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f|T|i 11 J UK Men’s Basketball National Championship i|||Jfj|i 11 j 
LT'ilLlJ Trophy Tour stops in E’town today I i J n 111J111H 



Special pullout poster INSIDE 


COACH CAl 

2012 NATIONAl CHAMPIONS 


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Some Ky. jails allow inmate baptism 


Grayson County jail accommodates 
inmates of‘all religions’ 


‘'We believe If they don’t understand what they’re 
doing, we’re not helping them by dunking them 
underwater.” 


By MARTY FINLEY 

iTifiiiley@thenewBenterprise.coiTi 

In its effort to conduct bap- 
Lisms for willing jail inmates. 


Elizivbelhtown Church of Christ 
launched an ad this week with 
the word “why" printed over a 
stark red background. It lists 15 
counties that reportedly allow in- 


The Rev. John Board 

Pastor, Elizabethtown Ghnrch of Christ 


mate baptisms, including 
Daviess, Fulton, Oldham and 


neighboring Grayson, 

The message is the latest 


chapter in the church’s push to 
overturn a decade-old ban on 
baptisms at the Haidin County 
Detention Center that went pub¬ 
lic last month when church 
members approached Hardin 
Fiscal Court about the topic. 

Grayson County Jailer Dar¬ 
win Dennison said his lacility in 

Turn Do BAFnSM. AU 


ftSHIONtBLV THIIFTV 


P^eant contestant competes 
in Goodwill’s finest threads 


Meade County 
student takes part 
in Miss Junior 
Teen America 

By AMBER COULTER 

acoti]tej'@tlieat'ws<rftti'rpri'i(>.tom 

Adrienne Foole could be called a 
Goodwill beauty queen. 

The Meade Comity High School 
freshman has a blue suit she bought 
on one of her biweekly trips to the 
thrift store. She plans to wear it dur¬ 
ing an inteiview when she competes 
today and Saturday in the nationaJ 
Misii Junior Teen America pageant, 

Poole will represent the state as 
Missjunior Teen Kentucky tonight at 
the national competition in Dickson, 

Tenn. 

Her competitors are girls who 
have won the title for their own states 
or a collection of states. Not all states 
send a representative to the competi¬ 
tion. 

Poole has competed in pageants 
since she was 2 weeks old. She is fol¬ 
lowing the example of her mother, a 
Miss Kentucky competitor. 

“Fve kind of been doing them 
since I was bom/’ she said. “1 just 
kind of inherited it and 1 found a love 
for it.** 

Brand names of all kinds found in 
a treasure hunt at Goodwill stores in 
Radcliff and Elizabethtown make up 
a large part of Poole's w'aidrobe. She 

Turn to POOlJs A16 



NEAL £AAaiN/Tne 

Miss Kentucky Junior Teen America Adrienne Poole, a freshman at Meade County 
High School, shows some of the outfits and purses she purchased at local Goodwill 
stores including the outfit she is wearing. She will wear some of the outfits while 
competing this weekend In the Miss Junior Teen America pageant. 


Arrests 
on the rise 
in Hardin 
Cnimty 

Jailer: Increase attributed to 
more alcohol and drug offenses, 
launch of e-warrant system 

By SARAH BENNETT 

Kentucky State Police Post 4 in Elizabethtown re¬ 
ported a 40 percent increase in arrests for driving 
under the influence in March^ aj>d according to area 
law enforcement, arrests in general have increased 
over the last few weeks. 

Jailer Danny Allen said the typical daily average 
populalioti at Hardin County Detention Center is 
GOO to blO mmdtcs. In April, the average head 
count has nsen to 630 and April 4, the inmate pop¬ 
ulation was more than 700, he said. 

*"10 general, we’re having a lot of people brought 
he said. 

Allen said contributing factors include increases 
in the number of drug- and alcohol-related arrests 
and the launch of the e-waiTant system, a web- 
based system that gives law enforcement officers 
around*the clock access to warrants from agencies 
throughout the slate. 

During the last weekend in March ^ the detention 
center booked people on old w'an ante as law en¬ 
forcement agencies duoughout the coimty executed 
aji e wa rant roundup, Allen said. 

The jarler said he expects to see e-wairanl arrests 
stay high for the next six to seven months. 

The Haidin Cormty Sheriffs Office reported 345 
ajTests since the e-wanant progi^i began- 

In addition to old warrants^ officers have been 

Turn Uj ARRESTS, A14 


Hardin County man arrested for stabbing during party 


Roundtop Road 
resident charged with 
attempted murder 

By MARTY FINLEY 

iiifinley^thencwjsemtfTijrise.tOrti 

Authorities apprehended a 
Hardin County man Thursday 


who had been wanted since 
Sunday when a stabbing inter¬ 
rupted a birthday celebration. 

Raymond Kendal) Wilson, 51, 
is charged with attempted mur¬ 
der. 

The Hardin County Sheriff's 
Office believes Wilson attacked 
Gerald Tharpe, 55, around 5 
p.m. Sunday at a residence on 
Roundtop Road south of 
Elizabethtown. The stabbing oc¬ 


curred dmiTfeg a neighborhood 
birthday party for the homeown¬ 
er’s son. Both men live on 
Roundtop Roadj authorities said. 

Folice said Wilson used a 
hunting knife to stab Tharpe 
once in the abdomen. Greg 
Lowe, a spokesman for the 
Hardin County ShcrifTs OfficCj 
said the stab wound was severe. 

“It was not just a slash," he 
said. 


Tharpe was rushed to Hardin 
Memorial Hospital by party 
guest" and late was airlifted to 
UmvensUy Ho pita] in Ixiuisville 
with life threatening wounds. 
Tharpe was listed Thursday in 
stable condition after undergoing 
surgery, according to the 
ShenlTs Office. 

Authorities were unable to 
find Wikon for days after the 
stabbing He was found ai ound 4 


p.m, Thuisday ai a residence on 
Crutcher Street in Elizabethtown 
after Investigators followed up 
on a .series of leads, said Rex 
Allaman of the Sheriffs Office. 

Described by police a^ armed 
and dangerous prior to his arrest, 
Wilson was taken into custody 
witliout incident, Allaman said, 
Allaman said it appears 
Tharpe was trying to defuse a sit- 

Tum 10 STABBING, A15 


INSIDE 


ABBY....AS 

CALENDAR „„...A4 
CLASSIFIEDS .,.B5 

COMICS .....Bll 

HOMES ... Cl 

HELOISE._..A9 

LOTTERIES ..B2 

MOVIES..._BIO 


NEIGH80RS.,...AS 
OBITU ARIES.,...A4 

OPINION,,...AS 

PULSE,....,A12*13 
PUZZLES.......B10 

SPORTS_,.,.B1 

TELEVISfON ...BIO 
WORSHIP..... AID 



^ 2012, Hie News-EntarnHse Goi;^. 



WEATHER 


PARTLY CLOUDY 


■ COMPLETE REPORT. A2 


■ TODAY’S OBITUARIES 

Mary Elizabeth Ball, 81 
James E. Carnes, 95 
Inge Conahan, 79 
Wuliain Lesyter Lax, 61 
Kenneth R. Trimble, 69 
Helen G. Warrent 8U 

m COMf^LETE OOrruAfiiES. M 


Follow us: 




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SINGE YOU SSNED 

Results of Thursday's The News-Evterpme online poll, as of 7 p.m,: 




QUESTION: Which siimTner movie are you most likely 

Dark Night Rises”: 15 percent "Braw”: 15 percent 
“The Aver^rs”: 25 percent 
“Dark Shadows”: lo percent 
“Abraham Utwoln: Vampire Hunter'’: 5 percent 
“Prometheus”: 5 percent 
“Madagascar 3": 25 percent 


TODAY'S QUESTION: Are you superstitious at>out 
Kriday the 13th? 


FiOd ttie poll und^the ‘'opinion" monu ^ wvmtheiiew»entfiipiis«.cani 


nl SOS-TTIO 























































































A2 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


Heartland 

LOCAL NEWS AND NOTES FROM AROUND KENTUCKIANA 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 



ON THIS D&TE IN 1742, 

Hcindcrs “Messiah” first 
was performed publically in 
Dublin, Ireland. 

IN 1861, Fort Sumter in 
South Caiolina tell to Con¬ 
federate forces as Union 
commander MaJ. Robert 
Anderson surrendered in 
the face of bombardment. 

IN HARDIN COUNTY 
30 YURS AGO, Maxine 
High of Radchfl accepted 
the position of festival direC' 
tor for the Golden Armor 
Festival. The previous two 
yeai's she was airector of the 
Golden Armor Parade, 
bringing the parade irom a 
50'Unit event to a 139-unit 
event with total participants 
of more than 2,000- Charlie 
Watts, president of the 
RadclifFNorLh Hardin 
Chamber of Commerce, 
which coordinated the festi¬ 
val, said he was ‘‘tickled to 
death when she accepted 
the position.’' 

2u YEARS AGO, the State 
Department of Fish & Wild¬ 
life Resources Officer 
Chuck WaiTen was awaixi- 
ed the Shakj-Safaii Award 
for outstanding work in his 
profession. The award was 
given for exemplary law en 
forcement work. 

Fnuti News-Enterpriic wire 
services and rtaff r^ris 




Partly cloudy, 
H^h:68 

TONIGHT; Partly 
cloudy. Low: 52 






m- 


77/61 

79/63 

7S/60 

Partly 

Perlty 

Storm 

cloudy. 

cloudy. 

chance. 




High 

Low 

Outlook 

Fort Campbell 

71 

41 

Ptcldy 


72 

41 

Mocldy 

Bowling Green 

72 

40 

Ptekiy 

Lexlnfiton 

67 

36 

Sunny 

Louisville 

70 

42 

Sunny 

PiKoviiJe 

70 

33 

Sunny 

Covtngton 

67 

37 

Sunny 


Sotirc«; itnaomA 



(»• r o 

LAST NEW RRST FLLL 
QUARTER MOON QUARTER MOON 
Aprtll3 April 21 ^^-1129 May 6 

Todfiy's sunHw. . Tflani 

Today's suT»«i &!SpjTL 

HIGHS/LOWS 

yesterday . 

Fpr^ Kwi NWS repgrfir^ slstw » pf 5 U-^- 

RecordhSgh/year* ..81718S7 

RecoFd tow/yoar*. . .26/1920 

Average high/low*..6645 


Eejrsiepaiura 


PRECIPITATION 

Pa$t 34 horns* le^&Mi.i .,.» .OJW 

Last 30 days** . 5,62 

DevlatiMt irflrti iwrm *1-56 

;an. l^resfliKt**.13JM 

[>e¥fatl«i ItwT] mnn ..-*1^ 

Sourcirt; 'RmI MrtKL • *NWS. flartBftjwn aaKm 


ALIEITGY REPORT 


National Allergy Buneati pollen and 


meld report lor the area. 

Trees. High 

weeds. Wrawrt 

Grass . . .Uiw 

Meld Low 


Sponsored b^: 

Ha T. Le, MD 
Thao H. Pham, HD 
T^o T. Le, MD, NHS 

Aliergi/ atid Aslhma Specialists 

270-765-614d 


Principal retiring 

North Hardins Dennison has served in top spot more than 10 years 


By BBN SHEROAM 

b^heroan(^theiM:wsei(iterpii£e.coin 

After more than a decade in the 
top job and a part of North Haixlin 
High School stniT since 1986, Bill 
Dennison is retir¬ 
ing as principal. 

Superintendent 
Nannetlc Johnston 
said Dennison de¬ 
voted his caieer to 
the Radcliff school, 
serving as a chem¬ 
istry and biology 
teacher before be¬ 
coming assistant principal in 1998 
and principal three years later. 

Dennison announced his plans 
to the staff just before spring break 
after consultation with the superin¬ 
tendent 

*‘The plan was very orchestrat¬ 
ed," Johnston said w^ith the April 
annouiKement providing the po.s- 
-sibility of crossover time with his 
successor. 

She said that is particularly im¬ 
portant because tlie school enters 
the final phase of its renovation 
next month, immediately after 
classes dismiss for summer The 
first-floor aiea around the band 
room will be updated and renovat¬ 
ed ici accLJmmodale the more than 


First instance 
of hate-crime law 
applied concerning 
homosexuality 

By DYLAN LOVAN 

The Afisndated IV«s 

LOUISVHXE - Two Ken¬ 
tucky men have been charged with 
a federal hate Crime in a beating at¬ 
tack on a gay man in an Appa¬ 
lachian park, mai king the first time 
the law has been applied in a LhS. 
case alleging bias over a victim’s 
sexual orientation, authorities said. 

