed. of each month at 7:30 p.m. New officers of the 
North Platte Club are CVC, pres.; ERM, vice-pres 
EVY, secy.-treas. The Ak-Sar-Ben Club has a 10 
meter, 6-meter, and 2-meter net operating under the 
Nebraska RACES program Mon. on 29,500 ke., 51 Me 

144.3 Mc. at 9 p.m. Western Nebraska net reports 
355, average 13.1, traffic handled 23. The Phone 
QNIs 799, average 25.8, QTCs 76, average 2.5 

» NSS Net: QNIs 267, average 8.6, QTCs 24, average 
8. Traffic: (Jan.) WéZJF 170, MAO 111, K6DGW 97 
W#PQP 45, UJK 40, SPK 36, BOQ 33, KDW 26 
K6CDG 25, W#ZOU 25, DQN 22, NIK 20, ERM 18 
FTQ 18, K§6BRQ 17, BRS 13, ELQ 13, KN6HUF 12 
WS#AIN 11, K#DFO 11, WOOCU 10, K6BDF 8, WOFXH 
8, HOP 7, LJO 7, RNH 5, AQQ 4, EGQ 4, IAY 4 
NHT 4, BTG 2, K6CYN 2, WOFBY 2, IXB 2, KLB 2, 
LEF 2, OOX 2, RE#L/6 2, UJM 2. (Dec.) WHORW 1 


Stations 


on 6 


NEW ENGLAND DIVISION 

CONNECTICUT—Acting SCM, Victor L. 

ford. WITYQ—SEC: EOR. RM: KYQ. PAM 

Traffic Nets: MCN, Mon.-Fri. 0645 on 3640 ke.; CPN, 

Mon.-Sat. 1800 and Sun. 1000 on 3880 ke.; CN, Mon.- 

Sat. 1845 and 2200 on 3640 ke. Congratulations to EFW, 
(Continued on page 102) 


Craw- 
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for an outstanding job as SCM during the past 3 years, 
In January MCN handled 69 messages in 20 sessions 
with high QNI going to RFJ (18), BVB (17), IBE and 
EFW (15) each. YBH advises CPN met 31 times and 
handled 221 messages for an average of 7.1 per session. 
High QNI honors go to DHP (31), VIY (30), EVH, 
TVU and VQH (29), HID and YBH (28) and FYF 
(27). KYQ reports each session of CN met 27 times. The 
early session handled 316 messages for an average of 
11.7 per session. Attendance averaged 7.7. The late 
session handled 111 messages for an average of 4.1 per 
session. Attendance was 5.1 per meeting. Why not 
originate some traffic to a friend and check in the late 
session of CN? New officers of the Stratford Radio 
Club are WAV, pres.; RFJ, vice-pres.; WAP, treas. ; 

WS, secy.; TCW, comm. officer, UFV and UFW 
(father and son) have a new p.p. 813 rig on c.w. FVX 
is using a new 3-band beam on s,s.b. Are there any 
other s.s.b. men in Connecticut? The Hamden Amateur 
Radio Assn, elected WHL, pres.; UKX, vice-pres. ; 
FKQ, treas.; QXT, secy.; GTG, JK and FCE, ac- 
tivities. GIX is maintaining his OBS schedule. RWS 
added 3 new countries after raising the power to 350 
watts. AW made BPL again. In addition to RM duties, 
KYQ made a fine traffic total. APA landed a JA on 
7-Me. phone. FDO is enjoying the new Viking Valiant. 
EKJ has a new p.p. 813 final and 100TH modulator. 
EOR finished the new all-band final using a pair of 
4-125As and 100TH modulator. New appointments: GEA 
oot HID as OPSs, FDJ and OS as ECs; DHP as OO; 

as OES. Renewals: ABZ, RDV, RLN and WX 

s ECs; RWS and TD as ORSs; GIX as OPS, OO and 
OBS. BVB, AMY and GIX sent in OO reports. OES 
reports were received from FVV and SUZ. Traffic: 
WIKYQ 371. AW 342, FYF 295, EFW 259, YBH 225, 
TYQ 166, GVK 138, IUC 126, HID 114, BDI 109, NJM 
103, LV 95, CUH $2, DHP 70, RGB 49, AVS 44, BVB 
40, RFJ 40, AMY 29, EBW 23, ULY 21, VIY 21, GEA 
19, RRE 16, YU 16, YOG 13, FHP 12, HYF 12, GIX 
9, GVJ 6, WNIMDB 6. 

MAINE—SCM, Allan D. Duntley, W1IBPI/VYA— 
SEC: TVB. PAM: FNY. RM: EFR. The Barn Yard 
Net meets Mon. through Sat. at 0800-0930 on 3960 kc. ; 
the Sea Gull Net Mon. through Sat. at 1700-1800 on 
3940 kc.; the Pine Tree Net Mon. through Sat. at 
1900-1930 on 3596 ke.; the Horse Traders Net Sun. at 
1600-1700 on 3940 ke.; and the State C.D. Net Sun. at 
1100-1200 on 3993 ke. ZNL has a new Globe Champion. 
TVB has burnt up the big rig so is only on mobile. 
NXX moved to larger quarters and will be on all 
bands soon, Calls we sure miss on frequency are EBJ 
NIQ, QJA, WSV, WIN, WTQ, RHA and LBJ. VYA 
still maintains a sked with 7HUV in Tueson, Ariz. 
You old-timers will remember ‘‘Skipper’’ as IHUV 
Thanks to FNT for the hard work on the number 
plate deal. Hats off to the boys and gals in the Granite 
State on getting their plates. SRW needs another crystal 
on 10 meters. Glad to hear COM back on the airwaves, 
We hear there is to be a super-duper hamfest in Au- 
gusta soon. See you there. YYW is back mobile and 
finally had to drill holes in the new black one. WRZ 
is operating with 9 watts. We sure had a good hamfest 
in Casco when the boys and gals from ‘‘The County” 
were down this way. The PAWA treasurer is not at 
present a ham. The Barn Yard Net now is under the 
very able leadership of: ZEN. We are looking for JIS 
to get back home. Traffic: WILKP 174, CEV 78, EFR 
55, BCD 29, BDP 2, UDD 24, FLV 17, EPN 144, 
BX 10, HZZ 10, OTQ 6, RJE 4 

EASTERN MASSACHUSETTS—SC M, Frank L. 
Baker, jr., W1ALP—New appointments: BNS as OO; 
KO Hanover, PO Norwell, COL Cambridge, KTG R.O. 
Sector 1D, as ECs. Appointments endorsed: ADM Can- 
ton, MME Hull, IPZ Shirley, IBE Rockport, VAN 
Norwood, PYT Ipswich, KWD Weymouth, SH Dedham, 
OSS Townsend, VYS Weston, MF Salem, ZDN Med- 
ford, as ECs; BL as SEC; MME, AAR, TZ, VMD 
and KBS as OBSs; MME, AAR, BB and CZW as 
OPSs; AAR, CAM, LM, USA, BB, AUQ and CZW as 
ORSs; GDJ, TZ and UIR as OOs, Sorry to have to 
report the death of DJ, of Winthrop, the husband of 
OIR, Heard on 2 meters: KNIls AQM, AGH and AAJ, 
and CBA, YNL, WCX, CEI, JHU and SNR. Heard 
on 10 meters: VMU, KYE, SNK and FNN. On 6 me- 
ters: CSH, UIQ and DYQ. DTU _ now is in Holliston. 
DTM moved to Wisconsin. KN1AVS is new in Quincy. 
KNIADB is on 15-40 meters. KIAXB is TZ’s XYL. 
DNF is on at Pocasset. THO, 6-meter PAM, reports 
that KIAFT and ALF and Wis AAI, AR, DLY, 4 
EZQ, EZZ, GAP, GEF, GLD, GQQ, IME, IAQ, 

JHJ, MB, MER, MPX, MR, MTT, OZ, VCJ, VsU, 
WAF and JVG are on. PX GRT and MEG have 6N2s. 
GEI is on with a Gonset. HOM and IME have halo 
mobile antennas. PF is on again. HHC is on several 
bands. A Sector 1B meeting was held in Stoughton 
with many R.O.s and Alternate R.O.s present. Mr, 
Langston, the new communications chief of the Mass, 
(Continued on page 104) 





THIS YEAR... 





il 
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TT 





























Lu 


1 
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3 














Take lero along, too, and have a wonderful vacation. 
Do your hamming enroute and also use as a portable sta- 


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MB-560A: 60-watt Transmitter, built-in VFO and modulato............ $214. 
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FALCON: Receiver with Broadcast Tuner as an accessory, serves 
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MBR-5 and Falcon have | microvolt sensitivity for 16db : si gnal 
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TV-600: High Voltage Vibrator Power Pack, 600 volt, 200 ma, 
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CBM6 or 12: Cable for interconnecting above units 

MK-N1: Modern Cylindrical Microphone 

MLV-50: Remote Control Antenna Tuner 

SH-?7: Speaker for mobile installation 

RTS-6008; AC Power Pack with speaker for portable use of 

CBF7 a MB-560A and either MBR-5 or Falcon 


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C.D. Agency, was present. The Dedham e.d. group 
has a Gonset for 6 meters. BB handled the Governor- 
to-President message for Massachusetts. QEY is Al- 
ternate R.O. for Acton. AWO reports that they have 
4 new Gonsets in Wenham. MSP is Asst. EC. KNIAWI 
is new in Newton. KZW has a new Valiant transmitter. 
The North Shore Chow Hounds, JBA, HLF, ZBE, 
JVG, NRY and EZZ, meet on 6 meters each night. 
Bill Galebach, Braintree, has his General Class ticket. 
MEG and ZEN have WAM certificates. Area 1 Radio 
Comm, held a meeting with ZYX, AR, KTG, LLY and 
ALP present. PIW has a baby YL. SXD has a 6146 
final. NEM is teaching a transistor class. LMU is on 
160 meters. LVN is going to California. EK is working 
on his house. ARU, AF and 3FCS will be on 6 meters. 
BW’s 60-ft. mast came down in a storm, AYG is on 
s.s.b. on 10 meters. OOP gave a talk on Simple Im- 
provements in Low Priced Communication Receivers 
at the GBARS. The Bedford Radio Club will hold 
an auction and get-together at the American Legion 
Hall, Bedford, on Apr. 18th at 8 pP.m., reports KJO. 
NF has a new L-1000-A final, worked 5 countries in 
45 minutes with a dipole and made Conelrad out of a 
Heathkit BR-2. BPW has WAS and 68 countries. RSE 
is in West Bridgewater. New officers of the QRA: VKF, 
pres.; PPK, vice-pres.; OG, treas.; VRK, secy.; OKB, 
CTW, KTJ, KI, DNW and EYZ directors. JSM 
worked 8SFG on Aurora skip on 2 meters. NCT is put- 
ting up a 60-ft. tower. AGA has 75A-3 and 32V-3 with 
super minibeam. VRK got a VS60Y card. DWY 
is on 10 meters with a DX-100. The 2200 Club meets 
daily at 2200 on 28,056 ke. A meeting of the new 
Federation of Eastern Mass. Amateur Radio Associa- 
tions was held at the G.E. place in Lynn. JLN is acting 
chairman and VRK _ secy.-treas, AVY has been sick. 
TZ has a new REM 2-11 receiver and 2-meter rig and 
a six-element beam. BB is busy on 160 meters. BCN, 
GRC and MKW are working DX on 80-meter c.w. 
LYV is DXing on 160 meters. CMT has a new 829 on 
2 meters. YHQ is back home. MQG, BCN and WHC 
are on 6 meters. MFI moved. BNC applied for OBS 
appointment. NPR is the new EC for Barnstable. BPW 
and KLQ are in the Eastern Mass. Net on 3660 kc. 
at 7 p.M., daily except Sat. and Sun. MON writes 
from New Hampshire that he is on 15 and 20 meters. 
The South Shore Club and the Braintree Radio Club 
are holding regular meetings. The Winthrop group still 
is holding drills. KNIAOT is new. QVK made a 
ground plane for 2 meters, RCJ and ZEN had Open 
House on New Year’s. SQY is on the Cape. AHE spoke 
on 2 and MHC spoke on 6 meters at the Framingham 
Club. EXH worked 2CFW again after a 22-year lapse. 
IBE has the RACES plan in for Rockport. AAR 
handled a message from Honolulu to Quincy Hospital 
and back again for a fellow whose father had a heart 
attack. ETH is DXing and looking for Delaware. AKN 
is trying to work his son in Los Angeles, but has been 
sick. MRQ/CHA has renewed his EC, ORS and OPS 
appointments. NBS has renewed ORS appointment. 
AVY has renewed OO and OBS appointments, TQQ 
has been in the hospital. ABC suggests that we make 
the Humdinger Fone Net a habit for efficient traffic- 
handling every Sat. at 1200 on 7.220 Mc. The net man- 
ager is 2PEQ. Traffic: (Jan.) WIEPE 252, BPW 242, 
EMG 235, MME 86, GNX 71, EAE 43, AVY 42, IBE 
32, TY 30, KLQ 16, BY 14, ATX 12, AHP 8, TZ 8, 
AUQ 7, AKN 5, BB 5, SMO 4, MKW 3, CAM 2, LM 2. 
(Dec.) WIIBE 379, MME 99, KBS 12, AAR 8, NUP 
8, RCQ 8, HHC 6, CZW 4, ETH 3, AKN 2. (Nov.) 
W1MME 150. (Oct.) WIMME 151. 

WESTERN MASSACHUSETTS—SCM, Osborne R. 
McKeraghan, WIHRV—SEC: RRX. RM: BVR. PAM: 
MNG. The WMCW Net meets on 3560 ke. Mon. through 
Sat. at 1900 and 2200 EST and has several new mem- 
bers. The Western Mass. Phone Net on 3870 ke. Wed. 
at 1800 EST needs your support to become an active 
and solid net. Comments have been heard from some 
Novices about forming a get-acquainted net on their 
frequencies. How about some more ideas from you 
Novices? DLS has been appointed an OPS. TAY has 
been elected a vice-director of TCPN. The Hampden 
County v.h.f. group topped the Hartford County boys 
this year in the January V.H.F. Contest to even the 
score at two wins each. Sgt. Joe Dunning, a W5 of 
Westover AFB, and several of his crew, all hams, put 
on a very fine demonstration of amateur TV on 420 
Me., using surplus gear, at the February meeting of 
the Hampden County Club. A move is on to secure 
call letter automobile plates for hams in Massachusetts, 
KUL is coordinating this activity for the Hampden 
County Assn. and seeks the support of other groups 
and individuals. The Greater Worcester Emergency 
Phone Net had a nice write-up in the Worcester Teie- 
gram on Jan. 21st. The Pioneer Valley Club in Holyoke 
is becoming very popular in the area and the boys 
put out an FB monthly rag called The Pioneer Valley 
Indian. Members of the Pittsfield Radio Club sent out 

(Continued on page 106) 





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seven mobiles and four walkie-talkies to assist in the 
sled dog races held at the Winter Carnival at Pontoosuc 
Lake Jan. 13th. These included BKG, LKO, UIS, UUJ, 
HPA, WF and CJG. New Novices are AQJ in Lenox 
and AHI in Peru. EOB got back from Florida in time 
for the DX Contest. He reports a countries total 
of 171 going into the contest. BVR has a Johnson 
Matchbox and can now be heard on 20, 15 and 10 me- 
ters, c.w. of course. 4NNW recently moved to Adams, 
JKD has 167 countries confirmed. NPL made WAC. 
ZER has a new cubicle quad up and working. BYH 
and ZXM have acquired phone patches. AGM is a 
regular on 11 meters and reports many fine contacts 
there. CPN is working 50-Mc. DX quite regularly from 
the Berkshire Hills. Traffic: (Jan.) WILDE 414, BVR 
118, EOB 66, FZY 53, DZV 51, DVW 20, MNG 20, DGL 
9, AGM 8, KGJ 2. (Dec.) WIUKR 301, EOB 88, 
AGM 15. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE—SCM, John A. Knapp, WIAIJ 
—SEC: BXU. RMs: CRW and COC. PAM: CDX. The 
Granite State Phone Net’s meeting time is now 1900, 
Mon, through Fri., with an informal session at 0900 
Sun. on 3842 kc. The New Hampshire C.W. Net is on 
3685 ke. at 1900. The New Hampshire Emergency Net 
meeting time is Sun. at 1300 on 3850 ke., tying in with 
RACES test runs on 2 and 6 meters. Please contact the 
following RACES officers for information on the New 
Hampshire RACES plan: For Belknap County, HZN; 
Carroll Co., IIQ; Cheshire Co., VZS; Coos Co., VEG; 
Grafton Co, RXA; Hillsboro Co., GDE; Merrimack 
Co., COC Rockingham Co., CDX; Strafford Co., 
WBM; Sullivan Co., PTB. Congrats to BPL-winner 
DYE, with a December total of 601. The Port City Am- 
ateur Radio Club is back on the air with a DX-100. 
GVL reports on RACES tests between Proctor Academy 
and Concord. Best of luck to Dover High School’s new 
radio club, the Dover Mike and Key Club, KKT trustee. 
Welcome to new General Class licensees KIAHE 
K1AXQ and GIB. Please check your certificates for 
expiration dates and send them in. Traffic: (Jan.) 
WIDYE 206, AIJ 7, FZ 7, NBD 3. (Dec.) WIDYE 
601, CRW 402, GJM 26. 

RHODE ISLAND—SCM, Mrs. June R. Burkett, 
WIVXC—SEC: PAZ. PAM: YNE. RMs: BBN and 
BTV. VWR is a new OBS. Endorsements: BTV and 
YNE as ORSs. Results of recent club elections—NCRC: 
2LHB/1, pres.; JBB, vice-pres.; JFF, rec. secy.; Tem- 
perence Semich, corr, secy.; and WNIIAG, treas. PRA: 
KKR, pres.; TQW, vice-pres.; VZP, rec. secy.; HIK 
corr. secy.; KKE, treas.; SGA, CPC and VSZ, di- 
rectors. , F been awarded the Navy’s Distin- 
guished Public Service Award and an Edison Citation. 
Newt has been regularly providing a link for many 
Rhode Island families with their relatives at Operation 
Deepfreeze. The NCRC held its annual banquet Jan. 
19th UHE is getting good reports with a new s.s.b. 
exciter running 4 watts on 50 Me. Some of the other 
Rhode Island amateurs now operating s.s.b. on various 
bands are AOJ, BTV, CCN, CPI, KGC, GPE, GR, 
GTS, HXS and ZPG. QR and VAY have been awarded 
the Clam Digger's certificates YNE has a new phone 
patch in operation. We are very sorry to learn of UT 
hospitalization and wish him a_ée speedy recovery 
WNIOTI and KNIAAK, two busy YLs, have been 
making very fine contacts on 15-meter c.w. KCS, who 
recently worked Florida for his 19th state on 144 Me 
is looking for skeds on this band with other stations 
interested in meteor work. Traffic: (Jan.) WIJJW 89, 
VXC 63, YKQ 63, BTV 56, BBN 52, KDS 38, ZXA 25 
HLY 23, YNE 17, CCN 16, TGD 16, YRC 15, (Dec.) 
WI1YKQ 110, VWR 13, DZI 9. 

VERMONT—SCM, Mrs. Ann L. Chandler, WIOAK 
—SEC: SIO. RM: BNV. PAM: SEO. Traffic nets: 
VTN, Mon.-Sat. at 6:30 p.m. on 3520 ke.; VTPN, Sun. 
mornings at 9 on 3860 ke.; GMN, Mon.-Sat. at 12 Noon 
on 3860 ke. VTN held 27 sessions during January with 
89 messages handled. Top QNI were ELJ 23, JLZ 19 
BNV 15, KRV 11, ZNM 9 On VTPN 44 different 
Vermont stations reported in during January with HOA 
and ETV as new members. A new OPS is VZE. Ap- 
rye endorsed: MEP as OES; CGW, OAK and 
VSA as ECs; IT, TXY and VZE as ORSs. Brattle- 
boro’s 6-meter, 6-o’clock emergency net has developed 
into a daily net called the “6 x 6’! The Rutland 
Radio Club held a chicken dinner at Lindholm’s Diner 
Feb. 3rd. Meetings now are held every Sat. at 7 P.M. 
ELR again is active on 14-Me. c.w. chasing DX, some 
of the latest being AP2AD, ST2NG, VQ2RG, CR6CZ 
and LU2ZS (Antarctica), running 100 watts to a home- 
brew rig with an HQ-150. From Bennington, MEP has 
a new home on top of a hill with a new sixteen-element 
beam on 2 meters, three elements on 6 and NH has a 
60-element 2-meter beam up again. KRV boosted power 
to 80 watts on 3.5 Me., and also finished the new band- 
switching exciter on 80, 40 and 20 meters. PZX, is now 
K6TSM operating on 20 meters. KKM is working the 
night shift and is missed on VTN. Stationed at Pep- 

(Continued on page 108) 





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SIXTH VERMONT QSO PARTY 


The Tri-County Amateur Radio Club of Brattleboro, 
Vermont, announces the 6th Vermont QSO Party and invites 
all radio amateurs to participate. Vermonters are urged to 
work as many out-of-state stations as possible, to help them 
toward WAS, WANE and W-VT awards. Here are the 
details: 

(1) Time: 24-hour week-end period from 6 p.m. EST Satur- 
day, April 6th, to 6 p.m. EST Sunday, April 7th. 

(2) No time limit and no power restrictions. 

(3) Bands: work any band or bands you wish. The follow- 
ing schedule is suggested. 1800-2000— 10, 15 and 20; 
2000-2200 — 40; 2200-0600 — 75, 80 and 160; 0600-0930 — 
40; 0930-1200 — 75 and 80; 1200-1500 — 10, 15 and 20. 
Fight it out anywhere from 1500 to 1800 EST. 

(4) Outside stations call ‘CQ Vermont.” Vermont sta- 

ions call “CQ (call) de VT” or “CQ (call) in Vermont.” 

(5) Scoring: Vermont stations: 1 point per contact and 
multiply by number of states, U. S. Possessions, Canadian 
Provinces and foreign countries worked during the contest 
period. Outside stations: 5 points for each Vermont QSO and 
multiply total by the number of Vermont counties worked. 
Contacts with the same station on any other band will count 
towards total. 

(6) Contact information required: Vermont stations send 
number of QSO, RST or RS report, and county. All others 
send QSO number, RST or RS, and state, possession, prov- 
ince or foreign country. 

(7) Awards: A certificate will be awarded to the highest- 
scoring station in each state, U. S. Possession, Canadian 
Province and foreign country, and to the highest-scoring 
station in each Vermont county. In addition, a W-VT certifi- 
cate will be sent to any station working 13 of Vermont’s 14 
counties, provided the station has not previously been issued 
this award. Party logs showing required date will be accepted 
in lieu of QSLs. Separate awards are not given for phone 
or ¢.w. 

(8) Logs and scores must be postmarked not later than 
June 1, 1957, and should be sent to Ray N. Flood, W1FPS, 
2 Marlboro Ave., Brattleboro, Vermont. 

Mark your calendars now so you won't forget the 1957 
Vermont QSO Party! 














perill AFB in VO-Land is newly-licensed WN1AKU, 
from Barre. WN1IVT advises another new Novice in 
East Calais is KNIAUE. New Novices are KNIADQ 
St. Johnsbury and WNINXB, Poultney. WNILTD 
dropped the ‘N”’ and is operating an AT-1, now grid- 
modulated, with an SX-99 receiver. HGZ also dropped 
the ‘“‘N.”’ §SGI/1 from Purdy, Mo., now lives in Uni- 
versity Heights, Burlington, and is technical representa - 
tive at Ethan Allen AFB. WOA is working on a roster 
booklet of Vermont c.w. and phone net members which 
will carry pictures and write-ups. VVP and VZE are 
assembling a DX-100 for a prospective ham—VVP’s 
father-in-law! TBG, VSA and WPY are enjoying 2- 
meter activity. EIB has a dandy signal on 75-meter 
phone. Lee Warner, jr., reported on the CAP set-up at 
the Mike and Key Club at its January meeting held 
in the Middlebury Fire House. ZEW is sporting a new 
four-element beam on 10 meters, A 6-inch telescope 
mirror will be FPS’s new telescope for counting outer 
space objects very soon. VZE held open house around 
Christmas time with many ham friends and XYLs 
present. Heard on during the January CD Party were 
ELJ, KRV, OAK, SEO and VZE. Traffic: WIBNV 
102, OAK 78, AVP 60, ZYZ 45, KRV 43, BXT 30, ZEW 
22, ELJ 20, JLZ 19, ZNM 18, VVP 12, VZE 9. 


NORTHWESTERN DIVISION 


ALASKA—SCM, Dave A. Fulton, KL7AGU—Our 
thanks to BZC, BPK and USA, whose contributions 
made this month’s column possible. BPK and family 
were on a trip to W-Land and just recently returned. 
Don is putting up a new vertical which he hopes will 
help him to snare those hard-to-get East Coast stations 
for his WAS. BCZ writes that the Bering Amateur 
Radio Club would like to enter in some of the coming 
contests as a club station. The problem is to get the 
information in time to enter. Well, Joe, that is also a 
problem here, too, as our mail is always late. Dog 
team is awfully slow for mail delivery. There might 
be one way to bea it, though. How about an OBS 
appointment out that way? USA rolled up quite a traf- 
fic count this month. USA is a single-operator station, 

(Continued on page 110) 





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6 10 ll 15 20 80 
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FRONT TO BACK RATIO 
STANDING WAVE RATIO 
NUMBER OF ELEMENTS 
HORIZONTAL BEAM ANGLE 


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17db (b) 
1.1-L6é Li-2i 
2 (b) 
37 deg. (b) 


7. 6db 

26db 2idb 

1. 1-1.8 L.1-L5 
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12. 6db 


1,2-21 
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FRONT TO BACK RATIO 
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NUMBER OF ELEMENTS 
HORIZONTAL BEAM ANGLE 


Tdb 

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1, 2-2,1 
2 


7. 6db 6. Tdb (c) L 5db 
26db (b) 
Li-21 
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1.1-1.8 
3 


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FORWARD GAIN 
FRONT TO BACK RATIO 12. 6db 
STANDING WAVE RATIO 1,2-21 
NUMBER OF ELEMENTS 3 
HORIZONTAL BEAM ANGLE 22 deg. 22 deg. 

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operated by KL7CAB, Nice going, Lee. Another nice 
job by USA is the running of the 75-meter Intra- 
Alaska Net. Traffic: KL7USA 16 

IDAHO—SCM, Rev. Francis A. Peterson, W7RKI— 
The Idaho amateur license plate bill finally was passed 
with almost no opposition. Congratulations and thanks 
to all who helped with it. Now we should all thank 
our e.d. director for his help by joining up with 
RACES. The Boise Club has started a fine new paper, 
Ham Hill News. Four new OBSs will give better cov- 
erage to Idaho. W7ABK and RKI blew up their modu- 
lation transformers with their big words. GMC is the 
new manager of the RN7 Net. YBA is working out 
with his transistor transmitter. QIS and WNR made the 
papers by handling traffic to disaster areas. The Poca- 
tello and Boise Clubs are running code classes. IY is 
now transmitting code practice on 7162 ke. Fri. 9 P.M. 
2-meter activity is growing in the Boise-Nampa Area 
with regular nets and continuous monitoring on 145.44 
(f.m.) and 145.8 (a.m.) Me. The Boise Club’s simulated 
search was a success, Traffic: W7GMC 270, IY 10, 
RSP 4. 

MONTANA—SCM, Vernon L. Phillips, W7NPV/- 
WXI—SEC: KUH. Governor Aronson signed the Mon- 
tana Amateur License Plate Bill into law Feb. Ist. The 
Bill went into Committee as House Bill #20 on Jan. 
15th. It passed the House 89-3 on Jan. 24th and passed 
the Senate 49-3 on Jan. 28th. Montana amateurs now 
will be able to purchase a single call letter plate for 
$1.50 and display it above one of the regular numeral 
plates. SJH, of Dutton, joined Silent Keys, Jan. 24th. 
New officers of the Great Falls Radio Club are YIO, 
pres.; ZOL, vice-pres.; JGG, secy.-treas.; TSM, act. 
mgr.; KUH, FDH and JGG, directors. The club is 
affiliated with ARRL, is incorporated and the club 
station is affiliated with MARS. KUH is on s.s.b. with 
250 watts. FUM is a new ham in Glasgow. GCY has a 
new Globe Scout. OOY and NPV have a jr. operator 
born Jan. 20th. Recent es ae TPE as EC and 

Traffic : /7SF NPV 35, YPN 22, OOG 15, 
TNJ 1: J 8, ED 6, 
5 EEO 2. EUQ 2. 

