Skip to main content

Full text of "A theoretical & practical essay on the Boehm flute as manufactured by Messrs. Rudall & Rose : intended for those who have a previous knowledge of the old flute / written & dedicated to the inventor by John Clinton (professor of the flute at the Royal Academy of Music), op. 87."

See other formats







>» n 


T HEORETICAL AND PRACTirAL RSSA Y 

ON THE BOEHM FT . I fTF 

By John Clinton. London: R. Cocks & Co. 

Instruction booklet for performing on the Boehm 
flute. Pierce Butler’s copy with his signature. 









I 

1 


I 



OP. 87. 

f.t‘iiili'11 . liihlmliiil ('Illy hy R .COCKS &.C . 6, 

MUSIC SELLERS (BY AUTHORITY) TO HER MOST Vi 

QUEEN VI CTOR I A I . 


NEW BURLINGTON 

RACIOUS MAJESI Y 


STREE T, 


ll '//i'/y f/nr V ht' /ifiif hr fht' Anf/n'r 

ELEMENTARY INSTRUCTIONS FOR THE SOEHM F LUTE . I N T EN D E D FOR BEGINNERS 






DEDICATION 


TO 

THEOBALD BOEHM, ESQ. 

( Of Munich. J 


My Dear Sir, 

Wlien, in after ages, the future historian of the Flute, in tracing its progress 
from infancy to maturity, shall enumerate those whose talents and exertions have successfully 
contributed to its perfect development, your name will stand conspicuously prominent in the 
list. He will point, with peculiar satisfaction, to your achievements, and this our day will be 
characterised by him as the commencement of a new era in the history of the instrument. And 
when he shall contrast the capabilities of the Flute, in his time, with the recorded imperfections 
of that of former generations, the name of Boehm will be transmitted in grateful remembrance 
to posterity, as the originator of the wondrous and triumphant change. 

To whom, then, can I, with equal propriety, dedicate a work, the object of which is, to 
introduce to English Flute Players, this monument of your genius, already so fully appreciated 
by the great body of Continental Professors and Amateurs ? 

Wishing you many years of health and happiness, in the enjoyment ot that fame which 
is so justly your due, 

I have the honor to subscribe myselt. 

Your very obedient and faithful servant, 

J. CLINTON. 


London., May 1843. 




PREFACE TO THE SECOND EDITION. 


Perhaps (here is no undertaking more difficult of accomplishment than that of bringing 
about a radical cbange in the principle of any art or science : but my own thorough conviction 
of the truth of Boehm’s system, induced me to entertain a hope, that, when the nature and 
advantages of that system should be fully explained, the public would not be reluctant to 
acknowledge its merits. 

It is a source of pride and pleasure to me, to find that, so far from my hope being disap- 
pointed, it has been realized to the fullest extent ; and the success which has hitherto attended 
my efforts, yields me the gratifying assurance of having now established the new system upon 
such a solid foundation, as will, ere long, ensure its general adoption. 

Since ray Essay was published, I have been constantly employed in teaching the Boehm 
Flute ; and, in every instance, I have rigidly adhered to the gradus and contents of this work, 
and with the most satisfactory results. 

It is therefore with the utmost confidence I venture to assure performers on the old flute, 
that the contents of the following pages will enable them to obtain a speedy and certain 
mastery over the Boehm Flute, and that the longer the instrument is played upon, the more 
will the practiser be pleased with it, I may with truth declare that the testimony to the merits 
of the Boehm Flute, which I have received from all quarters, has been uniformlv of the 
highest and most flattering character. With these few observations, and M’ith increasing 
confidence, I now submit this edition of my Essay to the Flute-playing Public. 

J. CLINTON. 

14, Greek Street, 

Soho Square. 




r c> » 

« 













4lM» ^ 





r/ 

»■ '. ; 


r 





4 








4 



-■/ Tiih'.oRh'.Tir.ii. PR.imc.iL Kss.iy t iik H oKH .yt h .i tk. 

I BY* JOB.Y Cl.tyTO.y . 

Tile Flute, one of the most ancient of innsical Instruments, had, for Centuries, but one hej; 
and iiiaiiN of the present jceneration remember the jfradnal addition of the others , which, although 
a great improvement , met with much opposition at first; arising partlj from a doubt of an) ad- 
vantage being gained, and partlv from prejudice, or a fear to encounter the trouble ofacijuir- 
ing their use; their utility however wasso manifest, in as much as the semitones were reinlereil 
better in tune, and greater scope was afforded foi‘ the execution of brilliant passages , t hat 
their superiority vas ultimately acknowledged, ami they were generally adopted . 

The Flute has since however undi'rgiine various alterations, such as the lioles lieing enlai - 
ged,to increase the power of tone, and to render the Harmonic fingerings more available . 
The size, form, and situation of the keys, have also been altered, to accommodate the size of 
the I’erformers hands, and duplicate keys on various plans have been added; but the only altei- 
ation that could render the Instrument perfect,, appears to have been neglected, although it has 
been a subject of speculation and attempt for many years, viz, in respect of the situation and 
size of the holes , which is the basis of Intonation . 

Previous to the following critical examination of the old flute,it may not be superflu' ns 
to remind the reader, of the well known fact , that . the lai’ger the hole , and the nearer it ap 
proaclie? to the top (or Embouchure) the sharper the note is rendered, and vice vi rsa . 

The tluee lowest hole’s jhat is, the holes covered by the two C keys, and theUj key ai e 
nearlv the same size, and almost at equal distances, consequently the following notes are tolera- 
blv correct A i The fourth hole, which when open gives Elj,is nearly double the 

distance from*1lh? hole in proportion to the others, and considerably smaller; the result is,i;: 
is much too shnry. because the hole is too /i('gb,and extremely zceoh, because the hole is too 
fmull . On the old system, there is no remedy for this defect, as if the hole were putinitsproiar 
stu.iliiiii , the finger could not reach it ; and if it were imide as large as the others, it would be 
<-till shiityer , and yield F; . 

We will now lake the primitive notes, which are as follow 

The above semilones, are ( in the system of equal temperament, as in a well tuned Piano 
forte ) nearly at equal distances apart ; it necessarily follows , that to produce them upon any In- 
strument , a just equality must be observed . If they were produced by 14 Organ Pipes, each pipe 
would gradually , and in equal proportion , decrease in length and diameter , to produce them upon 
asiring of the Guitar, each I'rel , would be arranged in proportionate gradatiors;if played uponone 
string of a Molin ,a similar equality would be observed in the movement of the iingers;and torenikr 
them perfect on the Flute , a corresponding equality must be observed in the arrangement of the 
holes ; thus , they should gradually and in equal proportion , decrease a little in size and d is - 
tance,aslhey a]|rixich the widest , or top part; but the basis of (he arrangement should be , 
etfedity in size uiid distnnre . 


If> wp>» - kivz “I t Ih , M iw to , t Sal ihtikf- covj-rt- rf l h»- ^ ar»- itici ii'lcl { i-xri pt [lo- tfitj.'im'* k«-v 

f r f J ) t the t>u»h*-r iw rt-rk frAiK I Im- I •«M‘wl k« i/j,v»^rrtw . j 

" li iw trarrf's iif reww«r\ !«• « that t S*- an*l iSirH Oclav tw of tfir FI iiio , are miTfiy Harmoinva '•! •! I.e- f 

;Tn| • ^ 



' J 


A relerfiicf to tlie old flute , will be Hiifficient to proTe, how much this iialiiral law has 
been \iolated ; all the holes , whether for the fingers, or key a, being of different Biies,aii(l|ilai cd 
at iiiieiiual distances, and the U()|ier holes larger, than some of the holes lower down . 