The U.S. attorney’s office in 
Lexington announced the charges 
against cousins David Jason Jenk¬ 
ins, 37, of Cumberland, and An¬ 
thony Ray Jenkins^ 20, of Part- 


200 students enrolled in band. 

The principal ’s job vacancy was 
posted this week on Hardin 
County Schools’ website with a 
osted salary range of $66,226 to 
100,795. The opening must be 
posted for 30 days. 

Johnston hopes to begin work 
with the site-based decision-mak¬ 
ing CO uncil iooner 

A revision m state law makes 
the siipeiintende it a participating 
membei in the cnuncirs hiring of a 
principal Johnston participated 
last year in the pnncipal selection 
at Lakewood and Woodland ele- 
meutaries and West Hardin 
Middle School, 

“It’s a wonderful, w^onderfiil 
process,” Johnston said Thursday 
“We work together through every 
single step of the process." 

Johnston said she plans to re¬ 
view every resume and application 
with councU members, which in¬ 
clude staff and parent representa¬ 
tives. 

The district plans to develop an 
online survey to collect input from 
students, parents, conununity^ and 
staff members regarding character- 
isUcs desired in a principal. She 
said those results will drive ques¬ 
tions prepared for applicants. 


ridge. Both were indicted by a fed¬ 
eral grand jury earlier this week iii 
connection with the April 2011 at¬ 
tack that left Kevin Pennington 
with chest, head and other injuries. 

The grand jury charged the 
men with violating a hate crime 
law that was expanded in 2009 to 
cover as.saults motivated by bias 
against gays, lesbians and tians- 
gender people. They also were in¬ 
dicted on federal kidnapping, as¬ 
sault and co“sprary chaiges 

""The indictment narks the fiist 
federal case in the nation charging 
a violation of the sexual orienta¬ 
tion section ol the Federal Hate 
Cnmea aid a U S Depart¬ 

ment of Justice statement. 

“It’s vindicating to see that the 
years of liard work that went inio 
making sure this law was on the 
books is now being put into place/’ 
said Michael Cole-Schwartz^ a 
spokesman for llie WEishington 


As the principal is curriculum 
leader for a school, Johnston said 
one characleristic immediately 
comes to mind. 

“In today’s leadership, the fust 
thing you look for is an exception¬ 
al teacher,” she said^ 

She praised Dennison’s class¬ 
room as a model for his successor. 
As a parent, she saw him challenge 
and drive her son’s work in ad¬ 
vanced placement biology. 

“He always had an interest in 
students,” she said, “He’s passion¬ 
ate about his students and has high 
expectations.” 

Dennison^s honors include 
recognition as a cross country and 
track coach. He was selected as 
outstanding educator in the 1996 
(iOvemors Scholars Ptogiam and 
the local chamber of comnierce’s 
educator of the year in 2002, 

He earned degrees in biology' 
and science education and a mas¬ 
ter’s in microbiology from the 
University of Kentucky and 
earned a Rank 1 plus additional 
certiiicalion from Weslem Ken¬ 
tucky University. 

Dennison w-as unavailable for 
comment. 


based Human Riglits Campaign, 
which pushed for the law’s pas¬ 
sage. 

“The law was really meant as a 
backstop so that the resources of 
the federal government could be 
brought to bear w hen necessary to 
deal with these kinds of crimes,” 
Cole-Schwaitz said. 

David and Anthony Jenkins 
pleaded not guilty Thursday to the 
charges in federal court in l^ndoir 
David Jenkins’ lawyer, Andrew' 
Stephens of Lexington, said 
Jenkins knew Pennington and 
Jenkins denies that he committed a 
hate crime. 

“The hate crime component of 
this is just flat wrong," Stephens 
said, “f think it’s very difficult to 
get into the mind of somebody and 
figure out w'hat their intent is.” 

Pennington also had injuries to 
his back, face, neck and ear* 


DAILY BRIEFING 

FRANKFORT 

Local businessman 
honored 

Elizabethtown business¬ 
man Rov ILich was named 
honorary commissioner of 
agriculture Thursday in 
recognition of nearly a 
quarter L entur) of e rv ice 
on a state advisory btjard. 

Bestowed bv Agnculture 
Crmmissioner Jame " Com¬ 
er, tile honor came ai Rich, 
who owns E-town Exterm¬ 
inating, resigned his posi¬ 
tion as chairman from the 
state’s Past Control Advis- 
oiy Board. 

The boaid reviews com¬ 
mercial stnicUiral pest con¬ 
trol, conducts enfoiceirent 
proceedings and makes 
written recoinmendalions 
lor the state Department of 
Agriculture. 

“The job can be thank¬ 
less and time consuming 
but Roy Rich did it with an 
unmatched passion and 
work ethic,” Comer said. 
“He will he sorely missed.” 

Rich began m% profes¬ 
sional career as a regulator. 
After graduating from 
Campbellsville College in 
1967, he work as pesticides 
director for the Department 
of Agriculture. He later 
jtiined Orkin and founded 
his owTt business in 1976, 
Daily operations are now 
run by his son, Shawn, who 
became CEO in 2003. 

OWENSBORO 

Teen charged 
with murder 

A Ifr-year-old western 
Kentucky boy has been 
charged w ith murder in the 
deatl:i of a man found in a 
pickup truck. 

Police said the Ohio 
County teen also faces a 
robbery charge in connec¬ 
tion to the death of Robert 
L. Rice, 53, of Fordsville. 
Rice’s body was found 
Tuesday hidden under a 
large toolbox in his pickup 
buck. 

PADUCAH 

Group plans to fly 
Confederate flag 
near Paducah 

A Confedciate hisLoiy 
organization has put up a 
flagpole in westen; Kentuc¬ 
ky near IntcTitale 24 cuid 
plans to fly a battle flag. 

The pole is on pnvate 
land in Reidland at exit 16. 

Kentucky division com^ 
mander John Suttles of die 
Sons of Confederate Veter¬ 
ans said the land for a me¬ 
mo rial park was donated by 
a mw who had Confea- 
erate ancestors, 

Suttles said the paik will 
contain, besides the flag- 
ole, benches and a circle of 
ricks to represent fallen 
Confederate soldiers. 

“We are doing Lhis to 
honor ancestors,' Suttles 
said “It’s the 150th aniwer- 
saiy of the war for Southern 
independence Pt'pl may 
have mixed feelings about 
this, but It IS histone.” 

McCracken County 
Judge-Executive Van New¬ 
berry said it doesn’t mean 
people seeing it won’t form 
opinions about Paducah, 

“There are people that 
view that flag with disdain,” 
Newberry said, “It's going 
to be seen by travelers, and 
we don’t need that.” 

From sfsff npQris 
ami arfrf jctstmot. 



Ben enn be 

readied at (270) 505 1764. 



NEAL CARDItf/Thfi NffiiS-EntWPftM 

MAXING HAY WHILE THE SUN SHINES 

Ryan Druen luns a tedder Thursday morning over recently cut timothy grass on the Co pel in farm west of Sonora. The 
machine fluffs hay and helps it cure faster, allowing a farmer to bale it sooner. Several farmers are making their first 
outs of hay early this year because of reoent warm weather. 

Two face federal hate crime 
charge in Harlan anti-gay attack 


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AA 


THE NEWS^ENTERPRISE 


HEWS 


FRtDAY, AJ>RIL 13. 2012 



Bwwfit gospel sin^ and auction. 6 p.nn. EDT, Big Clifty 
Community Center, to benefit Kim Cundiff for medical ex¬ 
penses. Singers inciude New Image and The Saucers, 
Refreshments available, donations coHected. POC: 312- 
8457. 

Couponing 101. 10-11:30 a.m,, today and April 27. 
Hardin County Public bbrary, 100 Jim Owen Drive, 
E’town. Leam where to find coupons, how to use them 
and how to save 50 percent. Registration required. POC: 
769-6337. 

Knights of Columbus Vine Grave blood drive. 10 a.m.-2 
p.m., 312 E. Main St., Vine Grove. POC: 1-SOO RED 
CROSS. 

Yard sale, 9 a.m.-3 p.m. today and Saturday, 3947 S. 
Wilson Road, sponsored by Open Arms Grandparents 
Raising Grandchildren Support Group; in case of rain, 
the event will be held next weekend, Proceeds go to 
raise money for a grandparent who Is raising a child with 
severe cerebral palsy living in a house with mold issues; 
money will help provide a motel room while the mold is 
removed. Money donations accepted as well as clean 
usable children's toys books small household items, 
small furniture, etc.; no clothes please. POC; Laura 
Cooper, 300-4966 Or kyminlcooper<g>gmail.com. 



Adult and pediatric CPfl/AED with first aid. 9 a.m.-3:30 
p.m., Hardin/LaRue Red Cross Service Cenier, 405 W. 
Dixie Ave., E'town. SllO. POC: 7654979. 

Adult and pediatric CPA/AEO vdth first aid. 10 a.m.4:3Q 
p.m.. Nelson County Library, Bardstown. $110, POC: 
7654979. 

Adult and pediatric CPR/AED with first aid review, 9 

a.m.-12:30 p.m., Fort Knox Red Cross Service Center. 
$90. POC: 7654979. 

In Evening in Paris,' a 'Me and My Guy’ dance. 3G p.m.. 
\^n Vborhis Elementary School, Fort Knox, presented by 
the Fort Knox Girl Scouts Service Unit. Dress: Sunday 
best or better Tickets $5 per person. Open to public. 
Dancing, appetizers and door prizes. Komo Photo^aphy 
offers an optional photo session for additional cost of 
$10 and $20. Tickets on sale through today. Girls up to 
age 18 and their maie escorts 16 years or older may pur¬ 
chase tickets Scout membership not required. POC: 
Patricia Cortaiar, 312-0292, or email 
mrsez2n v@gm al I .com. 

Basic Compirtoi* Shills, ll B,m.-noon, Saturday and 
April 28, Hardin County Public Library, 100 Jim Owen 
Drive, E'town. For those completely new to computers. 
Registration required. POC: 769-6337. 

Big CDfty Gills Reunion, noon COT, Big Clifty Community 
Building, for any woman wlio was born or grew up in the 
Big Clifty area. Bring covered dish and a drink. Paper 
products furnished. POC: Dixie Hart, 242-7648: sis- 
syk_53@hotmail.com. 

Disabled Veterans seminar, noon. Morningstar 
Missionary Baptist Church. 1106 S. Wilson Road. 
Radcliff. Seating begins at 11 a.m. Representatives 
from Radcliff Town Halt will brief veterans on VA disabili¬ 
ties. entitlements for surviving spouses, benefits, how to 
register for veterans assistance and more. Lunch foF 
lows. POC: Michael Gamble from Human Resources 
Command at Fort Knox, {502} 61S5881; or the Rev. 
Harold H. Craig Jr., 351-1161. 

Genealogy meeting. 1-5 p.m.. Rough Creek Baptist 
Church (on Howevalley Road near St. Johns). Bring fam¬ 
ily information, stories and old photos to share. Scanner 
and copier available. Bring drinks and snacks to share. 
POC: Bob Klinglesmith, (502) 451-5697; Anna Marie 
Rowers, 737-9425; or Brother John R. Clark, 862-9540. 

John Quiggbis Memorial Pancake Feast. 7 a.m.-i p m,. 
Colvin Community Center. 230 Freedom Wby. Radcliff, 
hasted by the North Hardin Lions Club. Feast includes 
pancakes, sausage, eggs and drink. Tickets are $6 for 
adults and can be purchased from any North Hardin 
Lions Club member. Children 6 and younger eat free. 
POC: Lion Mark Kelly, 351-9441. 

Open craft night, 4-7 p.m,. Silkworm Yarn Shop, inside 
Bookworm Book Store, 653 N. Dixie Blvd.. Radcliff 
Plaza, Radcliff. Bring knitting, crochet, tatting, or spin¬ 
ning projects and meet other crafters. Coffee machine 
and convection oven available for use. POC: 351-6777; 
TatinTeacher@yahoo.com. 

Pancake br^fast, 9-11 a.m., Summit Community 
Center, Summit Eastview Road, Summit. Donations re¬ 
quested to benefit summer events for youth in the 
Summit area. POC: 268-8445. 

Perennial Flower Gardening. 1^ p.m., Hardin County 
Public Library, 100 Jim Owen Drive, E’town, Learn to 
plant and take care of perennials common to this region 
from Master Gardener Norva Lark, Registration required. 
POC: 7696337. 