OREGON--SC M, Edward F. Congnghan, W7ESJ 
The OARS Net has some new officers, QWE, manager; 
JCJ, assistant manager; YQJ, net director; DJX, 
assistant net director. QWE is giving bulletins on the 
OARS Net. OLU is building a new double-conversion 
receiver with variable crystal filter to replace the old 
BC-312M. Using a Collins PTO and a Viking II, Bob 
worked ZLiAAX on 3854 ke. UJL has been playing 
basketball and his traffic score suffered. UGE has been 
hospitalized for the past two months. QFY is on his 
way to VK-Land for a vacation. WHE completed the 
c.w. section of a 300-watt rig. SMR finished modifica- 
tion on the ARC-5 VHF and now is working on a re- 
ceiver. LT is working MATN and the ham band with 
traffic. UZU has been busy trying to improve c.w. 
using a mill to copy. BEG, VIL, ULR, VPH and ISP 
have 2 meters jumping around Medford, in addition to 
working the lower frequencies. ALG, AXK, CEU, BJI, 
DTS, LI, MTT, NGW, OTV, RET, VZZ, WSP, WTQ. 
ZHF, DFK and YUN are keeping 2 meters hot around 
Portland. CMB, in Seattle, also works into Portland on 
2 meters. In the Pendleton Area we find ADX, AYT, 
BKD, DDP, PL, PON, TAK, TUC and WXB active. 
Around Portland we hear LI, PFA, QBO, WGB, WHE, 

iD, MTW, SMR, VLE, WAA, WJZ, RCL, FPD, 

6NBE. 7, GWV, BVH, QF, SQR, TYT, VBF, 

; ZBP, DFK, AVW, DXV, EUG, 

PDR, QEI, SRK, TMI, UJY, VKA, WVI, WNW, 
NPF, NTI, VNS and ZKH. Traffic: (Jan.) W7LT 49, 
HDN 41, HJU 29, OLU 20, BVH 11. (Dec.) W70LU 112. 

WASHINGTON—SCM, Victor S. Gish, W7FIX— 
The Valley Amateur Radio Club (Puyallup) held its 
annual banquet Feb. 15th. Guest speakers were FIX 
and OEB. Plans are being laid by PUA for the June 
V.H.F. Party with operation on 6, 2, 1% and % 
meters and on 1296 and 10,000 Mc. VARC’s code and 
theory classes average 20 students twice weekly. The 
Apple City Radio Club (Wenatchee) reports the fol- 
lowing officers: WN7DZX, pres.; ZGH, _ vice-pres.; 
ETO, secy.-treas. Theory classes conducted by HQO 
and code classes by ETO are well attended. OVE 
trained about 20 women operators for c.d. operation. 

‘UZ is leaving Fairchild AFB for KGli-Land. FWD 
now is Radio Officer for the State C.D. The Walla 
Walla Club is showing ARRL films at its meetings 
Word from the ex-SCM of Indiana, 9BKJ, says he has 
joined the “rocking chair’’ brigade. Welcome to the 
fold, George. So far there has been no response to the 
SCM’s appeal for each club to appoint an Emergency 
Coordinator. WAH still is QRL school, WSN, RN7 and 
PAN and is waiting for relief from the RN7 Mer. 
job. OE is on the road again and has dropped all nets 
except WSN and the 3550" C&E Plan. AIB is getting 
gear together for a 3DZZ 5-band antenna. EHH is 
keeping a second receiver on 3875 ke. (C&E Plan). 

(Continued on page 112) 





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ER says flu kept his traffie down. USO says Clark 
County C.D. now has 2-meter contact to nine outlying 
stations, each with one operator and two alternates, 
with drills each Tue. at 1930 PST. GAT’s antenna came 
down and he now is working WSN with one end of the 
Zepp on the ground. HDT is the only station in 
Asotin County on the air—the rest are repairing or re- 
building. UQY and family have been plagued with ill- 
ness but things seem to be on the upgrade now. AVM 
demonstrated 2-meter work to the Lions Club by hav- 
ing a brother Lion talk to the meeting from his bed 
in the hospital. WQD and DDY are working on RTTY 
rigs. “3550” is getting to be quite a ‘“‘calling’’ frequency 
in off-net times. GVV installed a differential keyer to 
keep AIB happy. Traffic: W7BA 905, PGY 734, K7FBN 
694, W7FRU 541, VAZ 538, K7FEA 524, WAT 520, 
W7WAH 169, OE 167, AHV i APS 70, JC 49, AIB 
42, EHH 41, AMC 35, ER 34, JEY 30, USO 30, BXH 
16, = 13, GAT 10, Wap 7, HDT 6, EVW 5, NWP 5 
GVV 4 


PACIFIC DIVISION 


HAWAII—SCM, Samuel H. Lewbel, KH6AED—IJ 
is the latest convert to 2 meters. He is on now using 
a new 6N2 transmitter and worked Honolulu from Lihue. 
He still is after DX and contest scores, too. Maui hams 
held a contest for the most countries worked during 
1956. The winner was ER, with 186. PM was second 
with 184 and MG third with 183. The Territorial Ham 
Convention will be held in Honolulu, July 6th and 7th. 
The Honolulu Amateur Radio Club will be the host 
this year. The SCM still needs news. Maui has pitched 
in, now how about Hilo and Kona? Traffic: KH6BQS 
329, KP6AK 125. 

SANTA CLARA VALLEY—SCM, G. Donald Eber- 
lein, W6YHM—Asst. SCM: Roy E. Pinkham, 6BPT. 
SEC: NVO. RMs: ZRJ and K6GID,. PAMs: OFJ and 
WGO. New appointees: VZT and K6GZ as ORSs; ZLO, 
OII and K6CGA as OPSs. The Monterey Bay Radio 
Club presented a 30-minute TV program on Feb. 3rd 
demonstrating the operation of a simulated emergency 
network. K6ILM acted as NCS, with the following 
stations working as mobile: K6RWJ, K6BDP, UJA 
and RJA. Although there was no remote pickup of the 
mobiles in action still pictures of the installations were 
flashed on TV as each station transmitted in the test. 
The following attended the joint meeting of the NCTA 
and SCT held at Fresno Feb. 2nd and 3rd: K6CGA, 
OFJ, HC, UTV, ZRJ, PLG, VZT, K6DYX, RFW, 
ZLO and YHM. Problems concerning the traffic nets in 
California were discussed. A talk on key clicks was 
given by K6DYX. CBX participated in the F.M.T. 
KN6RUO has changed QTH to South Carolina. VZT is 
trying to clean up a chirpy signal. PLG is building a 
power supply to run 4-400A. K6BBD was active in the 
last C.D. Party. YBV is working on a new tube-keying 
system. K6QCI is building a transistor rig. K6GZ holds 
stand-by watch on 3620 ke. Mon. through Fri. for any 
RTTY boys with traffic. Bob also will take anything 
on e.w. K6DYX makes BPL. HJP reports from Santa 
Cruz. ART has been heard from KR6RX recently and 
says he has twelve months of overseas duty yet. K6PWD 
is a new station in Gilroy. Traffic: (Jan.) K6DYX 550 
W6PLG 353, BPT 247, YHM 210, K6GZ 153, W6YBV 
112, VZT 110, K6CGA 75, W6ZLO 68, NW 55, AIT 
32, FON 25, K6BBD 22, QCI 15, KN6RUO2. (Dec.) 
K6CGA 224; W6ZLO 63. 

EAST BAY—SCM, Roger L. Wixson—As promised, 
from time to time this column will be devoted to 
paying our respects to the old-timers who helped make 
amateur radio what it is today. How many have ever 
worked ZX? Percy W. Dann, better known as Pop, 
was born in Oakland on Dec. 1, 1889. Percy spent some 
of his ‘‘teen’’ years in Reno, Nev., where he attended 
Reno High. He first become interested in amateur radio 
in 1910 while living in Portland, Ore. His first license, 
7DP, was issued to him by the Department of Com- 
merce in Seattle, Wash. Later Pop held the calls 6BFL 
and 6KR. His present call was issued to him in 1920. 
Pop’s first rig was a spark coil transmitter and crystal 
and slide-wire receiver. Pop says DX in those days 
was two to three blocks, After the spark-coil days Pop 
went Ist-class with a rotary and de Forrest audion 
detector. Operating frequencies up to 30,000 kc. were 
common in those days and plug-in coils were on hand 
for quick band changes. After returning to Oakland 
in 1920 Pop Dann went high power with a pair of 811s. 
At present he is running low ee on 20 and 40 
meters. Pop keeps daily skeds with CSD in Grover 
City on 40 meters (7125 ke.). GRT gets in on the sked 
now and then, too. Percy W. Dann is past president of 
the Oakland Radio Ciub, which office he held in 1927, 
He lives with his wife at 1246 Marin Street, San Pablo, 
Calif. Around the clubs in the East Bay section: 
The East Bay Club toured the Berkeley Division of 
Beckman Instruments for its Jan. meeting. MXQ was 

(Continued on page 114) 




















[POYNVYWLELR? & 


iMoyem el-10i0)aaal-laler-mt-aie @-11001 9) h 

a matter of watts. Only carefully 
integrated equipment design 

can be relied on to develop 
effective power that punches your 
signal home every time. 

That's what we call 
“communication power” . : 
and your Viking transmitter will 
deliver it in full measure! . 








Your best Cay! 


Johnson &Armeatewr Eqwipmenrnt 


VIKING “ADVENTURER” TRANSMITTER 


Here's a compact, completely self-contained 50 watt 
CW transmitter ideally suited to the novice! Used to earn the first 
novice WAC (Worked All Continents), the “Adventurer” 
is effectively TVI suppressed . . . puts 50 watts of power into a rugged 
807 transmitting tube. Instant bandswitching 80 through 
10 meters . . . operates by crystal or external VFO control. 
Wide range pi-network output—no antenna tuner needed. 
Break-in keying is clean and crisp. Designed for 


easy assembly—with tubes, less crystals and key. 
Cat. No. 240-181-1 Kit .. Amateur Net $54.95 


VIKING “RANGER” TRANSMITTER 


This popular 75 watt CW or 65 watt phone transmitter 

delivers a solid signal! As an RF and audio exciter, the “Ranger” 
will also drive any of the popular kilowatt level tubes. 
Completely self-contained . . . effectively TVI suppressed. 
Instant bandswitching 160 through 10 meters—operates by 

extremely stable, built-in VFO or crystal control. 

Final amplifier tube is a 6146. Easily assembled—with tubes, 
less crystals, key and microphone. 
Cat. No. 240-161-1 Kit.... : a Amateur Net $214.50 
Cat. No. 240-161-2 Wired and tested. . Amateur Net $293.00 


VIKING “VALIANT” TRANSMITTER 


Here is power to slice through terrific QRM .. . a transmitter 
engineered for outstanding flexibility and performance! 275 watts input 
on CW and SSB*, 200 watts phone. Instant bandswitching 
160 through 10 meters—operates by built-in VFO or crystal control. 
Pi-network tank circuit will match antenna loads from 
50 to 600 ohms—final amplifier utilizes three 6146 tubes in parallel. 
TVI suppressed—timed sequence (break-in) keying—low level 
audio clipping—built-in low pass audio filter—self-contained 
power supplies. With tubes, less crystals, key and microphone. 
Cat. No. 240-104-1 Kit.... Rrra Amateur Net $349.50 
Cat. No, 240-104-2 Wired and tested Amateur Net $439.50 


VIKING "FIVE HUNDRED” TRANSMITTER 


Over a half-kilowatt of fu// communication power! Rated 
600 watts CW .. . 500 watts phone and SSB*—compact RF unit 
designed for desk-top operation—power supply/modulator unit 
may be placed in any convenient location. All exciter stages 
ganged to VFO tuning—also may be operated by crystal control. 
Instant bandswitching 80 through 10 meters—TVI suppressed— 
high gain push-to-talk audio system—low level audio 
clipping. Pi-network output will match a wide range of antenna 
impedances. With tubes, less crystals, key and microphone. 
Cat. No. 240-500-1 Kit..... .......Amateur Net $699.50 
Cat. No. 240-500-2 Wired and tested . . Amateur Net $879.50 


*P.E.P. input with auxiliary SSB exciter 





VIKING “MOBILE” TRANSMITTER 


This power-packed mobile transmitter is rated at 60 watts PA input— 
powerful PP807 modulator is designed for extra audio punch! 

Instant bandswitching 75 through 10 meters. All stages 

ganged to a single tuning knob. Under-dash mounting. Specify 6 or 
12 volts. Less tubes, crystals, microphone and power supply. 

Cat. No. 240-141-1 Kit Amateur Net $99.50 

Cat. No. 240-141-2 Wired and tested on special order only. 


MOBILE VFO 

Small size permits steering post mounting rugged construction 
minimizes frequency shift. Temperature compensated and voltage 
regulated. Calibrated 75 through 10 meters. With tubes 

Cat. No. 240-152-1 Kit. Amateur Net $33.95 

Cat. No. 240-152-2 Wired and tested Amateur Net $49.95 


“WHIPLOAD-6" 

Provides high efficiency base loading for mobile whips—bandswitching 
75 through 10 meters. Air-wound coil provides extremely high “Q’’. 
Fibre-glass housing. Mounts on standard mobile whip 

Cat. No. 250-26 Wired and tested Amateur Net $19.50 


fou UH F. + VIKING "6N2” TRANSMITTER 


This compact VHF transmitter is rated at 150 watts CW and 
100 watts phone—bandswitching 6 and 2 meters! TVI suppressed—- 
may be used with the Viking I, II, ‘Ranger’, or similar 
power supply /modulator combinations. Crystal control 
or may be operated by external VFO with 8-9 mc. output. 

With tubes, less crystals, key and microphone. 

Cat. No. 240-201-1 Kit. Amateur Net $119.50 

Cat. No. 240-201-2 Wired and tested. . Amateur Net $159.50 


TWO METER VFO 


Replaces 8 mc. crystals in most two meter equipment, including types 
using overtone oscillators. Temperature compensated—excellent 
stability. Output range: 7.995 mc. to 8.235 mc. Edge-lighted 
lucite dial calibrated 144 to 148 mc. Requires 6.3 volts at .3 amp. 
and 250-325 volts at 10 ma. With tubes, power cable, and plug. 
Cat. No. 240-132-1 Kit Amateur Net $29.50 
Cat. No. 240-132-2 Wired and tested. . Amateur Net $46.50 


VIKING “PACEMAKER” TRANSMITTER 


This exciting transmitter is the perfect 
companion unit to the Viking “Kilowatt.” 
90 watts input CW and SSB (P.E.P.)... 

35 watts AM! Excellent stability—built-in 
temperature compensated VFO—separate 
crystal control provided for each band. 
Bandswitching 80, 40, 20, 15 and 10 meters 
—automatic voice controlled operation. 
Pi-network matches antenna loads from 

50 to 600 ohms. More than enough 

power to drive a kilowatt amplifier. With 
tubes and crystals, less key and microphone. 
Cat. No. 240-301-2 

Wired and tested Amateur Net $495.00 


POWER DIVIDER — Provides up to 

35 watts continuous dissipation for proper 
output loading of the ‘Pacemaker”’ 

when used to drive the Viking “Kilowatt” 
Cat. No. 250-34 Amateur Net $24.95 


‘ ) a 


wy 


4 VIKING “KILOWATT” AMPLIFIER 


Imagine yourself at the controls of this exciting Viking ““Kilowatt’’! You'll marvel at the ease of 
selecting maximum legal input AM, CW or SSB with the flip of a single switch. . . 
you'll immediately sense the authority of its fx// kilowatt signal, placing the world at your fingertips. 
Continuous frequency coverage 3.5 to 30 megacycles, wide range antenna matching and 
complete TVI suppression. Compact pedestal contains the complete ‘Kilowatt’. 
Excitation requirements: 30 watts RF and 10 watts audio for AM; 2-3 watts peak for SSB. 
Cat. No. 240-1000 Wired and tested with tubes Amateur Net $1595.00 
Cat. No. 251-101 Matching accessory desk FOB Corry, Pa. $123.50 


HRO-60 and NC-300 receivers—courtesy National Company, Malden Mass. 








Aitivues, Beams ond Rotation ... 


PRE-TUNED BEAMS—Rugged, semi-wide spaced with 
balun matching sections. Approximately 9.0 db gain over 
tuned dipole—more than 27 db front-to-back ratio with 
low SWR. Pattern is uni-directional, beam width is 55° 
With 3 elements, boom and balun. 


Cat. No. 138-420-3 20 Meters .... Amateur Net $139.50 
Cat. No. 138-415-315 Meters .. Amateur Net $110.00 
Cat. No. 138-410-310 Meters....... Amateur Net $ 79.50 


“ROTOMATIC” ROTATOR—Supports up to 175 Ib. beams 
even under heavy icing or in high winds. Rotates 14 
RPM—1200 to 1 gear reduction. Cast aluminum housin 
with 5/16” steel rotating table. (Tilts 90°.) Includes des 
top control box with selsyn indicator. 

Cat. No. 138-112-1 With slip rings for continuous rotation. 

For open wire line. . . Amateur Net $354.00 
Cat. No. 138-1 12-51 With limit switches for 370° rotation. 

For coaxial line Amateur Net $354.00 


VIKING "MATCH-STICK"—Fully automatic, pre-tuned 
multi-band vertical antenna system. Bandswitching 80 
through 10 meters. Remotely motor driven from operating 

osition. Easily mounts on roof top or in limited space 
Reston. Low SWR (less than 2 to 1) all bands. Imped- 
ance: 52 ohms. With 35’ mast, base, tuning network, 
relays, control box and 6 nylon guy ropes. 


Cat. No. 137-102  Pre-tuned.......... Amateur Net $129.50 








138-420-3 








137-102 


Ctatiow Accessories... 


VIKING"MATCH BOXES"—Self-contained, band switch- 
ing 80 through 10 meters. Provides integrated antenna 
matching and switching. Tunes out large amounts of 
reactance. No load-tapping or plug-in coils necessary. 
Cat. No. 250-23 275 watts, wired..... Amateur Net $ 49.85 
Cat. No. 250-30 Kilowatt, wired. ..... Amateur Net $124.50 


VIKING AUDIO AMPLIFIER — Self-contained 10-watt 
speech amplifier, complete with power supply and tubes. 
Speech clipping and filtering improves performance and 
effectiveness of your AM transmitter. 

Cat. No. 250-33-1 Kit.. ... Amateur Net $73.50 
Cat. No. 250-33-2 Wired and tested Amateur Net $99.50 


LOW PASS FILTER—Handles more than 1000 watts RF. 
75 db or more attenuation above 54 mc. Wired, pre-tuned. 


Cat. No. 250-20 52 Ohms Impedance... Amateur Net $13.50 
Cat. No. 250-35 72 Ohms Impedance... Amateur Net $13.50 


SWR BRIDGE—Provides accurate measurement of SWR 
for effective use of low pass filter and antenna coupler. 
Cat. No. 250-24 52 Ohms impedance. ... Amateur Net $9.75 


POWER REDUCER— Provides up to 20 watts continuous 
dissipation, permitting 100-150 watt transmitters such as 
Johnson Viking, Collins 32V to serve as exciters for the 
Viking ‘‘Kilowatt’’. Completely shielded. 

Cat. No. 250-29 Amateur Net $13.95 


CRYSTAL CALIBRATOR— Provides accurate 100 kc check 
points to 55 mc. Requires 6.3 volts at .15 amps and 150- 
300 volts at 2 ma. With tube and crystal. 

Cat. No. 250-28 Wired and tested... .. Amateur Net $17.25 


“SIGNAL SENTRY”— Monitors CW or phone signals up 
to 50 mc. Powered by receiver. With tubes. 
Cat. No. 250-25 Wired and tested Amateur Net $18.95 


KEYS AND PRACTICE SETS—See your distributor or write 
for descriptive literature on Johnson’s complete key line. 


The E. F. Johnson Co. reserves the right to change 
prices or specifications without notice and without 
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host of the affair. The members saw many items of 

interest such as electronic counters, control equipment 

Or OULFr and developments in the field of magnetics. The Oak- 
land Club had its semi-annual auction and drew a 

good. crowd. GK gave an account of the TVI commit- 

tee and the problems connected with getting help to 

support that activity. The Mt. Diablo Club had a 

eCS CL &S “radio quiz’? program similar to a spelling bee, Ques- 
tions were taken from FCC laws, regulations, theory, 

procedures and history. K6BYQ was down from Napa 


way the other night and showed me the new 6-meter 
The boys 


rigs the Silverado Six Shooters are using. 

are doing a real fine job with local ¢.d. work using 
these rigs. Incidentally, the rigs work on 6 volts d.c. or 
110 a.c. by merely changing the power plug. We have 
two more OBSs now, K6GK and K6KFF. GK is put- 


ing out Oricial Bulletins on UTL, Army MARS and 
RADIO TELEVISION CORP. Air Force MARS. KFF is doing the same on 6-meter 
RTTY. Reports have been received from all parts of 
the country commenting on the RTTY bulletins which 
are put out on 75, 40, 20 and 2 meters. VPC has teletype 
machines for anyone interested. Call Higate 4-5410 
RTTY activities are really moving and regular skeds 
are being kept from coast to coast. K6GZ, 6BP and 
1BDI have been quite successful with traffic between 
Hartford, Minneapolis and San Francisco. Traffic: 
K6WAY 447, GK 231, W6VPC 50. 

SAN FRANCISCO—SCM, Walter A. Buckley, 
W6GGC—-VE7AMM, of the Canadian Air Force, visited 
the Humboldt Amateur Radio Club when his plane had 
a stop-over at Eureka. K6OBX now is stationed on a 
fleet tug at Pearl Harbor. ZSE worked ES on 40-meter 
c.w. ES, in San Francisco, was using transistors only 
in his rig with a power of 60 milliwatts and it was 
solid copy to Eureka. The 10th Annual Dinner of the 
San Francisco Naval Shipyard and HAMS was held 
at Veneto’s Restaurant with a good turnout. After 
dinner the gang played bingo. Ninety-seven members 
of the 6-meter club held their monthly luncheon at 
San Francisco on Jan. 27th. Most of these fellows are 
in the 6-Meter C.D. Net ready for any emergency 
Sixty-one members of the Tamalpais Radio Club en- 
joyed an Installation of Officers Dinner held on Jan. 
26th. The Red Cross advised the Marin Amateur Radio 
Club that they would waive the previous charge of 
$2.50 per meeting night for use of the R.C. Hall by 
the amateurs. Nomination of officers was held at the 
MARC at this meeting. The speaker was UVB at the 
Marin Club meeting held in January. CBE finally has 
achieved DXCC and now has 126 worked with 108 
confirmed. IS started working as of Feb. Ist at the 
Standard Research Institute in the antenna labs. AHH 
was net control for the hidden transmitter hunt on 10 
meters held by the 29ers Club. WJF and FEA are set- 
tled in their new QTH at San Anselmo and Clare has 
accepted an appointment as OPS. GQY is back in the 
swing again with a traffic report. QMO is enjoying 
being a lady of leisure now and is very active on 
the c.w. nets again. The San Francisco Radio Club lost 
its regular meeting place at the Lakeshore Plaza Audi- 
torium but the committee got busy and found a new 
hall up on Forest Hills which met with the club mem- 
bers’ full approval. URA is rebuilding again and has 
the new rig half done, which calls for 400 watts to an 
814 on 40-meter c.w. The Ladies Radio Club of San 
Francisco held its election of officers and celebrated 
its 3rd anniversary with a dinner at Veneto’s Res- 
taurant with BYB as guest speaker for the evening. 
About thirty of the local mobileers took a snow trip up 
to Yosemite in January and although the valley was 
free from snow on arrival there we were treated to a 
real thrill when we woke up the second day to find the 
trees and ground a white winterland. A wonderful time 
was had by all. Many of the fellows were busy on the 
nets handling traffic for the Reno Disaster when some 
of the buildings were demolished by gas _ explosion, 
Traffic: (Jan.) W6GQY 244, QMO 196, FEA 62, WJF 
52, BIP 338, GGC 30, CXO 21, GHI 12. (Dec.) W6FEA 
296, WJF 120. 

SACRAMENTO VALLEY—SCM, Harold L. Lucero, 
W6JDN—With the election results awaited at this writ- 
ing I wish to take this opportunity to thank everyone 
for the wonderful support given me during the past 
term. I truly hope that I pleased more than offended. 
It has been fun and I have enjoyed every second, 
fellows and gals. The traffic has been on the upswing 
with more reporting. This is fine and I hope it keeps 
up. ZF is preparing a vertical with ground radials, 45- 
ft. aluminum tubing mast 2% inch in diameter fed 
with 52-ohm coax. He also is making a multi-band 
tuner for the grid circuit of his 813s. It was wonderful 
that HQF and K6EHT attended to the Governor’s 
message. but since the Governor was in Washington, 
D. C., and with the President, the message sent was 
signed by Lt. Governor Harold Powers. Thanks, fellows, 
and I am sure that it arrived at its destination in time. 
JEQ gave a talk on RACES and c.d. and it was re- 

(Continued on page 116) 


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ported to be very fine and to the point. ZF gave a 
run down on frequencies. Of course these were given 
during the Sacramento Amateur Club meeting. The 
meeting held in Fresno on the 2nd and 3rd of February 
was not attended by JDN because of the snow condi- 
tions in this area. Well, 73, for this time and again 
thanks for past cooperation. Traffic: W6MWR_ 86, 
K61YC 60, W6RXX 19, JDN 12, ZF 2. 

SAN JOAQUIN VALLEY—SCM, Ralph Saroyan, 
W6JPU—The Northern California and Southern Cali- 
fornia DX Clubs held their annual get-together in 
Fresno Jan. 19th and 20th. It was well attended and 
the talks were very interesting. Danny Weil, skipper of 
the Yasme, was a guest speaker. The Northern Cali- 
fornia and Southern California Traffie Association held 
a meeting at the Hacienda, Feb. 2nd. It seems that 
traffic men have their problems, too! K6KYW is on 40- 
meter mobile. BAN is building a modulator using : 
pair of 8l1ls. JXY is back on 75-meter mobile. K6AHQG 
is a new call heard on 75-meter mobile. WME is on 
75-meter mobile. CZO is new to Fresno from Stockton 
K6VQE is another new call heard around town. FAS8IH 
reports he is hearing several W6 stations on 6 meters 
K6JGH is running 120 watts mobile. K6LRQ has a 
new 6-meter Communicator. DBU is building a new 
QTH. K6BGO reports and has proof of lots of snow 
on his beam in Coalinga. FGJ has been awarded the 
boner trophy by the Stockton Radio Club. TV, Fresno 
City Civil Defense station, now is handling the check- 
ins on 3995 ke. every Monday night at 8 o'clock 
K6JQN is now a function of Region 38C. The Coalinga 
Radio Club officers are JJV, pres.; CET, vice-pres. ; 
NPP, secy. K6HTM is going s.s.b. 1“ one kw. Keep 
up the reports. Check into your local e.d. nets. It takes 
only five minutes, Traffic: W6ADB 62, EBL 8, GCS 5 


ROANOKE DIVISION 


NOR CAROLINA—SCM, B. Riley Fowler, 
W4RRH—SEC: ZG. PAM: DRC. Alamance County has 
organized a radio club with LXH, pres.; AEH, vice- 
pres.; K4DNY, secy. The club in Kinston is doing 
something about c.d. ESB, EC for District 22, ap- 
pointed NRG Asst. EC for the Kinston Area. District 
10 is busy registering AREC members. Thanks to YQX. 
KN4IEX has received WAS in ten months with a Globe 
Scout. The Winston-Salem group is building a remote 
transmitter on 2 meters. This will give state coverage 
on 2 meters. DKO informs me that the Wake County 
RACES plan was approved Jan. 23, 1957. K4CEB, 
NCS of the NCN, reports openings for ¢c.w. operators 
on 3700 ke. from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. daily. BCE, BUW 
and TMO are acting as liaison to the Fourth Regional 
Net. All Emergency Coordinators except Districts 9 and 
15 returned their certification forms for the Command 
and Information Net (RACES) for a State Net. This 
is an excellent record. SGD has received WAS « 
phone, eight endorsement stickers and has WAC/YL 
all confirmed except a YL in Africa. E. JQ has received 
her YLCC certificate. The Morganton Club is busy 
building 6-meter gear for c.d. The Raleigh and Greens- 
boro Clubs assisted in the March of Dimes with their 
mobile units. Traffic: K4BUJ 437, W4GXR 108, RRH 
te DRC 46, QC 13, K4FFR 7, W4EYZ 6, RQR 
» SoG . 