1 will now point out some of tile defects in the inachiner) , commonl) Irnowii b} them<ue 
of "the ke)B It being found impossible to pass to K;( in a slur) from anj note which re(jnired 
the third finger on the hole below it, a second kej has been applied , called the long t ^ ke) , ami 
I bat certainly removed the obstacle , altbough its use deiuiinded much practice , and gare an e>ti .1 
office to the fourth finger of the left hand, already no mote than sufficiently strong to manage 
the Gif key; but this did not provide for passages like the following: 



opening the 12'i' hole ( at the same time closing the ta'i' ) but as that is done by the first fiiigi 1 
of the right hand acting upon the key , called the shake key, it is rendered unavailable for gem 
ral purposes . We are therefore compeUed to ado|d a false fingering , thus o • o | • • • | d 
w liii h is little better than the fingering of the o]}e kejedFIute for B t , thus • o • | o o o | d 
or !'■ ,thus • • • I • o • I o besides wbich,it imdergoes constant alteration ,as seen in thefollow- 
ing passages , if played rapidly and legato . 



o o 

o o 

o ' o 


o 

o 

o 


■ \ o a □ ■ D 

■ 

■ 

Kach of the notes produced by the above fingerings , is different in i>itrh,strenfflh,atulqiial 
ily of tone , and they woulil be intolerable if sounded together; it must theiefore be_ evident , that 
s' lne. at least , can not be true when used separately . 





TIu re a,, mai.) otlu-r notes m a similar predicament , loo well known t,n e.iuue lurtln , con, 
„„.„t Tl.e unreflectmiC n>aj meet these incontroveitiLle a.serli..ns , • I-) saj in^.tJiat tlie peifo,,,,.., 

the notes in tune;” now although 1 conceive this would l,e an arWJed^rement , 

that tl.e old I lute is in itself , as an Listrumenl , out of tune , and consequent!) requires reior- 
n.ation. let ..s for a moment consider this point a little further • If the perfonner possess an acrte 
Far . and nexililil) of Lip . the notes ma) , after lonjc practire , he played in tune , but the 
ummtural distribution of the holes , causes the notes , if sounded in ■ tune , to be still imperfe,-t 
in qualit) , somewhat like the notes on a false string of a Violin . Assnming, then , that talent and 
perseverence , could render the notes perfect as regards tune , there is yet another difficulty . 

If the Flarer use precisely the same force of breath , he cannot then rend^ the notes equal in 
strength ;’that is. as full a tone cannot be produced from f=^ when fingeredthns 

O . o ) . . . |d or thus o.o|ooolaas when fingered thus .^o o | ° 1° or 

• o nor can as full a tone be produced from E b I from 'E\> 

neither can as full a tone be produced from A!j 


Eh'rt , the situation and size of the holes, render it impossible to have any twonotesexact 
ly alike in strength or quality of tone; or, as the French say,“there are not two notes uponthe 
old Flute . which appear to belong t , tl.e same family We have now offered to us , a Flute , 
invented by Boehm ( of Munich ) Manufactured by Mess'=“ Rudall & Rose , which is in accord - 
ance with the principles of acoustics , having the size and situation of the holes arranged in their 
natural older . Tbi= demanded a new system of machinery , in lieu of the former keys, and by 
which system, each finger is enabled to act simultaneously upon two or more holes , and whert-by we 
obtain" Perfection of TuiJ” “Increase of Power ” “ Superior quality of Tone” “Greater suscep 
tibility of sweetness” “Equal strength upon every note” “A very consideiable increase of facility 
in producing all the sounds ’’Much less extension of the Fingers , and peifect controul over all 
the keys &c. &c . I arn weU aware how reluctant some persons will be to acknowledge, orifnot 
to acknowledge, to adopt, these improvements; because many years of habit, often reconcileiisto 
imperfections, and create an imw'fllingness to depart from them , although we may be fully sersibb 
of their existence ; besides which , there is frequently a spirited ( shall I add too , an interestt d . ) 
opposition to all great inventions , especially where they are likely to supplant any establisludsys 
tern , they are looked upon as mere innovations , infringing upon vested rights; I would therefoie 
venture to suggest the propriety of a dispassionate consideration , whether or not , the impro 
ment when tested , does not offer more than an equivalent , for the small portion of trouBl'e it 
adoption and use will occasion • 


VpI#- the ■ta l* *- « fr"in the r*-wiill nf a critical cxauiinalii.n of the olH anH new Fitile* « at the R"\a f a 

. , la p^fi* w bj M» Cbv-ruLini . Pai-f • Anh»-r . •Carafa. btc . |ltr . rl« cl 

• In wlaLor “Ptrferl'tm of Tune,’’ 1 iiiuwl he uiitierkloAH imply , aafar aw a irinrf Itifclrumetil can he pwi • I" 


J 


il it uere poKsible for any Klautiat , to ha\e the perlectioiis ol Itofliin’s pystom , ai'plicd 
(o tlu‘ Flute lie has been accuBlonied to play upon , rejthout causing any cliange of finjfcrinjc, he 
uoulil be astonibhed and deli)(hted , becaiibe he would ab if by mat;ie, f ind hinibelf posaebbed of 
a full , rich, and mellon tone , with facility of prodiitinj!; if , and every note alike in sfrenjcth 
and quality, in addition to the Instrument beinjc rendered perfectly in tune , and affordinjc the 
means of executinj; vifli facility , pasba;;es shieh under the old system , would , by reason of its 
imperfections, be most difficult; it may theiefoie be reasonably supposed , that no consideiatioi 
soidd induce him to n linquish those advantages, and , by a parity of reasoninjf, that no pr<jm//rc 
should prevent theii aci|uiiemenf . As the appearance and structure of the 77ew Flufe,might 
induce many to inuqtine, that it requires a totally different system of fin^erin^, and that its a- 
doption would involie the trouble of reconui«“ncin^ , I have, in order to remove this erroneous iin 
pression , composed the first Six exercises in this work, so that they must hefittfceredpiTcisi- 
ly ns on the old Flute; the altered fin^erin^s I have introduced gradually, so that with a nio 
derate share of Industry and Patience,, a perfect controul over the new flute, may be obtained 
in a short space of time , 

Those who liave already adopted it, feel its superiority in a much greater dejrree than would 
be experienced in playing upon an Kight keyed Flute, after an Instrument with but one key, !<• 
cause the addition' of keys only improved, hut the 'system of Ifoehin perfects the Instrument . 
I, myself practised upon the old Flute, from Boyhood, yet when I became acquainted with Boi bin's 
system, I was so struck with its advantages, tliat J eagerly adopted it; and as I am neithtr tbe 
fiiientor nor Maker of the new Flute, I trust I sliall not be considered as actuated by am sel 
fish motive, in recommending its trial , which I feel persuaded will lead to its adoption as eagerK 
by otliers . As a sincere lover of the Ail of which I am a Professor , I conceive it to beadiitx, 
to make kiiowm publicly, a system which tends so materially to the advancement of that art, and 
thereby to dispense to others, the means of a pleasure and gratification, similar to that which 1 
have derived from the study of it . 

How far I may have succeeded in demonstrating that system, and affording those means of 
graiii ication , will be judged of by the following pages; and should my humble effiirts realize my 
sanguine expectations, a still greater source of pleasure will be opened to me; I feel convinced, 
that Ifoi Inn’s system , will cause the Flute to hold a much higher rank fai the estimation of lYo- 
fissors and Amateurs, then it has hitherto, and that the Art itself will be benefifted . 