Plant sale. 8 a.m., Hardin County Fair Squares build¬ 
ing. 1524 Hodgenvilte Road. Hwy. 210, E’town, Old fash¬ 
ioned plants. POC: 7356802. 

Vhrdsale. 8 a,m.‘3 p.m.. Vine Grove Gazebo on Main 
Street in Vine Grove, hosted by the Vine Grove Chapter 
122 Order of the Eastern Star; plus-size clothes avail¬ 
able as well as other Items. POC: Reanna McCarthy 268- 
5001, 



DPR for the professional rescuer review, 6-9 p.m., 
Hardin/LaRue Red Cross Service Center. 405 W. Dixie 
Ave., E'town. $90. POC: 7654979, 

E^own City Council, 4:30 p.m,, City Hall, 200 W. Dixie 
Ave., E'town, 

How to Grow: Green Beans, part of Gardeners Toolbox 
Series. Registration deadline is Monday class is at 6 
p.m. April 23, Hardin County Extension Service, 201 
Peterson Drive, E'town, $5. POC: 7654121. 

Long-Term Care Job Fair, hosted by ECTC Nurse Aide 
Dept., 36 p.m., in Room 257 of the Academic/Technical 
Building on the ECTC E'town campus. Free, open to the 
public. Organizations participating include E'town Health 
and Rehabilitation, Hardin Memorial Health, Helmwood 
Health and Rehabilitation, North Hardin Health and Re¬ 
habilitation, Parkway Long Term Care and Rehabilitation, 
Sunrise Long-Term Care and Rehabilitation. Tender 
Touch In-Home Care and Woodland Terrace ar>d more. 
POC: Nurse Aide Coordinator Stephanie Bennett. 706- 
8648: or email sbennetl0017@ketcs.edu. 

National HeaRhcare Decisions Day. with the theme, 
'Leading by Example.* Patient advocates at Hardin 
Memorial Hospital will provide information to the public 
from 10 a.m.-noon in the hospital's main admission 
area; stop by and complete a living will and get addition¬ 
al information. POC: 706-1327. 

North Hardin High School Greenhouse is open 9 a.m.4 
p.m. Monday-Friday beginning Monday. POC: 351-3167. 


More info 

J ONLINE 

POC refers tio 'point of contact/ 

SUBttllTTTNG A CAIiNDAft ITEM 

Calendar annourKsments are pubtlshetJ frean Cali 505-1751., fax to 769* 
6965, Of email to calendarai^eiiewsenierpri&e.cjom, tteois must be sub* 
mmed at feast tour days prK^td tbe event. The MewSrEnterpnae will publish 
the informatiofi al rts discritidh. Queitiona? CaJi 505*1751. 


Mary Elizabeth Ball 

Mary EUzabeth Ball. 8i> of Rjnoyvtile, died Tuesday^ 
April 10, 2012* al Hardiii Menioria] Hospital in Etiia 
beUilown. 

She was a mother, sister, grandmother, housex^iJe and 
a hiand lo everyone. She w'as a yety special person w*ho 
will be missed dearly by her family and friends. 

She was preceded in death by her husband, Devvard 
Huiiton Bad; her pajents, ITieudore R Hannon and 
Catherine (Car< icr) Harmon; and hvo stins, Richard 
W^Tie Ball and Willis Ray Ball. 

She is survjved hy four sons, Gaiy Ball of Vine Grove^ 
George Bail of Rjnc>vdlc, )eny Ball of St. Petersburg, 
Ha*, and I heodorc Ball of Irvington; four daughters, 
Janie Utile of Fahmmp, Nev., Dons Perra of Temple, 
Texans, Joan Burden of FJizahethtown Mary K. Price 
of Reno, Nev.; one biother, Raymond Harmon of Point, 
Texas; iJiree sisteis, Sue Robbins of Campbellsburg, 
Minnie Gammons of MilFoid, Ohio, and Jessie Wallace 
of Ijonisville; and numerous, nieces, nephews, ^andchil- 
dren and great-grandchildren. 

The funeral is at 10 a.ni. Tuesday, April 17, at Nelson- 
Edclcn-Bennett funeral Home in Vine Grove with the 
Rev. Charles H. Waters oflicialing* Burial follows in the 
post cemetery at Fort Knox. 

Visitation is from 5 to H p.m, Monday and continues 
at 9 a,m. Tuesday ai the funeral home. 

Condolences may be expressed al www/nebfh.com. 

James E. Carnes 

James E. Carnes, 95, of Paoli, Ind., died Wednesday * 
April I fr 2012, at Paoli Health and living Commimity. 

He uas bom Nov* 13, IPld, He was a retired securiU' 
guard of Carpenter Body Works^ formerly in Mitchell; 
and was a member of Marion Townsliip Fire Depart 
ment. 

He preceded in death by his parents, Joseph and 
Annie Huffman Carnes; his first wife, Sara jane Shanks 
Games; his second wife, Eva Cox Carnes; a grandson, 
James Carnes; two brothers, IVavis and Jesse Carnes; rmd 
four sisters, Mary', Rachel, Maglau an<l Marie. 

Survivors include a daugliler, Rcjseniane Hammons of 
Paoli; a son, James F. Carnes of Louisville; a sister, Hettie 
Montgomery of Louisville; five gnuideliddren; and seven 
great-grand childre n^ 

Fhe funeral is at noon Saturday al St. Anthony 
C^^mete^y in Peonia with Brother HaiTcy McAdams oRi- 
ciating the graveside seivice. 

Visitation is from 5 to H p.m. today at McAdams Mor^ 
tuary in Paoli. 

Rogcrs-Oller Funeral Home in Untchfield b in charge 
of local airangemenb. 

Condolences may be expressed al www.OilerBru 
thersFuneralHornes .com. 

Inge Conahan 

ingc Conahan, 79» of Rineyville, died Thursday, Apnl 
12 , 2012, at Hardin Memorial Hospital. 

She a native of W^rms, Ciermany. She was a lov¬ 
ing wife and mother who dedicated her life to taking care 
of her family. 

She was preceded in death by parents, Johann and 
Jacobena Satlcr Died. 

She is survived by her husband of f>0 years, Cormac 

M. Conahan; three sons, Aiden Conahan iuidjerry (Tiun- 
myj Conahatu all of Rineyvdic, and Michael Conahan of 
Cecilia; three daughters, Rose (joey) Smilli of Newburgh, 

N. Y., Liz Smith of San Ramon, Cdil., and Frances (Joe) 
Wise of Rineyville; one brother, Johann DieU of 
Germany; nine grandchildren; 12 CTeat-giandchildren; 
one great-great-grandchild; and her dog, Milzi. 

A memorial seivice is at I ]).nr Saturday al Brrnvn 
Fun era] Homt? in EliZcibi.'thtown. 

Visitation is at 11 a.m* Saturday at llie funeral home. 

Condolences may be e.Kpreitsed at www.brownfuner 
alxonn 


McConnell visits plant 
he helped keep open 


By BRUCE SCHREINER 

The l*rc« 

OLIVE HILL - US, 
Senate Republican Uader 
Mitch McConnell took ii 
victory lap Thursday 
through a Kentucky gar¬ 
ment factory he helped 
protect w'hen the producer 
of Air Force jackets wms 
threatened witli losing 
w ork to prisoners. 

McConnell chatted with 
workers over the wliir of 
sewing machines, telling 
them he was glad their jobs 
were pre.served, 05 he 
toured the Ashland Sales 
and Service plant in an 
area dogged by do uble-dig¬ 
it unempIoymeDt- 

Company Preridenl 
Michaci Mansh said the 
senator's interv^ention w'as 


instrumental in getting 
Federal Prison Tndusiries to 
back off pursing a contract 
to make the Air Force jack¬ 
ets. Tliai work has helped 
sustain the small plant at 
Olive Hill since the late 

mmh. 

**Tlie odds were that if 
they had taken it, we were 
doomed immediaiely,” 
Mansh said in an interview. 

The plant einpluys 
about 100 people. The av¬ 
erage wage is about $9 per 
hour. 

The dark-blue jackets 
churned out by the factory 
are issued to every inein 
ber of the Air Force, enlis¬ 
tees and officers, and are 
sometimes worn by U,S. 
presidents. The phml also 
makes Army combat coats. 


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William Lester Lax 

William Lester Lax. 61, of Shepherdsville died 
Wednesday, April 11,2012. 

Survivors include his molhcr, Maude; four daughters, 
Leslie, Christ\% Kemberly and Melanie; one stepdaugh¬ 
ter, Angie; three sons, Willie, Scott and Timmy; and two 
stepsons, Jack and Jeff. 

file funeral is at 11 a.m. Saturday at Fern Creek 
Funeral Home in Louisville with burial lo follow in lAmn 
Rimn Cemetery, 

Visitation is from I to 8 p.m. today at Fem Creek 
Funeral Home. 

DLxon Atwood & Trowbridge Funeral Home in Elmi- 
bethtown is in charge of local airangemcnts. 


X Kenneth R. Trimble 

Kenneth K- Trimble, 69, of Madiatin, hid., died Tiies 
day, April K), 2012, at King's Daughters’ Hcjspihil in 
Madison. 

He was bom Feb. 7, 1943, in Wasliington D-C. He 
married Fatty Trimble on Dec. 23,199 G> He served in the 
U.S. Army during the Vietnam War. He was vice presi¬ 
dent and general manager for radio station WKtl) 95,9 
where he served for 12 years. He started hjs radio career 
at WIEL-AM and WKMO-FM in Elizabethtown white 
serving io the U,S. Army in the 1960s. He returned to 
those stations as president and general manager in the 
1980s, Dunng his career, he also worked for radio sta’ 
tions in Louisville, Philadelphia, Minneapolis, Hartford, 
Conn,, and Madison. 

He was preceded in death by his parents^ Robert and 
Elizabeth Koury Trimble, 

Sunivors Include his wife, Patty Trimble of Madison; 
a son, Todd Trimble of Louisville; a daughter, Teresa 
McCammon of Louisville; a brother, Richai d Trimble of 
1 ^; two stepchildren and two grandchildren. 

Visitation is frioin 1 to 4 p.m. Sunday al Lyllc Funeral 
Chanel in Madison, 

Memorial contributions can be made to the Ajnericaji 
Ciuicer Society. 


Helen G. Warren 

Helen G. Warren, 80 of Louisville, died 'Ibesday, 
April 10,2012, in Louisville after an illness. 

The hineraj is al 11 a.m. today at Jjyon-DeWitt Funeral 
Home in Campbellsville. 



SMrtey ElaJnc Abrahamstin, 
65, of Elizabethtown, died 
Wednesday. April 4. 2012. A 
memorial service is at 5 
p.m. Sunday, at Kingdom 
Hall of Jehovah's Witnesses 
at 1350 W. Lincoln Trail 
Blvd., Radcliff. 

Andei^ L Gaswelt, 91, of 
Hodigenville. died Tuesday, 
April 10, 2012. A graveside 
service is at 10 a.m. EOT to¬ 
day at Campground United 


Methodist Church Cemetery 
io Bonnieville. 

Patrida Stevens Trait, 82. 
of Louisville, died Monday. 
April 9. 2012. A funeral 
Mass Is at 11 a.m. Saturday 
at SI. Helen Catholic Church. 
4005 Dixie Highway, 
Louisville, with burial In 
Calvary Cemetery. Visitation 
is from 3 to 8 p.m. today at 
Owen Funeral Home, 5317 
Dixie Highway. Louisville. 


FRftNKFOST 

Former lawmaker still recovering 
from punch 

IPs been one year since former law^maker 
Dewayne Bunch suffered a head injury lhal led (o his 
resignation and his wife to lake on me role of stale 
representative. 

Regina Buncli said her husband continues to moke 
progress, though he still canT UUk or widk. 

Since being elected to the post her husband held, 
Regina Bunch said she looks for ways to champion 
causes he believes in and she thinks he is proud of her 
efforts. 

Dewayne Bunch, who also taughi high school sci* 
ence, was critically injuriNj last year when he stepped 
in to stop a fight between students and was hit by a 
stray punch. — The Asswi^tkd Press 








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THE NEWS-ENTiRPRiSE 


NEWS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


AS 


Area growers escape threat of frost 





^Showcasing C 

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Saturday, April 14th • 11-9pm 


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200 S. Bell Ave., 
Glendale, KY 42740 
270.369.7925 / 


DofiH ml93 Itite unEqtie shop just 1 btocSt south of The Whfede Stop Restouraol 


Kentucky man goes on 9-hour crime spree 


Ttn; Assutiated FV^sa 

NASHVILLE, Ifenn, - A fugi 
Live from Kentucky who rode to 
Nashville on a bus broke spent nine 
hours raising chaos, police said. 