SOUTH CAROLINA—SCM, Bryson L. McGraw, 
W4HMG—K4GLYV reports new officers of the Edisto 
Radio Club are K4GLT, pres.; K4GLV, secy.-treas. ; 
KN4MHK, act. mgr.; K4HQK, reporter. Members of 
the club are visiting high schools with two-way com- 
munications and report much interest by students. 
EGI, of the Columbia Club, finished the Novice Class 
and all 7 passed their exams. BPD is back on 75 meters 
after a long absence and is being welcomed by the old- 
timers. ZRH has been appointed State Radio Officer for 
c.d. and is visiting clubs to urge participation. TWW 
is doing a fine job on 20 meters with Polar Expedition 
traffic. We regret to learn of the death of BBL’s brother. 
FFH is back with us after having been under the 
weather , for several weeks. GQE is now s.s.b. via 2 
meters with fine results. AKC is rolling up the DX 
with a new 3-band vertical plus the old kw. K4EAR is 
burning up antenna coils here with a new custom 500- 
watter. The Rock Hill Bulletin requests clubs in North 
Carolina, South Carolina and Georgia to list hamfests, 
etc., with them in an attempt to avoid the conflicting 
dates as in the past. Address P.O. Box 447, Rock 
Hill, S. C. What’s happened to ANK? Too much 
MARS? K4ADZ’s new 150-watter sounds great. ECU 
is on 75 meters with a new DX-100 that’s putting out 
a nice signal to all points. Shaw-Sumter is having a 
WAS contest with K4EJR getting 25 states the first 
week end. GIF has a new 813 on 40 meters with good 
results. BHS/4 is NCS for the 10-Meter Net Thurs. at 
2000 on 29.626 Mc. All in the Sumter Area are invited 
to join. Sorry to hear we are losing TNO/4, who has 
completed his military tour. The Charleston Club has 

(Continued on page 118) 








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“graduated 4 to the Novice ranks.”” HHO makes 4 
OBS skeds daily, Mon. through Sat. (75-meter phone). 
Congrats to Lois, K4CXJ, who placed 3rd in the YLRL 
Anniversary Party. K4EYV needs Nevada for WAS. 
Traffic: K4BVX 237, DFR 18, W4CAL 5. 

VIRGINIA—SCM, John Carl Morgan, W4KX—SEC: 
PAK (Route 1, Box 7H, Fentress, Va.). Please note the 
new SEC, succeeding RTV, now resigned. Get behind 
Hack and help him make AREC a going concern. 
K4EAS, the new South Boston EC, is getting AREC 
rolling, and RACES is about ready to roll in that area 
Fairfax Co. EC/RO TNQ reports much interest in 
6-meter pack sets, with K4EWW working on technical 
details. ZZV reports manning the Roanoke Club sta- 
tion, CA, and his own rig during the January flood 
emergency. Incidentally, all Virginians are urged to 
send the SCM reports of emergency operation. If YOU 
don't report such activity, it’s probable no one will 
Also see that the local press and radio/TV know about 
such things. Thanks to FJ, BZE and the Richmond 
gang, Virginia was represented with the Governor's 
message during the G.P.R. FLX reports UDX is head- 
ing the Bedford gang’s set-up at the NG Armory 
anticipating MARS gear. A fine time was had by all 
at the Annual PVRC/Frankford RC meeting held in 
Washington. BGP, now in Germany as DLASK, reports 
working plenty of DX and mobiling. K4ELG, who re 
ports receiving his CP25, is working DX on 80-imeter 
e.w., as is GF. K4ERY, now General Class, is asst 
commandant at FUMA, Fork Union. 8JQS, formerly 
of West Virginia, is awaiting a K4 call in Alexandria 
Former CZB now is K8DDG in Ohio. FZG is active 
on nets again after a long hiatus. OO BIJ opines that 
bad signals are becoming more plentiful. Most appear 
to be recently upgraded Novices fighting r.f. feedback 
parasitics, clicks, ete., with their first VFO. JUJ re- 
ports the first VA-JF certificate went to YL K4CZP 
with six issued in January. K4DKA gives advance 
notice of the Roanoke Hamfest to be held on Sun., May 
12th. IA received QSL No. 100 for YLCC, KX has had 
several pleasant visits from hams passing 
Fredericksburg on Rt. 1. The welcome mat at 
is always out. Traffic: (Jan.) W4IA 420, K4KNP 
W4QDY 224, BZE 199, KX 81, K4DBC 77, DKA 30 
W4FLX 24, JUJ 22, LW 22, PVA 20, K4ELG 12, W4CV 
11, K4BUI 10, EAQ 9, JLO 7, BYS 4, IKF 4. (Dee.) 
W4MWH 56, K4ASU 13, EAQ7 

WEST VIRGINIA—SCM, Albert H. Hix, W8PQQ 
ORD is building a new kw. all-band rig for s.s.b 
and a.m. 4VAN now has his call 8VAN back and will 
have an s.s.b. rig on from Charleston. The hams who 
helped during the flood are to be highly praised for 
their splendid work and cooperation. HZA/8 is oper- 
ating quite a lot from the ec.d. headquarters. IRN’'s 
XYL has taken her ham exam. MLX has a new Ranger 
and is working lots of DX. NLT is very active now 
and is to be congratulated on his fine work in pushing 
the auto license plate legislation. SNP also is quite ac- 
tive now. We hope to see a lot of you at the Dayton 
Hamvention on April 6th. Thirty-eight stations were 
active during the Kanawha Valley emergency demonstra- 
tion. This demonstration was witnessed by industrialists 
from all over the U.S. RKV did a bang-up job in 
planning the radio activities of this affair. ELJ as- 
sisted 4SBI during the flood. CSG is working lots of 
DX. PQQ QSOed ZC3AC on phone and c.w. for a 
new one. PBO sure is handling a large traffic load. The 
C.W. Net needs outlets in the eastern part of the 
State. If any hams would care to help out from this 
area it sure will be appreciated. DDB also is working 
lots of good DX. Traffic: W8PBO 214, HZA 76, BWK 
36, DFC 26, NYH 20, SNP 19, PJI 15, ELJ 14, PZT 12, 
UYR 10, CSG 1, PQQ 1. 


ROCKY MOUNTAIN DIVISION 


COLORADO—<Acting SCM, William R. Haskin, 
K§CEN—SEC: NIT. RM: KQD. PAM: IUF. INT 
wants more company on the 40-meter phone net on Sun 
mornings. The State’s first shortwave chess meet be- 
tween Denver and Pueblo was held Jan. 30th. K#DCC 
made the 5th Army MARS Honor Roll in November 
with 40 hours. New officers of the Montrose County 
Ham Club are UIB, pres.; K#BWI, vice-pres.; KN#EGJ, 
secy.-treas.; K#EGU, communications manager. The 
Larimer County Amateur Radio Club’s new officers 
are K#DTK, pres.; Jim Sandoz, vice-pres.; K#HFB, 
secy.-treas. The club project is 6-meter work, so you 
Denver guys look for them. K6SHG now is K@#ILX. 
The Boulder Amateur Club reports new officers are 
CHM, pres.; IA, vice-pres.; RRV, secy.-treas.; K#CEZ 
act. mgr. Bill Clyne from the FCC was the guest 
speaker and was assisted by BOW and Mel Rogers trom 
the Denver Club. DMC reports ACA, TVV, UHD, 
VSN, MLH, KN6QJY/6 and KN#DSW are active on 2 
meters and jooking for contacts in Wyoming and 
Southern Colorado. The Informal Net is held at 7 p.m. 
(Continued on page 120) 





Henry A 


WHALE 


of — 
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Thurs. on 146.25 Me, Two new Ist-class phone ticket 
holders are PTR and PGN. UNM has had his for 
some time now. K#BCQ made . Traffic: K6BCQ 
618, W#KQD 496, NVU 131, K XF 118, WBB 87 
DCC 74, W6YQ 50, W4ZIW 19, WS#JHI 12, K#6CEN 
8, WOSGG 6. 

UTAH—SCM, James L. Dixon, W7LQE—OCX says 
that he will QSO and QSL any needing Utah for WAS. 
He has joined the PAN Net. The Ogden Radio Club 
held its Annual Banquet Jan. 19th. Attendance was 
179, with John Reinartz, K6BJ, of Eimac, as the main 
speaker, and HWQ, Clyne of the Denver FCC, and 
IC, Rocky Mountain Division Director, as honored 
guests. The first prize, an NC-300, was won by Steed of 
Tri-State Electronics. QDS has added Ireland to his 
DX skeds. FYE has a new NC-300 and s.s.b. with 150 
watts on 80 and 20 meters with a Windom antenna and 
is converting an ARC-5 and a 522 for use on 2 meters 
with a ground-plane antenna. RPY completed a Conel- 
rad alarm and killed 10-meter parasitics in his kilowatt. 
New calls: GXB as Novice with a Globe Chief and 
SX-28 and three antennas; BCN as Technician on 6 
meters with 75 watts to a 4E27 and a ground plane 

an NC-57 and a Gonset converter. Traffic: 
W7FYE 4. 

WYOMING—SCM, James A. Masterson, W7PSO 
The Pony Express Net meets Sun. at 0830 on 3920 
ke., PSO and MWS alternating as NCS. The YO C.W. 
Net meets on Mon., Wed. and Fri. at 1830 on 3610 k.c. 
BHH, DXV and NMW alternating as NCS. BHH has 
been appointed RM. YO Net certificates have been is- 
sued to AEC, AXG, BHH, DXV, HRM, HX and 
NMW. YSS and YJG are now mobile in Cheyenne. 
#fHJR/7 is now THEB. LHW has a new 75A-3. MWS has 
his new s.s.b. exciter on the air. ORM has a new trap 
antenna for all bands. GS, RJP and RJQ are back 
on the air after a three-year absence. TZK has moved 
to Gillette. N7HAL is a new Novice in Worland. YKI 
and his XYL, COY, have a new daughter. DXV is 
active in MARS. MNW is State RACES Officer. PSO 
visited the Cheyenne Club. The YO Net urgently needs 
more check-ins. Traffic: W7DXV 89, BHH 27, TZK 18 
YKU 13, DTD 12, YSS 12, AXG 10, UZR 9, COY 8 
MWS 6, AMU 4, CQL 4, PMA 2, PSO 2, AEC 1, LHW 
1. 


SOUTHEASTERN DIVISION 


ALABAMA—SCM, Joe A. Shannon, W4MI— 
KN4KJE has 41 states for WAS on 40 meters. In Tus- 
caloosa the following have graduated from the Novice 
Class: K4s IPQ, HNJ and HQS. KN4KID, age eleven, 
is working 40 and 15 meters with 50 watts. K4BTO has 
installed the new operating position built by K4BWR. 
New club officers—Auburn: K4ANV, pres.; GZM, vice- 
pres.; K4GOM, secy.-treas. Tuscaloosa: JLU, 
K4HNJ, vice-pres.; K4BWH, secy.; CHO, treas. - 
bile Club: WHW, pres.; NU, vice-pres.; K4HNL, secy. ; 
YZR, treas. The Mobile ‘‘Mobileers’’ helped make col- 
lections during the Cerebral Palsy Drive. K4EEH is 
the new EC for the Mobile Area and K4BTO is EC 
for the Gadsden Area. A correction on the frequency 
of AENO, the 6-meter net: It is now 50.05 Mec AZC 
reports that the AENO was called into emergency ses- 
sion with eleven stations checking in—all without re- 
sorting to telephone! The Mobile Club auxiliary’s new 
officers are Dot Karcher, pres.; Betty Kennedy, vice- 
pres.; and Juanita Rudd, secy.-treas. AENJ, in Bir- 
mingham, is considering 6 meters. CNU has been ex- 
ercising his bug. HHG is sporting a new multi-band 
wire and worked NY with low-power 6-meter mobile 
during the recent opening. How about more LO and 
CD Party participation? Traffic: (Jan.) K4AOZ 227 
W4RLG 188, KIX 151, K4BRS 134, EOG 80, ANB 67 
W4HON 65, DTT 63, ZSQ 46, BFX 42, K4BTO 32 
W4MI 31, CIU 29, K4ADDC 27, W4YRO 24, ZSN 24, 
CNU/4 22, WHW 21, WOG 21, K4BWR 17, W4HHG 15 
UJJ 14, K4BFL 12, W4CRY 11, RTQ 11, TKL 10, 
YFN 9, K4EEH 8, W4TOIL 7, DGH 6, SXS 5, K4BFI 
4, KJD 4, APF 2, W4NIQ 1, UHA 1. (Dec.) W4EJZ 
17, GUY 14, K4HAL 12, W4HGF 11. 

EASTERN FLORIDA—<Acting SCM, Andrew C. 
Clark, W4lLYT-—Asst. SCM: John F. Porter, 4KGJ 
SEC: IYT. RM: LAP. PAM 75 meters: JQ. PAM 40 
meters: TAS. We are very sorry to report the passing 
of HRA, Ft. Myers. Jacksonville: ZJ is ‘‘The Poet” 
of the Old Goats Net on 3910 ke. 8-9 P.m. Attention 
Netters: The Florida Mid-day Traffic Net (FMTN) 
operates Mon.-Sat. on 7225 ke. from noon to 1 P.M 
All interested may check in with NCSs DTV, HGO or 
K4BNE. TAS has been appointed PAM for 40-meter 
phone and is acting net mgr. for FMTN. Another all- 
Florida c.w. net is now in operation, the Florida Slow- 
speed Net (FSN). Maximum speed is 15 w.p.m. The 
net was set up by RM LAP. DVR is net mgr. of 
FSN, Mon.-Fri. on 3675 ke. 1830-1900. Fellows, we need 
more c.W. participation in our section nets in Florida. 

(Continued on page 122) 








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Give LAP and DVR a chance to teach you how to 
work traffic on c.w., please! All NCSs will work you at 
your speed and no faster! Regular FN now begins at 
1900 on the same frequency. Miami Area: The Hialeah 
Radio Club’s new officers are PBS, pres.; AYJ, vice- 
pres.; EKZ, secy.; Marvin Hill, treas. PBS sound- 
proofed the ham shack. The South Miami and Miami 
Springs Radio Clubs are now ARRL affiliated. K4AEE 
has daily skeds on 15 meters with son KZ5RM_ for 
U. 8S. traffic. K4BLM has a new 50-ft. heavy-duty 
tower. K4DRO was top man in the YL/OM Contest 
GGQ, IYT and WWJ are on 2 meters. ZXK has a 
new 20-meter beam. BQW worked 42 countries in 36 
days with a new two-element 20-meter beam. DEN was 
shifted to 29,520 ke. AHW participated in Operation 
Crackdown. The Flamingo Net is going great each Fri. 
on 29,044 ke. at 1930 EST. The West Palm Beach Rz idio 
Club reorganized with the following new officers : 
pres.; K4AWG, vice-pres.; DWK, secy.; TH, 
Sarasota: WHF has a new 10-meter Pee Cage's og 
is ro for more 145.6-Mc. contacts. St. Petersburg: 
SPARC's new president is WME. The club now has 
about 60 members. K4BNE has a new Q multiplier. 
New Port Richey: 9ZAK, of Quincy, is visiting 9F RP/4 
until spring. Melbourne: The Melbourne Radio Club has 
grown from 2 to 30 members and now has a code 
class going. Miscellaneous: SMK and LUK have new 
DX-100s. New officers of the Miami Springs Radio Club 
are K4CEJ, pres.; HQW, vice-pres.; GGQ, secy.-treas. 
Please see page 6 of QST and get your reports off to 
your new SCM by the first of each month. Traffic: 
W4FPC 385, PJU 217, WS 142, PZT 138, DVR 135, 
LAP 132, ZIR 130, EHW 128, IYT 8, K4BNE 81, 
KDN 80, ABV 57, W4LMT 53, HNV 46, HFT 37, 
W9FRP/4 32, W4KG 4 18, HGO 14, K4JOX 10, W4TAS 
7, K4AAHW 4, W4BJI ¢ 
WESTERN FLORIDA—SC M, Edward J. Collins, 
W4MS/RE—SEC: HIZ, RMs: AXP Escambia, BVE 
Okaloosa. EQR received a heard card from KL7VT 
on 6 meters. FHQ is resting up after a trip to the 
hospital. QK is becoming interested in ham TV. K4KIF 
is debugging the 6-meter transmitter. UUF promises 
higher power on 2 and 6 meters. GMS is giving 
a fit with the new Valiant. CCY is getting the 
up at the new QTH. AXP has transistor fever. 
is pushing e.d. work over Tallahassee way. 
has 6-meter gear underway. K4ECP/4 goes 
Alabama with mobile gear on 6 meters to give 
another state. K4AGM has 23 states on 6 meters 
35 watts. MUX is home from Europe. PAA still 
DX. ZPN stays with 7 Me. VR is there with him. 
is rebuilding 6-meter gear. WKQ ran up 62,250 points 
in the CD Contest. New hams over Tallahassee way 
are DKT, K4MNE and K4MCL. K4LQC has an FB 
quad perking. Other new hams to the section are 
KN4LQE and KN4LQU over Ft. Walton way. RKH 
has added another monitor receiver for 27,994 ke 
CPE, UXW, 5BJZ and 7QNN are working on monitor 
receivers for 27,560 ke. in the Eglin Field Area. 8BOQ 
operates aeronautical mobile on cross-country trips. 
MFY and RKH enjoyed the use of 75-meter mobile 
gear during Christmas holiday trips. K4LBN’s new jr. 
operator was the first baby born in 1957 in the Ft 
Walton Area. SRX, the Eglin Club station, has an FB 
Conelrad monitor operating. SNV gave an FB talk to 
the EARS group. CKP is the proud owner of a Simpson 
260. PTK has been under the weather but is getting 
along FB now. TTM looks after him. JLW is after 
bigger antennas. CSS is on 6 meters over Eglin way. 
MS/RE worked Mississippi for his 41st state on 6 
meters. The Pensacola Amateur Radio Club is con 
ducting code and theory classes for beginners. PQW 
is the guiding light. DAO/DEF has moved into his FB 
new shielded shack. HBK has a new vertical antenna 
up. ODO put in an appearance on 6 meters. EQR now 
has 44 states on 6 meters after working Alabama, Hi. 
Word has it that UW is becoming interested again. 
ZFL has the mobile set-up in the car about ready to 
go. BGG is having modulation trouble. K4ADY wants 
to get on 6 meters when not QRL with the civil de- 
fense program. Fellows, look at your license and see 
if it is due for renewal. Traffic: W4BVE 152. 
GEORGIA—SCM, William F. Kennedy, W4CFJ— 
SEC: K4AUM. PAMs: LXE and ACH. RM: PIM. 
GCEN meets on 3995 ke. at 1830 EST Tue. and Thurs. 
and at 0800 EST Sun. ATLCW meets on 7150 ke. at 
2100 EST Sun. GSN meets Mon. through Fri. at 1900 
EST on 3595 ke. PIM is NC. The 75-Meter Phone Mobile 
Net meets each Sun. at 1330 EST on 3995 ke. UUH is 
NC. The Atlanta Ten-Meter Phone Net meets each 
Sun. at 2200 EST on 29.6 Mc. VHW is NC. The Atlanta 
Radio Club will hold its hamfest Sun., June 2nd, at 
American Legion Post 216 in Atlanta. Dinner will be 
served at 12:30. K4GGN is NCS for GSN on Tue 
night. BXV made BPL. K4CZQ is NCS for GSN on 
Fri. night. K4CSL cleared up all his TVI. PBK is doing 
fine work with the Boy Scouts in his spare time. 4RN 
(Continued on page 124) 





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2 Meters 24,500.0 ke’s 


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has gone back to 3547 kc. K4HOU racked up 394 QSOs 
in the last CD Party. The Valdosta Radio Club’s 
new officers are K4INN, pres.; KN4MEH, secy.; ZLS 
act. mgr.; RTN, ZLS and TSU, TVI comm. LNG was 
married Jan. 12th and hasn't been on the air since. 
K4CFO passed his Ist-class phone exam, The South 
Georgia Rag Chewers will hold their big picnic in 
Thomasville, Ga., on Sun., May 5th. Everyone is wel- 
come. Tifton has three new Novices, KN4MGP, 
KN4MGL, and KN4MSA. Fine information is sent in 
each month by K4HAV. The Warner Robbins amateurs 
did a fine job in finding a lost man this month, Also 
Atlanta hams did a good job in helping to find a lost 
three-year-old child. Check your Emergency Corps 
ecards for renewal with your EC. All ECs, be sure to 
send in your monthly reports to your SEC, K4AUM. 
Traffic: W4PIM 203, K4BXV 145, CZQ 118, W4DDY 76, 
PBK 63, K4GGN 58, CSL 35, W4ZDP 33, K4HOU 10, 
INN 8, W4PDP 7, K4CFN 6, W4CFJ 5. 

WEST INDIES—SCM, William Werner, KP4DJ— 
SEC: KP4HZ. DV is interim-president of the PRARC 
because of the resignation of HZ. SZ replaces MV as 
vice-president. The PRARC is installing a 400-watt 
station in the USWB airport office and a 400-watt 
station in the Teleo Bldg. in San Juan for hurricane 
net liaison. The 3559-ke. AREC C.W. Net shows in- 
creased activity with DJ and ABA alternating as 
NCS on Mon. at 8 P.M. The 3925-ke. Net continues 
active every evening with the Wed. roll call bringing 
out 10 to 15 stations. ABW is a new member of the 
AREC in Santurce. FJ, back on 3925 ke. after a five- 
year absence, is building a tri-band beam. AED uses 
a Globe King 500A on 10 and 15 meters but is satisfied 
to use an AT-1 and a modulator on 75 meters for 
Island ragchews. CAP hams are installing a BC-610 at 
their headquarters station, KP4QS. EK is on 3925 ke. 
using an Elmac 67A and an HRO. HZ built 10-meter 
mobile as per a QST article. ACF replaced the Globe 
Scout with Viking II and a VFO. AFL, at Mayaguez 
is on 3925 ke. since becoming General Class. AFS is 
DL4CD/DL4MM and wants to QSO KP4s on 15 meters, 
RK is heard occasionally on 3925 ke. Visitors to KP4- 
Land who attended the PRARC meeting were W2SKE 
and W2EXE. QR moved his ham station from the 
WMDD transmitter site to his home QTH and is ac- 
tive on the 3559- and 3925-ke. nets. LK built an all- 
band vertical antenna. PZ/KP4, attending Polytech at 
San German, skeds his father, ZK, on 75 meters every 
afternoon. MV received a certificate for working ten 
stations in Malaga, Spain. New hams at USWB are 
AHV and AIN. AIA is CAA Communicator. KD built 
a Conelrad monitor alarm. W4QEB is now KP4QEB at 
Pamey AFB. AAM is on 75 meters with an AT-1, URO 
reports to the 3925-ke. Net. KV 4BD’s XYL is now 
KV4BU. ZK says his call was 2BS in 1912! AEF has a 
new Valiant transmitter. BI celebrates his 20th anni- 
versary as a licensed radio amateur. ABA improvec 
antenna performance by changing from a ‘“‘V” to 
straight wire. ABA is the first official member in P.R 
of the Graveyard Net on 3885 ke. at 5 a.m. EE advises 
the Philmont Net on 29,493 ke. provides phone patches 
in the Philadelphia Area every Sun. 11 a.m. to noon 
W2JXE is visiting KP4-Land. QR makes printed cir 
cuit modules with resistors and condensers at Modular 
Systems, Inc., at Fajardo. VD is another new station on 
3925 ke. from Puerto Nuevo. AED skeds Ponce every 
morning at 7:45 a.m. on 3850 ke. AAA has an extra 
receiver now, an old HRO-W., ABD uses GS66 and 
GS77 mobile equipment on 3.9 Me. Other mobiles are 
AAA, CZ and MS in the San Juan Area. MS is using 
a 20A s.s.b. barefooted on 20 meters when the kw. a.m 
ean’t get through. RC also is using a 20A barefooted. 
AZ is on s.s.b. using a commercially-built kw. s.s.b 
amplifier and a 100A exciter. RD is on 14-Me, s.s.b 
using a 20A and a 700-watt linear. RD uses a 32V-3 
for ¢c.w. operation and put a Collins vernier knob on 
75A-3. The Governor’s message congratulating the Presi- 
dent on his inauguration was obtained by RM and sent 
by DJ on 14-Me. c.w. Traffic: KP4WT 112, DJ 1. 

CANAL ZONE—SCM, P. A. White, KZ5WA 
KZ5DG, keeps weekly schedules on 15-meter phone 
between civil defense units in the Canal Zone and Re- 
gion III of the Federal Civil Defense Administration 
in Thomasville, Ga. She and her OM, KZ5GD, recently 
made a 2-week visit by air to La Feria, Tex. The 
CZARA has appointed a TVI committee for every 
townsite in the Canal Zone. At the February meeting of 
the CZARA, Col. Les Gross lectured on the Earth 
Satellite, its launching, and how to track it by radio 
The Crossroads Radio Club, on the Atlantic side of 
the Isthmus, has a new president in the person of 
KZ5TG. KZ5iNM fired up a brand-new B&W 5100 and 
s.s.b, generator using a 105-foot trapped antenna, all- 
band. KZ5KA has a sticker for 120 countries confirmed 
KZ5VR will take traffic any day before 11 a.m. for 
delivery into the TCN Florida Net at noon via 
K4AEE. KZ5RM will take traffic up to 5:30 P.M. any 


(Continued on page 126) 





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were 160 licensed KZ5s on Feb. 1, 1957. Traffic: 
120, VR 91, WA 21, RM 12. 


SOUTHWESTERN DIVISION 


LOS ANGELES—SCM, William J. Schuch, W6CMN 
—Asst. SCM: Albert F. Hill, jr., 6JQB. SEC: LIP. 
RMs: BHG and GJP. PAMs: PIB and KéBWD. LIP 
is QRL reorganizing the AREC. K6DDO busy as OO 
and is working DX. K6LMW now is on 220 Mc. K6BEQ 
is s.s.b. mobile. K6BWD has a new beam. WPF is back 
in traffic again. K6ICS is trying for WAVE and needs 
VEl1. K6GTG has a new 200-watt rig. K6PLW is 
DXing these days. K6UYK is a new ORS. ORS will 
handle the April traffickers meeting. CK is having 
trouble with ice on his beams. K6CSR reports into SCN. 
USY now has emergency power. K6OZJ is active on the 
51-Mc. Net. K6GUZ is QRL three nets. BHG is crying 
for NCSs for SCN. GYH is skedding Pacific MARS for 
traffic. K6LVL is Asst. EC of Barstow. HJY is busy 
with three nets and makes a nice traffic count. KEBMON 
makes BPL the second month in a row. GYH made 
BPL for the twelfth consecutive month. NJU has a 
new 75-A4. K6EXO is putting a kw. on the air. 
K6KJN is back from the service. K60QD writes that 
the Glendora c.d. gang has formed a club. K6ICS is 
QRL college. K6COP is doing a fine job as OO and 
ORS. K6EA is building new gear. K6TAN is a new 
General Class licensee. There was little news from the 
gang this month. Traffic: (Jan.) W6DDE 712, GYH 
660, BHG 226, K6MON 221, W6HJY 156, K6COP 92, 
LVL 82, EA 68, GUZ 66, HOV 56, W6LIP 52, CMN 46, 
K6OZJ 43, W6GJP 36, VSH 27, USY 24, K6CSR 21, 
W6CK 20, ORS 19, BUK 16, K6UYK 13, PLW 11, 
GTG 8, ICS 6, OQD 6, WPF 6, BEQ 4, BWD 4, DDO 
3, LMW 3. (Dec.) K6DQA 127, W6LIP 34, K6DDO 3 

ARIZONA—SCM, Cameron A. Allen, W70IF—SEC: 
YWF. PAM Grand Canyon Net 7210 ke.: LUJ. It meets 
Sun. at 9 am. MST. PAM Arizona Emergency Net 
3865 ke.: ASI. The AEN now meets Mon, through 
Fri., inclusive, at 7:30 p.m. MST. It will take all traffic 
coming into the State. Members who check in on other 
nets will take traffic going out of the State. The Little 
Fatty Net meets every Wed. at 9:00 a.m. MST on 3885 
ke. All YLs and XYLs are welcome to check in. The 
Montezuma Well Hamfest has been set for June Ist 
and 2nd. Tickets are one dollar per call from George 
Olson, W7OAS8, 210 E. Moreland, Phoenix. Pre-registra- 
tion must be in by May 15th. The Phoenix V.H.F. Club 
gives code practice each Tue. and Sat. from 8 to 9 
P.M. on 11 meters. KYE and his XYL, YWD, are in 
charge of it. LED received a letter of thanks from the 
Elks for service he rendered in taking traffic for them 
WN7FMZ is building a DX-100. The Arizona Amateur 
Radio Club is getting its station, LO, set up at Boy 
Seout Hq. Sixty-foot poles, courtesy of the phone com- 
pany, have been set with antennas on them. The trans- 
mitter and receiver are being installed. Traffic: W7NFL 
41, OIF 19, OUE 6, WN7FMZ 2. 