The utility of the new system, may possibly be as much doubted at first , as was the ailli 
tion of keys to the old Flute, but the present invention being so strictly consonant in its propel ties , 
with Musical principles, must ultimately preiail against all attempts at opposition . Some experiments 
have been made here , and on the Continent . as an alteration of Boelmi’s sy stem, the professed object 
being the acquirement of greater simplicity ; hut the theoretical and praqlical experience of the In 
ventor, and (he principal Continental Professors and Instrument Makers, has abmiriantly proved that 
it will allow of no compromise without losing its best qiialities.namely Tone and Intonation , and 1 
theiefoie conceive that Mess'.' Riidall & Rose ,have wisely determined to preserve the perfection 
of the system in their manufactures . 

The annexed plate points out to the Student .where the fingers are to be placed &c &c • 




7 /rv/ v“.'-r 




TAr Tu/tin^ 7 ubr. 




y/ y-f' 

Fintfrr\ 
I ^ - -y Fiiti/ft\ 



‘t fin^^r. 

T*‘ Oft IlfM'lt 
thr Thnr Im-IIoIh 
l\rvje ti.f rn llt< 
n,l Flutr. 


■ /■^vv'vy. r/y /.y . y-y'-y y- '//, .. 

• ///ft >/*•*/ //*- /yf^ >4 

,!,■/,/ y,/, z/,y// /» Hy.///i4i. //li- ///>^/- 

t/rAi yfwi k.t'Ze^ f>nf yZ/vfZ y • yZ/fz/fZ^ Zzy.y zz />/>///, /,/, 

,/zyyZZVz/<yZ/ ty .tZttzZiZZ// ZZ'ZfZ //z y/*Z zet/ • y/zzzzf/z//z '^Z' • 'zy/44/. , 

^/rtC zyzz>zf B. zzz/z/ //z /■'/ ■ 'y-zzzzyz> zyiz z, c . 

• yzz'- ■ 'I'zzy ZZZZZZZZZ,/ ZZ.Zzz/ zy:,-zz .,z zz,zz//,z zzz,-z..,/y. „ , 

■z„zy ,y'/Zz :Z/zzzy.iy'z>> ^/z .'A'zzyZr yZ.zzzz/ zz>z r,zzyl/,-,y,z, . 

^ / ’W . ' rt A .. tt _j j tit //jf vy^viyy. t A „ 


• 'y/zz ■ '/z'zz/ zzzzz>/zz/ Z.Z., zzz-Zzz/ zyyzz-zz ^zzzzzz//zzzzzzvz.,/zy. zz/. 
//z ‘zZiZ ■ Azziz/z> zy '//z '^yz <y/z/zzzz'./z-z //, yzj.,/ ■ /,„y, . 

//, ' r z/////z‘y/f f* . - 

• '//f ‘ E. /V /-//VVy / / / //• . y'////yr> 

//r ^z^Fzy^/ii/f///z^fz>/fzy, //*///^ /.y // y///-////y.//,y ,z^/tz/, 

E /f/y . 

•' T'' / ' '* 

• 4/tr- y. 


y.z. 


• / // z-// /// A/yz’ - Aj j 


v// 


/f yt'////// //A/y . 

• //zyr /yy y/-v/^ ^ ///// /z>/, zAz, A^/.^ /////. 

z/z- /f z‘A/ zf/y A^r- ' . /f /t/Z A/f/,/ o A^zfA A^^ 

/f' //■ fy4r/f ^ Jz.r/f z/y/f/z" , y/r * // yf ^/ // y 

I'Z /,/ ,AA^^ tj-// ^/i^y ^ ZzZ , A‘Z///z' '.y //*/// 


'fz ,/ //zz.z 




/ Fintjfi'. 
•JV* Fi'n r/rr. 

.7 'y y»,y, r. . 

/-' FOif/^r. 

‘J ’\'J Ftn t/ff . 
.7 f'intfrt'. 


f.rp J/iiffA ■ 


L A'/./*' 


0 D ^ Arr to f/r lyzriii il . 

7^1 rhnmh A'z'w thf G ^ AVv- 
ihi IXfVzr A. 8 . C. ////// fn-Ufm. 

C iu r-». wili lu- uutr7s.nl oulv whon thf v utr rv//uir> >l • 
t/in,f. g • Thnmh Krv to hr opeurzl . 


'T- 


0 G ^ Krv to hr ijwnnt . 
o 

B , to he oftennt . 


The Thn'r hi-tti tu l\iy.e to />• ss-hut 


7 


In inittinj:; the Jnstnimeiit tn^ellicr , llie middle joint should he j£ra!-|)ed near the top, (o. 
avoid an mineceesary pressure upon the inaehiner)' . It is held lihe the old Hute , except that 
the left hand Thiiinh must he placed upon the Ke) , to keep it shut. As tliis thumb has leenal 
vta)s placed against the Instrinnent ( being one of its supports) it can make no difference to 
the pla}er , to place it upon the ke) , instead of the side of the Flute ; hut in the action of 
MC gain an important advantage, having now mereh to detach the Thumb, vthereas it fonnerlj 
renuired Two movements , vii. one to detach it from the Flute , and the other , to opeirtheB? ki ) » 
Tills point requires constant attention , for if the key be open , the proper sound cannot be produced . 

Undue pressure upon the Rings , should be avoided , as it would retard the neatness and rapid- 
ity of execution . In slopping the holes forthe Right hand , be careful not to touch the shake ke_\s, 
wldch are placed between them , parhcularly that which is situated where the former key was 
placed . 

The Instrument is perfect) in tune in every key , with one fingering for each note;this , 

I shall call, the Aatnrat fingering; still to facilitate some passages, it ( like every other MusK-al 
Instrument of any pretensions) sometimes requires a change , which I shall call ,KJcceptions . 
The tone is produced upon precisely the same principle as the old Flute , covering the Kmh,-,- 
chure less tlian half; but ere the Student commences to blow , he should fix upon his nnm. one 
main point of difference between the two Instruments , namely this, the notes of the old I In e, 
varied so much in Pitch and strength , that pcrfbrmers were obliged to alt( r the directum o le 
stream of air , as well as to increase and decrease its velocity ; hut as all the notes oc the 
Boehm flute, are pure and equal , they necessarily demand equal blowing . Althoui,d, tl is s 
an obvious advantage, it requires practice , or rither Habit ; the notes which ^ 

too flat , will very probably be- considered too sharp . at first , and r,ce versa , the Mudu, 
!l, le.,,, to H.; tltoio t«.e . b, .™pl, bt. .,...-0 . ..J •la--- ») 

tLo .o-.,»t btrotoo. 0,1 or tb, S,..,™,. to tb. b...b. 1. 

key may be forsaken ( as on the old flute) in passages like the following . 



Note . To prevent the pi^sibility of an error, perhaps it would be as well If 'the stud.ut 
were at first to practice the notes in N? 1_. withoirt any reference to time ,but merely as fust 


t-.wards bloitin^ in<n tiu* Flute pruperl) - 




Do iiof i'orjjet lo keep <lie tliuinl) key shut . 






, .5701 





10 


O.v riir. .^LT^:R^:l> /‘i.vgkri.m:s. 


The first isFr.aiid by this alteration \»eat once rid Wselves of all its former difficulties . 