William Todd, 24 remained in jail 
Thursday and awaits trial on charges 
including nine felony counts. 

According to police, Todd left a 


bus station during a March 25 lay¬ 
over and broke into a haunted house 
tourist attraction where he stole a re¬ 
volver, shotgun and stun gun. He is 
suspected of using the weapons to 
hold up four people as they left a 
nightclub, shooting one with the stun 
gun, pistol-whipping another with 
the revolver and t^ng cash and 
credit cards used later at a WaJmarL 


According to police, Todd also 
carjacked a cab^ posed as a hotel 
worker to rob guests and broke into 
an office where he smeared feces on 
iramed law degrees* He was arrested 
after taking a cab to another hotel, 
where police said he pulled a knife 
on the driver and refused to pay the 
fare. 


Temperatures 
only reached 
borderline 


dangerous lows 


By AMBER COULTER 

acnukcr^thcncwiscntoirprisc.coiii 

Area growers narrowly 
avoided more than mar¬ 
ginal damage from a late 
frost Wednesday uighL 

Jeremy andjosuina Hin¬ 
ton, owners of Hinton’s 
Orchard near Hodgen- 
\dllc, set to work that night 
placing row covers over 
strawberries to protect the 
fruit from the low tempera¬ 
ture, which reached about 
30 degrees. 

Thai was barely high 
enough to avoid damage 
to apple and peach trees in 
the orchard, Jeremy 
Hinton said. 

"^WeVe thankful that it 
didn’t get any colder than 
it did,” he said. 

The trees should be fine 
at 30 degrees. There can 
be a 10 percent crop loss at 
2 K degrees and nearly 
complete loss as 25 de¬ 
grees, he said. 

The chill was ftauble- 
some because warm 
March temperatures 
caused trees to bloom 
about three weeks sooner 
than usual. Cold weather 
cart kill pollen on bUiom- 


We weald love to see you and 
yoa^tt to glad you camo! 


without negative effects. 

Very little wheat in the 
county has developed 
heads. At that stage, the 
crops can endme tempera¬ 
tures as low as 30 degrees 
for a few houxs. 

Wheat, like many crops 
this season, is two to three 
weeks ahead of its typical 
growing cycle because of 
the warm March. 

Planted com and soy¬ 
beans mostly have not 
emerged. Those that have 
come up still maintain 
growing points under¬ 
ground. They shouldn’t be 
impacted by the frost, 
Adams said. 

Ben Miller, who lives 
near Sonora, said his fami¬ 
ly had to place row covert 


phot'D 

Jeremy Hlnten covers strawberries Wednesday night at 
Hiriton's Orchard in hopes of protecting the young plants from 
an anticipated frost. 


ing plants, Jeremy Hinton 
.said. 

Also^ moisture in young 
finit can freeze and plants 
can suffer frostbum, he 
said. 

The orchard expert 
enred a near totaJ crop los' 
in 2007 when a imila 
weather pattern led to eai 
ly tree bloom and a cold 
spnng mght Uiat damaged 
the crop, Jeremy Hinton 
said. 

“I think we’re going to 
make it through this one 
all right,"" he said, think 
we’re going to be OK.’’ 

The couple also grows 
blackberries and raspber¬ 
ries, which haven’t begun 
blooming yet, and broccoli 
and cabbage, which are 
tough growers and unlike¬ 
ly to be affected by ftosL 


Hinton worried more 
about berries and wheat 
planted throughout the 
area than trees because 
ground temperature is 
cooler llian air tempera¬ 
ture. 

Matt Adams, a Hardin 
County Extension agent 
for agriculture and natural 
resources, said it won't be 
clear mitil a week or 10 
days of good growing has 
passed il the frost affected 
wheat in the area because 
the temperature was bor¬ 
derline. 

Adams thinks wheat in 
Hardin County escaped 
harm because most crops 
are in the stage just before 
a head is visible. At that 
point, wheat can hcindle 
temperatures as low' as 2S 
degrees for a few hones 


on strawberries Wednes¬ 
day night to protect them 
from frost. 

The plan seems to have 
worked, but Miller won’t 
be surprised if he loses 


some strawberries. He’s 
not worried. 

"TheyTl bloom still af¬ 
ter this,” he said. 

Amber Coulter C4ui be 
reached (370] 505-1746. 


NEAl CARUIN/The 


A custom canvas made to protect transplanted tomatoes on an Amish family farm near Sonora 
helped keep Thursday morning's freeze and frost from damaging the young plants. 


Meet Coach Gal 





The News-Enterprise will have copies of 

“UK Season To Remember” 

available for purdiase. 


Trophy 


Of Kentucky 

Fans will have photo opportunity with the trophy 

FRIDAY, APRIL 13,2012 

from 2:30 - 3:30 at Kroger 

Kroaer 111 Towne Drive, Elizabethtown 


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A6 


The News-Entekprise 



FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 



Volume 37, Issue 84 


EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS 
R. CHRIS ORDWAY BEN SHEROAN 

Publisher Editor 


SARAH REDDOCH JEFF D’ALESSIO 

Editorial Page Editor County News Editor 


LARRY JOBE SARAH BERKSHIRE 

Advertising Sales Director Eeatures editor 

MAJ. GEN. TERRY KENDRA STEWART 

TUCKER, Ret. Public member 

Public member 


An overview of 
local excellence 



ISSUE: Honoring veterans, charity work 
OUR VIEW: County maintains high standards 


From time to time to ensure 
that special efforts receive their 
due, we stop to review accom¬ 
plishments in the community 
and offer a few well-deserved 
kudos. 

PURPLE HEART EFFORTS. Irvin 
Lyons Jr. of Vine Grove came 
home from Vietnam with two 
Purple Heart medals but found a 
country critical of the war effort 
and taking it out on soldiers. 

When you’ve been putting 
your life at risk in service to 
your country, it’s hard to return 
to harsh criticism and being 
called baby killers. 

He has not forgotten the feel¬ 
ing. 

‘‘It was bad. It was bad,” he 
said. “You wanted to get back on 
the airplane and go back to 
Vietnam. You got treated better 
there than you did here.” 

A few generations later, 

Lyons is working to cement the 
climate of support for American 
troops. He is encouraging cities 
throughout the state to declare 
themselves Purple Heart cities. 

Lyons, state commander for 
the Military Order of the Purple 
Heart, has won the endorsement 
of Vine Grove and Elizabeth¬ 
town. He continues to venture 
out. 

He explained that issuing a 
proclamation requires no money 
or effort on the part of a city. It 
signifies support for veterans in¬ 
jured during service. Members 
of his organization plan to pay 
for Purple Heart signs to be 


placed near participating cities’ 
welcome signs. 

It’s a noble effort and, in a 
way, an extension of Mr. Lyons’ 
service to the nation. 

SHOE SUCCESS. Sometimes it’s 
the young among us who set an 
example. Recently, second- 
graders at St. James Catholic 
Regional School hosted a drive 
for shoes to send to St. Marc’s 
Parish in Haiti. 

Some of the adults involved 
thought 100 pairs would be a 
great objective. Students collect¬ 
ed almost 600 pair. 

“I didn’t know it was going to 
be so overwhelming, the re¬ 
sponse,” said Janet Steller, a 
grandmother of a second-grade 
student and a coordinator of the 
project. 

CONSTRUCTIVE HOLIDAY. 

Another youth-led example 
comes from Rockford, Ill. An 
enthusiastic group of high school 
students devoted their spring 
break to helping others. In 
Hardin County, their focus was 
Habitat for Humanity. 

Nearly 30 students from 
Boylan Catholic High School 
helped on a Habitat site this 
week in Elizabethtown. They 
had similar adventures in neigh¬ 
boring communities and proved 
once again that willingness goes 
a long way toward making a dif¬ 
ference. 

This life lesson for the stu¬ 
dents serves as an example to 
others. 


OUR READERS WRITE 


Objective sources 
should offer 
counterpoints 

I was perplexed by the propa¬ 
gandist tone taken in an April 12 
article (“HCS offering free break¬ 
fast for all students”) concerning 
the intention of Hardin County 
Schools to expand its “free” 
school breakfast program to in¬ 
clude all HCS students. The arti¬ 
cle contained many positive 
quotes and statements about ex¬ 
panding the program and making 
it permanent, yet no counter¬ 
points were mentioned. While 
providing free breakfast to all stu¬ 
dents in the county sounds wise 
and charitable, there are serious 
reasons to question the proposi¬ 
tion. 

Eirst, remember nothing pro¬ 
vided by government is “free.” 
The breakfasts need to be paid for 
and if the initiative expands, 
Hardin County taxpayers will 
carry the burden. Most taxpayers 
do not begrudge subsidizing 
school meals for students whose 
parents honestly cannot afford to 
feed them, but the program will 
require residents to cover the 
costs of daily breakfast for thou¬ 
sands of children who have plen¬ 


ty to eat at home. Ultimately, this 
results in our money, food and 
precious natural resources being 
wasted. 

Additionally, the program 
shamefully questions the irre¬ 
placeable role of the family, roles 
schools are rapidly usurping. 
Healthy breakfasts can help a stu¬ 
dent focus in school, but so do 
many other things that require 
daily parental responsibility and 
involvement. Students also need 
fresh clothes, baths, supper, a 
good night’s sleep, etc. Is HCS 
going to step in and provide 
those, too? Where do the schools’ 
responsibilities end and the fami¬ 
lies’ begin? These are reasonable 
considerations and should be de¬ 
bated in any balanced news arti¬ 
cle concerning this topic. 

We need to be careful as citi¬ 
zens to think through some of the 
“great” initiatives ubiquitously 
materializing to help our nation’s 
school children. Sometimes it’s 
easy to let deceivingly altruistic 
ideas run away with our common 
sense. Readers depend on The 
News-Enterprise to help them 
weigh the merits of issues and the 
newspaper should take that re¬ 
sponsibility seriously. 

Heather E. Kolodziej 

Elizabethtown 



Letters to the editor reflect the views 
of their writers and are not intended 
to reflect the views of the editorial 
board. Submitted letters must be 
original works directed to the editor 
and submitted by the writer, and 
address one topic. Personal attacks 
are not allowed. Letters will be edit¬ 


ed for clarity, length, grammar and 
inappropriate content. Letters should 
be 350 words or fewer and must 
include the writer’s name, city of res¬ 
idence and a telephone number for 
confirmation purposes. Longer let¬ 
ters may not be published. One let¬ 
ter per month, per writer is allowed. 


CONTACT YOUR 
CONGRESSMAN 


U.S. HOUSE OF 
REPRESENTATIVES: 

Rep. Brett Guthrie, R- 
Bowling Green 
guthrie.house.gov/ 

■ Washington, D.C., 
office 

308 Cannon House 
Office Building 
Washington, D.C. 
20515 

Phone: (202) 225-3501 
Eax: (202) 226-2019 

■ Hardin County 
regional office 

411 W. Lincoln Trail 
Blvd. 

Radcliff, KY 40160 

■ Warren County 
regional office 

1001 Center Str., Suite 
300 

Bowling Green, KY 
42101 

Phone: (270) 842-9896 
Pax: (270) 842-9081 


Submit letters to: 408 W. Dixie Ave., 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701; fax to 
(270) 769-6965, or email to letters 
@thenewsenterprise.com. Callers to 
(270) 737-2205 must give their 
name, city of residence and phone 
number before leaving their com¬ 
ments. Calls are limited to 1 minute. 


This editorial represents a consensus ofThe News-Enterprise editorial board 


Email to letters@thenewsenterprise.com 


Tax freedom day arrives at last 


A pril 9 was Tax 

Preedom Day in the 
Bluegrass State - 
the day Kentuckians finally 
earned enough to pay off 
this year’s tax burden and 
quit greasing the palms of 
the Nanny State. 

That means we worked 
99 days - from January 1 
through April 9 - to satisfy 
the demands of Washing¬ 
ton, Prankfort and City 
Hall before we had fully 
paid the tax man. 

Not only is 99 a lot of 
bottles of beer on the wall, 
it’s another indication of 
the high cost of big gov¬ 
ernment. 