SAN DIEGO—SCM, Don Stansifer, W6LRU—New 
officers of the Clairemont Club are K6KIJ, pres.; 
K6UKG, vice-pres.; INI, secy.; and ZBE, treas. Guest 
speaker at the Convair Club’s January meeting was 
OH2SF. K6JYQ is a new member of the Helix Club. 
K6ITF is the proud father of a jr. operator. K6HLQ 
is in Oklahoma with the Navy attending school. New 
officers of the Upper-Ten Club are JKM, pres.; WCH 
vice-pres.; K6AFO, secy.-treas. Eighteen stations are 
now active on 420 Mc. in San Diego: W6s BLK, BYE 
GTZ, JKM, KRV, KUG, LWT, MVV, OSA, UFI 
and YWM and Kés BCG, BTO, HXK, LQR, 
OLS, OWY, and PFP. It is with regret we note the loss 
of KVB to this section. Paul has accepted a_ position 
in the East. His work in the AREC as the EC for the 
northern part of the country will long be remembered. 
K6LXL lost his antennas, but is now back in business 
handling traffic. EOT has made BPL two months in 
a row. RAN is a new member of the San Diego DX 
Club. The Aztec Club at State College is on the air 
with a BC-610. The activity on the part of the San 
Diego DX Club in the ARRL c.w. portion of the 
contest sounded like old times with more than 20 
stations in this section participating. K6EC has moved 
to a new and better DX location. Special congratula- 
tions this month go to the mobile boys on 10 and 75 
meters who for many years have participated in many 
civic parades and events by offering their facilities for 
communications. K6BHM and JVA are nearing the 100 
mark on countries worked. K6BHM was the last 1956 
QSO for 9S4AX as a separate country. BGX is back 
in town looking for a good DX location. br are glad 
to report the recovery from an illness and the recent 
marriage of OAJ. Traffic: (Jan.) W6IAB 2337, EOT 616, 
LYF 28. (Dec.) W6IAB 7127, K6SLB/6 1604, W6YDK 
i. EOT 1048. (Nov.) W6IAB 2877. 

ANTA BARBARA—SCM, William B. Farwell, 


(Continued on page 128) 





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W6QIW—The Paso Robles Radio Club auction was a 
huge success, with 17 visiting hams from out of town. 
ENR, RED and K6EEJ are sporting new mobile rigs 
on 75-meter phone. The AREC was active during 
the Ventura and Lake Sherwood fires handling spot 
newscasts for radio — KVEN. Among the Novices: 
KN6UUX, now K6UUX, worked New York on 40 me- 
ters with 15 watts with 9 589 report. KN6QIL and 
QIM built a transistorized code monitor. KN6VHB is 
building a new shack in back of his house. The Ventura 
Ham Club paper really gets around, last month’s paper 
going to KL7BKZ, Ketchikan, Alaska, 6MMP, in New 
Mexico, and KV4AA in the Virgin Islands, LQ reports 
his son John has received his Novice Class ticket and 
is KN6VKI. NTF has his windmill fixed up with a 
15-inside-20-meter cubical quad antenna. Traffic: W6QIW 
182, K6ELR 12, W6ENR 10, K6KPU 6, W6FYW 4. 


WEST GULF DIVISION 


NORTHERN TEXAS—SCM, Ray A. Thacker, 
W5TFP—SEC: PYI. PAMs: YKT and IWQ.RM: KPB. 
KPB reports NTX had 27 sessions in January with 118 
stations handling 122 QTC. FCX invites more c.w. 
devotees to check in on the net. AHC is sporting a new 
813 final! YIJ has been elected NCS of CTEN 
KNS5IRB is new to the Novice bands from Tahoka 
Teen-agers, there is a new Teenage Net on 3940 k« 
K5IAB is manager and I hope he will advise the time 
the net meets. K5DXJ is responsible for getting the 
entire 6-Meter Net in Dallas to join the AREC “en 
masse.”” PCN advises that Amarillo Area hams are 
activating the Panhandle Storm Warning Net and 
3950 ke. will be monitored daily at 1730. Should bad 
conditions exist in your area get on and report it to 
the Acting NCS. BWV reports a very successful March 
of Dimes program jointly handled by the Midland and 
Odessa ARCs. Dallas ARC's new officers are PED 
pres.; CNI, vice-pres.; TUU, secy-treas. We certainly 
enjoyed visiting with the Central Texas ARC recently 
and was most surprised and grateful for the nice turn- 
out in spite of bad WX! The boys in Waco are 
DOING things. My thanks to BOO and AYX for their 
hospitality. Stop in and visit the club when you are 
near Waco. Thanks for the many reports, folks, Traf- 
fic: K5WAB 1672, W5UBW/5 648, K5FFB 340, W5KPB 
232, DTA/5 K5EMR 103, W5FCX 72, AHC 5: 
K5BKH 51, W5ASA 41, BKH 28, TFP 24, CF 
K5EUV 23, BBM/5 15, IGY 11, W5OCV 10, K5AIB 
W5DFB 3. 

OKLAHOMA—SCM, Ewing Canaday, W5GIQ— 
Asst. SCM: ——. R Booker, 5ADC. SEC: LXH. 
PAM: MFX. RM: JXM. A big thank you to EJK for 
his fine work in hiailing emergency communications at 
Gans, Okla., following the recent tornado which killed 
8 persons, Another note of thanks for the fine job done 
by the boys in Enid, Lawton and surrounding areas 
who relayed donation reports during the March of 
Dimes telethons held by TV stations in the two cities. 
EHC originated the Governor-to-President-Relay mes- 
sage. New officers of the North Fork Amateur Radio 
Club are LZ, pres.; FRB, vice-pres.; and K5DUX 
secy.-treas. Congrats to WEI, RRU and LTD upon 
the arrival of new harmonics, all boys. VNC is in the 
hospital at Rochester, Minn. MMD is back on the air 
after a long absence with a DX-100. RRM, former 
Northern Texas SCM, is operating portable from his 
new home in Bartlesville. K5DUJ is back on the air 
with a new 250-watt rig. ZOW has a new Globe Champ 
300. KN5IBZ worked 40 states in 30 days with his new 
DX-100. KN5ERK also has a new DX-100. KNSEUD 
and ERI have new DX-35s. KN5ICC, recently named 
Duncan's outstanding young man of 1956 by the Junior 
Chamber of Commerce, has a new Globe Chief and 
HQ-140. K5BAR, K5EVN and K5DWO have new Gen- 
eral Class tickets in Duncan, Bartlesville and Cushing. 
Traffic: WKS 432, DRZ 258, K5CAY 252, W5GIQ 153, 
FEC 128, EJK 121, CBY 8, ‘B76, K5HZF 75, 
AOV 58, W5MFX 43, K5CVU 36, W5ZAJ 35, ADC 34, 
K5AUX 34, W5CCK 30, MRK 29, K5DJA 20, WS5MGK 
19, K5CBA 18, W5QAC 18, PNG 15, SVR 11, EHC 9, 
RST 7, WEI 7, MQI 6, IER 2. 

SOUTHERN TEXAS—SCM, Roy K. Eggleston, 
W5QEM—2NEW is in Houston attending Houston Uni- 
versity. The Houston Amateur Radio Club has code 
classes under ITA, FYW and HKE. VWT and K5BVH 
are s.s.b. mobile. KN5EYZ is a new Novice at Angle- 
ton. He is 70 years young. Houston Mobile Dragnet of- 
ficers for 1957 are DNJ, NCS; TIJ, ACS; BRM, secy. 
CVQ handled the Governor-to-President message and it 
was in Washington seven minutes from the official 
Starting time. YJB now has an XYL. KNS5IUR is a 
new Novice in Austin. OBA has a new beam on 20 
meters. IAN has a new 20A s.s.b. exciter. The Houston 
and Galveston County Amateur Radio Clubs partici- 
pated in the March of Dimes Telethon. URU contacted 
a VE station whose operator had been a victim of 

(Continued on page 130) 


2 
23 
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130 


polio. He was patched into the television station, where 
the Master of Ceremonies was televised talking to him. 
DKK is the OPS in San Antonio. DTJ is trying to 
work all Texas counties. He has 193 out of the 253 total. 
The El Paso Amateur Radio Club sponsors eode and 
theory classes. Attendance is about 40, including 6 YLs. 
This class is held Thurs. at 7:30 p.m. MST. ES is the 
OBS for the El Paso Area. The schedule is Mon. 7:15 
P.M. on 29,640 ke., and Fri. 7:45 p.m. on 3828 ke. All 
time is MST. Traffic: W5PXZ 25, DTJ 18 

NEW MEXICO—SCM, Einar H. Morterud, W5F PB 
—SEC: DAA. PAM: DVA. RM: RKS. The NMEPN 
meets on 3838 ke. Tue. and Thurs. at 1800 MST, Sun 
at 0730; the NM Breakfast Club meets on 3838 ke 
daily except Sun. at 0700. POT has his Ist-class phone 
license. ZLF was home on a 30-day furlough before 
leaving for JA-Land. GVB moved to El Paso. DAO 
has been on a business trip to Washington, D. C. BNJ 
is on 20-meter c.w ‘ED received a safety award from 
the Texas Company. Members of the Totah Radio 
Club assisted the Mother’s March on Polio, TBP is the 
new EC for Chaves Co. WNU is the new EC for the 
Albuquerque Mutual Aid Area, with UWA Asst. EC for 
mobiles and K5GLJ Asst. EC for 144 Me. The other 
ECs are FHL, Santa Fe Mutual Aid Area; K5CE\ 
Eddy Co.; NQG, Lea Co.; SUY, McKinley Co. 
CIN, San Juan Co. There are no ECs for the follow- 
ing counties: Catron, Colfax, Curry, De Baca, Grant 
Guadalupe, Harding, Hidalgo, Lincoln, Luna, Mora 
Otero, Quay, Roosevelt, San Miguel, Sierra, Union 
How about an EC in the counties where there are ama 
teurs? Traffic: K5DAA 63, W5UAR 19, FGZ 15, DVA 
14, ZU 9, K5CEV 7, W5RKS 1. 


CANADIAN DIVISION 


MARITIME—SCM, D. E. Weeks, VE1WB—Asst. 
SCM: Aaron Solomon, 10C, SEC: FH. PZ reports the 
formation of a new club at Sydney, N. 8. The Dart- 
mouth Club has a new DX-35 transmitter. Newly- 
elected officers of the Fredericton Club are LS, pres 
OQ, vice-pres.; VU, secy.-treas. NQ is a new call from 
Charlottetown. The Cape Breton Emergency Net mem- 
bers recently presented what is believed to be a first 
all-amateur TV show in North America over CJCB-TV 
Sydney. QY worked Argentina on 6 meters to es rer’ lish 
what is believed to be a DX record for this band. FQ 
has been handling traffic from VE#@ND (HMCS Magnifi- 
cent). TT has a DX-100 transmitter. LY keeps regular 
skeds with brother 7AKN on 10 meters while OC works 
7HV and 7ARB daily. Other reg ce occupants of this 
band are ACP, XY and ZT. IY now is VESAD at 
Whitehorse. HJ is active on 20- and 75-meter phone 
DB, EK, LY and OM have new Q multipliers. KM 
(ex-7AJV with DXCC) needs only one more country to 
make the Century Club from the East Coast also. SI 
and LZ have joined the ranks, Traffic: (Jan 
VEIFQ 172, AV 43, FH 18, OM 17, DB 14, ME 14 
LY 13, UT 138, ADH 11, QM 10, ABT 8, BY 5, VU 5 
WK 5. (Dec.) VE1IOM 17. 
ONTARIO—SCM, Richard W. 
SEC: KM. The start of the new 
Magnificent, aircraft carrier, en route to the East 
AML, Sarnia, took many messages from the crew to 
their loved ones. BUK and DVY were heard 
and will be returning to their navigating duties soon 
VESMF was a visitor to the Sault Area. The Ottawa 
Radio Club has a drive on for new members. IU and 
are active again on 75 meters. The Muskeg Net 
3755 ke., while the Ontario Phone Net is on 3770 
AA has a new DX-35. AVS is ORS. DAR, RI 
ADA, AKC and RW are all new OPSs. 7 is an 
BJV is an OBS on 7-Me. c.w. CD and LO Parties 
brought out a lot of VE3 officials. RH is now = OPS 
HK is feeling better, as is GG. AMB is in the Civil 
—s Toronto. HB is working good DX on 14 
has a new mobile on 10 meters and skeds 
cain in Germany. The Ottawa Club Dinner will be 
held May 4th. The Northshore Radio Club of Oshawa 
also will hold its Dinner on May 4th. AJR was active 
in the YL/OM Contest. DZA is working 28-Me. DX 
AREC in the Toronto Area worked the ARRL booth 
at the Sportsman Show held in Toronto in March. 
Three clubs operated a rig each, Nortown, Metro and 
Westsides. Your SCM was the coordinator, with HE 
as assistant. Our thanks to all concerned; it was a 
good show. AML worked VE4, 5, 6 and 7, all in one 
week on 75-meter phone. DMU, Dr. Spooner, is a new- 
comer to 75 meters. Doe is taking off on a banana boat 
for points south on vacation. BUT has recovered from 
a broken arm. CMP will depart for VO-Land soon 
AML and AJR act as liaison to c.w. nets 
Phone Net. Traffic: (Jan.) VE83BUR 141, NG 95 
87, COY 69 | 43, DEX 43, BOY 40, NO 33 } 
23, DPO 22 1 21, CO 16, IU 13, BJV 11, DSM 9, 
VI 8, CJM 7, EAU 7, RW 5, APL 4, AVS 4. (Dec.) 
VE8GI 191, BOY 44 
(Continued on page 182) 


s.s.b. 


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QUEBEC—SCM, Gordon A. Lynn, VE2GL—The 
° ° ° activities report in Feb. QSsT, line 11 of the Quebec 

for a CAREER in communications section, should have read “EC is celebrating 25 years 
il FCC skeds with AEM, etc.’’ The MARC at its annual ae: 
38fo pass amateur exams ing had as a nominating committee old-timers QQ, 


DR and BK. Election results were BB, pres.; AKT 


; Ist vice-pres.; TA, 2nd _ vice-pres, ; HI, secy.: AKY. 
treas.; VV, XX, MB, MW and SU, directors; with BK 
as auditor. Plans are being discussed for the ARRL 


Convention to be held in Montreal in autumn. BB is 
Radio Officer of the Lachine Disaster Control Unit, 
and Theory which is equipped with a Collins 32V-2 and a 75A-1. 
OR and DY are taking a c.d. course at Arnprior. 
AOL and GI are mobile and ready for emergency 
work. AIZ, TI and AJD are active on 20 meters, PV 
ZG and VE are experimenting with u.h.f. CP was on 15 
meters for the first time on New Year’s Day and 
FAST HOME STUDY! worked 29 countries. KG has completed a 5-over-5-ele- 
a ment 2-meter beam and reports it is really hot. The 
(with 78 rpm phonograph records) South Shore Amateur Club, now incorporated, elected 
(UNBREAKABLE in normal use) the following officers: _ Boe ATT, vice-pres. ; 
PASS COMMERCIAL AND AMATEUR CODE KG, ae. af treas. ; act. mgr.; GD, social 
EXAMS, AMATEUR THEORY EXAMS, FOR mer. raffic : VE3DR 100, C Pi 48, EC 41, GL 9. 
YOUR FCC LICENSE! ALBERTA—SCM, Sydney T. Jones, VE6MJ—PAM: 
OD. The reference made to LZ in this column in De- 
4 AMECO Courses Available: cember QST was an error. It should have read “LQ.” 
No. 1 — NOVICE CODE COURSE. You get and keep 10 re- Sorry for the mistake, Al. I’m sorry to report the 
racrdegpe (alphabet through 8 W.P.M.). Includes typical aoe resignation of XG as Route Manager. If any of the c.w. 
type code exams. Free instruction book on learning how to senc . . apply - . . 
and receive code the simplest, fastest way; plus charts to check oe would like to apr ly for this important post, 
your receiving accuracy; plus an album; all for the low pig P agree hee - ani _ ee EX 
of only . $7.9: or the ex eer anc zacombe rea. L ane A are 
No. 2 — SENIOR CODE COURSE. You get and keep every- working over some surplus 144-Me, gear. QR is work- 
Saas a ih. — Rana fe WP Mo plas <yicat fe Fae ing 28 Mc. GS is chasing DX on 28 Me, and is active 
s (alphabe 1roug \ »lus Ce x s con . ¢ . . se . 
code ecamn ine Ge eo and 2nd class commercial telegraph meilers.t _ 4 . pomp mag ag & = CARA 4 rae 
licenses. All this for on] $12.95 cations. 4 reports 1e annua anque 
3 — COMPLE’ TE RADIO THEORY COURSE. A com- | held recently was most suecessful. OB took a 144-Me 
, simplified home study theory course in radio covering the expedition thirty miles west of Calgary. SX is work 
», Technician, conditional and general classes all under ing on the modulation problem with varying degrees 
one cover — with nearly four hundred typical FCC type ques f a OE c ‘ : 
No technical background o oc genet 7 is back in se of oe aioe ae 
F c, a guide to setting up your own several months of inactivity. “i reports his usual skecds 
iam station. / > amazing low, low price of $3.95 with the northern gang and leads the section with 
No. 4 rey, fl! ADV ANCED COL Ree. rupee . Novice op- traffic. NX reports well over 200 countries worked on 
erators tor the amateur general class and second class commer- » "Tes » ys ® "he 99 TT 9 
cial license tests. Contains 12 < psa & (8 through 18 W.P.M.) a ion atin 159 YE 22, OD 18, MJ 9 rl — 
PLUS the complete code book PLUS typical F.C.C. code . AS K: CHE Al —SCM, Harold R. Horn, VE5HR 
examinations for general and commercial tests. ALL foronly $6.95 —LU visited the Saskatoon Club, giving a run-down 
No. 5—RA apie AMATEUK QUESTION & ANSWER] | 0” AREC for the district and the section as a whole. 
LICENSE GUIDE. A “must” if preparing for Novice, Tech TH reports his new QTH is much better for activities. 
nician or general class exams. Approx. 200 questions & answers EH has accepted a position in CN Telegraph's installa- 
ree gecben ge fag gp FOC tune ann Unie 50° | tion department and will not be heard so frequently 
: . peated $500 vl, > chasing DX. GT has built an FB all-band with a 6146 
‘ by subjects, easier to study. Low, low price of - ‘ coe a oe 
a udy Low Jow pices final. BZ reports the Rosetown AREC Net is doing fine 
and has a new frequency of 3740 ke. for Sun, skeds at 
FREE LITERATURE AVAILABLE 1300. He also is getting in some 10- and 20-meter ac- 


Sold 6 ee tivities. EQ is rebuilding an all-band mobile for sum- 


Dept. Q4 | mer work, AT has a new Heathkit Q5-er, and is build- 
a low-pass filter. EX is building a VFO exciter 

.M has a new 3-band beam to go up as soon as the 

. weather permits. LT has built an a.m. modulator and 


now has a very nice signal on the bands, Traffie: (Jan.) 

URE eC UN aL Me | VESEM 28, DS 16 RE 1. Cl 10, BI 6, LE 6, BZ 5 

: BF 4, EQ 4, PJ 4, QL 3 Y 2, JK 2, VL 2. (Dec.) 

VE5BZ 30, DS 26, RE 22, GO 10, QL 9, SL 8, HF 7, 
CB 5, PQ 5, EQ 4. 


























PRP Project 


(Continued from page 70) 


their use for practical communication by radio 
amateurs. Now, perhaps, hams can make equally 
important contributions toward their more de- 
tailed explanation. It goes without saying that if 
something pops up which can’t seem to be 
explained at all, we’re interested in that, too. 
The reporting job of our observers is simplified 
by the use of special report forms. These are 
, something of a cross between contest forms 
Founded in 1909 a and the ARRL log, and provide space for all 
RADIO TELEPHONY | the required information. This brings us to PRP 
RADIO TELEGRAPHY “Phase B.”” We wanted to make sure that the 
RADAR & TELEVISION 


reporting form decided upon not only provided 
Courses ranging in le i from 7 to 12 months. Dormitory - 
room and board on campus for $48.00 a month. the college the wanted data but also would meet the needs 


owns KPAC, 5 KW broadcast station with studios loc: of the observers. (After all, they would be the 


campus “Vi tude $ accey a monthly. If interes 


radio training nec o pass F.C.C. examinations ones using the forms.) About the middle of 


first-class tele; pans and second-class takaaeamns licenses, 


write for details New: Advanced TV Engineering Course November, therefore, we sent out samples to be 


PORT ARTHUR COLLEG “a used in a trial run before actual reporting got 


Approved for G. I. training under way. Observers wore asked to comment on 
| (Continued on page 134) 











132 








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134 





the form, and several changes were made in it 
as a result. In December a shipment of modified 
reporting forms went out to all PRP observers. 


News Bulletin 


Along with the December shipment of forms 
went the Number One issue of a brand-new 
publication, The PRP News: The Project has 
its own monthly bulletin, available only to 
registered observers. 

The first issue, primarily instructional, brought 
our observers up to date on the project, and 
went into some detail about what we wanted 
reported and how to present the reports. It 
described the results of our November trial, and 
contained a made-out sample report and a list of 
the fellows so far registered. Our second bulletin, 
which came out about the first of February, 
was a bit more newsy. It dealt primarily with 
some of our foreign observers, and included 
information on v.h.f. abroad as well as tidbits 
from more local sources. 

Future issues will draw more heavily on the 
actual reports sent in. These have been arriving 
at a very satisfying rate. All of the propagation 
modes mentioned above, including transequa- 
torial scatter, have been spotted at least a few 
times. 

By the end of January, PRP reports and 
other correspondence were threatening to burst 
out of the ARRL Technical Department corner 
where the writer has been working. Fortunately, 
our new PRP Headquarters office (we had to 
have a separate office, since there was no space 
available for us at 38 LaSalle Road) was ready 
for occupancy just about this time. So it is that 
we're now operating from a pleasant and airy 
room in a modern office building at 530 Silas 
Deane Highway in Wethersfield. It is a few 
miles from ARRL Headquarters in West Hart- 
ford, which makes for problems now and then, 
but they’re rapidly getting ironed out. 

Incidentally, the writer’s editorial “we” ac- 
tually means something now. The PRP staff 
includes Mrs. Constance Campbell, X YL of the 
ARRL Technical Department’s WICUT and 
formerly of QST’s Advertising Department. She 
will help screen and evaluate the reports sent in 
by observers. 


Deta Handling 


Actual observing began January Ist. Although 
this was six months before the beginning of the 
IGY, an early start was considered essential so 
the program could be in full swing by July Ist. 
Also, with propagation conditions improving 
every day much valuable information is ac- 
cumulating during this advance period. 

Individual and personal inspection of all 
reports is the first operation to be performed 
when a batch of them is received. It is also, 
perhaps, the most important operation. Follow- 
ing evaluation, additional information such as 
station latitudes and longitudes will be added 
and the reports will go to an operator who will 
prepare punched cards containing all pertinent 

(Continued on page 136) 





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information. This process will put all data 
received in a form suitable for high-speed 
automatic sorting, collating, and summary prepa- 
ration, later on. 

It is important to note that this system is 
a flexible one. Our data, like all data collected 
during IGY, will be available for study by 
scientists the world over for years to come. 
That’s the main purpose of the IGY — to build 
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1958. This record will be in such a form that 
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their forerunners. 


Welcome to PRP! 

Though this discussion began as a progress 
report, it seems to be ending on a note of predic- 
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of the world in order best to paint the propagation 
picture as it really is. If you’re interested in 
v.h.f., write in and tell us. If you’re not in- 
terested in v.h.f. you should be, because you're 
missing some of the most fascinating aspects of 
our hobby. 

Lastly, if you’re visiting the Hartford area 
and ARRL, don’t forget you will also be wel- 
comed at PRP Headquarters. 





All Band Antenna 


(Continued from page 29) 
excellent results over a period of several months. 
It was found that moving the antenna to the 
lower altitude of 30 feet gave poorer signal 
reports, indicating that the height of the antenna 
was a controlling factor in its performance. 


The Image Principle 


While pondering over the problem of the 
amateur who isn’t blessed with a 50-foot flag- 
pole in front of his terrace, the principle of the 
antenna ‘“‘image’’ was recalled. This is explained 
in any good textbook on antennas; briefly it 
means that every antenna has an ‘image”’ 
directly beneath it in the ground, and it is the 
combination of the effect of the antenna plus the 
effect of the image that gives the antenna most 
of its directional properties. Conjecture as to the 
location of the image when the antenna proper 
was buried under the ground resulted in taking 
down the ferrite antenna from the flagpole and 
burying it 5 feet under the ground. It loaded the 
transmitter in the same way, and the s.w.r. 
checked out to be nearly the same as before. 
Examining the space above where the antenna 
was buried disclosed that the maximum field 
intensity existed 5 feet above the ground, in- 
dicating that the buried antenna did indeed 
have an image above the ground! Inspired by 

(Continued on page 138) 








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138 


this discovery, the antenna was buried 30 feet 

| below the ground. Raising and lowering the 
field-strength meter by means of the flagpole 
rope, the area of maximum intensity was found 
at 30 feet above the ground, further confirming 
the earlier finding. At 50 feet below the ground 
a very hard rock formation was encountered 
that prevented further experimentation at this 
location, but the signal reports continued upward 
and the performance was every bit as good, if 
not slightly better, than the performance had 
been when the antenna had been 50 feet above 
the ground. 

Using the antenna for receiving for the first 
time, it was noticed that all c.w. signals came 
in on the other side of zero beat to what was 
usual for the receiver. After a little cerebration 
the reason became apparent: one should expect 
image signals with an image antenna. This works 
no real hardship on the operator, once he has 
realigned his receiver to cope with these slightly 
different signals. 

This sketchy report is offered to the amateur 
fraternity in the hope that some of the remaining 
parameters of this antenna will be determined. 
For example, it is predicted that if the antenna 
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a good low-resistance ground system is always 
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Side Band, W2CSY on Product Detectors, W2- 
AMJ on V.H.F. Techniques, and W. Kaufman 
on Control Theory. A similar technical net covers 
the southwestern states Sundays at 1:00 p.m. 
CST on 7305 ke., and a Western Technical Net 
will soon be activated on 7832.5 ke. 


buried. 











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Grounded-Grid Kw. 


(Continued from page 15) 


850 volts is possible without the necessity for 
changing the series resistor. A 50,000-ohm bleeder 
is used as well, and the VR string remains across 
the supply in ¢.w. operation for improved regu- 
lation. 


Cooling 


Some form of blower should be used to keep 
the tube seals within temperature ratings in 


| order to obtain full life from the tubes. Originally, 


a smaller, higher-speed unit was contemplated 
so it could be mounted on the chassis or at the 
rear of it. However, blowers do not seem to be too 
readily available even in the larger cities, and 
they are not low in cost. In the interests of getting 
on the air, a surplus unit was purchased which 
was physically too large to be placed in the chas- 
sis. It is mounted on the bottom plate by means 
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removed before the amplifier can be withdrawn 
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accommodated below or on top of the chassis. 

Eimac Air-System sockets were used because 
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those who might find the cost prohibitive, a 
number of good designs using less expensive 
sockets have appeared in QST in recent months. 
As for pressurizing the chassis, no special pains 
need be taken other than to cover any large 
unused holes, such as those punched in the ends 
of many chassis for rack panel brackets. 





V.H.F. Meteor Scatter 


Continued from page 24) 


breaking, with calls for about 5 seconds and 
breaks about 2 seconds. Station B does the same 
for the second 5 minutes, ete. 

2) Station A calls for the first 15 seconds of 
each minute. Station B calls for the second 15 
seconds, A for the third, B for the fourth, ete. 
This is varied by some to make the periods 
30 seconds or a full minute’s duration. 

The advantage of the first method is that 
it does not require precise timing. It will catch 
a long overdense burst easily, and enable a 
rapid exchange of information. For the short 
underdense bursts, where information must be 
exchanged bit by bit, it is not so desirable. 
The 2-second break results in neither station 
being on the air for 30 per cent of the total 
time! 

The second method is almost 100 per cent 
efficient for the more common underdense bursts, 
but it requires precise timing, with WWV 


| synchronization and sweep-second hand clock 


faces. Also, it tends to make less-effective use 
of the long bursts. The majority of meteor DX 


(Continued on page 142) 





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work is done with underdense bursts, so the 
second method seems more valid. An exception 
would be with low-power stations, where in- 
sufficient underdense bursts are found to make 
contacts. They will make out better by con- 
centrating on the good showers and gambling on 
sustained strong bursts. 