. The second altered fiiitferinjc (C^) the most imperfect and difficult of all the notes on the 
old Flute , is nos placed on an equality vith the others . Need I say what a decided advantage is 
derived from these alterations ? Two of the greatest difficulties and imperfections removed . 
We now have splendid notes , in lieu of the most imperfect ; and settled fingerings, insteadofcon 
stant alterations . 

The acquirement of the new fingering fur F1[ ,is a mere matter of memor) , but the new 
fingering for C; , demands a little practice and patience . 

The Student should not feel discouraged , if he can not imme<liately conquer it ; I know 
experience, that it soon becomes perfecfl) easy . When we reflect ,thaf the difficulty of this 
fint£ering , is occasioned by using the thumb key , with a novel (although much easier) movement, 
and by its yielding Cl[ , instead of Bh as formerly , our reason will dictate , that it only requires a 
little time and habit , to render it quite familiar . 


The notes FI and ct are fingered alike in both octaves , thus 




w 


I must here offer a few words of advice , vii , To progress rapidly , practise slowly; and let 

1 . 

no day pass without some practice . 

The following scale should be played many limes , until a tolerable knowledge of the new 
fingering is acquired . 


• • • • o o o 



0 1 


■ f 1 



n 

* 







j 

















‘ ^ ^ m 





.5 To I 






rj 


Thf neit (vo altered fiii^eriiijcs are FJ and Ct, fingered 
alike in both uclaves . 


thus 



vere 

nii'iit 


The fingerinir vf t : differs but little from the old B)stem , and that of Cf still less, as 

It not f.,r having the thumb ke) open , it vtould be precisely similar ; therefore the acuuiie- 
of those two,vill offer no difficulty . 


The new finjcering for Cr removes the former difficulties of this note 
tile folios ing example . 


may be seen by 








^ r - ’ 

We have now Lirt one more altered fin^erin^ to render theT>*'o first 
Oita^fs CM.Diplete . iianiely . fingered alike in botJi octaves . tbus 




This fiiijferiii^c , offers many advantages , altlioii^li its use requires hnbit , to ensure a 
simultaneous movement of the fingers . It may be first practised in the following passages, 
in which some of its facilities are apparent . 



In the following groups , it changes its nature to A; , but of course , fingered like b!> . 



Tlie following examples will render it more familiar . 



•^7o| 




Tl„. finKeri,.,. of U„. notes in the thini octave may nou he learned ; thev a ill be 
dill.T hut sli>;li(Iy from the octave helow . 

At first they may be considered too sharp, especially DJ andKi|,for as the Notes of 
<l.e third octave on the old KInte . were very flat . and demanded ,reat pressure of the lips to 
fKliice them ,the Student may not he enabled to divest himself immediately ofhis former ha- 
b.ts . If should be remembered ,f haft hey yield freely , u/,/,our exertion .The Df hey hcinic 
required for all of them , ( except the two hi|<hest . ) they .ill herealtcr he found much easier of ' 
execiilion, than the third octave on the old Flute / 



Although the Student has now fearned every note upon the Instnmienl , he should dili 
gently study the general Scale of fingering , page 6J. where he will find them under 'different 
names . It is printed on a Fly leaf, so that in subsequent study , it may be op, ned, and appear 
to view at every exercise,!., case the memory should fail . This may appear a recapitulation , 
htil many years experience as a Teacher , convinces me how indispensable if is. that the finsrer 
mg of each note , should be known without reference to , or association with any other; for ,x 
a.nple; tl,e fingering of g!. , should present itself to the mind , without thinking that if is fin 
geredlike Ft , for although their sound ,is(in modern practice) the same, their nntu,r is en- 
tirely different , as F) cannot exist in a Seale which requir,-s Cib , and vice Vers^ . 

Neglect of flu's system of study leads Amateurs into innumerable errors . 

'When a tolerable knowledge of the fingering is established ,the following lessons may he 
I'laetised . in which the altered fingerings are employed indiscriminately , and in different Ma 
jor a!ul Minor keys, so as to afford the Student a general knowledge of the natural fingi-riig. 
The greater parf of all the subsequent exercises , will be found to consist of favourite mel.ulies . 
aruj selcftions from l/u* most eeteemed works fur the old Flute . 





o To I 


17 


A> y /, . 
lirgro 
S]iiritoso 








.jr«i 





.^Toi 


I 



:oi 



•jrtii 



Haviliji: ol)<aiiied a toitralj/e command of Oic Xatiiral fiii>ccrin>c , </ic Student ma) novt |ho 
C fcd willi the “ ea-cffitions,” practising tlie Scales &c. &c. alternately as vritten . 

It is aluays difficult to unite, rapidly and legato, all passages of Flute Music , where 
the hreali of the Octaves occurs , 



It would be impossible to remove the above difficulties entirely, but they are to a great 
extent obviated on the New Flute, by Tso extra holes at the Top, which aie acted upon by the 
Leys for the Right hand , marked in the plate page f>, L.c . Perfirmers shonidhowever accnsloin 
themselves to unite the above passages, by using the .\atural fingering, becausetJieieare some 
Passages, in which the keys B.C. can not be made available . 

The only new difficulty for the Student , on that part of the Boehm Flute, is in passing 
((iiickly from C!j to Dil,but after a little habit, it offi'rs no greater difficulty, than in passing 
from Ili> to d 1] on the old Flute. No person should expect to conquer it inunediately, it requires 
time and patience; because the left hand thumb, has hitherto performed a different office . 

The following group should be practised , until it can be played legato, in about the movement of 
Semiquavers in an Andante. Subsequent practice will render this fingering quite easy . 



The following Scale Exercises should be repeated many times , varying the Articulation , 
as in the Study of the old Flute . A lesson is given in every key for the e.rreptions ,and the 
letter E marked over those notes , where the exceptions should be employed ; in all other cases, the 
natural fingering should be used . Some of the altere<l, notes require a slitbl jiiodification of 
till' stream of Air, but it will be found very trifling. . 


'y 'V 




A rapid euccesBion of C.D. in the second and third octaves , as in a Shake or Turn , or 
passages of a similar nature, is facilit^ed h) using the ke) , letter B.The small notes fingered ^ 
are the n>.tes of i^iiich (he shake is composed . 





□ □ 
A'*' I . 




Vlii n K is (}ie accented iiutf , NV J . of llie ircciuHu^ fiiitrcnjitfp i-liould he eiii[)|i;)eil;l iil 
if llie acf.t nt should Ijp on JK , M'.'ii .would lx- heitt r . Tlio |iract]<.al use of (he fore^oinjc exceptions. 






*:oi 


In psssat*-!^ likf the f.illuwing ,the fiiwsering of F: in the three »( laves *is ^realK fa( iliia 








The afajTe fingerinjc should be empl.jved only to render passa>:es If^nto ,as in the following; 
S. ah . In the arpew" of <he Chord of the I '' the .Xutural finterini: must be used . 

It aould I* found improving • f“ I'ractice the Seale of D . »ilh the .\aliiml finjceriiijr. as w N 
a. ihe exception, as if »ouJd assist in strength n i!,r the fingers in passages like the following . 