Incredibly, many of the 
economic amateurs deter¬ 
mining tax policy in gov¬ 
ernment’s hallowed halls 
actually think it’s not 
enough and that we need 
to do more before being 
allowed to escape the 



heavy burden of govern¬ 
ment redistribution. 

I don’t doubt the good 
intentions behind such 
ideas. Billionaire Warren 
Buffet genuinely believes 
that higher tax rates on 
some Americans will elimi¬ 
nate debt and control 
deficits. 

Certainly, if Buffet wish¬ 
es to donate to the cause, 
he is welcome to do so. As 
Kentucky Senator Mitch 
McConnell recently said, 
he’s free to “send a check” 
to Uncle Sam. 

(Make those checks 
payable to the “Bureau of 
the Public Debt” and send 


it to: Dept G, P.O. Box 
2188, Parkersburg, W. Va. 
26106-2188.) 

While I don’t question 
the motives of those who 
support higher taxes, I 
doubt their grasp of history 
and current events far and 
near. 

Socialist leaders in Eur¬ 
ope have, for years, tight¬ 
ened taxpayers’ chains 
rather than make serious 
attempts to shrink bloated 
bureaucracies or confront 
ever-expanding deficits. 

Greece plunged into 
economic insolvency even 
as public managers submit¬ 
ted $38,000 bills for office 
curtains and while one in 
five workers was employed 
by the government. 

A local press investiga¬ 
tion found the bureaucracy 
had careened out of con¬ 
trol to the point that some 
government workers don’t 


even bother showing up 
for work because there 
aren’t enough places for all 
of them to sit. 

The Cato Institute’s 
Daniel Mitchell, a tax-re¬ 
form expert, wrote recent¬ 
ly that European nations 
“have been raising taxes 
for decades while almost 
always arguing that higher 
taxes were necessary to 
balance budgets and con¬ 
trol red ink. Yet that obvi¬ 
ously hasn’t worked.” 

Look no further than 
the massive strikes and ri¬ 
ots in Europe’s streets to 
confirm Mitchell’s conclu¬ 
sion. 

Closer to home, Illinois 
provides a striking exam¬ 
ple of what happens when 
politicians try to tax a state 
out of its fiscal problems. 

Just last year, Illinois 
politicians hiked the state’s 
corporate income tax by a 


whopping 46 percent and 
the individual income tax 
by an even-larger 67 per¬ 
cent. The stated goal was 
accompanied by fruity pie- 
in-the-sky rhetoric: restore 
Illinois’ fiscal footing and 
pump up the state’s credit 
rating by seizing even 
more of taxpayers’ produc¬ 
tive income. 

Instead, they received 
more spending, lofty def¬ 
icits and a downgrade in 
state debt to the lowest 
among the 50 states. 

The aftershocks of this 
economic earthquake have 
resulted in an exodus of 
businesses and jobs. 

Illinois’ proclivity for Drac¬ 
onian tax policy spooked 
some well-known compa¬ 
nies like Mitsubishi and 
US Cellular so badly that 
they are considering leav¬ 
ing the state altogether. 

That’s a preview of 


what could happen in 
Kentucky if some - under 
the guise of “tax reform” - 
get their way. 

Members of the Beshear 
administration’s tax-reform 
task force would do well to 
remember Winston 
Churchill’s contention that 
“for a nation to try to tax 
itself into prosperity is like 
a man standing in a bucket 
and trying to lift himself 
up by the handle.” 

Considering no govern¬ 
ment at any level ever 
taxed its way into prosperi¬ 
ty, here’s the best recom¬ 
mendation that could be 
made: allow citizens to be¬ 
gin working for themselves 
sooner rather than working 
for government longer. 

Jim Waters is president of The 
Bluegrass Institute. He can be 
reached at at jwaters® 
freedomkentucky.com. 


OPINION AND OP-ED PAGES 


The Opinion pages are intended to provide a forum for the 
discussion of issues that affect the area. Editorials are the 
opinions of The News-Enterprise’s editorial board and 
appear in the two left-hand columns of this page. Other 
articles reflect the views of their authors. 



If you have a question, you can 
reach us at (270) 769-2312. 

Or at our mailing address: 408 

W. Dixie Ave., Elizabethtown, 
KY 42701. 


EDITORIAL PAGE EDITOR 

Sarah Reddoch. 5051744 

sreddoch@thenewsenterprise.com 

EDITORIAL BOARD MEMBERS 

R. Chris Ordway. 505-1466 

cordway@thenewsenterprise.com 


BenSheroan . 5051764 

bsheroan@thenewsenterprise.com 

Jeff D’Alessio. 5051757 

jdalessio@thenewsenterprise.com 

Larry Jobe . 505-1409 

ljobe@thenewsenterprise.com 


Sarah Berkshire. 5051745 

sberkshire@thenewsenterprise.com 

PUBLIC MEMBERS 
Kendra Stewart 
Maj. Gen. Terry Tucker, Ret. 



Mail: 408 W. Dixie Ave. 

Elizabethtown 42701 

Email: letters@thenews 
enterprise.com 

Fax: (270) 769-6965 


































T>IE NEW&Er^EftPRISE 


QPINION 


FRIDAY, APRJL 13, 2012 


A7 


Minister argues in favor of jailhouse baptisms 


C hristianity is the one 
true religion of the 
one tine God. I 
make no apologies for that 
statement. 

Altliough God loves all 
mankind, he sent his son 
into the world so that the 
world through him might 
be saved. Jesus claimed, 
am the way, the tinth, and 
the life. No one comes to 
the Father but by me." 

I believe the founding 
fathers also recognized 
Christianity as the only 
true religion, and thereby 
practiced Christian toler¬ 
ance toward other reli¬ 
gions, even enshrining 
such free exercise in the 
First Amendment. Many 
today not only misunder¬ 
stand separation of church 
and state, they are shocked 
when they hear such word¬ 
ing is not found in our 
country’s founding docu¬ 
ments. 

Yet because of this mis¬ 
guided concept, many, in 
die spirit of freedom and 
political correctness, will 
push for religious ffeedonis 
for religions other than 
Christianity, In a land that 
constantly is making con¬ 
cessions in the name of re¬ 
ligious freedom for those 
of belief systems other 
tlian Christianity, it is a 
disgrace our county will 
not allow a recognized 
Christian practice such as 
baptism to be a right avail¬ 
able to prisoners attempt¬ 
ing to rehabilitate them¬ 
selves. 

Bapti sm predates Jesus 
and is something that con¬ 
tinues to be recognized as 
a religious rite today. Yet 
those in control in the 
Hardin County Detention 
Center continue to forbid 
baptism under the guise of 
safety concems. 

Now this, at first hear¬ 


ing, might make sense un¬ 
til further knowledge is 
provided to the public. At 
a Fiscal Court hearing, 
members of the Elizabeth¬ 
town Church of Christ sat 
in amazement as the Jailer 
spoke of the iranspoilation 
of prisoners to various fa- 
cihties for medical and 
dental treatments. 

Although we do not 
doubt this is necessary, 
something is askew when 
transportation for a med¬ 
ical need, w hich is of a 
physical nature, is allowed, 
but something a prisoner 
view as an action essential 
to their ctcrucd soul's salva¬ 
tion, IS denied 

Again, the emphasis of 
the jailer and county attor¬ 
ney is safety concerns, yet 
the public probably is not 
aware that certain individ¬ 
uals and groups have the 
right to allow inmates to 
work at various locations, 
feed them and return them 
to the facility without any 
guard accompaniment- 
prisoners also are permit¬ 
ted to clear trash from the 
sides of roadways which in 
our mind could raise huge 
safety concerns. 

If money is the concern, 
the church has offered to 
pay to secure its facilities, 
pay tci have a baptismal fa¬ 
cility installed at the jail, 
pay for a portable baptistry 
to be kept at the Jail or pay 
a bond to ensure the pris- 
oners return after baptism. 

Again, all of these have 
been denied. But the issue 
is not about money. Even 
when first discussing the is¬ 


sue with the jailer before 
he spoke w itli tlie chaplain 
emeritus and the county 
attorney, he indicated that 
he had guards he could 
spare to transport prison¬ 
ers and that he himself 
would be drilling to drive 
them if necessary. This is¬ 
sue is a First Anendment 
issue. 

^Congi’ess shall make 
no law respecting an estab¬ 
lishment of religion, or 
prohibiting the free exer¬ 
cise thereof ^ is the first 
part of the First Amend* 
ment. What does this 
mean? The relevant parts 
to the church and state ar- 
gumeiU say notlnng more 
than the federal govern¬ 
ment is not allowed to es¬ 
tablish an official national 
rehg^on or force people to 
conform to any specific re¬ 
ligious belief, and they are 
not allowed to interfere 
with or prohibit citizens 
from exercising or partici¬ 
pating in the religion of 
their choice, or no religion 
at all. 

If this is true on a feder¬ 
al level, should it not also 
be true on a county level? 

Though we are aware 
that The Religious Land 
Use and Institutionalized 
Person Act does address 
the rehgious fieedoms of 
those incarcerated, we be¬ 
lieve baptism should not 
be one of the religious 
freedoms impacted. 

Please do not misunder¬ 
stand, T hold no ill will to- 
wai’d the jailer, chaplain 
emeritus or county attor¬ 
ney. Our communication 
has always heen profes¬ 
sional and cordial. It is 
their positions and deci- 
sions that 1 strongly op¬ 
pose. 

hi this countiy, I am 
permitted freedom of 
speech. Whether or nf>t I 


am pemitted freedom of 
speech, I am bound to 
speak by God, 

By their choice, whether 
intentional or not, the jail¬ 
er, chaplain emeritus and 
county attorney are forcing 
people to conform to their 
religious beliefs. At least 
two of these individuals 
have expressed their reli¬ 
gious beliefs in which they 
view baptism as an unnec¬ 
essary option, not as an es¬ 
sential element of salva¬ 
tion. 

Could their belief that 
baptism is not essential to 
saltation he influencing 
their thmku^g regarding 
safetv concerns? How can 
one explain the fact that 
the county detention cen¬ 
ters we contacted more of¬ 
ten than not indicated they 
allow baptism in their facil¬ 
ity? 

It is clear, though inten- 
tiona] or not, Hardin 
County has at least three 
government officials decid¬ 
ing how inmates will fol¬ 
low God, 

No matter how you in¬ 
terpret Matthew 18-20, 
Mark 16:16; the book of 
Acts, or 1 Peter d:2l - 
whether yon believe those 
passages teach baptism is 
essential to salvation - the 
problem in Hardin County 
is that some prisoners do 
believe the Bible teaches 
baptism is essential to sal¬ 
vation and government of¬ 


ficials are removing their 
right to clioose how they 
will follow God. 

This, my fellow citizens, 
is a violation of the First 
Anendment. 

More iniporlantly, lliose 
who are hindering others 
from being baptized are by 
their actions, perhaps not 


by their intentions, playing 
God “ or should 1 say go¬ 
ing beyond God, lor our 
God allows free will. 

John Board is muiister at 
Elisabethtown Church of Christi 
a tocai mngregatioii that raised 
die Issue regari^g jail baptism. 

Hp can be reached at 
Juhn.boftrd@whidstroamj[iet 
or 765 6446. 


(^)Turner Law Office, PLLC I 

Amy L. Turner - Attorney at Law 

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AS 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


NEWS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13. 2012 


Family looks to gently 
ease away from grandpa 


Dear Abby: My hus¬ 
band and I have been 
niaiiied for 16 years and 
have two teenagers. 
"Moni” died two years 
ago, and my husband is 
an only child. How can 
we tell my vddowed fa- 
ther'in-law that we need a 
weekend to om^elves? 

“Pop,” who^s 87, lives 
an hour away and dri ves 
to see us eveiy weekend, 
staying until Monday af¬ 
ternoon. We doif t doubt 
that he’s lonely^ although 
he does play bridge twice 
a week and has dinner 
with friends occasionally. 
We love him dearly ai:id 
would never want to hurl 
his feelings, but we long 
for a weekend for “just 
us*” 

How do we ask Pop 
not to visit? We believe 
he's sdD in mourning 
ovej’ the loss of lus of 
60 yeais. We don't want 
to ^d to his heartache. ~ 
Tom in Texas 

■ Deal’ Tom: You do 
need to talk to your fa- 
ther-in law' and set some 
boundaries. Accomplish 
it by setting a predeter¬ 
mined visitation schedule 
that allows you time 
alone with your husband 
and nuclear family ^vith- 
out him being present. A 
way to get that message 
across would be to say: 
“Pop, we love you, but 
we need some time to 
ourselves, so let's sched¬ 
ule your visits for twice a 
month. You pick the 
weekends.” 