The shortness of most bursts has led meteor 
enthusiasts to ever higher keying speeds. (You 
should hear my tape of W38TDF!) The only 
limitation on keying speed, after we have dis- 
pensed with human operators and gone to tele- 
type, is band width. Present receiving setups 
allow minimum band width around 100 to 500 
cycles, which is adequate for speeds up to 100 
W.p.m., so it seems logical to use all the selectivity 
we can get, and go to the highest practical keying 
speed. Obviously, it is useless to try to get 
information across on half-second bursts if indi- 
vidual characters are 0.25 second long! 


Speculation 

Here we are not asking you to agree. All com- 
ments are welcome! During the 1956 Geminids 
contact between W9GAB and W4LTU, Mose 
noted (and recorded on tape) that our signal 
had some characteristics of ionospheric scatter- 
ing. For 4 or 5 consecutive calling periods by 
W4LTU the signal in Wisconsin was weak but 
steady, with no sign of underdense bursts.® If 
it was a single long overdense (5 minutes?) why 
was there no such signal at this end? All over- 
dense bursts heard here to date (5 of them) have 
obeyed reciprocity, giving signals both ways. 
It may be possible that there is some ionospheric 
phenomenon that is not reciprocal, differing 
from the usual overdense bursts. Nonreciprocity 
can be brought about by effects of the earth’s 
magnetic field, (Faraday rotation of polarization.) 

There is such a fine line of division between 
meteor scatter and ionospheric scatter that some 
say they are the same. Perhaps the high level of 
underdense meteor activity at the time (12 per 
minute) resulted in sufficient turbulent ioni- 
zation to give signals of a continuous character, 
as in ionospheric scatter. It is interesting to note 
that normal ionospheric scatter signals on 144 
Me. would be expected to be 35 db. below those 
on 50 Me. Perhaps an abnormal increase in 
background ionization brings 144-Mc. signals up 
to a usable level on rare occasions. 

During nightly skeds with W3GKP, Smitty 
has noted apparent increases in duration of bursts 
when there is an aurora present. Not enough 
auroras were experienced up to the time this 
article was written to double check this, but 
more will come. 

More definite effects which may have a bearing 
on the subject resulted from checks with W2ORI 
and W3GKP during shower periods. During the 

Continued on page 144) 

3 On one occasion during nearly two years of daily tests 
on 144 Mce., W4HHK recorded 5 minutes of weak steady 
signal from W2UK. There were only about two or three 
meteor bursts in this entire period, and their level was only 
a few db. above the residual signal. This was in January, 


when tropospheric bending would not be expected to pro- 
duce signals over a 940-mile path on 144 Mc. — Ed. 








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1956 Orionids, nightly tests with W2ORI showed 
up to nearly four times the normal burst rate 
of about 0.5 per minute for nonshower periods. 
This does not seem unusual until we note that 
the were from 2030 to 2100, while the 
meteor radiant does not rise until 2230! The 
actual shower meteors were striking the opposite 
side of the earth, and the only effect that could 
be laid to them is residual ionization remaining 
on our side of the earth from the previous night’s 
shower meteors. Were the increased bursts merely 
from sporadic meteors which found it easier to 
ionize where there was initial ionization? W8GKP 
found a similar effect during the 1957 Quadran- 
tids. Increased burst rate was noted on schedules 
running up to 2145, when the meteor radiant 
did not rise until 2300. 

A check on this effect would be to run schedules 
during a very short shower, perhaps the Gia- 
cobinids, Oct. 9th, and see if the enhancement 
exists just before the shower, as well as just 
after. More tests which should prove interesting 
would be the comparison of normal burst rates 
with those obtained during intense sporadic-F. 
If the presence of high residual ionization does 
enhance meteor scatter, then EF, might well 
permit meteor-scatter contacts under non-shower 
conditions. 

Or perhaps we are putting the cart before the 
horse! Note the very intense daylight showers in 
June and July. Their peak rates rival the Perseids, 
and the total number of meteors received during 
them is immense. Perhaps the 
tense E during this period is due to the integrated 
ionizing effect of these recently discovered day- 
time showers. 


tests 


presence of in- 





Know the Regulations? 


(Continued from page 31) 


Answers 

1. (b) A photocopy is valid only for the station 
authorization; you must carry your original op- 
erator license. 

2. (c) Of course he must also have his operator 
license of the proper class. 

3. (c) His name must be written in the log, but 
not necessarily by himself. 

4, (c). 

5. (c) The call sign of the station transmitting 
must follow, not precede, the call sign of the 
station being worked. 

6. (c) For the code test (b) would be correct. 

7. (b). 

8. (b). 

9. (c) The ‘“‘maritime mobile” designation is 
used for operation outside the continental limits 
of the U.S. 

10. (c) While (b) is not incorrect, 
sere 

“1. 
“9 (c). 
13. (b) Novice and Technician license holders 
(Continued on page 146) 


(c) is rec- 





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| have no mutual frequency assignments and there- 
| fore cannot operate in each other’s 


bands. 

14. (c) Before granting authorization, FCC 
will clear the application with aviation agencies 

15. (c). 

16. (c) On e.w., geographical position is re- 
quired only for mobile operation outside the U.S. 

17. (¢). 

18. (b) This procedure is to avoid multiple 
issuance of licenses for temporary moves. 

19. (e). 

20. (b), since all of Lake Michigan is within 
the U. 8S. For operation outside the U. S., (a) 


would be correct. 


Scoring 
Correct 
Answers 
20 
19 
18 


Rating 

You must be an FCC examiner! 

Oh come, you peeked at the answers. 

Pretty good; you are eligible to give 
legal advice to other 75-meter 
phone men. 

Excellent. 

You pass. 

You pass, but it is getting marginal. 

Better brush up. 

You can come back and take the 
exam in 30 days. 

How many tickets have you collected? 

Who did you say took the exam for 
you? 

Aren’t you ashamed? 


17 
16 
15 
14 
13 


8 to 12 
4to7 





Cubical Quad 


(Continued from page 19) 


selector switch. In this way, my receiver and 


| transmitter are switched from one antenna to 
| another simultaneously. 


Well, boys, there it is. Of course, you can’t 
figure in the cost of the mast and coax cable or 


| rotating mechanism, but the three-band cubical 


quad itself cost me approximately $10.00. How- 
ever, I did my own welding. 

If you who build this antenna get as much 
pleasure out of it as I have had, it will be well 
worth its cost to you. I have worked more DX 
with 10-over-9 reports than ever before, and 
my transmitter is a Viking II. In checking the 
Australian station, 
I received a 10 over 9 on the front, nothing on 
the sides and a 3 on the back, and I have never 
changed the original tuning of the driven elements 
Maybe I could improve it, but 


‘a-Strays 3s 


K2ANN simplifies his log-keeping by using 
various colored inks for phone contacts, ¢.w., 
DX, etc. He has also used different colors for 
work on different bands. Says it makes it fun 
looking back through the log. 





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EASY TO INSTALL Results 


(Continued from page 51) 
TELESCOPES ee ee ae 
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Continued on page 150) 








~ us 





148 





MAKING THE BIG DECISION ? 





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149 





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59 E. Van Buren Street Chicago 5, Illinois (Continued on page 152) 








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REVISED... 
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An INVALUABLE reference work and text for 
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In the pages of this latest edition will be found, in addition to accumulated 
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New, improved models of both i.f. filters used in W1DX's receiver. 
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Hints & Kinks 
(Continued from page 78) 
audio leads as short as possible and away from 
the existing a.c. wiring. 
William J. Engle, jr.. W3KKO 


(QST wishes to thank Vernon Beck, W5DNY, 
for submitting a conelrad ‘‘ Feedback” circuit 
similar to the one received previously from 
W3KKO. And Walter Bruun, W2DGP, also 
sent us his version of the arrangement. Walt 
however, picks up feed-back voltage from the 
speaker side of the output transformer instead of 
tapping on to the plate of the output tube.) 





YL News and Views 


(Continued from page 57) 


which appeared in the January 1957 column. The net will 
issue the YL-OM Certificate to any amateur, YL or OM, 
who sends confirmation of contact with twenty-five full 
members of the Texas YL Round-Up Net to certificate 
custodian Helen Douglas, W5LGY, 1501 Monroe Street, 
Commerce, Texas. Write WS5LGY for the complete rules. 
The certificate has already been issued to K5s BNH, 
BNG, BWM, and W5s KEC, LGY, and WXY. 


MISCELLANY: 


OM W2QHH has a six hundred endorsement sticker for 
his YL Century Certificate! .. . OM W4JUJ relays that 
K4CZP, Mattie, received the No. 1 Jamestown Award 
VA-JF, a certificate offered in connection with the 1957 


The new President 
of the South African 
Women’s Radio Club is 
Pat W oodland, ZSIMI ® 
of Cape Province. One 
of the best known of 
some ninety ZS YLs, 
2at has served the 
SAWRC before in vari- 
ous offices. Using twenty 
phone and c.w., Pat has 
close to 100 countries 
confirmed. 


Jamestown, Virginia, Festival. (Write the Richmond ARC, 

Box 1985, Richmond 16, Va., for details.) .. . W3s AKB 

and CDQ helped with operation in the Governors to Presi- 

dent Relay on Inauguration Day. ... W6PCA, Opal, 
(Continued on page 154) 





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Brazilian YL 
Olga Oliveira, 
PY4DL, reigned 
as Queen of Ra- 
dio Amateurs at 
the LABRE con- 
vention in Sao 
Paulo. When 
about her more 
mundane duties 
at home, Olga 
can be heard on 
forty meters. 
Photo viaW2BV'S 
and W9BRD. 


holds the Texas YL Round-Up Net 10CC Certificate #1 


| and W8HWX, Lillian, has #2 (1000 OM QSLs required). 


. . WILUZR lists some of Maine’s more active YLs: 
KIADY, Wis BBY, GWF, VVT, YTE, ZLT, and ZOL. 
Rita is happy about her own good mobile reports from 
European DX on ten. . . . In just eight months W4VCB/3, 
Ev, has worked some 100 countries. ...YLRL Veep 
W3YTM/5 is back on 40 e.w. from her new Pasadena, 
Texas, QTH. . . . KZ5VR, Virginia, is another YL who has 
worked KC4s USA and USB. . . . Though her four little 
harmonics provided plenty of interruption, KN6PQG of 
El Granada, Calif., made 1030 contacts during her novice 
year. Babs has persevered on to her General Class (this item 
from OM KN6TNU),. . . . For working ten maritime mo- 
bile stations W8MBI, Marie, swept up her Witch Certifi- 
cate, awarded to YLs only. . . . Best wishes to W1ZID, 
who graced our YL page last December. On February 2nd 
Anne became Mrs. William Hopke. She has resigned from 
QST headquarters staff and will continue ham operations 
from her new QTH in upper New York. 





How’s DX 


(Continued from page 64) 


NCDXC-SCDXC parley in Fresno was a lively testimonial 
to the effective planning of chairman W6TI and assistants. 
VP8AP (ex-GM3EYP) attended a February SCDXC meet- 
ing, edifying W6AM and other members with much De- 
pendency and antarctic info. ._ .— After years of frustra- 
tion listening to rare DX calling C Q NEV, CQ VT, CQ NO 
WK, CQ this, and CQ that, W8NOH declares he'll drop 


| stone dead if he ever hears a juicy one calling CQ MICH 


| 


._ W4CYY fights the Battle of Belmont, N. C., a 
running skirmish between himself and a neighbor's leaky 
fence-charger. J. B. figures that darne . popcorn-popper must 
be double-DXCC by now. _ . —_ .~ W8QGI nominates Rosa, 
YL at HR2GH, as a candidate for your YL-DXCC col- 
lection .—_ . W9RJV/VES, through W9KJ, credits 
K2EOR, Ws 3T KQ 8HAI 9RUO 9TGB, VEIF Q and others 
for key assistance in keeping northern Canada outposts in 
touch with the home folks... As W2GVZ so aptly 
put it, they always come back. Ws 6CIS 8YGR and 
@FWW report into the “How's” net after DX layoffs 
caused by a traveling job, house-building and hospitaliza- 
tion, respectively. One of W8YGR’s first comeback encoun- 
ters on 15 featured OB3KA “on the moon.” Imaginative 
maniac, what?._.—.— VE1PQ warns that old VEIZL has 
the itch again and is preparing a 4-element spinner for the 
20-meter wars.—.— .~— Help! Y “4 wants the present 
address of op Kruse of SV@WO ; K5IILX needs QTH 
scoop on the current CN8FV; VE 3AAZ hungers for the 
whereabouts of FF3CN ('48); and VE3PK will settle for 
data on old KJ6AR, SUIMT and ZD9AA ('52-’53) . 
OVARA's Ether Waves, with W4KVX handily punc hing out 

(Continued on page 156) 





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its DX column, reports W8FGX lurking in the Caribbean. 
New OVARA oon: W4JBQ, 77, WS8ELB, v.p.; 

WS8CGY, treas.; 4KVX, sec.; W4OMW, ed.; and 
WSIFX, v.h-f. ed... . ‘Out hee those pasteboards 
really roll in, we note that W6TI has been handling your 
ARRL W6/K6 QSL Bureau for over twenty twine-snapping, 
card-sorting, pigeonhole-digging years. 

Ten Years Ago in ‘‘How’s DX?’’ — Moderator WICH 
acknowledges assistance from Wls GKA GKK KMY 
LQO, W2s CYS MPA PNB QUJ RDK, W3s HH JKK 

y W5IWY, Wé6s SAI SN TI, W7s BED JHB 

W8s NBK RDZ ZBK, W9s AWO E INQ RBI, VEs 
1EP and 3ACS in turning out his second ‘‘How’'s’ ‘effort 
following the retirement of W1DX from DXdom’s fourth 
estate... — Forty-meter resurgence is noted in our 
April 1947 column. CR9AD, HASF, J2AAM, KAlIs EA 
ZU, KP6AB, LX1AS, TRIP, UA3s AF DQ KA, UG6AB, 
W6NQG/KM6, W6VSO0/J9, XU6GRL and YR5M are 
reported worked, and our West Coast gang avers that 7-Mc. 
European signals now roll through as never before . — 
Twenty c.w. captivates s its growing audience with EP3D, 
FF8WN, HA4EA, HZ1AB, I6USA, J3AAD, LX1AO, 
PIiL, PKs 1RX 4IP, PZis AL MY, SPIKWK, ST2AM, 
SV1RX, TAIDB, TE3A, UAs 6BC 9DP, UN1AO, VP8AD, 
VO5TWJ, VS7ES, WOMCF/C1, YO5WZ, ZCIAN, ZD2G 
and ZK1AH. On 20 phone the smart set mingle with C7AA 
EKIMB, Js 2UVW 3DN 9AAW, KAISS_ KP6AB, 
PK1AW, UAIAB, VQ8AB and Basutoland’s ZS4P . 
Ten phone gets a good going-over because of FK8V B, Js 

9AGT, SUIBD, W4HUR/C7, W9URU/C7 and 
4s while the 28-Me. c.w. gang dote on CRs 4AA 
4 HA7AD, OE1AX, UA9CF, UB5KAE, 

VOS5FCA, VR2AB, YI2ZAT, ZBIAB and ZC6FP. 





World Above 50 Mc. 
(Continued from page 67) 


to tune the sigs in readably. Results were not related to 
signal level, as signals were strong during the January 
session. Aurora veterans are familiar with the variation in 
distortion of signals, even during one event. Distortion 
usually tapers off gradually toward the end of the opening. 
In the closing minutes of an aurora session s.s.b. should get 
through often when a.m. will not. The quality of the c.w. 
notes should provide a clue. 

W2EWL has done it again! Tony now comes up with a 
modification of the system he described in March, 1956, 
QST, to give a simple approach to v.h.f. s.s.b. The signal is 
generated at 7150 ke., in a manner similar to the original 
unit. The trick is that some of the crystal oscillator output 
on 7150 ke. is fed into frequency multipliers with output 
on 42,900 ke. This is then mixed with the s.s.b. energy on 
7150, to give a sum frequency of 50.05 Mc. Thus only one 
stable oscillator is required — and it uses readily-available 
ham-band crystals, or a good v.f.o. already in use on lower 
bands can be pressed into service. The rig is in use at 
K2KSW, Denville, N. J. 

The first two-way s.s.b. on 50 Mc. for K2KSW was 
with W2HBC, Mt. Vernon, N. Y., who reports that the 
life of a v.h.f. s.s.b. enthusiast is not ali a string of successful 
extended-range work. Out of Bill's first 14 stations worked, 
only 5 could copy his s.s.b. well enough to make a QSO 
of it. W2HBC uses a B & W rig on 14 Mce., a high-level 
6146 mixer with 36-Mce. injection, and a 4D32 amplifier 

K6GFI, Sacramento, passes along some hints that may 
be helpful to budding sidebanders on the v.h.f. bands. He 
built a phasing exciter for 14 Me. and then heterodyned 
this to 144 Mc. in a manner similar to that shown in QST 
for November, 1956, page 74. His injection unit uses a 
43.33-Mce. crystal oscillator and a tripler to 130 Me. It was 
found that a regulated 150-volt supply was necessary to 
maintain adequate stability in the crystal oscillator. 

The first attempt at a mixer for 130 and 14 Me. was an 
832A, but output was too low to drive a pair of 4X150As 
as a final stage. Thinking that part of the trouble with this 
arrangement, which involves injecting the 14-Me. energy 
into the screen circuit, was the high screen-to-ground capaci- 
tance of the 832A, K6GFI next tried a 6524. This required 
more inductance in the 14-Mce. tuned circuit in the screen 
lead, but it netted output to burn 

The 6524 is driven on 130 Me. to the point where it shows 
3 ma. through a 12,000-ohm grid leak. The plate circuit is a 
conventional 144-Mc. tuned line. Screen voltage, fed 
through the 14-Mce. tuned circuit, is taken from an adjusta- 
ble tap on a bleeder across the 300-volt plate supply. Screen 
voltage is adjusted for maximum output, but metering is 
advised, to prevent exceeding the tube’s ratings. The 14- 
Me. s.s.b. signal is fed to the 6524 screen, of course, 

(Continued on page 158) 





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To keep unwanted mixer products out of the final grid 
circuit, K6GFI runs the 6524 output through a 144-Me. 
re-entrant coaxial tank circuit. This is made of copper, 13% 
inches square and 10 inches long, with a 44-inch inner con- 
ductor, tuned with a 50-yyf. trimmer. 


OES Notes 
W1KCS, Providence, R. I. — Worked W4LTU, Orlando, 


Fla., via meteor scatter during Geminid shower. Would 
like skeds for other meteor work. 

W1SUZ, Colebrook, Conn. — Receiver especially designed 
for v.h.f. use now nearing completion. Front ends are con- 
verters for the various bands. These work into a 6BA7 
mixer and 6SJ7 local oscillator, covering 30 Me. to 500 ke. 
Two stabilized tuning ranges for converters are provided 
at 7 to 11 Me. and 1.5 to 2 Me. I.f. system at 465 ke. includes 
crystal-lattice filter, either product detector or infinite- 
impedance detector, and Q multiplier. Audio and power 
supply with Selecto-ject is separate unit used with previous 
receivers. 

W1UHE, Tiverton, R. I. — Working W1VNH, Agawam, 
Mass., regularly on 220 Me. Signals usually weak. Path is 
about 75 miles with rough terrain and hills up to 1000 
feet in between. Both locations near sea level. 50-Me. 
s.s.b. exciter completed; good reports being obtained with 
4 watts. 829B linear under construction. 

K2DDK, Flushing, N. Y.— Can't figure out why some 
fellows with otherwise well-equipped v.h.f. stations do not 
make provision for c.w. operation. In a contest they can't 
possibly compete with the c.w.-equipped station, and they 
automatically leave themselves out of much of the interest- 
ing v.h.f. DX work. 

K2ITP, Riverton, N. J. — Half-watt mobile on 50 Me. 
doing better than expected. Normal solid range with home 
station is 10 to 15 miles, and the signal has been reported 
out to 50 miles. Worked 157 stations on 6 alone in V.H.F. 
SS from home station, including W4IKK, by ionospheric 
scatter. 

K2RKL, New York City 
Tuesday and Thursday, 50.25 Mc.; 

W4HKK, Collierville, Tenn. — Converter ae 432 Me. 
now completed. Includes 416B r.f. stage built by W7LHL, 
6AJ4 cascode i.f. at 50 Me. with output at 7 to 11 Me 
for working into HRO-50. Will be on shortly with 4X150A 
doubler, running 50 watts input. Presently working W5RCI, 
Marks, Miss., crossband, 432-144. W4RFR, Nashville, 
nearly 200 miles, is worked crossband 6-2, making for fine 
duplex QSOs. 

W4IKK, Rome, Ga. 
Ga., Ala., Tenn., and 8. C., made 
more fun than ever before. Ionospheric scatter 
scatter contacts helped, too. 

W6LWT, El Cajon, Cal. — Now working 420-Mc 
Notice fast flutter in working fixed stations, but mobile-to- 
mobile sigs seem steady. 

W7QDJ, Clearfield, Utah— Newcomers to 6 include 
W7s RPY, Sunset, and BCN, Ogden. Stations on 144 Me. 
in Salt Lake Valley now changing to horizontal polarization 
in attempt to extend working range. 

W8TIN, Clio, Mich. — Biggest surprise of ham career 
came on Jan. 3rd, when KL7VT, Summit, Alaska, responded 
to a 50-Me. CQ at 1801 EST! KL7VT reported it his first 
stateside contact on 6 

W9PUD, Anderson, Ind. Would like to stir up interest 
in RTTY on 50 Me. Any takers? 

WOUSQ, Davenport, Iowa Expect to be RTTY on 2 
and 6 by middle of March. Heard several East Coast 2- 
meter stations during Jan. 21st aurora, but could not raise 
them on c.w., 144.043 Me. Suggestion from W1HDQ 
Try moving higher in the band and calling some good long 
CQs. The first 100 ke. is a solid mass of strong signals here 
during a good aurora. 


— Two Long age ae nets: 
Sunday, 50.1 Me. 


— Fine response of 6-meter men in 
this year’s V.H.F. 8S 
and back- 


mobile 





MEMBERSHIP CHANGES OF ADDRESS 


Four weeks’ notice is required to effect 
change of address. When notifying, please 
give old as well as new address. Advise 
promptly so that you will receive every 
issue of QS7' without interruption. 














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MR. O. A. BOWMAN 
Field Engineering 


Dept- Q 


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THE HOTTEST NEWS 
OF THE YEAR— 
FROM HAMMARLUND 
IN MAY QST | 


GPR 


(Continued from page 45) 


These relays are customarily one-way traffic 
exercises. We almost had an unexpected chapter 
to report in this relay. Government officials ap- 
prised of the relay in progress hinted the strong 
possibility there might be radio acknowledg- 
ments filed by the White House. The Washington 
gang advised ARRL; the Regional Net Control 
Stations that are key points in the ARRL Na- 
tional Traffic System (see Feb. QST, page 50) 
were alerted to this possibility. We were ready 
with our best service. But on Jan. 24th word was 
distributed by W1AW and W3WYV that no reply 
would be filed. So another relay becomes history. 

There was no fully satisfactory answer to the 
question why all states didn’t send messages. 
We do know that at least one SCM or his desig- 
nated man failed to contact the governor. WOKQL 
reported the Illinois gubernatorial stand that 
sending a message was superfluous, since their 
governor was going to Washington in person to 
extend felicitations. We’ll conclude with a state- 
by-state message routing from data reported 
here: 





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Happenings 


(Continued from page 75) 


are 


such application has been made in advance of 
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Don’t use 405-A for renewal if at the same 
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Bear in mind that the application does not 
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of Renewal of Radio License,” is authenticated, 
stamped with the new expiration date, and re- 
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Wire mounted, plated crystals for use by amateurs and 
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CIRCUIT: Designed to operate into a load capacitance of 
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(Continued from page 69) 


for each conference, and that exclusive space be provided 
for the radio amateurs both internationally and nationally. 
For example in 1943, during the work of the Craven Sub- 
committee in preparing the proposals of the Interdepart- 
ment Radio Advisory Committee for the revision of the 
Cairo Allocation Table, the Navy submitted and strongly 
justified detailed recommendations for the provision of 
amateur bands in the spectrum above 27 Mes. These bands 
may be found today in either the Worldwide or Atlantic 
City Allocation Tables, almost without change. 

“The United States was successful in obtaining exclusive 
space for amateurs at the Washington Conference of 1927, 
and at the succeeding Conferences at Madrid, Cairo and 
Atlantic City. At the Cairo Conference, the advocates of 
high frequency broadcasting brought considerable pressure 
to bear upon the amateur service, and ultimately succeeded 
in breaching the 7000-7300 ke. band insofar as the Euro- 
pean region was concerned. Similarly, at the Atlantic City 
Conference, proposals and counter-propesals regarding 
amateur allocations in the high frequency spectrum caused 
such a sericus deadlock that the success of the radio con- 
ference was for a time in jeopardy. The United States dele- 
gation, again with the strong support of the Navy members, 
was successful in bringing about an ultimate compromise 
which, though not providing what we would have liked, 
was instrumental in making available to the amateur service 
the maximum amount of spectrum space obtainable under 
the circumstances 

“The increased use of the radio frequency spectrum, 
brought about by technological developments since the 
end of World War II, demonstrates the wisdom of the fore- 
going, and dictates that for the future, firm action must 
continue to be exercised in the preservation and provision 
of spectrum space for the radio amateur. I might add that 
the Joint Communication-Electronics Committee of the 
Joint Chiefs of Staff organization is well aware of this im- 
portant consideration. 

“No discussion of amateur radio is complete without 
mention of the American Radio Relay League, or ARRL, 
which is virtually synonymous with amateur radio itself 
in this country. Established in 1914 and continuing with 
increasing growth and influence (except for the short period 
of World War I), the ARRL and its leaders are responsible 
primarily for the progress and development of amateur 
radio as it exists today. The ARRL today is not only the 
spokesman for amateur radio in this country, but it is also 
by far the largest amateur organization in the world. It is 
pledged to promote interest in amateur communications 
and experimentation. It is interested in relaying messages 
by amateur radio, and is concerned with the advancement 
of the radio art. It stands for the maintenance of fraternal- 
ism and high standards of conduct, a cooperative loyalty 
to the traditicns of amateur radio, a dedication to its ideals 
and principles, so that the institution of amateur radio 
may continue to operate in the best public interest. The 
radio amateur code, drafted many years ago by Paul M 
Sega], now General Counsel for the ARRL, still stands as a 
shining guide to the amateur in his activity and in his rela- 
tionships with others. The amateur is gentlemanly; the 
amateur is loyal; the amateur is progressive; the amateur is 
friendly; the amateur is balanced, and the amateur is 
patriotic. By virtue of this exemplary code, the ARRL has 
established a standard of conduct unexcelled in any similar 
field. 

“Through the years, the ARRL has had as its presidents 
four distinguished Americans. The beloved and well-known 
Hiram Percy Maxim, ARRL’s first president, served for 
22 years, until his death in 1936. Dr. Eugene C. Woodruff, 
then professor of electrical engieeering at Pennsylvania 
State College, sueceeded Mr. Maxim, and served ably 
and well from 1936 to 1940. George W. Bailey, now execu- 
tive secretary of the world-renowned Institute of Radio 
Engineers, and formerly president of the Armed Forces 
Communications and Electronics Association, served with 
distinction as ARRL president for 12 years, from 1940 to 
1952. Goodwin L. Desland, whom I am proud to call a 
brother officer in the Naval Service, and who also served 
as one of the illustrious members of the 1956 Edison Radio 
Amateur Award judging panel, is currently president of 
the ARRL. The official organ of the ARRL is QST magazine, 
a respected and valuable journal not only to radio amateurs 


yrrvrrvrrrrrrrrrrrrrs,r 
162 


(Continued on page 164) 








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but also to many others in the field of communications and 
electronics, world-wide 

“‘It has been a pleasure, this evening, to address this 
receptive audience who shares with me a common interest 
in the past, present and future of amateur radio. | consider 
it a privilege, as I know you do, to have a part in these 
ceremonies honoring the 1956 radio amateur of the year, 
Mrs. Mae Burke.” 