V6” 





The 


folldwinji exce|.lion , is very iiseiuJ in man\ cases . 



o • 

0 o 


• o 

o o 


O • *0 

DO O O 


o o 
0 o 

c c 


o o 
o o 


o o 

O 0 


c c 


o o 
0 o 


- o 



.?Toi 




riK'ie is an..(l.er „f lakinK lib, wl.icl, j. extre,n,.K n.a.n v,z 

l.j (l.e first of (l„. h-ft hand onto the key, marked Z in the [Jate.'ia stoppinic’ 

I ,ih V and Z at the same time, and witli the same finger 

In passages like the fidlowing, the first finger should be placed upon Y, Z , at the cottimence- 
Iiienl,and remain upon them during the whole of the passage; it then becomes needless to employ 
the first finger of the Right hand, as the ac t of shutting the holes y and Z. makes lib . 



To obtain a judicious and read) use of the above fingering, reijiiii es yrartice and r.xphKiF.jfch: . 
Ill a legato passage like the fi.llowing , the first finger of the left hand nia) be raisedPv 
Ihe middle Eb , but if should return to Y, Z , at the next note . If the pagsage he pla)ed ra- 
pidl) . the first finger need not be moved . 


Y Z 



A better idea of the use of this fingering , may be obtained by comparing the following 
passages , which are both alike , but differently fingered . 


Xatiiral rinut'i inK; , \ery difficult . Y Z , very easy 



f would here advise the Sludciit to practice the following 3IaJor and Minor Scales,aixl 
Arpeggios of Chords ( slowly at first ) until he obtains a command of the Xatnral fingeriig, 
as the best means of ultiniafeN establishing a perfect Mastery .over what might befeiined. 
• he (-'roimd Hoik- of fingering . 

The exceptions facilitate tJie passages , so palpably .that their aci|nirement will present 
m'dirficully . However as scale practice only , is rati er uninteresting , the examples from 
page.'itto page -J-S liiay be advantageously studied, in conjunction with the Scales , 

The Xatiiral fingering must be employed .except when marked otherwise • 

Some pieces for I'liitc* and Piano forte might also be stttdied . but not without the superin- 
•riidence of a Master , as passages might be met with . appearing insunnoiintable.allhongh very 
• if taken with the proper fingering . 

:-nI 


% 



I''; Majoh . 






•iTol 



.TTol 





The atf Octare should be practised separately, and very slowly . 



Ill a siilise(|iient patje, finjcerinK will be /jiven to render the preoediiiif octa'e leg.ito , 
and „f evecitlioii . 


?T<il 



From .V?/ of Kiiinmcr’s C?prices Op: 12 . 



Tr<>i 


. K > 


From HilKis’s “ Studio di .M.uliilazionc 



From Kinnmer’s Caprice Op: 12. 



.7 Tot 


From •>'? a of Berbi^iiier’s Studies . 



From Kuhlaii’s Grand Solo Op:.i*. 






. s 
.V rs. 

.-Ir/'tnlr 

(it 


Fmiii JUrliiijiiier's Dmi; Kiut.--! ■ ()|i: 2 h . 





From Berbiguier’s Duo: (Two Flutes) Opi'iS. 



From Ribas’s Studio di Modulazione . 


.v.® 50. 

. UUjrro 







From .A”? 2 of Firrstenau’s exercises Op:l.j. 





Var; / , from C. Kellor's Divertissment (Kiute & Piano) Op: IS 


53 . 






^0 

F. 

1 




• f 

f ' 


■ 

ZA 

P 



i. ^ 









ssl- 

1 / 

^ T # r ' 

— ^ 




u ^ 








Kroiii Kiihlan’s Trio .V? / . Op-. I'j . 


// 



.i7ol 








Another Exercise from the above Fantasia . 



Prelnde from Coche’s Methode . 



•vTol 


iw--); 



•sTol 


From Cochf's .Mi-lluidt- 



From Kuhlaii's Trio .V? 3 Op: sff . 

A'.” fi3. 


From Weiss’ SiOO Studios . 


17 




From Nicholson's Fantasia . 



.>Toi 




,. 0 . arriu. at U. of tl.e known fy K.^:liHh flanliBts , as “Harmonies ” 

Fmte orl reso„rces hitherto unknown .for the e.eeut.on of pa.^es ... 

"T" i.eKt Artistes have rejected this fi.«erintC on the oM fh.te ,l.eea..sethe pnm.Mve 

Th, uniialiir.1 di.lril.iili.ii af ^ ”ka d-Ua *'««■ 

,„„re tha.. the other notes , as .t not «n^) 

exa.nide ,but rendered many others ent.re y unava.a^^ „,„r„,.^hJy convinced ; as a pror.f oi 
Tl.at Ha/mnmcs are mdrspensatil , ^ _ 

.,eir hei..g so , I may mention that there are empfyv.. 

.,ueh cannot be played with any "V; I conceive the quality 

the passage can be played legato , w.th t e a ..r ^ smothered nature, not .n. 

„f Tone ( produced by the Harmonics ) to be .nferm ^ considerably 

like the sound of a H.nnan Voice , .f h„,cver may avail then,- 

lesse.ied on the Boehm flu e , eiis s o offending the most refined Ear , beca.ise tin- 

selves of ajmhWous use of the ‘.'7 sounds perfect, extends 

.,„al,ty of the holes in site and - ^. ^^t ve ,ras , at first , considered too 

,ts influence to all dcrtfat.Vc so.mds - As the third 

Sharr .the Harmonics may be tl.o..ght too Jin f ■ Air , with increased Velocity, 

Ir. practising the.n , the ,,, 3 ,,„„o„,ed to do , for the Harm.mics 

|,y giving nuich greater pressure . ^ that anothered qqal 

on the old flute; this w.ll render them .n Tu^’ them nearly on an equality 

ity of Tone ( which 1 conceive to be so o ject.onab^ ) 

with the so..nds produced from the ^at^ral ' octave (or primitive sodnds ) , 

„i, s ( or derivative sounds ) of the twelve se..utones .n the f.rst P 

their vrnrti<-al use is exe.nplified in subsequent exercises . 



1 


.^:7ol 


.>0 

Ki"iii llic prwfCim: Talifi- , tin- fillipMiii;: Scairs arc (Icdiiccd . S'pIiic nl' tln-tn (..ntid 
difTiiidl lo pnidnce ; tlut-c liowcvcr wliich aic rc<|iiiicd (u facililatc liassajjcs , arc cas^ uf |indiic- 
ti"ii , after a little practice; the irthers,! conceive to !«• more cmioiis, than useful . 




.'JToi 


M'lieii llif Hariiiiiiiio finjCfriii^ can Ik- made availahle , if will lie denoted, b) tile |Miini1 \e 
fioiinds being written under , in smull notes 



"Inch will ini|il) , that the large notes are to be fingered like the sinall notes, but the soi/ml 
o| the lar^e note , is to he imidueed , bj pressure of the li]i , as before stated . I would 
mliise the Student to practice the fingering of the Harmonics in tlie subsequent exercises , 

• ^ 1 1 tit ally ■> before he attempts to produce the sounds , in order tliat his undirided attenlior nia_\ 
be given to the Tone and litonation . 


Flute Solo in the Overture to La Gazza Ladra . 



From Cherubini’s Overture to Anacreon . 



I 


From Kuhliui s Diio: Op*, si . 



Frnin the same Duo . 



<5701 


From the sanie Duo . 


. ). > 



TJk* Hariiioiiic fingerings in are marked as they used le he the old Flute, l<rt need 

not iiMW he enii)l(ned , as' tlie natural fingering offers no difficult) in that situation 

In tlie Introduction of the Fantasia from wJiich >7^6.5 is taken , there is a passage of a suni 
lar nature ui which the Harmonic- fingering is indispensable ; it nms thus. 