SERML SNORER. Dear 
Abby: The neighbor 
above my apartment has 
a. snoring problem. My 
bedroom is directly be¬ 
low' his. Around 10 every 
night he starts snoring to 
the point that it sounds 
like an elephant lives 
abcjvc me^ I have to sleep 
with my TV on and 
sometunes the radio. 

Please tell me what to 
do. Should 1 confi’ont this 
neighbor? Should I com¬ 
plain to management? Or 
should I just live with it? 

“ Fed Up in Newjei^sey 

■ Dear Fed Up; Write 
your neighbor a letter 
and explain to him there 
is a problem. He may not 
know that he snores* If 
he’s snoring steadily, but 
stops for 20 or 30 sec¬ 
onds before starting 


jeannie'^ 

PHILLIPS 


again, it could indicate 
that he has a serious med¬ 
ical condition tliat should 
be discussed with his doc¬ 
tor. 

If the apartment above 
you has poor insulation, a 
carpet under liia bed 
coidd mufile some of the 
sound. Playing a tape of 
“white noise'' could block 
it out more restfiiUy than 
your television or radio. 
Or, because adequate 
sleep is so important, you 
could ask a real estate at¬ 
torney about the possibili¬ 
ty of breaking your lease 
and leaving without 
penalh'. 

IN flEED OF A WORKING 
WARDROBL Deai Abby; I 
Eun a 23-year-old woman 
who will graduate from 
college soon. I am look- 
ing to undergo a post-col¬ 
lege makeover. I want to 
find some clothes that 
will work in tlie profes¬ 
sional world, but also mix 
for more casual environ¬ 
ments, Taking a recent 
college grad’s budget for 
this into account, w'hat 
signature pieces should a 
young female have in her 
w'ardiobe? And what tips 
do you have for building 
a great coUection over 
time? — Youngs Broke, 

But Fabulous 

■ Dear Y.B.F.: Start 
with two suits — one with 
a jacket and matching 
skirt, the other with jacket 
and slacks. Make both 
suite interchangeable and 
in a neutral color - black, 
navy or beige - whatever 
looks best on yon. Ajdd a 
couple of blouses and 
sweater sets, several pairs 
of shoes and a good 
handbag. Make sure to 
look for “classic” styles 
rather than trendyj and 
you will have the basis 
for a business wardrobe 
and the beginning of a 
great collection. 

Dear Ablw la wtitten by 
Abigail Van Buren, also 
known as Jearine Phillips, 
and was feunded by her 
cnotber, Pauli nq Phillips. 

Write Dear Abby at 
www.DearAbby.com or P*0. 
Box 69441), Los Angeles, CA 
90&69* Universal Press 
Syndicate. 


^TWEENirnr 


Put up or shut up 


Dr. Wallace: Fm a reg¬ 
ular pot user, and 1 really 
enjoy getting high. You’re 
always telling us that 
smoking pot can cause 
die same cancerous ef¬ 
fects as smoking tobacco, 
but I don’t remember 
you providing any scien- 
tilic daUi to back up your 
statements. Because mari¬ 
juana is a totally natural 
plant, I think you're just 
trying to scare us into not 
using marijuana. So 
please giv^ us the real 
facts. In other words, put 
up or shut up! — Dave, 
Santa Fe, N.M. 

■ Dave: That is some 
accusation but is certainly 
unfounded. Please read 
the following information 
slowly and carefully,, and 
when you finish reading, 
cut out this column and 
tape it to yonr refiigeratoi 
as a reminder: 

According to the Aca¬ 
demy of General Dentist¬ 
ry, smoking marijuana 
may lead to cancer of the 
tongue and other areas of 
the mouth and neck, in¬ 
cluding the larynx and 
the esophagus. 

Researchers at the 
Prince of Wales Hospital 
in Sydney have studied 
patients who smoked 
marijuana and developed 
tongue cancer. Because 
none of these patients 
smoked or chewed tobac¬ 
co or drank alcohol - 
which could have fed to 
similar consequences - 
resear chers believe that 


f'Ln , 




ROBERT 

WALLACE 


smoking marijuana could 
have been the sole cause 
of the disease* 

Because of this study, 
marijuana appears to be 
linked to cancer of the 
upper aiway and diges¬ 
tive tract. One explana¬ 
tion, according to tire re¬ 
search team, is that mari¬ 
juana smokers tend to in¬ 
hale the smoke rapidly 
and deeply, which leads 
to a faster deposit of tar 
and other organic com¬ 
pounds in the respiratory 
tract. 

A previous study was 
conducted with 20() 
smokers of hashish, the 
resin from the Cannabis 

plant. The results shouted 
that 87.5 percent had up¬ 
per aimay complaijits. 

Dr. Eric Shapira states 
that a joint not only may 
deposit its poison faster 
but also dujnps four times 
more tar in the mouth 
and upper airway than a 
cigarette. Marijuana also 
contains about 50 percent 
more cancer-causing or¬ 
ganic compounds than to¬ 
bacco. 

I am not trying to 
scare you, I just want you 
to know the facts. 

Email Dr. Robert Wallace at 
rwallace^galesburg.aeL 
Dktrihuted by Creators 
Syndicate hic. 


Neighbors 




KEVIN "NICK'^ GLASS AND AMANDA CABOL JOHNSON 


Johnson — Glass 

Amanda Carol Johnson and Kevin “Nick” Glass, 
botli of Ehzabetlitown, announce their engagement 
and ff>Tthcoming marriage. 

The bride-to-be is the daughter of Bai ty and Pam¬ 
ela Jolinson and lisa and Joseph Coombs, aU of Eliz¬ 
abethtown* She is a 2002 graduate of Central Hardin 
High School and is enrolled at Elizabethtown Com¬ 
munity and Technical College pursuing a degree in 
business management. 

Hie prospective ^oom is the son of Kevin and Cin¬ 
dy Glass of Upton, He is employed at Nasli MecJiani- 
cal. 

The wedding is April 14, 2012, at Camp Caj hon in 
Muldraugh. 

Invitations have been sent. 



Hawkinses 
celebrate 50th 
wedding 
anniversary 

Donald and Peggy 
Hawkins of Hodgen- 
ville vvill celebrate tiieir 
50th wedding anniver¬ 
sary with a reception in 
their honor from 2 to 5 
p.m., April 14, 2012, at 
Sportsman’s Lake in 
Hodgenville- 

They were married 
April 14, 1962 in Sahna, 
Tenn,, by the Rev, Ro¬ 
bert Holland. 


MR. AND MRS. HAWKINS 

They have four chih 
dren, Kenneth Haw¬ 
kins, Dawnna McMa¬ 
han, Jason Hawkins and 
Lance Hawkins; seven 
grandchildren; and sbe 
great-grandchildren. 


COMMUNITY CALENDARS SCHEDULE 


Looking for something to dof^ 


Look for these community 
calendars on the 
Neighbors page iiiside The 
Nem-Enterprise through¬ 
out the week, 

Sundays Community 
Events 

Mondays Support Groups 


Tuesdays Military 
Wednesdays Lending a 
Hand 

Todays Organizations 

For kids’ activities, check 
out the Youth Calendar in 
the Schools pages each 
Monday. 


Neighbors content 
also can be seen at 
www.thenewsenterprise.com 


ORGANIZATIONS CALENDAR 


HOW TO USE INIS COLUMN. 

Club and organization meet- 
ings and events are pub¬ 
lished at no charge in this 
calendar items for the 
Organizabon Calendar must 
be turned in by noon Wed- 
nesday POC refers to "point 
of contact" Area codes are 
listed onlv for phone num- 
her outside the 270 area 
cOode Listings not updated 
within a year will be re¬ 
moved. To update or submit 
a calendar entry, email cal 
endars^thenewsenterprise 
.com, call 50&1751 or fax 
to 769-6965. 

Today 

Oixon-DartwII Commande- 

py N* 19, 7 p.m., Hub City 
Lodge Hall, lOOI-B Skyline 
Drive, E’town. POC: 234- 
0462. 

TOPS (Take Off Peunds 
Sensibly) No. 126, 10 a.m., 
with weigh-in 8:30-9:50 
a.m, POC: Liz Smothers. 
737-0124. 

TUPS (Take Off Pounds 
Sensibly) No. 213, 10 a.m.. 
Safe Harbor Club, Vine 
Grove. POC: Donna, 828- 
5026, or Mary, 3514233. 

Saturday 

Hardin County Fair 
Squares pkuit sale. 8 a.m., 
Hardin County Fair Squares 
building, 1524 Hodgenville 
Road, Ky, 210, E’town, Old 
fashioned plants. POC: 
735-6802. 

John Quiggins Memorial 
Pancake Feast, 7 a.m.4 
p.m., Colvin Community 
Center, 230 Freedom Way, 
Radcliff, hosted by the 
North Hardin Lions Club. 
Feast includes pancakes, 
sausage, eggs and drink. 
Tickets are $G for adults 
and can be purchased from 
any North Hardin Lions 
Club member: children 6 
and younger eat free. POC: 
Lion Mark Kelly. 351-9441. 

Meeting Creek Lodge No. 
611 F£AM, 7:30 p.m., 

16674 Sonora Hardin 
Springs Road (Ky. 84), 
Eastview. POC: 765-7047. 

Military Order of Purple 
Hearts (MOPH) meets 10 
a.m, at VFW Post 10281, 
299 Briggs Lane. Vine 
Grove. POC: Commander, 
retired Sgt, Maj. Irvin Lyons 


Jr., 304-6044; llyonsjr#aol 
.com. 

NABVET6, a veterans or¬ 
ganization, National Asso¬ 
ciation for Black Veterans, 
meets at 11 a.m, at VFW 
Post 10281, 299 Briggs 
Ave., Vine Grove. POC: 
Commander Irvin Lyons Jr,. 
304-6044 or ilyonsjr@aol 
.com. 

Sunday 

Vietnain Veterans of 
America, Chapter 1051, tlie 
Gold Vault Patriots, 2 p.m,. 
Nolin RECC, 411 Ring 
Road, E’lown. Anyone who 
served in Vietnam and 
Vietnam era (August 1964- 
May 1976) is welcome to 
join. Copy of DD214 and 
$20 membership fee re¬ 
quired. POC: Sally Johns, 
352-3765, www, Vietnam vet 
eransl051.org or etownwa 
@gmx.com. 

Monday 

All Datsun & Z Car ewmers 

meet at 6 p.m. upstairs at 
Swope Nissan Dealership, 
1100 N. Dixie Ave., E’town. 
You can join if you do not 
own a Z car. POC: Irvin Ly¬ 
ons Jr., 304-6044 or ilyons 
jir@aoLcom. Website: www. 
bluegrasszcarclub.com. 

The Bards Center Winter's 
Group, 6-8 p.m,, Hardin 
County Public Library Com¬ 
munity Room, 100 Jim 
Owens Drive, E'town. Free. 
POC: Robert Villanueva, 
234-9971. 

Camp Nttox Masonic lodge. 

7 p.m. POC: 351-3498. 

Cecilia Community Ruritan 
Club, 7 p.m., Ruritan Build¬ 
ing. POC: Irene Dodson, 
862-3808. 

Heartland Dulcimer Club, 

6.30-8:30 p.m., Rrst Pres¬ 
byterian Church, 1600 Pear 
Orchard Road, E’town, Ail 
traditional instrument play¬ 
ers involved including ham¬ 
mered dulcimer, lap dul¬ 
cimer, guitar, mandolin, fid¬ 
dle, bass and more. Ob¬ 
servers welcome. POC: 
862-9747 or www.heart 
landdulcimerclub.OTg 
Mid-Kentucky Kennel Club 
gathers at 6:30 p.m. Mon¬ 
days and Tuesdays, Bella’s 
K9 Academy, 1248 Wood¬ 
land Drive, E'town. Mon¬ 
days dedicated to obedi¬ 
ence practice; Tuesdays 


dedicated to conformation 
practice; free to MKKC 

members: $3 for non mem¬ 
bers. Up-to-date shot record 
mu“t be pre“ented on all 
dogs entering facility POC 
Mary Ginier, 465 6299 
WWW.midkykennelclub.com. 