Correspondence 


(Continued from page 79 


CQ Dx 
1340 Giddings 8. E 
Grand Rapids 6, Mich. 
Editor, QST: 

In contrast to those who condemn the use of “CQ DX” 
as standard procedure, I would like to thank all those who 
do use it and offer the following for consideration of those 
who say it brands us as lids 

I use it because I want to save time for other W stations 
who might be hearing me. It tells them I'd rather not get 
hit with an 89 signal when I am only interested in searching 
out a weaker foreign signal. Conversely, when I hear a “CQ 
DX” on the air, I immediately know enough to let him 
alone and I can search the band for another contact. I'd 
no more think of calling him than I would if he were calling 
“CQ California,’ or for that matter actually calling an- 
other station 

The operators who use “CQ DX" provide me with a 
valuable service. It not only saves me time, but, if 1 have 
just turned on the receiver and am waiting for the rig to 
warm up, it gives me a known spot to monitor the band 
and to see who comes back to him and what conditions are 
If he answers a VSI I didn’t even hear and my beam is 
pointed NE, it tells me I'd be wise to swing it around and 
see if I can pick up a new country. If it is a G or some 
other European station and he is only an 85 in my receiver, 
but I hear a W7 give him an 88, I can be pretty sure skip 
isn't favoring the midwest. The “CQ DX” boys instantly 
identify themselves as excellent monitoring spots up and 
down the bands. 

And so I'd like to thank every one of them who uses this 
so-called lid procedure, and with the kind permission of 
those who condemn it, I think I'll continue to furnish the 
same service for those who wish to avail themselves of it 
I don't wish to start an argument, but I think there are 
two sides to this matter 


Vorman C. MacPhail, W8DLZ 


HAM Q 


P. O. Box 207 
Winnebago, Ill. 
Editor, QST: 

I fully agree with W6MUR’s letter in February QST, p. 
49. The boys who spend a lot do get an unfair break. A way 
to cure this follows. It’s so simple, it is almost stupid 

1) All of us have spent something on ham radio. 

2) None of us has spent as much on ham radio as we 
would have liked to spend 

3) The true merit could be found for any ham by simply 
dividing what he would have liked to spend by what we did 
spend 
“Ham Q” = What a ham wanted to spend 

What he spent 

The “Ham Q”" would then be a multiplier in all award 

or contest rules. This would take into account the rich 


Continued on page 166) 





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ELECTRICAL - MECHANICAL - ELECTRONIC 


Be sure to get your 
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WE'VE BEEN 
ROBBED! 


Nor YOU, who buy OST on a newsstand 
(it's well worth $6 a year), but we, the 
60,000 licensed members of the League, 
have been robbed—of your full support. 
OST is more than a magazine, you see. 
It's the official journal of a large and 
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fellow who spent all he cared to and give a break to the 
fellow who only had a few pennies but was nuts enough to 
want a good rig. 

Frankly, I feel persecuted as I feel sure my lousy 
rig, my poor fist, my skippy copy, and my disinterest have 
kept awards from me and my mother always said I was as 
good as the next fellow. In fact, I'm boiling mad at those 
millionaires. Maybe only hams who have stolen all their 
equipment should be allowed to compete. (These would 
have a “Ham Q of infinity”; i.e., something divided by 
nothing equals infinity.) 

— Conrad R. Hilpert, K9DJG 


WAIT ONE 


Antioch College 
Yellow Springs, Ohio 
Editor, QST': 

It occurred to me recently that we are more or less in need 
of a new Q signal. Something to the effect of “Wait, I am 
checking my Conelrad monitor.’’ Many of the monitors 
either involve a brief pause in checking, or will indicate 
“alert’’ under conditions of malfunction, sign off of station 
monitored, or temporary cessation of modulation on the 
monitored signal. There should be something short and 
brief indicating that a check is necessary before further 
transmission is necessary a Q signal? Haven't a complete 
list to check but QNL, QCD, or some such seem logical 

— Jim Pullman, WSEXZ 


STRONG WORDS 


76 Highland Road 
Glen Cove, L. I., N. Y. 
Editor, QST: 

February QST, p. 49, carries a note from W6MUR, 
expressing his personal opinion of sponsored DX-peditions 
and voluntary contributions to those who spend their time 
and money to visit out-of-the-way places 

Personally, I appreciate the efforts of these venturesome 
amateurs and feel that if I can cover the airmail and printing 
cost on my QSL and maybe chip in a few cents for some 
other ham who can't afford it or who won't, I'm glad to be 
able to help 

Certainly one fellow’s idea of “morality” and ‘depths 
of degradation" are awfully strong words to throw around 

even as transient opinions. .. . 


— Al. Stobbe, W2WZ 


125-MILE LIMIT 


1685 Lincoln Hwy. E. 
Lancaster, Pa. 
Editor, QST: 

I wish to register my opposition to the recent ARRL 
proposal to the FCC requesting a return to the 125-mile 
limit for license examinations. I believe that the liberalized 
rules on mail examinations have been a great contribution 
to the growth of amateur radio. (It saves us a few tax 
dollars, too.) ... 

Many of the new amateurs that I have talked to are 
under 20 years of age. These younger amateurs are doing 
us all a service by increasing our numbers and using our 
bands. ... Many of the younger applicants could not 
manage a long trip to obtain a license. We should not ask 
for rules which would tend to exclude them. 

— George S. Gadbois, W8FEY/W1UIZ 


R. F. INDICATOR 


Orange, New Jersey 
Editor, QST: 

Conelrad monitors, CD monitors, faney gadgets, and 
so forth — all very fine. The law says you have to, so I did 

I built the little gimmick as described on page 49 of 
January QST (Conel-Band Aid) and attached it to my 
trusty old broadcast a.c.-d.c. portable radio and fired it up. 
It works fine with practically any B.C. station in the area. 
I’m using WOR. 

Now, can anyone tell me how I keep the neon bulbs from 
blinking when my 110-watt transmitter is on? Some warning 
device! When I go on the air, it tells me I’m on and to hoot 
with Conelrad! .. . 

— Paul Boivin, Jr.,. WiZXA/K2SKK 





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HEAVY DUTY} 
ROTATOR R-200 


—and Direction Indicating & Control System R-200S 


1000” Ib. torque at .9 rpm provided by 1725 rpm, 110-v 1/6 hp motor, 
double worm gear reduced. Enough power to rotate up to 24 sq. ft. of 
wind surface area in winds of 120 mph. This means, you can rotate the 
largest available full sized 10, 15 and 20 meter “Christmas-tree” set-up. 





FREE COIL BULLETIN 


Technical data on coils specified in QST and Handbook. 
Standard coil series ideal for experimenters and designers. 
NORTH HILLS ELEC edad co., INC. 
402 Sagamore Avenue Mineola, L. |. 
{ Harrison Radio wg New York, N. Y. 
DISTRIBUTORS < Radio Shack Corp., Boston, Mass. 
Zack Radio Supply Co., Palo Alto, Calif. 











DUTY 


BEAM ROTATOR 


Complete with heavy duty mast casting, rotation 
limit switches, selsyns, cast aluminum control box 
with colorful direct and reciprocal bearings, plus 
ON-OFF switch. Price $344.50. DIRECTION 
INDICATOR 





ALSO AVAILABLE— Model R-100S, 
300” Ibs. torque. Price $158.75 


Y.PARK 22, NEW JERSEY, USA 


USA.” - 


TV & COMMUNICATION 
ANTENNAS 

















THE BIG SECRET 
WILL BE OUT— 
IN THE MAY ISSUE 


Hammarlund again makes history with 
products designed for you . . . brand-new, 
not replacements for present products. 


AWM IMIANR RU INIG 
HAMMARLUND MANUFACTURING CO., INC., 
Since 1910 460 W. 34th ST a es Pe 


Aout af 
The Sensational, New, AMECO 


CONELRAD MONITOR 


Not just a kit, 

but wired and 

tested, complete, 

ready for 

operation. 

Priced at 

a LOW 95 MODEL eT 


Completely enclosed im an attractive black case and 
brushed copper panel with block lettering, the AMECO 
Conelrad Monitor converts any receiver having AVC, 
into an effective conelrad alarm system. When the 
broadcast station goes off the air, a loud clear tone is 
immediately sounded in the receiver. The AMECO 
Monitor is a complete electronic audio alarm. There 
are no buzzers or relays. 


OTHER FEATURES INCLUDE: 

Easily installed. No leads in radio to cut. 

@ Connectors provided so that monitor can be 
plugged in or out of receiver. 
Monitor switch allows receiver to function 
normally or turns on Conelrad Alarm System. 
Excellent as Code Practice Oscillator. 
Receiver completely silent during the monitor- 
ing. No transformer clatter. 
Easily modified for mobile use. 
No potentiometers to vary. No relays to adjust. 


AMERICAN ELECTRONICS CO. 


1203 Bryant Avenue, New York 59, N. Y. 














NEW BOOKS 


Reference Data for Radio Engineers, 
fourth edition, published by International Tele- 
phone and Telegraph Corporation, 67 Broad St., 
New York 4, N. Y. 1121 pages, plus index, 6 by 
834 inches, cloth cover. Price, $6.00. 

Users of the preceding (third) edition of this well-known 
handbook are invited to note that the fourth edition is just 
about 500 pages larger. In fact, each new edition gives the 
impression of being twice as thick as its predecessor — a 
process that for physical reasons alone obviously cannot 
continue indefinitely! 

Part of the expansion in this new edition of the popular 
“Federal Handbook" is in additional subjects not previously 
covered. New chapters have been added on magnetic ampli- 
fiers, semiconductors and transistors, transistor circuits, 
scattering matrixes, digital computors, nuclear physics, 
information theory, and probability and statistics. Earlier 
material has been enlarged and in some cases rechaptered 
for example, there are now three chapters on filters: one on 
design by the image-parameter method, one on the use of 
modern network theory, and a band-pass design chapter 
that includes material formerly under the title ‘Selective 
Circuits.”” Servomechanisms are now treated under “ Feed- 
back Control Systems,”’ the material on this subject being 
largely new. The mathematical sections also have been 
considerably expanded. 

The compact and economical method of presentation 
characteristic of preceding editions is continued in this one. 
Truly a book that anyone professionally engaged in radio or 
electronics can’t afford not to have. 





Electronic Technology Series (formerly 
Rider Review edited by Alexander 
Schure. Published by John F. Rider Publisher, 
Inc., 480 Canal St., New York 13, N. Y.; 5% 
by 8% inches, paper covers. No. 13, L-C Oscil- 
lators, 72 pages, $1.25; No. 16, Resonant Cir- 
cuits, 72 pages, $1.25. 


Series), 


Earlier volumes in this series were reviewed in the October 
and November, 1956, issues of QST’.. No. 13 appears to be 
on a more advanced level, at least from the standpoint of 
the amount of mathematics employed, than the other books 
so far published in the series; the mathematical design ma- 
terial is carried a bit deeper than is customary in elementary 
texts. Most of the book is devoted to conventional tube 
oscillator circuits, but there is a short closing section on 
special types of u.h.f. oscillators. No. 16 discusses reactance, 
resonance in series and parallel circuits, coupled resonant 
circuits, and transmission-line resonant circuits, with a brief 
outline of their principal applications. 


Servicing TV AFC Systems, by John Rus- 
sell, jr., published by John F. Rider Publisher, 
Inc., 116 West 14th St., New York 11, N. Y. 
119 pages, including index, 514% by 81% inches, 
paper cover. Price, $2.70. 

A general text describing the operation of a.f.c. systems 
for horizontal sync in television receivers, with methods for 
trouble-shooting. 


SOS at Midnight, by Walker A. Tompkins, 
published by Macrae Smith Company, Phila- 
delphia 2, Pa., 223 pages, 5!4 by 814 inches, 
cloth cover. Price, $2.75. 

K6ATX has done a remarkable job of sugar-coating an 
introduction to amateur radio, wrapping it in a fast- 
moving adventure story involving 17-year-old Tommy 
Rockford and his friends with a gang of smugglers. Before 
the boys are finally rescued after a dramatic SOS at Mid- 
night, Tommy has explained many things about amateur 
radio, including TVI, ham language, cost of getting started, 
DX chasing, rag-chewing, and the League — all without 
slowing down the plot. This may make an ideal gift for that 
junior op, nephew, or friend you have been trying to 
interest in radio. 








Tbe ORIGINAL f 
THREE-BAND | 





Vv NO STACKING REQUIRED—all elements are at the full height yet wind resistance is held to a minimum. 

Vv UNIQUE WINDMILL DESIGN—permits ready access to all parts of the beam from the tower. 

v¥ WIDE-BAND BALANCER—offords perfect pattern symmetry with coaxial feed line. No adjustment required. 

¥ MAXIMUM GAIN—over 8-db. gain on 20 and 15 meters, somewhat higher on 10 meters. 

V HIGH FRONT TO BACK RATIO— in most installations the front to back ratio exceeds 30 db. on 10 and 20 meters 
and 25 db. on 15 meters. 

V¥ RUGGED DESIGN—Boom consists of two 12-foot lengths of 24 dia. tubing with .065” wall. Three-band elements 
are made of 1/2” tubing with .058”’ wall. All tubing is of 6061-T6 heat-treated aluminum alloy for maximum weather 
resistance and strength. 

MODEL FT-100 BEAM ANTENNA PARASITIC ARRAY operating on 10, 15 and 20 

meters. Complete with chromate dipped hardware and aircraft type stainless steel clamps $225 00 

(to assure against corrosion and rust), assembly instructions and prints * 
MULTIBAND DESIGN FOR WIRE ANTENNAS—The W30DZZ design employs a concentric coil and ~~ 


condenser completely potted in Polyester Resin. Polystyrene insulation of concentric capacitor can withstand 
highest amateur transmitter voltages 


MODEL FT-200 TRAPS for 5-band antenna cperation on 10/15/20/40 and 80 meters. (75 ohm feed 
line). Pair, postpaid 





See your loca! distributor (HARVEY has it in the N. Y. area) or write to: 


FREDERICK TOOL & ENGINEERING CORPORATION ag 
414 PINE AVENUE, FREDERICK, MARYLAND 


TURN COUNT DIAL 




















Register Fractions to 9TH RADIO and TELEVISION 


OR roller inductances, INDUC- 
~ TUNERS, fine tuning gear re- Over 30 years N.E. Radio Training Center. Train 


lucers, vacuum and other r t for all types FCC operators’ licenses. Also Radio 


E nting andy and Television servicing. FM-AM broadcasting 
4 transmitters at school. Send for Catalog Q 


variable condensers. One 
logging space. Case: 2’’ x 
2 has 2%"’ dial — 1%” kr 
2%" knob. Black bakelite 
TC 2 $4.20 -TC 3 $4.75—Spinner Handle 75c extra M A Ss S ’ R A D I 1°] ) c H °o °o L 

idd 8¢ for Parcel Post 271 Huntington Avenue Boston 15, Massachusetts 

R. W. GROTH MFG. CO. Lic. by Comm. Mass. Dept. Educ 

10009 Franklin Ave. Franklin Pk., Ulinois 











GET INTO BIG PAYING MOBILE RADIO MAINTENANCE 


with 
Biba hen ybne - aetigameen LAMPKIN’S 
on LAMPKIN meters. ry : E 
se uae © abi oon te ary 
| fate gl oe 
me PAYMENT PLAN! 


To find out how l/ittle it costs to start... and 
how profitable mobile-radio maintenance can 
be... send coupon for payment plan 

details and free booklet “HOW TO 

MAKE MONEY IN MOBILE-RADIO 
MAINTENANCE.” 


LAMPKIN LABORATORIES, INC. 
Mfg. DIVISION, BRADENTON, FLA. 


Type 105-B Frequency Meter Type 205-A Modulation Meter At no obligation to me, please send free booklet and dope 
Range 0.1 to 175 MC. and up. Range 25 to 500 MC. on time-payment plan. 
Price $220.00 Price $240.00 Name. 


LAMPKIN LABORATORIES, INC. BRADENTON FLORIOA [Ail 


City. 

















HAM-ADS 


(1) Advertising shall pertain to radio and shall be of 
nature of interest to radio amateurs or experimenters in 
their pursuit of the art 

No display of any character will be accepted, nor can 
any special typographical arrangement, such as all or part 
capital letters, be used which would tend to make one adver 
tisement stand out from the others. No Box Reply Service 

can be maintained in these columns nor may commercial 
type copy be signed solely with amateur call letters 

3) The Ham-Ad rate is 30¢ per word, except as noted in 
paragraph (6) belo 

(4) Remittance in full must accompany copy, since 
Ham-Ads are not carried on our books. No cash or con- 
tract discount or agency commission will be allowed. 

(5) Closing date for Ham-Ads is the 20th of the second 
month preceding publication date 

(6) A special rate of 7¢ per word will apply to adver- 
tising which, in our judgment, is obviously non- 
commercial in nature. Thus, advertising of bona fide 
surplus equipment owned, used and for sale by an individual 
or apparatus offered for exchange or advertising inquiring 
for special equipment, takes the 7¢ rate. An attempt to deal 
in apparatus in quantity for profit, even if by an individual, 
is commercial and all advertising so classified takes the 30¢ 
rate. Provisions of paragraphs (1), ( and (5), apply to all 
advertising in this column regardless of which rate may 
apply 

(7) Because error is more easily avoided, it is re- 

uested signature and address be printed plainly. 

ypewritten copy preferred but handwritten signa- 
ture must accompany all authorized insertions. 

(8) No advertiser may use more than 100 words in any 
one issue nor more than one ad in one issue, 


Having made no investigation of the advertisers in the classified 
olumns, the publishers of OST are unable to vouch for their 
integrity or for the grade or character of the products or services 
adverltt sed, 











Brazil of best quality pure 


QUARTZ Direct importers from 
Diamond Drill 


cpeaste suitable for making piezo-electric crystals 
Carbon Co., 248 Madison Ave., New York City 16. 


MOTOROLA used FM communication equipment bought and sold. 
WSBCO., Ralph Hicks, 204 E. Fairview, Tulsa < 


WANTED: Cash or trade, 
W9YTY, Troy, Ill 
MICHIGAN Hams! Amateur supplies, standard brands. Store 
hours 0830 to 1730 Monday through Saturday oy Purchase, 
W8RP, Purchase Radio Supply, 3 E. Hoover St., Ann Arbor, 
Michigan. Tel. NOrmandy 8-8262 : 
WANTED: Early wireless gear, books, 
1922. Send description and prices. W6GH, 
Barbara Calif 
WANTED: All types aircraft & "ground ee we receivers 
ART-13, RT18/ARC1, RS5/ARN7, BC610E, ARN6, BC788C 
ARC3, BC342. Highest prices possible paid Dames, W2KUW, 308 
Hickory St., Arlington, N. J z 7 
ATTENTION Mobileers! Leece ville 6 volt 100 amp 
alternator, regulator & rectifier, $45.00. Also Leece-} 
100 amp. system, alternator, regulator & rectifier, 
condition. H. A Zimmermi ann Jr., K2PAT, 115 Willow St : 
Y 2-347 


lyn 1, N Ulster 2 


fixed frequency receivers 28/42 Mc. 


magazines, catalogs before 
1010 Monte Dr., Santa 


system 
12-volt 

Good 
Brook- 


CASH for your gear. We buy as well sell. Write for cash offer or 
trade. We stock Elmac, Gonset, Hallicrafters, Hammarlund, John- 
son, Lysco Master Mobile, Morrow, National and other ham gear. 
H & H Electronic Supply, Inc., 506 Kishwaukee St., Rockford, Ill, 


URGENTLY need AN/APR-4 items particularly tuning units for 
important defense contracts. New high prices. Engineering Asso- 
ciates, 434 Patterson Rd., Dayton 9, Ohio 


WANTED: Receiver R5/ARN-7, MN-62A transceivers, RT18 
ARC-1, AN/ARC-3, BC-788C, 1-152C, Collins, Bendix equipment, 
test sets, dynamotors, inverters. We pay highest prices. Advise 
quantity, condition, price in first letter. Aircraft Radio oy hom 
Inc., 15 East 40th St., New York City. Tel. I E xington 2-625 


DX’'ERS Notice! Save money? Save DX QSL 
Coop, Box 5938, Kansas City 11, Mo 


PANOR: a Adapter ID-60/APA-10 Tech 
paid in U.S Electronicraft, 27 Milburn St., 

MULTI-BAND Antenna. 80-40-20-15-10, $19.95. Patented. Send 
stamp for information. Lattin Radio I aboratories, Owensboro, Ky. 
SAN FRANCISCO and vicinity. Communication receivers repaired 
and realigned. Guaranteed work. Factory methods. Special problems 
invited any equipmens Associated Electronics, 167 So. Livermore, 
Livermore, Calif. WOKF, Skipper 

WANTED: 2-way FM equipment. Phillips, 1312 
City, Mo 

WANTED: Highest prices paid for ARC. » ARC-1, BC788, BC610, 
BC348, ART13, BC312, BC342 and other military or aeronautical 
surplus. Name your price. We pay ies and c.o.d. James S. Spivey, 
Inc., 4908 Hampden Lane, Bethesda, Md 


Time? Free info. 


Manuals $2.75 post- 
Bronxville 8, N. Y. 


McGee St., Kansas 


WANTED: Used receivers and transmitters: Will pay cash or trade 
10% down with up to 24 months to pay. In stock: New 75A4's, 
KW S1's (Collins equipment shipped out of our Cedar Rapids store). 
Demonstrator Johnson amplifier with desk; Johnson 6N2, 
Valiant, Pacemaker, B&W, Nz ational, Hallicrafters, Elmac, Hammar 
lund, Gonset, ¢ entral Electronics; 10-15-20 meter Hi-Gain beams, 
$99.75; 10 meter, $18.95, also Mosley & ane Write for Bargains 
in used receivers and transmitters. Ken, WOZCN, or Glen, W@ZKI D, 
at Ken-Els Radio Supply Co., 428 ¢ entral Ave., Ft Dodge, lowa. 


170 


QSLS? SWLS? Finest and largest variety samples 25¢ (refunded), 
Callbooks (Spring Callbooks), $4.50. “‘Rus" Sakkers, W8D 
P.O. Box 218, Holland, Mich. : 
C. Fritz for better QSLS- SWLs! 
Briargate, Joliet, Ill 
OSLS-SWLS. Meade WOKXL, 1507 Central Avenue, 
Kans. ¢ OF ‘ 
QOSLS-SWLS. 100, $2.85 up. Samples 10¢. Griffeth, WIFSW 
Pine Heights Ave., Baltimore, Md 

Samples, Besesparis, W3QCC, 


Top quality! Samples 10¢. 1213 


Kansas City, 
, 1042 
QSLS Site dealawa: 207 S. Balliet St., 
Frackville, Pa 
DELUXE OSLS 
ples 10¢. 
QSLS-SWLS 
town, N. J. 
QSLS “ Brownie," W 3C jl, 
10¢; with catalogue, 25¢ 
SLS-SWLS. Samples 10¢ 
Toledo 14, Ohio 
OSLS. Western states only. Fast delivery 
K6JCN, Box 66009, Mar Vista 66, Calif 


Petty, W2HAZ, Box 27, Trenton, N. J. Sam 


Samples free. Bartinoski, W2CVE Press, Williams 


3110 1 ehigh, Allentown, Penna. Samples 


Malgo Press, 1937 Glendale Ave., 


Samples 10¢. Dauphinee, 


OSLS, sharp, 200 one color, three bucks. Multi-color samples dime, 
refunded. 
nd. 
QSLS. § 

N. J. 


Edward Green & Sons, 4422 Marquette Drive, Ft. Wayne, 


amples 10¢. Bob Morris, W21HM, 230 Rose St., Metuchen, 
Rush $3 for 100 or 


QOSLS. Twenty exclusive designs in _3 colors 
Satisfaction 


$5 for 200 and get surprise of your life. 48 hour service 
guaranteed. Constantine Press, Bladensburg, Md 
ea: — All kinds and prices, er 10¢ fast service. DX Card 
, Kulik St., Clifton, N. J. GR 3-47 
Osi Samples. Dime, refundable. 
om ‘Conn. 
QSLS. Lower prices faster “delivery. 
10558 E. Olive, Temple C ity, ¢ alif 
OSLS-SWLS. Samples free. Bolles, W ort hs 
Texas. (We regret p.o. box error in last ac 
LIVELY! Original! QSLS! ¢ ‘atalog, stamp. WAT, 
ville, Ohio. 
QOSLS. Neat, Attractive. Samples 10¢. Woody's. Box 164, Asher Sta., 
Little Rock, Ark 
QSL Special. Free 
Umatilla, Fla 
QSLS, Taprint, Union, Miss. 
RUBBER Stamps for QSLS: sample “gma Ge We 
W9OUNY, 542 North 93rd, Milwaukee, 
QSLS. Samples, 10¢. H. J. Snyder, 398 Wasklagion, Peru, Ind. 
NEW! OTH cards! Proud of your call? QT H? Large call in color, 
QTH, Land Line. Business card quality, size. Must for Ham Gather 
ings. Samples 10¢. Country Print Shop, Route 2, Chesterton, Ind 
QSLS. Samples, dime Printer, Corwith, lowa 
NOVICES! Generals! QSLS, SWL S, YL-OMs (Samples approxi 
mately 9% ¢.) Reasonably priced ‘ tacked up-kind,"’ different, comic, 
sedate, diversified, attractive, prototypal, unparagoned, infrequent, 
Bape pee noteess extraordinary, dissimilar (whew!). Rogers, KOAAB, 
’ acoln Ave., Saint Paul 5, Minn. 
QSsI rtons, ae . Samples i5¢. Chris, WOPP. A, 365 Terra Cotta, 
Cc rystal L ake, me Mtoe: 
QSLS, SWLS. Samples dime. Backus, 
mond, Va oS saa | 
OSLS. Glossy. Samples 10¢. WIOLU 
Mass. 
RUSPRINT Special: QSLS-SW gv 
print, Box 7507, Kansas City 16, Mo 
QOSLS Ham's * Super-Speed Specials ” are ee best darned wallpaper 
you've ever seen, Gil Cartoons, Maps, X YL-OM, Mobiles. Samples 
dime. Robinson, W9AYH, 12811 Sac ramento, Blue Island 11, Ill 


NEED Information: wish to meet hams operating fur farm, letter or 
radio. Work all bands. Schedules possible week-ends and evenings 
except Monday. W8WUN., 

FOR Sale: Collins 32V2, in new condx, $375. W2JXP, J. Erickson, 
10 Woodbury Way, Syosset, L. I., 

CASH for BC-312, BC-342, RSA ARNT. BC-788, BC-610E, BC- 
939, BC-614, BC-221 and late type test equipment, receivers, etc. 
Amber Industrial Corporation. 75 Varick St., New York 13, N. Y. 
We pay freight charges. Write 

SELL: 32V3, $475; 75A3 with speaker, $350. Guaranteed in excellent 
condx. Fred Stein, W9KPL, 203 S. Harrison St., Warsaw, Ind. 
SEND for this month's stz ag ge tings of Reconditioned Equip- 
ment. Also request our new ‘*19 Amateur Catalog. We feature 
all leading brands and promise you an attractive deal always re- 
gardiess of your needs or budget. Check our offer first. We deal 
quickly, easily and always on a personal basis. Stan Burghardt, 
WOBJV, Burghardt Radio Supply, Watertown, S 


RECEIVERS: Repaired and aligned by competent engineers, using 
factory standard instruments. Authorized Factory Service Station 
for Collins, Hallicrafters, Hammarlund, National. Our twenty-first 
year. Douglas Instrument Laboratory, 176 Norfolk Ave., Boston 19, 
Mass, 

VACATIONS. 
cabins, egg ‘sya ig 
Martorano, W9HZ( 


UNUSED BC-429 receivers, complete w/6 tubes; 2500-47 k.c. coil 
and 201-398, 4150-7700 k.c. 2 band coil. eg weight app. 18 
le $2.95, C.O.D. only. George Salyers, 112 Neai Ave., Dayton, 
Ohio. 


WANTED: ARC-3, ARC-1, ART-13, BC-312, BC-342, BC-610, 
BC-788, O-17/ART13 LFO ‘and other surplus. Advise what you 
have and price. Ritter, W4VHG, Box 5878, Bethesda, Md 


sc HE MAT Ic diagrams ARC-5 80- 40 n meter revrs and xmitters, 25¢ 
one, or trade. S. Consalvo, 4905 Roanne Drive, Washington ) 


Roy Gals: WI1BD, Box 154, Water 


Catalog, 10¢. Dick, K6GJM, 


Box 9007, Austin 17, 


Box 128, Breck- 


sample. Nat Stinnette, W4AYV, P. O. Box 155, 


‘Hamm, 


703 Cumberland St., Rich- 


Press, 30 Magoun, 


Medford, 


01¢ each, samples 10¢. Rus 


Ham with my equipment, modern housekeeping 
McKenzie Lake, Spooner, Wis. Tony 








RADIO magazines. Buy, sell or trade. Bob Farmer, Plainview, 
Texas. 

COLLINS KWS-1. I 
Late series and never uncrated. $18 
retail price of $2095. WOFMK, lenouess. 
Louis, Mo. s 
BEAUTIFUL Nickel plated self inking poc , pocket rubber stz amp. Name, 
address and call, 40. For sale: back issues of QST. Howard 
Rapple, WOVRB, 4 J. 2nd St., Humboldt, lowa. 