/• 


I„ i.as.;u:.s like ti,e follow in,c .the Harmonie fii4Cerii,K otitrlil he » can..(< n. 


siUTrs line uit‘ ^ ,i . , 

„a.n.lit. n„r w,„dd I use if .mself ,>cause , hj emploji.^: the exee|itlun W Q tlm s o . . |c . o | □ 

the etia r parts leooine easy . 

It mijiht he lemleied still easier, by the folloMii^ fiiuceriut: , 

Var; 8, from Drouefs God save the Queen . 



o o o o o o o 

• • • o • • • 


o o o o o o o 

o o o o o o o 

O • 0 0 0 *0 

□ c o □ □ c n 




.';Toi 





when the Cliroiiwtic Scalf is plajed jripitf/y the Haiimitiics niitfld be a(lvaii1ii;;etiiis In 
emiilojed , as in Ihe fidlimiiuc example 



A Hide pracfiee wll render the above Sr^ale , verj eas\ . 

/ 

Sliiiiild the tivo hij^hrsl notes be required , they may be fingered as under 



■VVlien the Student has acquired a tolerable facility of tlie above, the following: exett ise 
from XicholMin’ s it".'* Fantasia ma\ tie practised , the 21^ and 6^ Bar of vhich are alike, 
but differently fingererl . 

The fingeriiqf of the 6'b Bar , is preferable . 


.V7<>l 











.) I 



Tlure is aimther way of fingering some notes, Tiz,by ('lacing the finger npon the oirtiT 
or inner edge of llie Ring , s-itlioiit Btopping the hole under the Ring ; for example, if an\ 
of the Rings for the right hand be acted upon in this manner, if shuts the 'I'S hole, and 
( sith the finger, of the left hand down as in playing Gj ) mates FlT; when this fingering is requir- 
ed if sill be denoted by haring a cut through the hole , thus • • • | 6 'a, o| d which implies,that,lhe 
finger is to act upon the outer or inner edge of the Ring, instead of stopping the H>le, as hitherto. 

The Variet) of passages in Music being almost infinite , an Instrinnenlalist cannot be 
possessed of too many fingering , or in other words ,“ should be thoroughlj familiar with all 
the resources of his Instrument ', in order that he may be prepared for every style of pas- 
sage . The Natirral fingerings , and the exceptions already given , will serve for ordinary 
purposes; still I would advise the Student to peruse attentively , the fingerings in the CjIIow- 
ing passages , for even if their use be of nnfrequent occrmrence , it is possible ,that the perfect 
performance of some passages, might be marred in their absence . I do not mean it t o be infi red 
that a thoroirgh knowledge of them is indispcrrsable , but I offer them , as additional resratr 
ces , hitherto irnknown on the old flute , as an amusing stinly , as a means to heighten 

the effect of Fhrte music generally , consequently to elevate the character of the Instrunienl. 

and as art indncernert to the Shtdious aitd Talented Flairtist , to explore still fitrther, the vast 
resources offered in Boehm’s system . 

Some of them rmrst lie employed in Pimio passages only . and others , in Forte passa 
ges , consequently tlrey will reqttire an alteration of the lip , as on the old Flute . 

The notes which arc not fingered, are to be taken .with the Anturul fingering, and in 

every case , the first and last note of eaih grottp , are to he fingered alike . 


^ Tills i-w ihe fciiiiM- fineerin^ fi.r.FjI aw thf oM , in to th«- numlt-r of acted ujw.n . 

* V* *lu-i» tire Kiiijf lv •l U-d iili'Oii Instead of the hole « it causes the Note to a h'llle «h,«rjrer . Hie following >. coni ««n 

■ s.iiiijiles for 1 1 s Us, . Iiki-Mise some her l)o\i I !• '?« nois , ato' a lew exi ept-:oits bef ore t>u M « but in a s..no »liai ‘ ' ler i>t f . 


.)S 








I 






o o o o 


• o • • or tf • o • • 

C z* . D 

o o o o f and o o o o 

• • • • presto • • • • 





0.0 o o 


o o o o 


O O 

O X O 


O X O 


o -Q □ o 



(.; 7 (»i ) 


trtii4 




I,') 


Tile folloxiiiic Scale of SliakcK slimilil ii»« lie sliiclied ; it will lie fimiid tu cuiil.im a 
sli.ike for ever) Hole ii|ion the Instrument « whether to the full tone or Beiuilonc . 

W'liere a choice' is arailalile , the student should select that which is most coiiTenimt 
to himself, Imt with a due cousideralion of the st)le , or nature of the passage in wliidi 
the shake is introduced, as some of them will lie loiind servicalde injbrfc passa);es onl\ , 
and others , ill piiiuo passages . Those which ma) (from their norelt) ) present a diffi 
cult) , shoiiW be practised a little ever) da) , until an eipial and brilliant iiiovement of the 
fincers be establish! d . The first fimeerinj; of each , is the most approved 

It is III) intention to write studies for everv major and minor key; the shakes;thi- 
staccato &c S:c tcc , in which the various lin^erii'ts will he introduced , and marked . 
Till') will be published in Two Books , and entitled “ Ktudes Caracth istiqurs 


Sr.^LF. OF SH.iKKS. 



r 

/ />■ Ir , 

D 

!r !r Ir Ir 

Ir Ir 

E 

Ir Ir 

K ^ 

Ir Ir Ir Ir Ir Ir Ir h- Ir 





-•g --id M 

it’rCf II y Ij ^ ^ If 





hi 



. O 0 0 

Ah' Ah' 


O O O hr 

Rlr 

o o o 


o o o o 


oo ooo\oo'\ 


O h' tr 


o o X • ® 


” ^ Ch- Cfr* C/» 

oA‘/rOOOO 0OO-) 

ntr B/r 

O tr O O hr O \lr O O • "3 

OOOOO/rO 0*0« 


□ occ □□□oo 


CDDtDO COO C 



C/r 


• •••• 9 0 •• Iro tr tr Ir Irtrirh-tr** 0 0000*00 

00*0 OO* O ••O • tr m tr 

O • O • 00*0*fr*0«/r •^OVXOOOOX*^ 


trtr»^*trhrO OO# 00#00 
Ah' Air 

• X O 


,« • o O O Ir O Ir 
Ah' Air 

Xooo ooo ##**ooo# 



B/r Hfr 

o o o 


00 ooo oo oo 


c c c c □ □ 


o • o o 


o o o o 


O Q O C 


o o 
o o 


o o O J 
Afr Atr 
O O 0 < 


^ M ik< ilt«- k« j % A* '••ill rl>»- KfC'-nW finjer .1 iii»- R if' hanH . 
II ! ....f.l 

.> 7ol 


h.XtTClSC for t Ik* sfj;ikt*s . Knehiu's StudifiK Oj>' It ) 









GKXKK.U. S(\4LK OF F I \G h. Ui XG . 



lOOOOO**** 

□ 








o 

o 

o 

o 

• 

o 

o 

o 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

• 

C 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

• 

• 

• 

o 

• 

• 

• 

• 

r 

o 

• 

c 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

o 

• 

• 

o 

o 





**»ooooo**c***«oo« • 

n □ □ n 


oooo»oooo**»ooo* *«o* 

OOOOOOOOO** 0000-0000 
• oooooooo«oo«oooooo 


f, □□□□□□□□□□□□CIDOO** 



n .»«l) I'T 


I . til R.C^H'KS aud Cn'jc Cjtil'ipif '«*f Mu«.k 

'»»‘0 ,»•« • . 