Radcliff-Hortti Hardin 
Ministerial Association. 6 
p.m,, at Fellowship Commu¬ 
nity Full Gospel Church, 
600 Shelton Road, Radcliff; 
all area pastors and minis¬ 
ters welcome. POC: Pastor 
Gloria Fite, 352-4919. 

Tuesday 

Bunco Nlglit community 
fundraiser, 6-3 p.m., Nolin 
RECC, 411 Ring Road, 
E'town, presented by Har¬ 
din County Republican Wo¬ 
men’s Club, proceeds ben¬ 
efit Elizabeth Tori Scholar¬ 
ship fund. Cost is $20 per 
person or $60 for a group 
of four. Grand prize in¬ 
cludes makeover day for 
the winner and 11 friends 
at Rejuvenation Medispa by 
Dr. David Zoeller, cash 
prizes, ^ft certificates and 
Vera Bradley door prizes, 
RSVP to Kathy Fowler, 737- 
1211 or hleefawler@com 
cast.net. 

BR YDimg Lodge No. t3i2 
F&AJH. 7:30 p.m.. 11 Lin¬ 
coln Square. Hodgenville. 
POC 765-704 r 

Centra) Kentucky Wheeh 
men Bicycle Club offers regu¬ 
larly scheduled rides for bi¬ 
cyclists of all skill levels; 
the club has more than 130 
members with a 30-year 
history. Visit www.ckwheel- 
men org to learn when the 
group rides. 

□izabflthtown Chess Chib, 

7 p.m. to dosing, Family 
Buffet Re'taurcim: There is 
a USCF rated tournament 
the second Tuesday of 
each month at ECTC 
Occupation and Technical 
Building. Rooms 106A and 
108B. POC: etownchess 
.biogspot.com. 

iSzabetHown Lions Club. 
6 p.m., at Howard Johnson, 
1058 N. Mulberry St„ 
E'town. POC: Gary Miles, 
769-6997. 

German/American Edel- 
weiss Chib, noon, basement 
of Prichard Chapel on Fort 
Knox. All German-speaking 
ladies invited. POC; Heidi 
Baker, 352-0-401, or Re- 


nate Gibson, 401-6394. 

Gilded Tonies Toastmas- 
tBPS Clab, 6:30 p.m., Eliza¬ 
bethtown Communifr and 
Technical College, Adminis¬ 
tration Building, Room 112, 
POC: Bill Pfeiffer. (502) 
548-1507 or bpfeiffer@air 
hydropowerxom. 

TOPS (Take Off Pounds 
Sensltdy) Ho. 113, 6:^5 p.m., 
Vine Grove United Method¬ 
ist Church, 306 High St. 
POC: 877 0662. 

White Niills Chne Lea^e, 7 
p.m*, Civic League Building. 
POC: Dot Graham. 369- 
S118. 


Wednesday 

(a Leche League of Hardia 
and Meade ceuntles, lo 

a.m., at Education for Child¬ 
birth and Parenting, 1024 
N. Dixie Ave., E'town; for all 
expectant mothers, breast¬ 
feeding mothers and wo¬ 
men interested in breast¬ 
feeding. POC; Amy, (931) 
220-1660 or Kim, (740) 
412-7931: or lll.hardin 
.meade@gmail.com. 

Teen T0.P.S. (Take off 
Pounds Sensibly), 6-7 p.m., 
202 N. Mulberry St., 
E'town, POC; Helen Jacobs, 
317-7112. 


Thursday 

Bridge Club, 1-4:30 p.m., 
Hardin County Public Libra¬ 
ry, 100 Jim Owen Drive, 
E'town. POC: 769-6337. 

Central Kentuchy Re-en¬ 
try Council, 9 a.m., Proba¬ 
tion and Parole Office con¬ 
ference room, 207 S, Mul¬ 
berry, E'town. Council cov¬ 
ers the Lincoln Trail Area 
Development District in¬ 
cluding Breckinridge, 
Meade, Grayson, Hardin, 
LaRue, Nelson, Washington 
and Marion counties and 
networks with area re¬ 
sources to address issues 
offenders and ex-offenders 
face transitioning back into 
the community. POC: Glenn 
Minor, Glenn® Kentucky Re 
entry.org. (502) 290-2725, 
or Eva Myers, 735-7530. 

TOPS (Take Off Pounds 
Sensibly) Ho. 1«9. Lincoln 
Trail Behaviorai Health Sys¬ 
tem. 3909 S. Wilson Road. 
Radcliff. Wetgh^in 5:30- 
6:15; short meeting foE= 
lows, POG: Joyce. 351- 
9365, or Melva, 737-5930* 



GETTING IT TO US 

i NeLghbors submissions should be typed or 
legible. The information should be clear and 
corKise. Include a name and daytime phorve 
number In case of questjons. We reserve the 
right to edit. 

■ StiL^mt^sions and photos can be emailed 
to: 

cetebraticins@thenewsentefprise.com ~ 
engagements, births, bfrlhcfays. archiver- 
series and rive generations, 
or 

clubs@thenewsenterprise,oom — Aii ciub 
news, induding calendar listings for dub 


activfttes. military news, and all other general 
news submissions. 

■ If email Is not available, fax the Itemls) to 
7696965. drop them off or mall to 408 W. 
Dixie Ave., Oizabethtown, KV 42701. Office 
hours are tram S a.m. to 5 p.m. Mond^ 
through Fiid^. There Is an after-hours drop box. 

WHAT ABOUT PHOTOS? 

■ Photos sent by email should be in Jpg for¬ 
mats Original black arid white Or color prints 
are accepted. 

■ To have photos returned, include a self- 
addressed stamped envelope; otherwise, the 


photo can be picked up at the front desk up 
to one month following publication. 

■ Be sura to identify the people in the 
photo. 

■ The NewsFnterprlse cannot guarantaa ali 
photos will be published. 

WHAT ARE THE DEADUNES? 

ightxjfs runs darly and items will pubi sh 
fin t-come first serve on a space- 'Vh. jJabte 
basis Gelebrat on' get r st pnorrty lo pub 
lish on schedule. 

QUESTIONS? Call 505-17S1 
























NEWS-ENTERPRiSe 


NEWS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 3013 


&9 


Check 

towel 

spots 



Dear Heloise: 1 recently 
read in your column the 
problem Vickie (a reader) 
was having with towels that 
came out of the wash look’ 
ing as if someone had 
spilled bleach on them. 

Pve had the same problem, 
too. 

Let me tell you what 1 
found out. I went right 
back to the boutique from 
which 1 pui chased my tow¬ 
els, taking the ruined sam¬ 
ples wi\}i nie, and tlie em¬ 
ployees were not a bit sur¬ 
prised at what I had to 
show them. 

Tiiey said it happens all 
the lime, and what 1 should 
have done is to wash the 
towels in cold water before 
1 used them to set the dye. 

1 really wish tl^tere had 
been a big warning label 
on the towels telling me to 
do so. - Sylvia, via email 

■ Sylvia, I mji so soiry 
you had Lhiii problem. It 
does seem to be a common 
one today, according to my 
readers. Unfortunately, 
there isn^t much you can 
do at home to “set” the dye 
on fabrics. Washing in cold 
water does “reduce’’ or 
prevent color bleeding, but 
will not set the dye. 

You might want to check 
for other causes, too, just to 
be on the safe side. 
Sometimes the bleach dis¬ 
penser doesn’t emptj^ all 
tlie way fiom a previous 
load- Or if you arc u.sing 
powder detergent, make 
sure it dissolves fully in the 
water before adding your 
towels or garments. Don’t 
sprinkle powder detergent 
on wet fabrics, as it might 
cause spots. 

Readers, input? Have 
you had the same prob¬ 
lem? I^et me know, and I’ll 
share 

PLASTIC PIKCHER Dear 
Heloise r To easily open the 
plastic bags in the produce 
department \\-^thoul having 
to lick my finger (yuck), I 
walk over to where there is 
water sitting around the 
edge of the produce bins, 
get a little on my finger, 
then open the bags. -Jill 
from Folsom, Calif. 

■ You also can rub the 
bag between your hands, 
and the opening will come 
apart. 

TRY FOR FREE Dear Hel¬ 
oise: 1 have die ability to 
download applications to 
my phone ajid tablet com¬ 
puter. There always are 
new apps I am interested 
in trying. 1 have found that 
most apps have a “light"' 
version or small sample of 
the app that is free. You 
don’t get the full app, but 
you get a smaller version 
to try. If you like it, you 
can buy the full version. If 
you don’t like it, no prob¬ 
lem ” no money wasted. - 
Janice, via email 

ON-THE-GO SUPPORT 

Dear Readers: If vou have 
a bad back, traveling can 
be hard- Here is a helpful 
hint. Bring a small tote bag 
with a cushion in it It will 
be more comfortable to sit 
on during long drives or 
plane rides. The tote makes 
the cushion easier to carry, 
and you don’t need to take 
it out of the bag. Use it, 
then just grab it and go. 

Write tp Hctaisc at P.Qp Box 
795000, San Antonio, 'fX 7S279- 
5000, or fax to {m) HEI--OI5E 

Kinj^ Features Syndicate Inc. 


It’s in the 
paper. 






AUSTA 1 R GRANT/The 


COMMEMORATION AT SEA 


Mary Beth Crocker Dearir^ and her husband, Tom, of Newport^ Ky., poso Sunday in 
period costume as they wait to board the MS Balmoral cruise ship in Southampton, 
England. Nearly 100 years after the Titanic went down, a cruise with the same number 
of passengers aboard set sail to retrace the ship's voyage, Including a visit to the 
location where it sank. Tho 12-fiight cruise comrtiemDrates the 100th anniversary of the 
sinidng of the White Star liner. With l^OS passengers aboard, the MS Balmoral Is 
fbllowing the same route as the Titanic. Organizers are trying to recreate the onboard 
experience —minus the disaster ^ from the food to a band playing music from that era. 
Organizers said people from 28 countries boohed passage, including relatives of some of 
the more than 1,500 people who died when the Titanic collided with an iceberg and 
sank on April 15,1512. 


TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS: Movie director 
Stanley Donen is Actor lyfe Waggoner 
is 77. Actor Edward Fox is 75. Actor Paul 
Sorvino is 73. Poet Seaitius Hdaney is 7S. 
Mo vie "TV composer Bill (fonti is 70. 
Rock musician Jack Gasady is (iS. Actor 
Tony Dow is 67. Singer Al Green is 66. 
Actor Ron Perfman is 62. Actor WHIiain 
Sadler is 62. Singer Peabo Bryson is 61. 
Bandleader/rock musidan Max Warn- 
b6T^ is 61. Bkiegniss singer-musician 
Sam Bush is 60, Rock musician Jimmy 


Bestri is 58. Comedian Gary Kroner is 
55. Actress Saundra Santiago is 55. 
Chess grandmaster Garry KaSDarov is 
4f>. Actress Page Hannah is 4H. Actress- 
comedian Caroline Rhea is 48. i\ctor 
Ricky Schroder is 42, Rock singer Aaron 
Lewis (Staind) is 40. Actor Bokeem 
WEKHlbine is 39. Singer Lou Bega is 37. 
Ajclor-producer GIbHII Howorton is 36. 
Actor kyle Ho ward is 34. Actress Court¬ 
ney POldon is 3L Pop singer Nellie McKay 
is 30. Actress Hannah Marks is 19. 


■ Atex Karras, the former Detroit Uons defen¬ 
sive tackle and TV and movie actor, is the lead 
plaintiff in the latest lawsuit brought against the 
NFL by ex-players who say tlie league didn’t prop¬ 
erly protect them from concussions. 

Karras and his wife, StfSBfl Clark, are the firsl two 
of 119 plaintiffs m the complaint filed Thursday in 
U.S. Distnet Couri m Philadelphia, where dozens 
such cases arc pending 

Clark, who also plaved the wife of KaiTas" char¬ 
acter on the 1980s sitcom “Webster,"" said in a tele¬ 
phone intemew with The Associated Press that the 
76'yeai'“Old Kairas was diagnosed with dementia 
about seven years ago. She says day-to-day life 
“would be very difficult for him without help.” 

Karras was an All-Pro in L960, 1961 and 1965, 
He made the Pro Bowl four times. 