CASH Paid! Sell y< surplus electronic tubes. Want unused, clean 
transmitting, special purpose, receiving, TV types, magnetrons, 
klystrons, broadcast, etc. Also want military, and commercial lab 
test and communications gear. We swap, too, for tubes or choice 
equipment Send specific details in first letter. for a fair deal write, 
wire, or telephone: Best ry Electronics, 512 Broadway, New York 
12, N. Y. Tel. WAlker 5-7000. 


FOR Sale: One NC 2 revr, $100, p 
Canisteo, N. Y. ¥ ae eae 
WANTED: BC-221, BC-348, BC-. ty 312, : BC- -342, BC-610-E, ARN-7, 
BC-788, ARN-6, APR-4, AR¢ 1, ARC-3, ART-13. All types surplus 
or amateur transmitters, receivers, test equipment taken in trade for 
New Johnson Viking Ranger, Pacemaker, Valiant, Hallicrafters, 
Hammarlund, National B&W, Gonset, Elmac, Telrex, Fisher Hi Fi, 
etc. Write Tom, AFN, Alltronics, Box 19, Boston 1, Mass. Tel. 
Richmond 2 0048 
¢ Ol. LINS” 32V2_ xmitter LN condx, 
396 E. Whittier St., Columbus 6. Ohic ae x 
FOR Sale: Best offer or swap for sm rig: 4 transformers 1600 
volts 300 Ma., a? filament transformer for 866's; 3 transformers 
12 volts . om fd 4000 v. and 2-3yufd, 2000 volt condensers; 
3-10 Hy. rp, 24 noke and one 300 Ma. swinging choke, 6-866 
and 1-813 poe ‘All unused Govt. surplus from storage. W6HOJ, 
2006 Hamner Ave., Corona, Calif. " Say 
KW $300; complete; VFO, 813, 250TH's, Class B 304TL’s, speech 
amplifier, all power supplies, rack-mounted; spare tubes and coils. 
Presently on the or, Final adapted for C or AB1 operation. KODUE, 
North Holly wood, Calif 
FOR Sale: Ham station with less than 300 air contacts. B&W 5100, 
epcetient condition, $350; HRO-60 with spe bailar and 7 coils A, B, 
, D, E, F and AD: $478. Both for $795. KOPGE. is 
FOR ale: HO-140X with speaker, not yet a year old, $220, 40 watt 
modulator, $35; Adventurer, $40. KSCDD, 2400 Long, Beaumont, 
exas. 
FOR Sale: Hart c.w. xmittr, 75 watts; 80 thru 10, $45; Kni ht VFO, 
$20. Information on modulator furnished on request. K2MFB 
Bill Valky, Stella Rd., Binghamton, N. Y. 
SELL: QST 1930-40 inclusive run. Good condition, no dog-eared, 
torn. missing, discolored pages, covers, etc. $25 or $2.50 year. Want 
BC-221 with calibration chart. VE7DY, 1610 Pinewood Ave., Vic- 
toria, B. C., Can. 
10 Mtr. lo W. mobile xmittr, $12.50; 
10 or 15 mtr. Preselector, $4.50. F.o.b. WORET, 
Vista, Calif. 
TRADE: Voigtlander Vito B camera for DX-35 Globe Chief, Ad- 
venturer, or the equivalent. 100% QSL. Hugh Shoemaker, New 
Haven, Kentucky. mS GS ee 
SELL: Gonset G-66, 12 volt, excellent condx, used 5 months, hot on 
all bands omnpuete with all hardware, manual, accessories, $195. 
Allan Murphey, W4JAG, Princeton, Kentucky. 
HRO-6OT in top cuales and appearance, coils dover all bands 
from 50 Kes to 30 Mes. and 50-54 Mes., complete with crystal 
calibrator and NBFM adapter, $425. W3QVK, 327 Roberts Ave., 
Glenside, Pa. pimps ss JA Sle & 
AS54H with 40 and 15 added, Gonset Super Six converter, 400 at 259 
mil Gynamoter All six volts, and all in exc. condx: $100 F.o.b. 
Peekskill, N. ¥Y. Dick Walker, Adams Rush St., R3, Peekskill, N. Y. 
SELL Hallicrafters receiver S-40B. Complete with Q multiplier. 
Both in brand new a physically and mechanically sed less 
than 50 hours, $75. Townsend, 234 Charles St., So. Meriden, 
Conn. 
WANTED: 
y Scout troop trying to get ham license: 
S-38D, SW-54, Adventurers, Homebrews, etc 
code course. C ‘harles D. Cobb, 206 Pitt St., 


FOR Sale: 





Purchased new, delivered late November 1956. 
95 cash or consider trade on 
Telephone TE 7-3491, St. 





8 “shipping ‘cost. Arden Henry, 





_ Gest offer over $350. Blum, 











10 mtr. converterette, $8.50; 
862 Elm, Chula 














Novice transmitters And Receivers for ery ae ed 

Heath / at 
Must be cheap. ‘Need 
Greenville, N. 
BC906C freq. meter, excellent condx, and GE 
Slicer mod. A. Write for price and details. Peter Unchur, W2UR) 
RFD #5, Amsterdam, N. Y. 


Sideband 





FOR SALE: Complete Elmac mobile outfit including AF-67 trans- 

mitter, PMR 48A receiver, PSR 12 power supply, Cemeenaner a 

Vaaro wo antenna and mount. All relays, etc. $250.00. Wm. S. 
30 SW 54th Ct., Miami, Fla. 


“Eimac 4 400A, B&W KW inductor #850, National 
Baan reasonable offer considered. Send check. WIGKK, 
> North Adams, Mass. 


- Heath AR-3 receiver; highest offer over $20. QF-1 Q-Multi- 
“$11. 50; both are one month old. Mike Hoodes, 219 Beach, 
_1., N. ¥ 


lier 
35th St., Roc kaway Beach 94, 


OPPORTUNITY of a lifetime. Someone Sercten the ages of 16 to 
19 will be needed to operate complete Johnson Kilowatt Station at 
brand new boys’ camp in New Hampshire. Free travel expenses, 
room and board, salary dependent upon qualifications of amateur. 
Needed for end of June 1957 through middle of August. Come and 
get it! Contact W3THI. 


FOR Sale: Collins 32V1 improved with shielding, 3 ‘by- passed, 
etc.: $275. Collins 75A1 receiver with speaker, . HROS-TAI 
receiver with speaker and power supply, $150. VHF 152, $35. Gonset 
Commander trans. w/coils, 160 thru 10 meters, $75. All items are in 
—— shape. Jim Adamson, W9THB, 2422 Grand Ave., Granite 
City, 


SWAP or Sell: Have HRO6O, like new condx; Collins 32V1 TVI1 
suppressed, with antenna coupler and co-ax relays, also 1951 Johnson 
5 H.P. outboard; want good outboard runabout with motor and 
trailer. All inquiries answered. W1WQN, Bill Mueller, 10 Dover St., 
Pittsfield, Mass. 


LOOKI G for good condx copy De Soto’ s‘ 
& Down". Reasonable price. K. 
Box 73, Kanazawa, Japan. 

















“Two Hundred Meters 
Komuro, JA9AB, 1-6 Ikedamachi, 


FOR Sale: Gonset 6 meters Communicator, 6/115 VTS with xtal 

and mike and mobile whip ($125) or will trade for Ranger, etc., with 

cash. Thomas Dalton, K2QC P, 18 Broad St. . Ne wa ark, N. J 
HAM Register soon goes to pre ss! 

TWO Vacuum variable capacitors “18-80 pufd at 7000 volts, ?-1000 

uufd at 3000 volts. Need Communications rece iver ae what have you? 

Ren, W7ROM /4, 336 W. Bivd., Charlotte, N. C. 

WANTED: Collins 75A4 with filters, $1000 in tubes, power supply 

units, test equipment, meters, miscellaneous parts for trading. 

W6OOB, 4254 Niagara Ave., San Diego, Calif. at 

GLOBE KING 400B, TVI suppressed. In excellent condx: $275; 
Phasemaster Jr., 50 watt SSB exciter with voice control and receiver 

anti-trip, excellent, $70. Robert Hanson, 5509 Highland Road, 

Minneapolis 24, Minn. 

HAMMARLUND PRO- ae for sale: Ser. No. 686, 
une 1956. Used very little: $375. Subject to prior sale. 
96 Ridge wood Rd., Millburn, N. J. 2 

FOR Sale: 1.4 KW ({ alifornia Kilowatt) D.C. power supply on 

casters. Powerstat control to 3.5 KV, 400 Ma., 115/230 input. F 
Berkeley, Calif. Robert L. Eilsworth, 2637 Dana St., Berkeley 4. 

Calif. 

SELL: 
Rt. 1, a > indian 7 “a 

WE Plan to add several members to our staff of 55 state po! io 

operators. We prefer men with commercial licenses but will consider 
amateurs who are high school graduates, not older than thirty-two, 
some typing ability, code speed of at least 15 WPM and int erested 
in servicing equipment. Permanent positions with retirement. Write: 
ent Radio Division, Highway Patrol, J City, Mo. 

SELL: DX-100, $185, 5’? ‘scope, $25 
All letters will be answered. W3BMF, Wood- 
lyn, Pa 


FOR Sale: Hickok microvolt signal generator "Mod. 19XD, pert 
condx, no reasonable offer refused; BC-221 complete with original 
charts and A.C. power supply, $50, perf. condx; Gonset Super Six 
converter, used 3 months, with steering column bracket, perf. condx, 
$35. Sid Tritsch, W2NFU, 97 -10 62nd Dr., Rego Park, N. Y. 
TRADE: Will trade my cameras for ham gear. W3YZL, Baltimore 4, 
Md. 801 Weatherbee Rd : - 
DX100, in excellent condx, with improved grid blocked keying, $185; 
nearly new Matchbox, $40. Moving to area where station is forbid- 
den. Lt. Col M. Senn, Watervliet Arsenal, Watervliet, N. Y. 
WANTED: 20/meter 5/element SC20MS5 Hy-Lite Sky or beam 
or what have you? Russ Garlin, W3BCZ, 211 Berry St., West Pitts- 
ton, Penna. 

WANTED: Two HK24 transmitting tubes. State price. 
Porter, W7WEE/6, 515 So. Kingsley Dr., Los Ange les 5, Ca 
MIKE/Line to grid xirmrs, UTC All (4); CRT xirmr aIsi7400 Var at5 
Ma.; Haydon timer 0-60 Sec. Want: 3-el. 20 mtr. Shortbeam and 4 
wire rotor for same Howard E. Leyland, W3UDM, 19 Rainbow 
Lane, Levittown, Pa. 


NEW SX-96, never used, 
power supply. W1YFX, 34 Highland Ave., Somerville, 


perc chased new 
B. Bailey, 


7: ATi — $22; 5-38, $25; ACi — $8 or 50 takes all. K6RLX, 
Box 264, Le Grand, Calif. 


excellent condx; Heath 0-! 
1120 Mac Dade Bivd., 





Bess id 


$200, also beautiful 3000 v dc @ 
Mass. 
BROADCAST Transmitter and equipment wanted. Advise model, 
age, condition, price. Need vibrators, Mallory 525, 534C Radiart 
5805. Sell ART 13, sachading A.C. supply. — > Cc. Higley 
W20EA, 82 Lower Main St., Matawan, N. 
COLLINS 32V2 with spare RK 4D32 tube. 
relay, 110-volt co-ax type only $32 M. 
N. Mesa, El Paso, Texas. 
BEST Offer over $50 takes a Knight 50 watt rig me Knight VFO. 
Postpaid within 150 miles. Vic Abell, St. Bede ¢ e, Peru, . 
VIKING Ranger: Latest model with grid “ble ing. Used less 
than 2 months. Brand new condition. Will deliver 30 mile radius. 
$200 .. a Avery, W3ARB, 129 9 Hopkins Rd., Balto 12, Md. 


SELL: Two husky W estinghouse ¢ selsyns, gud condx, x, 120 volts, 60 60 
cycles, type ADS, $10 pair. Baldwin type E headset, excellent, $10. 
W2TB, BA 9-3260. Chas Gardiner, 39-20 220th St., Bayside 61, 
Rew Big Ss Us 

WANTED: Commercial 450 Mc. FM 2-way equipme ent; I ampkin 
freq. meter and deviation meter, HQ100 or HQ140 and DX100 
fixmitter. Cash. W9DSV, Webster, Wisc. 


1 amp. 


. Antenna 
615 


yw pass filt er 
Levy, W6WGT, 





FOR Sale: Five complete custom-built phone transmitters ranging 
in power from 50 watts to 1000 watts. All units are complete with 
high level modulators, well metered, built-in ‘scope circuits, band- 
switching 20-40-80-160. Includes xtals, tubes and microphone. 
Complete station at one dollar per watt. Hubert Ingalls, W1NQ, 
Nottingham, N. H 

WAN TED: Eldico SSB-100 or Johnson Pacemaker, W4PRM, 
L. D.C hipman, 816 Melrose St., Winston-Salem, No. Carolina. 


MEDICAL Hams! 
a good ( <olline receiver. T. R. Jacobson, M.D., 
5. Dak. 





Trade Beck Lee “Model E ele -ctrocardiograph for 
W®OSLG, Hot Springs, 





SALE: QSL metal file boxes with State and DX index. Initialed with 
call letters. $3.00 each. Gerold Kaminski, W8OQR, 2814 Albion St., 
Toledo, Ohio. 


FOR Sale: BC-610D and speech amplifier BC-614D with coils for 
80—40-20-10 and manual, all for $250. Will consider part of cost in 
trade. W4E BH, Winchester, Va. 


SELL: - Supe serPro SP- 4008X, , $190 bd best offer; Gonset 10X11 con- 
verter, $17.50; TBSSOC, $55: $30 power supply for xmitter 

$25 (1200 CT at 300 Ma.) ee bi amplifier c phono & mike input 
and mixer, 10 watts $20; 3650 VDC CT at 450 Ma. surplus xfrmer 
& cT primary, standard 15 watt multi-match mod. frmr, new, $6.50; 
BC459 7 Mce., VFO or xmittr, and meter and coax output, $16; 
WRL 3-el 10 meter beam, $16 new, VEC-DX beam rot. new, $20; 
tubes 6146, $400; 807, $1.25, $30 Mendelsohn flash unit, exc. condx, 
$10. Interested in hi-fi tape recorder. D. Connor. 65 Suffolk, 
Worcester, Mass. 


FOR Sale: 32V2. $375. W2ADD 
TECHNICAL Maneals TM11-273, 120 pages covering BC-312 


receivers and *-191 transmitters, $2.50. ID-60/APA-10 Pan- 
adaptor mz i $2.75. Both postpaid in U.S.A. Electronicraft, 
¥. 


Bronxville, 
171 

















SIX Meters S.S.B. transmitter, one kilowatt peak, in rack, complete, 
ready to operate: $350. Cash or will take receiver in partial trade. 
V4UCH, Sterling, Virginia 

FEW DM-35D dynamotors 12 v 
$12; matching 12 v. combination play 
voltage) 50. S. A. Tucker, W2HL” 
Little Neck 62, N. Y A eh AOS A, Ele a Le aoe 
SELL: Pi-net PRL 807s amp., $12; push-to-talk grid modulator, $18; 
Shure 707A mike, $9; E-V Push io talk stand, $9; need cash badly. 
Ramon Britt, W4GIM, 819 E , Lumberton, Cc 

First offer of fiao. “Bought a Collins. W. M. Mont- 
Freedom St., Ravenna, O. Will ship collect. 


input “625 v. at 225 Ma - output 
(antenna changeover and hi 
, 51-10 Little Neck Parkway 


SxX-71 for sale. 
gomery, 7 
ADVENTURER with modulator in cabinet, complete with micro- 
phone and crystal, $40; ARC-5 with power supply, $15 ne Lieber- 
man, K2SHK, 118-01 Park Lane S., Kew Gardens 18, Y 
NOTICES! Get started: Heath AR-2, AT-1, antenna aes crys- 8- 
tal, and key, $55; code course 0 18 WPM, $12. Top condition, 
*.o.b. Racine , Wisconsin Poulson, K9C PT, 929 E. Colonial a 
FOR Sale O81 complete: 1926, -26, -27, -28, -29, -30, -31, -35, 
36, -39, -40. Some 1923; all except June, July, Onoker 1924. Almost 
complete run 1933, -34, 7 38. Some exes 1926, -28, -29 
Also E lectronics complete 1934, 37, -38, - -40. Almost ee 
1930, -31 32, 41, -42. No 1935. wilh ‘sell entire lot for best 
offer or in portions All in good condition except 192 QSTs (no 
covers). W3QMZ, 17 School Lane, Springfield, Pa. 
FOR Sale: DX-100 xmittr box, unopened. Liquidating estate: $170. 
Tajbl, 1319 S. Cuyler, Berwyn, 
Pair 829-Bs. in gud condx. 
Allerton, Cudahy, Wis 
WAN TE D: BC-779, with power supply. Quote best price in first 
letter. James Mose, Box 131, Sharpsburg, Md 
CANADIANS! 35 mm Diax f2.8 Xenar lens, coupled range finder, 
meter tripod, new, with cases. Will swap for gud revr. VE3DU 
Wilton, Ont., Can 
VHF Transmitter and receiver SCR-522A and SCR-542A, $35. 
W7NLR, Roy Kenna, 713 East 5th, Tucson, Arizona 
WANTED: Used Citizens Band mobile 2-way radio, 10 or 12 watt 
r.f. power output or more. John J. Strouhal, Hungerford, Texas 
COLLINS Station 32V3 and 75A2 with RCA speaker, $795 complete. 
Alfred A. Bein, K2BWQ, 26 Lenox Ave., Clifton, N. J 
WANTED: 15 meter coil for HRO-50, in gud condx 
W8ASL, Convoy, Ohio 
FOR Sale 
with matching speaker, like new throughout, 
W9OHX, Kiowa, Kans 
FOR Sale: AT-1 with home-built modulator and antenna coupler 
with two switching relays ery nice rig .8A KE, Lake Odessa, 
Mich 
TRADE: RCA color TV, new, 
equivalent valued equipment Wot 
FOR Sale: 120-watt home-built c.w. only transmitter, ‘bandewitching 
80-40-20 meters, 6AG7 VFO, 6AG7 buffer, 4-68A final, 6AS 
vacuum tube keyer and power supplies, all in one metal cabinet 
nice looking clean operation; also M.B. 3 signal monitor for break-in 
operation ig is excellent for NETS. You wouldn't go wrong. Best 
reasonable offer takes it. You pay freight. Seagars, WOTRF, 109 Elm 
Circle, Needles, Calif 
WANTED: Mobile 6 volt converter. Gonset Super Six or Morrow. 
W8SHG, G Collins, 1221 Ridge Dr., South Charleston, W Va. 
SWAP: 5KW of S.S.B. for a 455Kc Panadaptor, Ss, a brand new 
Eimac: 4-1000-A and A 2 inc. bar of copper to Keep the meter on 
scale for * Panadaptor. Don Taylor, 5A2TP, 633D AC & V ‘sl 
APO 231, N. Y 
HARVEY i ELLS TBS-50C Bandmaster Sr., transmitter with 
carbon mic; excellent condx. Bandmaster VFO, APS-50A( power 
supply; Johnson key Speed-X 114 -320 and 2 Amphenol 139-010, 
139-020, all never used; Shure 101C carbon mic; Mobile antenna 
80 m., crystal, control box and al! cables for mobile rig. $165 
Kamborian, Jr., WIUSP, 133 Forest Ave., West Newton, Ma 
WANTE "A Lampkin 205A modulation ae iation meter. € 
trade. WSAMK 
NC-300, new, never used. Factory sealed. Shipped prepaid in U. 
A sacrifice at $350. Lynn Finch, W2MS]J, 14 Myrtle, Oneonta, 


SWAP Zeiss Contax 11A camera with Sonnar F2 lens and flashgun 
($300) for good receiver HRO 50A1 or 183-D. Contax camera guar- 
anteed new. R. Long, 933 E. Broadway, So Boston, Mass. 
WANTED: Eldico SSB linear amplifier 500 or 1000. 
W6QGD, 2751 Marty Way, Sacramento 18, 


FOR Sale: DX “ge $185, in e) 
balun coils, $6; low pass filte 
$.S.B. K@DOJ, Ric hard E vans, Britt, 

WANTED: Prop pitch motor in good condition. WODST, 
Lincoln Road, Bettendorf, lowa 

FOR Sale: Collins 310B modiffed with turret output for front of 
panel, band switching new condition, $185. Gerard Miller, W2AVY, 
16 Hendrickson Ave., Hempstead, I oh. 





“Hardly used: $20. Al Walthers, 


State price 


Hallicrafters S-76 double conversion receiver, complete 


$100. Wilford Lane, 


- full warranty, for - 32V3, 75A4 or 
ry 1176L incoln, San Jose, Calif. 


Cash or 


Please write 


condition, new final tubes; 
$24. Reason for sale going 
lowa 


Pellent 
AR-3 


1420 


WANTED: 833-A’s for work. E. Kucharski, 39 


Aqueduct St., Ossining, N 


FOR Sale: Gonset (¢ onmenee with coils for all bands, $75; Millen 
Exciter, #90800, $12; HROSTA1 receiver and power supply, $150; 
RME VHF 152, $35. WOTHB. Granite City, Tl. 


SELL: Complete two-meter rig: Gonset VFO ‘and reamp, deluxe 
Communicator, Iwo and linear power amplifier, spare tubes and 
E-V mi value over $480. Sell for $278. NC-98 receiver with Central 
Electron ao) Multiplier; value $180, sell for $107. RME-100 speech 
clipper, All wonton emer Dies new or like new. Express C.O ».D. or send 
money na will ship prepaid. W9FFP, H. Roddick, 153 Robsart 
Place, Kenilworth, III 


CUSTOM Built: KW linear band switching BW KW coil, Jennings 
vacuum, .4-1000 air flow socket pie net, fully metered with 
plastic front meters; cabinet 28 x 21 x 15 complete with bias gupply 
bottom rack photos available; 5 watts driving power Class A 
beautiful amplifier: $500, with complete power supply, $600. Wi 1c P iL 
Greene, Wakefield, R. I. 


172 


experimental 
Y 


FOR Sale: Complete 10 meter mobile 12V converted Link PBX 
10-30 watt transmitter with Gonset Tri-Band and Delco converted 
receiver with built-in TNS designed for trunk mtg. with all cables, 
relays and control box for dash control, $100; S 5 Hallic. receiver, 
no spkr 5; 500 W 10 meter c.w. transmitter less power supply, 
813 final with tubes, $50; Johnson Viking II complete with VFO, 
all tubes factory wired. Used about 20 hours. Modified for added 
mike gain and better audio, like new, $250. Frank Lester, W2AMJ, 
Bergenfield, N. 


280 West Main St., 


WANTED: C ircuitry y and/or manual ie r megaphone amplifier er Mod. 
Mi- aaa Mfg. RCA, John J. 
Wash. 


Towey, 1511 17th Ave., Seattle 22, 


Poe most t dough, sell to ) Harjo! V We're “buying: | BC-224 and BC-348 
receivers, ARC-3, ART-13, BC-788, RS/ARN-7. Cash or trade. 
Quick action. Top money. Harjo Sales Co. Dept. E, 503 North Vic- 
tory Bivd., Burbank, Calif 

522 Transmitter-Receiver, paneled and metered. 6J6 preamp. Sepa- 

rate power supplies, $30; QST 1927-1951 nar oy plus 6 issues 
1926, two missing, $25 F.o.b. San Anselmo, Calif. W6DXA, 209 
San Francisco Blvd 

AT-1 Perf. with 2 xtals; Hallicrafters S-40, working condx but needs 
repairs; SCR- 3 set brand new; trans. VFO controlled with voice 
tone, c.w. 2500-7900Kc. with coils; recvr. minus coils; dynamotor 
with filter base; 2 control boxes, 1 relay. Shock mounts, manual 
included. The works for $70 F.0.b. Anthony Danese, W3DGQ, 2511 

Girard Ave., Phila 25, re. 

FOR Sale or trade: AT-1, $30; AR-3, $25, G4ZU beam, $50; 522 
transmitter rack Ae. with power supply on 8’ steel panel, 
6 meter cascode xtal converter, Command sets. Want: Hunter Cycle 
master. Frank Baker, W8QJR, McComb, Ohio. 

TMC GPR-90 receivers in stock. Write for details or trade prices. 
Penta tubes. Gonset and E Imac Baker Supply Co., McComb, Ohio, 
B&W 51SB Sideband Generator, new, still in poo carton, $230; 
Battery Hs idy D.B. field strength meter, $15; RME MCS5S5 con 

verter Pair 4’’110V selsyns motors, $5. M. Adamson, WOYEB, 
4060 So. os Englewood, Colo 

400 Watt fone transmitter: standard relay rack mounted, push-pull 
output, Class B modulated, five power supplies, xtal oscillator and 
2 VFO's, KW Barker & Williamson swinging link output coils, T-R 
relay, 10, 20, 40, 80 meters, remote control unit with time delay, 
push-to-talk, VFO frequency test, etc. Can be used any distance 
from xmitter. Write for full description. Hear it on the air Monday, 

Tuesday, Thursday, Friday at 0730-0800 on 3835 Kc. Won't be avail- 
able long for only ecm complete. W6OFWA, H. B. Axtell, Rte. 3, 
Box 971, Porterville, Calif 

CENTRAL Electronics 10A sideband exciter with 75, 40, 20 coils; 
like new condx: : $ 0. W3SF, 564 Austin Ave., Pittsburgh 16, Pa. 


WE Will pay_ you $$$$/¢¢e¢ for an AN ‘ARN-6 or any of its compo 
nents, AS-313 Loop. Phone us collect at STanley 7-0406 on these 
items. We also pay fabulous wer for APR-9, ARC-1, ARN-7, 
ART-13 parts; BC-788-C, LP-21-AM, LM, or MO-18A, or MC-507 
from these loops; I 152¢, R-65 AP N- 9, test sets I-100, TS-117, 
-125, -47, -148, w2 Arrow Sales, Dept. QST, 7460 Varna Ave., 
North Holly wood, Calif 


FOR "Sale: NC 98 and speaker in original carton, 
multiplier, $8; BC453 (QS’er), 
St Bayside 61,1 I., N. Y 


n, $105; Heath Q 
$10. Jonathan Wachtel, 36-42 206th 


OLD Cone type lou ispe akers: . ¢ ollector wants all makes and modeis 
manufactured before 1927. In reply write make, model, condition, 
location, price. Donal Eymard, 140-35 58th Rd., Flushing, L. L., 
N. Y. 


SELL: Elmac AF-67. Excellent condition: $130. Also Heath DX-100 
wired by professional engineer. All reasonable offers will be con 
2 Si Larry Pyle, WOAGE/2, 78 Southgate Rd., Murray Hill 
N 


HRO w pwr “supply. ‘and bandepread | coils, $75; S$X32, ~ $90; "Gonset 
3-30, $20; Gonset_ 10 ts $10; DB20, $20; Bliley CCO2A, $5; Eico 
sweep generator, $18; UTC S22 unused 250 watt modulation, $20; 
rC S48 3000 VCT, “ amp, $15; ART(ATC) w/tubes and manual 
rough, $50. Art Ford, W SHAE , 85 Franklin St., Northport, 
’. Tel NOrth port 3-0501J. 

CLL: : Hallic rafters S40B receiver, excellent condition. Price $65 

W3YTL, 848 Medway Rd., Phila. 15, Ps 


FOR Sale: Harvey-Wells TBSSOD Bandmaster Deluxe transmitter, 
never used, plus schematic, $110. Robert Hildebrand, 501 Washing- 
ton Ave., Greeny ille, » Ohio 


SELL: DX- NC-98 w spkr and Bud 100 Ke freq. 
standard. ¢ ‘omplete station for $220. Pair of 813's, $10. Jim Jones, 
WOYER, 1220 W. Fourth, Sedalia, Mo 


12V. Viking Mobile, tubes, dynamotor, cost $247. Never u nee $165 
or best offer. Harold Greene, W1KO, West Hanover, Ma 


B/ ARGAINS Wit h new guarantee: HT-9 $99.00; S-52 Receiver 
55.00; SX.- 28 rack $99.00; S-77 Receiver $69.00; HT-18 VFO $39.00; 
sco 600 $69.00; Eldico TR75TV $30.00; Meissner EX VFO $25.00; 
NC-183D rack $259.00: oe 90800 $14.95: Johnson Adventurer 
$34.50; es ¥ FO $24.95; Viking II $199.00; Ranger $179.00; 
RME $65. Gonset Tri Band $24.50; Sonar SRT-120 $99: 00: 
Globe Trotter Si0 00; Scout 40A $59.00; Globe C hamp 165 $160.00; 
Globe King 275 $225.00; Heath AR-2 $22.50; and many others. Free 
trial, Terms financed by Leo, WOGFQ. Write for catalog and best 
deals to World Radio Laboratories, 3415 West Broadway, Council 
Bluffs, lowa 
$60. Want late model 
Columbus 6, Ohio. 