• JTo! 




























a 


} 




i 


ja 







> 


ff 












I 








9 




0 






% 















UM+ ,, M* II ^ II • ll • II • • II ♦ II . _ I 






• i V , i . . • * * ^ * * j ^ f • » • * ^ * * . ♦ > . 




ll>%. 











f 



e 


A 




- J>4 







& 




.t«iUiMllli>iii*i5isfl»U'ili»lil M'’=l‘iik|f=»ni.st 




: 4 - 


u 

I) b4 4 b| 4b4!)t t\>t±|)lblii-»-k-»- ^b = i b|bt ibi Ibi bl4- t>i 


b?tbi±btb».^l,f-^,t. 

# 

j__==^= 







0 4b 


(10- 


'’4bl ii){;tb^V^+b+pi>,^j,^'’?i'’tfbiytf l)f f bp 


L 

0 














^ *==i^ "LLIJ t±il ' ^ ^ r'^ ' f f f f r f 
























C_C 












jKt'l-yvriril SItitI oijnifi- o1‘ Diil^p t>1 .M auplip Ml pr ^ quart'. 


if. ^V.Cnrtl, .')fl,Oiiru//rmf./'-i//-ii/X//rrf. 

r- -y 


%\ 




Coiiipostd exp^cssJ^ to acquire the use of all tlie Keys . 


For tlie F. Key. 



li'rbijniirr’s Sttidie*. . 








6 


For tl)c f1) aii<] Bp Ke^'s. 









r** Siudie- . 



I' »• rhtgHi irr'^ SUi<)ir«. 






II 





M* rh i;f>ii^r*v Stiidi* . . 


1.3 



H«»rbi^-uirr\ Studies. 




14 - 


The ■cimt- fiiiffcriiiff as the preceJine- 





1.5 


Kor tliL- GZ Key. 



Krrhi^*»iier% Studi»-\. 







1 ? 


K(ir tl.c and J); Keys. 



!Vrhfg;uif r’s SfurliVt. 



is 


For the . 




w 



- • »'u i I T'- S iii(i Ifs . 


‘JO 


For tlic Gj(. A|. and Ej Keys. 


















I^-tH i«*«i iir's SttiH les , 





Kor the E^.aiul GS Ki\>s. 



H»rMpuifr’s Studies . 



K1 N K . 










<^>(vnc par 






• A" 4 ,'i 80. 


Pri.t 30 ,J\ 


A OITenbacli "'ll!, Huz.I. Aiidj-c 








''^ V 

w ' 

# f 

« 





V |;^ 


> '. • i'S, . ■ ■ j- ^ 

‘ ®*» ■ '- * ’ '■ " "r* .' 









• , 1 * s 



■I’. ' 

^ . fctf • •"' < * '•■■•' *ii ^ 

*" ^ . . 

V- . 


L 

...% ‘ 




vr 


w s 


‘1* b- 




4 


Tl.AU TO 




KLATrrO 



4 5 « O 



1 ) 





15 8 0 






Poco AUc^ri 







iK*T i>isr:x ,'>’f 'j^Me,'i 




r 


r:‘ Suitf 


‘iTSiiili* .. 


_^VI 

y.':‘i 

•N‘.'5 


/f/z/^yZ/ty/./.w; ////^/^//f/Zz/jy^ N?-l ^jyi/y/Zt//.*/y y/ fy/iyi/Zzy// 


f^f ^ / zy 

' y*/ /zZf//.jZr' .Z//T y/// ’ /Z/,/ 
Z/^/ZZtt 

'y'yyy/Zt/y.zfy yZ' />/ /yttZ/ry/^ z 
^Z/t ■yy/i/y/yy J/y, y /r//. y 


.ffyi/yyy- ^yyyZtify 

?»“;» Zy^y y/Z,//jty.ff/ z /y.. //yZy/. ' 

t/y/C /yy*/ yy ^y /M^ytZyyy 

, . /W 

N?<j ' yWyyZ/yy.tyf yZ Z^yzy^yZy/w. 


^/Au- /Zf/^./ty//zyzyyy.y^^yys^^ 


/ytfipystVzz /utr 

C.CotligTriies 

_-^^y/^yyyyy •Z^^z/y tZ^y r/^y^iyzt - t/y.^’/t^/zf'^ 


\ I D. jsri*. 

1 


A. J'lOT, Zi/M/yf/yr. 7iti/>,’r/yr<Z'M/yy/tit/.i/yr,Z/y/f/y:y.\r> 

/.'ZZt'hyy/ymt 



N 9 1 . 


VAKI ATIONS 
Sur UT\e Cava\\ne 

UH eo.^lTE OK.Y . 



4 





i 




N'.' 


I 

1 

J 

KA.NTAISIE ^ 

Svw Ai-s moTits ^ 

\)v: PHlLTll^. 


FLLTE . 






















_J — g# ^ 




t-ss 









iiii^ 

1 — 



4 "- 







t; 

I 




N V 3 . 


9 


K A T A 1 S I K KT V A K I AT 1 0 .\S 

Sur VI omance 

vn: PB.K. A\:x cv^evics. 


. FLUTK . 





I 



Cottifnies 


6 Fant*"*'**^* I'* Selt . 





4 



4 






^ I 




% 


r. 



n 





i 




** ■ 







4 



4 



r 



C 



Surdcs Mollis lavon's 


ic 


u t: 

V 






ll'iilicr, ^Morol'tS rs \ ocnM* u t 






j¥.T UKjrx .'•irf’Tic.'i 


r 


IV’Suiu- 


,u/f //// - 

N?r> J '^u t //r/Y-* 
/ z' . y j ^ / ' 


f4t Z' 'r////f ^ ''y 


\."2 'yi///Zt//./fz ,y//t ///f . Z/fZfZ 

Jr ^y/'/Jzzi, 


Jr ^ / rfrr zr Jr //riY*rJit 


K'.‘7i // /rr/rrrZr ‘trr^.rrn X"li ^ yUrrZ*rr:,r> V '/,rrrrrZrrrr.i 

i'i’ni]nyzt\\'/ufr 

C.Coiagnies 

_ ■ A'y.y-z-y''"' 


^ -Z^/Za/Zy/Zr/' 

A. HOT. ruUiflifn 

/•*r>'t’Jirr/rui/ Zf. 


1 

1 i»..so rt*. 


* 

L * 


yt ^ . 




*»• ' 




• , * - • . - * I . 


s • t 

A-_E 

k- -*< 

**- 

"* V 






, / . 


v3 


. f -M 




*!>* % ., 


t* ■ - 

IW 1 ' 

fw ^ 






iT*»J 








<-> • 


-, ' -t% ■■ 

•^ % >% * * . 


4 


3 


\ ? 4 . 


K.ANTAlJilK et VARIATIONS 


sur (1 h 4 mofift de 


GV:STAVE . 




4 




6 


,N ? S . 


VA.V'YA\S\E 


Sur tit's mol i Is 


DU DIKII KT LA BAYADKKK. 


FLUTE . 




X. 


7 



fi Fantaitieg. 


8 




9 





10 


N? S . 

KANTAISIK KT VARIATIONS 
9UT Afs tooA'a^lS du 

PVVE A VS. CVERCS . 







1l'> 


1-2 








CoUi^ni^v F>nUi«ii 




13 







r- 

.1 


^ FT 




■H 

*- 4 


fi . 

ik>. 


,« ' 



fe 


■<? 

y.- -i,v 





' *1 

. I 


J 




4 ^ 




E*i' 




r. 


lx 


{ ^- \ ■ 


■j 




¥ 








V 


9 


If 


r 




¥ 


1 

« 








\- 

\ 


% 





♦- 



> 






« 

» 


« 



.-.V 



2 


Droin t . 


F L .1 u r 0 

hvIjE m t , I T .1 , 





Uroi;«s ttui,. liritanni;; 


R.C.i C9 


F L Jt U T 0 





4 


F I u r 0 . 



Droii'ts Britannia. 


4? 


K . r. \ ry 


L A U T O . 


r 

kJ 



II. C.& c? 


6 


F L .1 u r 0 








i 


m 



0‘fw/.lr////f'/'r y/A.'i' 
'P^fws/r/t*/ ('t ur» 3t/N rm f'/trsffut tJfurlr/ 




L • ^ Mi ^ 


---Av 

■"* > nX \ 4 ' 




# # 


> 


it.i ^^5;ai>^. 


icrr=r-:^^'^rr~r^5' , — «— s^zSt ^tr ^ 



J 


'-3 


1 


-i^ . 


3 



4 



U — -1-1 — f 

i4)- ^ 1 ■ ‘ \^ \'\ 1 U—L- 

'J f)p 

^ ^ r [ q' 

1 M ■ — [- 

=F=^ 

^ ^ — 1 - 



-J— •! 

9 


N^-, l.L L ■ gu> i : ! ^ : 1 ?--± 

^ C' f • r • .j?: L. 

bg : r^— :±1 

r— 

~X- ^ 

-r — 

1 



diilce. 



5 











II 



FLAl'TO a; 



FLAUTO 19 




14 


FLAUTO 2! 




FMLTO r; 



16 




17 









Uffip'-rl i'jiHi.- 3 3<s33af- .\ajsalf*uv.'i -fji' I3jf 

^ 




Ar 


"EJDWAMJD 


K‘' 


3 ’3jj3.-Rn3!i'3 jsh in . 


I'rj,y. 


riill,ii/'. /'ii/i'A/n' liinrii . Wi Vi/il/ii// A 7' . I ■ 'W Srii//i /■',i/r//i S'. 



Nff IIOLSO.V s rKLKHKATKn 


WA I.T7. . 


3 



hi» 


4 


r-oi- — — *-'-w=0=:r-^P^ 






















9 



* 0 . 


1)1 AVI) LO W Al/rz . 


K V. l)»Mlvfr. 




II 

Auh**i- . 








13 






* 


k 


■ • 


♦ $ 





M ♦ 



i ■ 


^ - 

i 

t 

n 


i. 




«<' ■» 



i 






? . 



• # 


V 



2 


FLUTE . 





79 


4 


FLUTE. 



79 







7 !) 





79 




FI.IITp 



79 


8 


FLUTE. 







FLUTE. 


9 



79 




79 


Fin. 






44 






5 

























1 



ioii. 









iOSi- 



I 



Prix oO ki'. 


<. I Of[cn/>t(r// '^//r,c/ir.i Jiid/r . 


7g:willig’St 

^MtmcdLjyjcana j 



> 1 . 







% 



519 








3 






5f^ 





Tema 

I 



XI’ 7. 



« / Offcnb((c/i ^\ U,r}ui J. t 1)1/ he 



Fla l 'I'o solo 


3 




I 


b'LAvro s(fLO 









38 *3 



6 t'L^lV^TO SOLO 



iifis 







7 


l'’u /iUTO SOlsO 



,5 8^3 



Tcm«i 5 



1 . 


PmU> 





3 S' 6s. 


Pris 30 Xi. 


' OfjenbacP ,ciiex. J. ^^rlndrc. . 



2 


l''l,AVTfl SO I A) 













3fi 6.i 


I 



i'luwro sof/O 






.11 OJ 



h'l.Atrro so/,0 






prv'^ 



1 



■1, ■». 




J *4 




V • 


K•^ 





f V. 


..Aj , 


< -*< 


3 

« : 


?,a» |[ fjp-.T-i ^>|»' '-r . ^ -•"* 


I »■ 
‘1 





“ 5'iu 

•., ,_rik. = i E?: 

.<■' . g, . ■' •* %. . -It 

^ ■> it ^ , '■ /:i 

It • •* «•? ■ 

'■ - -'r" ■ ' •■ iRi*.- j^^o;::^jEl 

* ■■ A- -:y- 





lt.::V' 


•r^'. 


^ t 


r,.* •" '»i:'JE4 4-'/ ' ' ■'. - -j 


fm;- '''■%» •./'- 








vsr. 





« 




1 






(Ic I 0 p era 



romposce et ckdM 


—jiar. 

S , B M B H . 

OpdO. /'ropriedr l7c iV^ 


JfAJ[BOrBO, 

\ 11 s I 0 C 1' a 31 z . 


C Jie z 



F L AUTO . 


3 




t 1. A U T 0 . 



. F I> A I' TO . 



6 


K I . A VI T O . 






F L A U T 0 . 






All egio . 



F L A U T 0 . 


// 


Andante . 




1 


^//f' //////>/ / 0 /■//// /'of r 


Of 


) 




110:V11E mi CE'^llE 


. Irniiiiii'il with I iiriiilinii.s 



/Mi,/:‘/‘iili/idrJXSd/ hn o'm llillhi 171 ihsiiiil Sr 




■ Wri-T HOM C , VAK ' rLUTr. • ;<0&T0Tt. 




*. rn Tr . wo*rtt»-' • 






4 





4; 


( 


iNKKE JtOODhE 


0 


lmifi(/(’d with IW/'h/thw ior t/w 



.. 'hid Di’diratid h> 


riEMCE BrTLEM ES 


jt \ 


I. 




IhiliKl't l’til>li(/iri/ A’Mt f'O Oinlliltiii 17 /thymit Sr. 


^ODERX't®' 





TAH^KB OOOSLB ■ VAK. rbUTB. 





iTtrt 














^ D 1: J 




" --3 


f A 


1 ^ ‘ y^ ; ■ Ui»' 




-*L-j_^' , 


ff 


^ ^ f ^ ^ Eli?' 

--IW i 


^ * *= ' .;ff. E? j lli i ' '^r ' r%' 

S Lli *"IJL,' tl-'' I:-!-' it’* '' ' '^- f 

. ‘ 2y i ''=^ ;f^ =& ’ 

< ! -lr-i= f sJ==^ ‘ ==f - \ ^ ' ' ' 7 ' 

f ^1 ftft tiii !ii: ti:} , 

f LlL==e, ' J- il ^tSSi^S S ^ J 


■f < -*>1>1 


■!.**» 


&.t. 




^lV- c- 




"/ i-y 






/ 


c. 




7 



\ f. 



f 















conjposc(^s 


/fitr 



Oeuv: y-5 . L.2. 


.‘J L(M[)Sir 


I’n 8 tr. 


('//r: /fnv/A'/y//' 






"'I 



5I.-I4. (i. 











^^3 






1. 

1 





1 

j 

et. 



e 

iS 

e. 

c:j 


«> 











^ - 








5M4. h. 


4 



5lA4. h. 



a 




5i;<4. b. 


inti* 



51 -14. I). 



5 1 . < 4 . [). 




'll 14, I'. 



0 



5H4. I'. 




cojTifJoscrs f>{ir 



.T Linpsif 


r//r: /frr/yAo///' Vf ///frfry. 


fh 



m.-i-i. c. 



51 < 4 . V. 



(> 



Sl.i4. 0 . 









51.^4. C. 





(\ 


fj 



51A-1. c. 


Fine 










i 



1 


i 








V