S40 Revr, recently “overhauled and aligned, 
Lettine 240 . Blum, 396 E. Whittier St., 


L E ARN ( ‘ode easy. Instructograph with 10 rolis of tape, AC motor; 
in excellent condition: Roman S. Segiel, 1024 N. Damen 
Ave., Chicago 22, Ill 


FOR Sale: Hallic rafter: rs 3 S53A brand new in original pesten, price: 
$70. Charles W. Ehrlers, 319 Union St., t., Jersey City 4, N. J. 


LATE HRO- 60 with coils and ‘spkr; extras include 100 1000 Ke. xtal 
calibr., 21 Mc Bandspread coil set, Central Electronics ‘‘Q”"’ mult., 
exc. shape; $395; Gonset C ommunicator II, 2 mtrs; 6 volts & Gonset 
VFO, $150. Your piceup- W2TE Ng ¥ 01 1106 York Rd., Barclay 
Farm, Haddonfielc Phone HA. 9169, 








SELL Or Trade: Viking I! unmodified, perfect, $200 or trade for 20A 
Complete 10 meter mobile, Stancor 20 425/6 volt. dyn., Master 
whip, VFO, cables, Gonset Tri-Band, Deluxe, Packard radio; TNS, 
push-to-talk mike, meter, $165 or trade for (¢ ommunic ator 2, 6 volt 
Both units now in operation. Will demonstrate. W2KVJ, Ronald 
Poinsett, R.D. #1, Trenton, N 


HAVE the following magazines: Radio News and Radio Technician 
News, years 1942-1955: Radiocraft & Radio Electronics, years 
1942-1955; OST, years 1943-1947. Most years complete 
trade. Richard D. Ford, 122 Darby St 
SALE: New V iking Adventurer, wired, 50 watts c.w 
xtal. Perfect. New H¢ allicrafters S-38D receiver. 
Dewey Nelson, Remington, Ind 

MOBILE 6-meter rig, complete, with transmitter, 6-V power supp 
and converter, $50; 2-meter 6-V transmitter/receiver, $20. W8PL( 


PHASEMASTER II is yours for best offer over $200; also Navy 
TBX transceiver (80 mtr.) new condx, with manual but no power 
supply. Make offer. K6E YB, 760 Via Marin, San Lorenzo, Calif 
IDEAL Mobile power source, Janette rotary, converts 12 VDC to 
115 VAC, 60 cycles, 150 wat ts; will ship, price $20. W4MO, 434 
Cornell Place, Louisville, Ky 
POWER Supply: 500 W., partly wired; UT¢ parts, S-49 pwr xfrmr, 
4200 VCT 300 Ma.; swing and filter chokes S-33 & 33. 5/25 and 26 
hy. 300 Ma. fil. xfrmr S-57, 2.5V 10 amps. 10 x 13 chassis; 100 V 
bleeder; 2 2ufd oil cond. Local pickup sale. Make offer 
Maier, 231 Columbia Ave., Trenton, N. J. K2BSZ 
*UARANTEED, Reasonably priced new and used gear for sale 
HROSOT/SOT1 AA and AC coils, HROGOT cabinet, Precision 
E-200C signal generator, Gonset 100% R, Electro-Voice Mod. 1000 
speech clipper; Thordarson 1250/1000 VDC, 300 Ma., UTC 825/600 
VDC, 300 Ma. Thordarson T15D79 Multi-Match driver trans 
formers, assorted Triplett. milliammeters 75T's. W8VJD, 203 
NV. Kaye Ave., Marquette, Mich 
LATE Model SX-71, 
tioned. Best offer. K 
FOR Sale: Complete 120 watt phone/c.w. xmitter, bandswitching 
80-40—20-15, in Bud cabinet; Heath VFO, Bud variable low-pass 
filter, antenna changeover relay, Balun coils, Electro-Voice Cardax 
950 crystal mike, speech clipper, all for $155. Can see in operation, 
would prefer local buyer. Carl Zimmerman, K2GCB, 2701 Webb 
. Bronx 68, N. Y. Tel. KIngsbridge 8-2964 
SELL: Globe Scout 40A, factory-wired, $50 
$27. Warren Hendricks, K2GQT, 1526 Corlies Ave., Neptune, N 
SELL: DX 35, mtd. balun coils, window antenna, 5 Novice xtals, all 
operating: $75. Alvin Berger, 21 Pleasant St., Littleton, Mass 
COLLINS 32V-3, excellent condition, spare 4D32, instruction book. 
Will crate and prepay motor freight to any QTH in USA. $525 cash. 
This is the rig that ran up 1270 QSOs in the 1955 Sweepstakes, an 
unbeaten record. All inquiries answered. John D. Ryan, W7KVI 
18 Laird St., Ramsay Mont 
SELL Viking Kilowatt with Ranger exciter, as new. Used less than 
fifty hours. Complete and in perf. condx: $1000. F.o.b. Apex, N. ¢ 
C. S. Schaub, Box 218, W4LOZ 
LEECE-NEVILLE 6V-100A alternator, regulator and rectifier, $35; 
Carter 6V dynamotor 630v. 370 Ma., $10; TA-12C xmitter, 100 watt 
VFO, $25 with MP-28, 100 watt modulator, $15, both converted to 
6v. input; 0-1 Ma., 0-8 VDC Simpson meters, $2 each or swap for 
antenna tuner, HV pwr. supply or what have you? All F.o.b. Mid- 
land, Texas. J. Herold wee 4310 Harlowe Dr 
FOR Sale Viking Valia kit, in origi 
opened, $350. W3YP oa « harles Kranias, 
Gettysburg, Pa 
WANTED: BC-221, original calibration book, metal case; BC-779-B, 
or 794-B or 1004-C w/pw sup; instruction book for Super-Pro Mod. 
LRX. St ate condx, price. All letters answered. A. M. Wickland, 308 
Monroe , Kalamazoo, Mich 
HEATH =x 35, excellent cond ition, $55 
Westwood, N. J 
FOR Sale: Collins KWS-1 transmitter, less than four months old and 
in excellent con lition. Completely checked by Collins 30 days ago. 
$1600 cash; 75A1 receiver, no modifications. In excellent condition, 
$200. Cash. 30 ft. Kuehne t +r, 3-el. Telrex 10-meter ‘* Mini-Beam"’ 
AR22 rotor complete, 100 ft coax, all for $70 cash. L. M 
Newberry, 1703 Bunker Hill Dr., Irving, Texas 
SSB Elenco PA400 linear, $150; Collins 32V-3, $495; Gordon rotator 
with 10 and 20 meter beams, $275; Dymont #274 ‘scope, $50; Mo- 
torola P-69-18ARS mobile receiver, $25; 6-volt dynamotor power 
supply, $25. WI1RMS, 198 Euclid Ave., Waterbury, Conn 
rELRE 4 20 meter beam for sale, five element, Mod. 506-A, un- 
used, $140. R. E. Winkelman, 54 Boylston St., Cambridge 38, Mass. 
SALE: Brand new DX-100 with assorted $200. S-85 
receiver with external “‘S’’ Meter, $90 Daren Kettler, 
Chesaning, Mich fi: 
SELL: NC300, matching speaker, 100 Kc xtal calibrator, brand new 
condx, $335; Factory wired Ranger, $159; Matchbox, $29; B&W 380 
T switch, new, $15. W2NDP, 910 Smith St., Uniondale, L. I 
N. Y. Phone [Vanhoe 5-3190 
SELL: Meissner 150-B, 300 watts, EX-VFO, $225. Edward Theiss 
210 23rd St. Drive S.E., Cedar Rapids, lowa 
Ww eet a D: Coils or forms for National SW-3. All letters answered. 
K4BN 


SELL: 
ing speaker, 
Dakota SE, 
WANTED: Late 
18680 West 13 Mile Road 


Will sell or 
. Hartford 12, _Conn 


. key and 80M. 
Both for $100, 


Francis 


speaker, S9’er, excellent condx, just recondi- 
Johnston, c/o J. Cattier, Locust Valley, N 


Hallicrafters S-38C, 
J 


shipping carton, never 
. Chambersburg St., 


Mohn, K2RPI, R.D. #1, 


accessories, 


F.o.b 


Viking aus ant, $350; Hammarlund HQ-140XA with mat ch- 
Both in exc. condx. C. L. Gomel, WSBZW, 1125 
aah. rque, New Mex 
75A4 Quote lowest price. I. Shepard, W8BNG, 
, Birmingham, Mich 


‘ TE D: A Mobile receiver (Amateur Bands) with or without 
Pe power Ponder W8PNM 

VIKIN¢ ; Agventare r, like new, $35. M. Kunzman, 723 Hillside Ave., 

Plainfield, N. J. 


SELL: Complete modern AM and CW Band-switching KW. Parallel 
4-250As, pi-network, 810 modulators; 2500v @ 1 amp; final supply 
1500v at 500 Ma. Mod. supply. HT-18 VFO. Complete in standard 
77’’ rack. Reasonable offers considered. Will trade for Globe- Kine 
500. Joe Shank, Jr., 2310 Washington Blvd., Huntington, W. Va 


CLEANING 
condensers, 
tubes, 


House: High and lo t transformers, chokes, 
other components. Meters, cabi S, test equipment, 
dynamotors, misc. surplus equipment Send stamy ped self- 
addressed envelope for complete list E effries, 255, Enon, 
Ohio 
ELMA( 160 thru 10 with 
power supply including microphone, $150. El 
supply for 6 volt, $90; Collins 32V3 transmit 
$490. F.O.B. Toledo 
QSTS 1932 to 1956, 4 for $1 
W3FYW 
MULTIBAND Traps 80 thru 10. Weather sealed, 52 or 72 ohm feed, 
1 KW. $8 pair, Send star for literature. S. & W Elec- 
tronics, 293 N Kankakee, [Il 
FOR Sale: Globe Kir 1g 500 with 500A modifi ag like new, 
Elmac PMR6A and | perf. condx, Gonset Communi 
I for 6 volts an condx, $125: 1.5 KVA Kohler 
ylinder water Co ~ power plant with automatic relay 
control, 2 


and mounted - trai » reg t . just 
push the 
183D receiver, 


button, $35 n SO] 
15 
Gastonia, N. ¢ Phone 


, W 4Z AV 3012 
VIKING II, perf. condx., factory wired, $275; Johnson VFO factory 
wired, $50; low pass filter, $10; HQ150, used 10 hours, $270 
ing spkr, $10; B&W #3975 balun coils mounted, $5 ats atic | 
mike, $6; He ath grid dip meter, $10 2 -r transceiy , home 
$125; Mallory ibrapack VP6-325, $12; PE-103 $22 K6C 
1712 Austin Way, Santa Rosa, Calif 
COLLEGE undergraduate, gen 
summer, Westchester County 
Camp, Peekskill y 
WANTED: Collins 75A2 or 75A3 
Rx with 800 cycle filter 
Bill Butler, 141 Elisworth 
CADILLAC 
K9CQO, 228 V 
FOR Sale 
Mich 


JOHNSON Viking I, 4532, factory t 
$30; Baluns, $5; 40 microphone, Hallicrafters SX-7 

$125: Heathkit AR-1 $22.50; Heathkit VF-1, $19.50; new 

$17.50; Bud CPO-128A oscillator, mohitor, $10; BC-645-A 
mitter, dynamotor, antennas, | , $17.50; Triplett 1295 modula- 
tion monitor, carrier shift a 50; Wilcox CW-3 receiv 
$12.50; Sonar VFO-120 t Pe. 50; General Electric YE- 
electronic switch, $20 F’ transceiver, new, $3; 
set 300 crystals, FT-2 othe various channels 0-70 
$17.50; re Indian Request free detailed listing. W9DPL, 
Howard O -vereid, erside Dr., Indianapolis 23, Ind. 
Tel. WAlnut “4 2184 

SWAP or sell 


Elmac 110 volt 
er with power 
‘r, excellent condition 


AF56 transmitter, 


B&W Mod. 425 low pass filter, $10. 


post paid 
ergreen, 


$450 


ilkinson Bilvd., 


radio counsellor job this 
referred. Furnace Woods 


iking Ranger. Would like 

though r ary. State condx, price. 

Crystal La 

os Will trade for 
Marshall 


Globe 


xmitter or revr Jim Windeck, 
Belvidere, I) 
Champion Write W8DED, Holland, 


Details 


$130; Johnson \ FO, 


Gonset 2-meter Communicat . plete 10/11 
meter mobile including Subraco MT15X, Gonset *rter, Mal- 
lory dual Vibrapack, etc. PP 813 complete CW r with Meissner 
signal shifter, Millen exciter, low-pass r, enc ai rack, TVI 
suppressed, complete high gain speech z 2 modulator in 
346’’ rack mounting; set Ri le r se ce 4 Voltohmist 
and many other items. Want: table top band rig, ins, Johnson, 
B & W or what have you? W2G¢ Vv, > al, 5 Hillside Ave., 
Kearny, N. J. Tel. KEarny 2-8077 
FOR Sale: xtal filter, perf. condx. $15. K2PHC. 
VIKING I and VFO. TVI suppressed $135. New 14V. 
425V at 163 Ma; filter and relay, $8 
SPE as, Texas 
SPA Receiver for sale: HQ-129X or BC-1004 Super-Pro ither 
one ry) 20. With slicer, $140. Also speech am cand 811's modula 
tor, $15; new dynamotor, 6 volts 425 volt 3 a. $12. All 
F.o.b. Princeton, N. J. Morrisor 7 ndom i., Pri ston, N. J 
PERFORATED Aluminum 
centers, $1.20 sq t 
num Tubing, etc ) e 
START Your QSO Index File now! 200, $1.00; 1000, $4.50. Postpaid 
Sample free. Hamproco, Box 183, Merriam, Kansas. Box 247, 
Rapids, lowa 
SELI Eldico TR75TVI, 65 watts , Coils for 80 and 40 
Eleven Novice crystals for 80 and S$ akes all. Bill Laskey, 
2 Chicago, Rossville 


“‘Dynamotor 
Scott Smithson, Box 914 


sheet, 5 4” OD holes, %” 
a r Beams, Alumi- 
Fostoria 


Cedar 


NINE Years: OST from 1947 t 55 excellent condx: $10, 
plus postage Eimac 5/125B p *s, used, two for $18. W30JW, 
6913 Churchland St., Pit 


COLLINS 310B-3 factory lifie E ws PA 
suppressed, $190 or best offer r 
Q-Multiplier, factory wired, Select-O-Ject, $10; Thordarson 
Splatter Choke T-20C60 $10; CHT choke T-15C47 400 Ma, 250 Ma. 
CHT bias transformer MU-LTI-Volt : 15R62 275V-500V 150 Ma 
Cornell-Dubilier transmitting capacito 1) TJH-50020 2yufd 5000 
WV.G.E. 1 and 2 wfd 4000 WV Mi xc 02 3500 WV Sangamo type E 
porcelain micas. 115v. AC relays, DC and AC volt Ma. ant RF. 
No reasonable offers refused. W4AIX, P QO. Box 178, Henderson- 
< 


control, TVI 


nics B-Sideband Slicer, 


$74.95, Collins 32V2 

. I $49.95, VFO.2 $19.95, 

OA $38.95; Elmac 45 $4 $99 95, AS4H $110.00, Polke $19 95, 

$19.95: Gonset Commander $94.95, Communicator II 

Super-Six $34.95; Hallicrafters SX62 $225.00, S76 $139.95, 

$89.95, S86 $89.95, SX96 $229.95; Hammarlund HQ129X 

$1 30.95. SP400X $229.95; Johnson VFO $39.95, KW $1295.00; 

Lettine 240 $59.95: Lysco 600 $79.95; Millen 90810-VHF $89 95; 

Morrow MBR-5 $194.95; Naticnal HRO-3 $99.95, HROSOTI 

6 coils and speaker $350.00, NC183D $275.00, PE-103 $19.95; many 

other used items available. Write for latest list. Evans Radio, 
Box 312, Concord, H 


‘A Slicer oS 
$550.00; fI 


WANTED: Press Wireless FRR-3 diversity receiving equipment, 
parts or complete. Also APN-9, ART-13, TG-7 i. #15) teletype 
model #26, T-D #14 arts distributor. 2, Viking 1, 
NC-300. Tom a AFN, 46 Mt. Vernon St., Boston 8, Mass. 
Richmond 2-09 


FAMOUS VHF “I vunenburg”’ antennas, 6 meter 
2 meter 6 element, $6.95. 6 meter horizontally 
antenna. Wholesale Supply Co., Lunenburg, Mass. 





element, t, $14.95; 
polarized mobile 


173 








The No: 90651 
GRID DIP METER 


The No. 90651 MILLEN GRID DIP METER 
is compact and completely self contained. 
The AC power supply is of the “trans- 
former" type. The drum dial has seven 
calibrated uniform length scales from 1.5 
MC to 300 MC plus an arbitrary scale for 
use with the 4 additional inductors avail- 
able to extend the range to 220 ke. 
Internal terminal strip permits battery op- 
eration for antenna measurement. 














JAMES MILLEN 
MFG. CO., INC. 


MAIN OFFICE AND FACTORY 
MALDEN 
MASSACHUSETTS 








Index of Advertisers 


Adirondack Radio wr as ck 
Aeromotor Co 
Allied Radio Corp. 
Alltronics 
American Airlines, Inc 
American Electronics Co 
American Radio Relay L eague 
Radiograms. 
Handbook... . 
Gateway. 
OST. 
Arrow Electronics, “in 
Ashe Radio Co., Walter 
Barker & Williamson, Inc 
Belden Mfg. Co. 
Bendix Radio 
Bliley Electric Co. 
Bud Radio Co 
Burghardt Radio Supply, Inc. 
Candler System Co 
c enteee> 
> & G Radio Supply Co. 
€ ollins Radio Co. 
Commercial Radio Inst 
peers eee Yi pope Products Co. 
Crawford Rad 
DeMambro Radio re Co., Inc. 
Dow-Key Co., Inc., 
Dxerama 
Eitel-McCullough, Inc 
Eldico Electronics 
Electro- Voice 
El 


Electronic Sales & Service 
Elmar Electronics 
Engineering Associates 
Equipment Crafters, Inc 
Evans Radio 
Ft. Orange Radio Distrib. Co., Inc, 
Frederick Tool & Engineering Corp. 
Freed Transformer Co 
Gardiner & Co 
General Crystal Co., Inc 
General Motors (A.C. Div.) 
Gonset Div 
Gotham 
Greenlee Tool Co. 
Grayhill, Inc 
Groth Mfg. Co. 
Hallicrafters Co 
Hammarlund Mfg. Co., Inc. 
Harrison Radio Corp. . “ 
Harvey Radio Co., Inc... . Z 117 
ery of Hartford 152 
Heath Co Pere Fh 
Henry Radio Stores 119 
Hi-Par Products Co 
Hudson Radio & Telev. Corp... . 
Hughes Research & Dev. Labs. 
liycon Eastern, Inc 
Illumitronic Engineering 
Industrial Radio Corp 
Instructograph Co. 
International Crystal Mfg. Co., Inc... 
International Resistance Co. 
Johnson Co., E 
K-W Engineering Cc oO. 
Lafayette Radio.... 
Lampkin Laboratories, Inc 
Lettine Radio Mfg. Co. 
LMB... 
Lynmar Engineers, Inc. 
Mallory & Co., Inc., P 
Mass. Radio & Tele graph School 
Master Mechanic Mfg. Co 
Master Mobile Mounts, Inc 
Millen Mfg. Co., Inc., James 
Morrow Radio Mfg. Co 
Mosley Electronics 
National Soc. cats Sinnied Children & Adults 
National Co., In 
North Hills E lectric Co., Ine 
Page Communications Engineers, Inc. 
Palco Engineering Co. 
Petersen Radio Co. 
P & H Electronics 
P & K Electronics 
Port Arthur College 
Premax Products 
Radio Corp. of ean 
Radio Shack C ory 
Raytheon Mfg. 
RCA C eamienions, Inc 
Regdon Corp.. 
Reyco 
Remington-Rand Univac 
Rider Publisher, Inc., John F 
Selectronic Supplies, Inc. 
Sonar Radio Corp. 
Tapetone, Inc 
echnical Materiel Corp., The 
Telrex Labs. 
Tele-Vue Towers, Inc. 
Tennalab. 
Terminal Radio C orp. 
U.H.F. Resonator Co. 
Uncle Sam Re cordings 
United Transformer Co 
Universal Service 
U. S. Crystals, Inc. 
Valley Electronic Supply Co 
Valparaiso Technical Inst. 
Variety Electronics Corp 
Vesto Co., Inc. 
Vibroplex Co., becg 
Ward Products Corp... 
Waters Mfg., Inc. 
Western Electric Co oes 155 
World Radio Laboratories 101, 106, 131, 144, 150, 156 
YMCA Tr. & Tech. School of N. Y. 128 


1, 87 
136, 160, 165, 168 
133 


Suche 


A eee 

















Dependability 


for 
“VANGUARD” 


Earth Satellite scientists who will 

photograph and visually track the ‘‘moons” 
of Project Vanguard will require perfect 
coordination of effort and reliable exchange 
of information between their widely 

separated observation stations. Selected 

for this vital communications task, MOSLEY 
Multi-band Beam Antennas will be used 

to relay time signals and to provide 
dependable radio links between these 
far-flung outposts of science. 


MOSLEY Beam Antennas are providing 
dependable and outstanding DX performance 
for legions of Radio Amateurs—the world 
over, and for many commercial and other 
services. 

In current production are MOSLEY Beam 
models for every DX band—both single and 
multi-band types. Your favorite Ham Dealer 
can supply the MOSLEY Beam of your choice. 


Catalog H—57, describing MOSLEY 
Rotary Beam Antennas and other 
electronic components, sent free 
on request, 


8622 ST. CHARLES ROCK ROAD, ST. LOUIS 14, MISSOURI 


175 





it's time to ““*mobil-ize” at ALLIED! 








— 





Now’s the time to get ready for those “‘out- 
on-the-road” QSOs—be “‘mobil-ized”’ when 
that balmy spring weather comes along! 
Whether you’re just getting started in 
mobile work or “sprucing up” your present 
road-rig, ALLIED has exactly what you want. 
We’ve got everything in stock for immediate 
shipment—from a complete deluxe mobile 
installation to a tube of anti-static powder! 
And, of course, when you deal with us at 
ALLIED, you get the biggest trade-in offers 
in Ham Radio and the Easiest Terms. 


ALL FAMOUS-NAME MOBILE GEAR 
1S AVAILABLE AT ALLIED! 


GONSET 
G-66 
G-77 
Communicators 
Converters 


JOHNSON 
TRANSMITTERS 
240-141 
240-152 
240-152-2 


MORROW 
5BR-2 Converter 
MBR-5 Receiver 

MB-560 Transmitter 





MULTI-ELMAC 
Trans-citer 
PMR-7 Receiver 


REGENCY 
ATC-1 Converter 


JAMES 
POWER 
SUPPLIES 





RME-EV 
CONVERTER 


Order from ALLIED RADIO 





MASTER 
MOBILE 
Antennas 
Tuners 
Bumper Mounts 
Coils 








SONAR 
Direction 
Finder 
Radio- 
Telephone 


our 36th Year 





hw 


KING-SIZE TRADES: We're trading highest 
—just try us. Write today—describe your 
present equipment—and see what a sweet deal 
we'll give you on the Mobile gear you want. 


EASIEST TERMS: You'll find it light on your 
pocket when you buy on our liberal Easy Pay 
Terms. You pay only 10% down (your trade-in 
will more than cover the down payment)—and 
the rest in easy budget-sparing monthly pay- 
ments. So make your Mobile selection now! 





APRIL BARGAIN BULLETIN 


More of ALLIED’s famous values. The low- 
est prices anywhere on top-quality recon- 
ditioned gear—with 90-day new-set war- 
ranty—plus top-notch values in surplus 
items. Quantities are limited—be an early 
bird—order now. 


Super Values in Reconditioned Gear 


Cellins 32V2 $329.00 
Eldico SSB 100 

Hallicrafters SX99 

ATI Transmitter 

Johnson Ranger 

Johnson Viking Il 

National HRO 50T 


Buys in Surplus (New) Gear 
DM-42A Dynamotor. | 2-14 v. input. Output: 
1030 v. DC @ 260 ma. With 6v. DC input, output 
is 515 v. DC @ 215 ma. 


58 PX 172. Only 

807 Tube. Stock No. 58 E 403 
™23/ARC 5 Xmitter 

T21/ARC 5 Exciter 











KEEP YOUR ALLIED CATALOG HANDY 
It’s your complete Buying Guide to every- 
thing in station gear—and the most widely 
used Electronic Supply Guide. If you 
haven’t a copy of this latest 356-page cata- 
log, write for it today. 


100 N.WESTERN AVE. 
CHICAGO.80O, ILLINOIS 











WORLD’S MOST 
VERSATILE 
RECEIVER! 





ONLY $12.95 DOWN: 


WITH RDF-66 LOOP. 


Available at extra cost 


Use this rugged portable 4 ways..@S 4 
ham receiver, a 3-way portable, a marine 
receiver, and as an SWL receiver. Use it in 
your shack, in your car, on your boat. Take 
it along on your vacation. It’s truly the 
world’s most versatile receiver! 


National’s exciting new NC-66 offers 115V. 
AC/DC or battery operation, 5-band cover- 
age from 150 kc to 23 me, electrical band- 
spread with logging scale, plus a fixed tuned 
CW oscillator! Housed in a handsome, sturdy 
metal cabinet with carrying handle, the tra- 
ditional National quality is evident throughout. 


Attractive, yet functional, it has full-vue 
slide rule dial, 5” PM speaker, phone jack, 
and two built-in antennas (ferrite loop for 
DF and BC bands, whip for SW bands). And 
for boat owners, a special marine band from 
150 kc to 400 kc that covers maritime DF 
frequency. CD positions are clearly marked 
too. A 220 V. adaptor is available. 


ADDITIONAL FEATURES: 

Provisions for external direction finder 

for marine use (RDF-66 Loop accessory). 
Receives voice or code. 

Salt-spray tested. 

Separate switch for stand-by operation. 
Logging scale provided. 


Handsome two-tone metal cabinet, chrome 
trim. 

12-5/16” wide x 9-11/16" high x 10” deep: 
weight: 16 Ibs. less batteries. 


BAND: DF COVERAGE: 150 -400 kc 
BC P 1.4 me 


For complete specifications, see your 
National distributor or write for catalog. 


*ONLY $12% DOWN 


UP TO 20 MONTHS TO PAY AT MOST 
RECEIVER DISTRIBUTORS. 


Suggested price $129.95 less batteries 
(slightly higher west of Rockies) 


8 out of every 10 U.S. Navy ships use 
National receivers 


SINCE 1914 


Nationakt> 


MALDEN 48, MASS. 


@) Lined ib lmouww 














Known for their ability to handle high power at relatively 
low plate voltage, RCA high-perveance tubes are the answer 
for radio amateurs looking for power types that will save 
substantially on transmitter construction costs. 


Here’s why RCA high-perveance designs contribute to overall 
economy: 


High-perveance tubes—an original RCA development—enable 
you to use lower-voltage-rated tank-circuit components. 
These tubes eliminate the need for very high-voltage 

plate transformers and very-high-voltage-rated filter 
capacitors. They enable you to use more reasonable values 

of pi-network components. And they simplify your insulation 
problems. 


The power tubes pictured here are typical of the many RCA 
high-perveance types available to provide power up to the 
legal limit. Ratings on these and other RCA high-perveance 
types are listed on the chart. 


RCA high-perveance tubes are available at your RCA Tube 
Distributor. For technical data on any of these types, write 


Type 


Beam Power 
Beam Power 
Beam Power 
Triode 

Triode 

Triode 

Beam Power 
Twin Beam Power 
Twin Beam Power 
Twin Beam Power 
Beam Power 
Beam Power 
Triode 

Triode 


*Total for Tube 


RCA Commercial Engineering, Section D-37-M, Harrison, N.J- 


TUBES FOR AMATEURS 


RADIO CORPORATION OF AMERICA 


Tube Division + Harrison, N. J. ing, Harrison, N. J 





OC Plate Input Watts 
a 8 
40 
250 
75 
750 
260 
260 
500 
75*