Hardin County 

Farmers* Market 






Locally Grown & Fresh Daily 



OPEN 

Saturday, 
April 14th 
until 

Noon 


Asparagus 

«rEggs 

Honey & Sorghum 
if BaKed Goods 
it Jams & Jellies 
* Green Vegetahtes 
it Cucumbers 
it Annual Plants 
ft Vegetable Plants 
ft Blueberry Plants 


Under the Farmers’ Market pavilion 
200 Peterson Drive 
(On Corner of Hwy 62 & Peterson Drive) 







1 EPA^eBtinmti^d 6<0M?C;e coinbLnE'ct is a b]E?nd betwEen alL-cSrclrk* rangE and ga^tinc -powerad range whkcblaba^ed MHCo [electric) iuid SS dtyMQ b LgiirwH^' Actual ran^ varies with condkiana. 

V&li i# avuKabte [oi>rderat p^irticipaiing nealerj- 2 ftfltsed■On KPA VljsjUMpUK^Onnmy.gov for3 PaseO orii EM p»tiwItb 1,41. twrb£>clu)trgefder>gjnttand 6-«pi<cil mamiat tnrtsmiifsipn. 



2012 Buick Enelave 


23 NIPG 

tPA Hi^nr 



2012 Buick Regal 

30 MPG 

EPA (nwHhid nlQh'A’tY 


Herb Jones Is Offering 


HERB JONES EMPLOYEE PREFERRED PRICING 


For Everyone On Every New Chevy, Buick Sl GMC. 





2012 GMC Acadia 

24 MPG 

f PA f 


2912 Chevy Malibu 

33 MPG 

EPA Emoarad Mlgiiwiy 



2012 Chevy Traverse 

23 MPG 


\AUH 


ITiAH 

mat: 

MamL 

MILKS 

O^V^ MlWMT 

200,3... 

. Si\AH . 

. 93 L'Diivertibte.. 


.. $6,995... 

..$144 

2007... 

. ChcvEdlct... 

. .Malihu, Like New ... 

...58,267,. 

..$11,995. 

..3151 

2002... 

. Chevrolet... 

, Inipala^ LS .... 


- $7.995.,. 

.* 3159 

2008 *i. 

. Fur^ 

1 Fuiiion 

H, 32.532 ,. 

,, S12,.995, 

*. 3184 

2008... 

. dMercuiy 

> Cmnd Marquis L3 


.,514,995. 

,,3I9S 

2007,.. 

. ihevroWl 

, Impala^ ..... 


.,$14,995. 

,.$198 

2008... 

. Chevrolet ... 

. Impale ... 

... 59,872,. 

.. $14,995. 

.,$198 

2008... 

. Chevrolet 

. Unpaid LT ... 

... 3$.026,. 

..$14,995. 

,,3190 

30HI„ 

ChevroWt 

. InrpAU LT 

... 38,837. 

-$16,995, 

„ 3223 

200 s „ 

. Ni^Sin .. 

, MAvima _____ 

.. 68J0(I , 

-$17,495. 

„ 3230 

2011 .. 

. Chevrolet 

. Cruz^ LT2 

.X. 12.813. 


XX $252 

2008... 

. lEondA .. 

. ilccisrd .. . 

.X. 50.776.. 

..$18,995. 

.. $253 

2011 ... 

. Chevrolet ... 

Malibu LT .. 

... 19,668 .. 

..£19.995. 

..3260 

2010,,. 

. Chevrolet ... 

, Impair LT ... 


.*£19h99S. 

.,3260 

2007*.. 

. jNissan 

> Maxima 


., £19h995 . 

. . 3260 

20U ... 

, Chevrolet 

i Impala LTJ^ ,x..„k„+,,+„.+.. 

.,F 20,332,. 

.,521,995 . 

..$290 

2011 ... 

. Chevrolet ... 

Malibu LTZ ... 

... 24,300- 

.. $ 21.995 . 

.. $290 

2011 ... 

. Chevrolet ... 

Malihu LT7.. 

... 2:C962 .. 

.. $22,995 . 

..$:t05 

2007... 

. Ciidi]1:ii;. 

81S VS. 

.,. 59,290.. 

..$22,995. 

.. $305 

2011 ... 

. Chevrolet ... 

. Cruze LT ..................... 

... 14,300.. 

..S22.995. 

,. 3305 

2008 

BMW 

328i ... 

38 932 . 

.. $24,995 . 

„ 3324 

2011 

. Chevrolet 

I Cn]ze LIZ 



..3339 

2010,.. 

. Chevrolet 

, Omaru R3 


S27.995 . 

.,3369 

2010... 

. Chevrolet ... 

. CaniarQ 35 .. 

...26.546.. 

$29.3$S . 

..3399 

2007. 

BMW . , 

. 328i Convertible .. 

... 38.400 .. 

$29.995 . 

..$399 

2011 , 

. CadiUAc 

STS ----- 

... 14.320 .. 

$37.495 . 

.,3499 

2011 . 

Chevrolet . 

. Cdiraro Convertible SS 

.. 14.270, 

. $.39.995. 

-3549 



rkt^iEf 




it;ah 


mDEL 

iMlLKS 

owM myjFMT. 

1999... 

. Chevrolet... 

1500 Ext. Cah 4x4. 


.. $.5,99,5... 

..$99 

2001 . 

. Chevrolet ... 

2100 Ext. Cab 4x4_ 


.. $9.995 ... 

..$149 

2003. 

Chevrolet . 

. Tahoe 2\n> ... 


.,$10,995. 

.,3151 

2007 * 

Ponti3.c: 

Tonrent, AWD 


., S11.995 F 

-.3151 

2003*,. 

. Chevrolet 

, Tr^ilblaxer 2WD .,..,f.,f., 





20D3 Chmokt1VflckevZR2 4x4.. S(i,lSe ... $7,9i)5.Sl(59 

Smi3 ... CkeiiTAlet... Av’iijsrttfhft 4x4 ......^5.529 ... Sl2,ft!l5 ... SI^^4 

200:1 ... Clicwftlct... ICsL Cah 2WD ....................... $^2M^ . .. $1S4 

21K1S ... Nissan.Pathfindtr.......Sl3,9fl5 ... SlfiO 

200 s ... Chevrolet... Suburban 4s4.... SH.D&S ... S190 

2I>07 Ford.F ISO Ext. Cab 4x4.SI 4,995 .,,5190 

2007 Ford.SE FWV .72.802 ,.. S1S.49S S215 

2010 Chmulet tviimirtux: FVil> pvp^-pp+i 515,905.., S2tS 

2011 ... KIA.Snul...27,0EM> ... SlM,49.5 ... $245 

2004 ... Chctmlct... 2.50U Cab 4:t4 ...$1^99,5 ... $249 

2009 ... Chevrolet... 1500 Heg. Cah 2VVO. 15.882 ... S18.995 ... S252 

2007 ... Chevrolet... Tahoe 4x4.92.016 ... SI 6.995 *.. S253 

2006 CMC.Yukon XL.77,300 S19.995 S260 

2063 ... Ford.EdjJe SEL FWD.42.423 ,*. 319.995 S260 

2009 ,.. JtlA.BoTTerio.61.433 317,995 ... 5264 

2007 ... Chevrolet... 1500 Ext. Cab Z71 4x4 . 76,504 ... $20,995 — $275 

2007 ... Ltnc^tn MKX, AW1> ___ 79.285 .,. $20,995 ... $275 

2008 .., Chevrokt1500 Hij?. Cab Short 4s4 „ 2l,79M .,. $21,995 $290 

2008 ChtvfoUt _ Cnkracirt Crew Cub 4x4 .. 70.886 -- $21,995 $290 

2007 ... Chevrolet... 1.500 Ext. Cab 4x4 ... 50,987 .., $21,99.5 ... $290 

2005 ... CMC .......... Acadia FWD ................................... $22,995 ... $20.5 

2007 ... GMC.Yukon SLE 4x4.$22,995 ... $305 

2008 ... Dodge. 1500 Quad Cab 4x4.60.217 ... S24.99S *.. £316 

2009 Fold.. EASft .....50.242 ... 524,995 *.. £324 

20OS ... GMC ..1500 Crw C^b Denali .WTJ.. 67.055 ... 522,995 ... $325 

2003 ... Ch^iTolet... Tah.ie LT .... 67.732 — 526,995 ... $353 

2011 ... Chevrolet... Travtn^t LT F\M>. 1H.057 ... $27,995 ... $:i6H 

2010 ... GMC .. retrain SLT AW'D .. 41.250 ... $27,995 ... $309 

2011 ... ChetTolet... 15*PaMEnger Van.29.547 ... 525,995 ... 5384 

2008 ... Chevrolet Suburban.65.515 .*. 329.995 ... £399 

2008 ... Ch^^Tolet A^^anche LTZ 4.\4.. 60.140 ... 330.995 ... 5409 

2012 ChevroletTrav^^e LT WW .. 5409 352,995 ... S444 

2009 Chert^alet... Tahne LT4x4.40,265 ... $33,993 ... $455 

2008 ... Buick.tnetart CXL FWU .. 12,000 ... $33,995 ... $455 

2011 Chevrolet,., Suburban LT4x4 —35,209 ,,. 536,995 $491 

2012 GMC —.Acadia SLT AWIT.9,950 $37,995 $499 



Till brs4 uiw^jric irr Amflrlu 


100,ODD miip/S -ypaf 

WhithcKFi^rttii frit Irt Mu ip sxu'S’. 

*T.Tq^fn>Wip lipPIf Tipil IMMWiPJpUt 
"flMAtdrAuattiu 
* CwtRT TipnpoiliMi Piiggm 

MILITARY 

PISepUHT 



CHEVY 

1601 NORTH DIXIE HVITY., at th« corner of Ring Road 


NEW VEHICLES: 72 mnnih linancinQ is with 
no money cto^n with approved eredil Some 
cijsidmers will roi qualify. 0% 72 Month pay¬ 
ments are $13.S9 per $1,000 financed. Net 
avaiaoie wth some oih^f otters, see dealer 
for details. Take delivery by 04^30/12. Cash 
baoK Qffor nil of all incenlivis ind dlr^counts. 
Phclo^ for lllu tration purposes see dealer lor 
campletB details. PRE-OWIMED VEHICLES: 
Payrnents based on £0% down plus tax, OOe, 
license, s tees wi(h approved credit. 
Paymenls based on APR as low as 5.99%. 
Terms 36 mpnltis up to- 72 fnpnihs- Cue to ad 


27CP76S'2123 Toll Free deadlines, some vehicles may be sold 


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Chi Bm M \ 


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04 n* 

II 


Ch^k Out Our Weekly 
Internet Special 9 ! 



Ihe News-Enterprise 





































































































































A10 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 



FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 




DENNEY WINS EASTER BASKET 
FROM FAITH APOSTOLIC CHURCH 

Faith Apostolic Church of Elizabethtown recently held a 
drawing at its annual fish fry for an Easter basket which was 
won by Beth Denney of Elizabethtown. She was presented 
with the Easter basket by Barry Tucker. 


Ohio church gives charity 
‘$1 for Tin attendance 


The Associated Press 

PERRYSBURG, Ohio 

- A Christian megachurch 
in northwest Ohio is donat¬ 
ing nearly $18,500 to char¬ 
ities to represent the atten¬ 
dance at services over the 
Easter weekend. 

The Rev. Lee Powell, 
senior pastor at Cedar- 
Creek Church, said dona¬ 
tions will be made monthly 
in 2012 as part of the new 
‘‘$1 for 1” effort to donate 
$1 to charity for each per- 


HOW TO USE THIS COLUMN. 

Church and religious news 
announcements (special 
events, not regular weekly 
events) are published at no 
charge in this calendar. 
Deadline for the Friday Reli¬ 
gion News calendar is noon 
Tuesday. POC refers to “point 
of contact.” Area codes are 
listed only for phone numbers 
outside the 270 area code. 
Listings not updated within a 
year will be removed. To up¬ 
date or submit an entry, 
email religionnews@thenews 
enterprise.com, call 505- 
1751 or fax to 769-6965. 

Friday 

Feast on the Word Minist¬ 
ries, 904 N. Mulberry St., 
E’town, Brighter Day in con¬ 
cert. Free meal served at 
6:30 p.m. POC: prayerforce 
inc@hotmail.com. 

House of Prayer Lutheran 
Church, 904 N. Mulberry St., 
E’town, morning stretch ses¬ 
sions, 8:30-9:30 a.m. Mon¬ 
day, Wednesday and Friday. 
Medium impact exercise. 
POC: 765-4212. 

Saturday 

Embry Chapel AME Church, 

401 Skyline Drive, E’town, 
annual Adult Choir Day, 5 
p.m., with a gospel concert 
featuring area choirs and 
groups, including the 
Moore Sisters, The Second 
Chance Spirituals and Mar¬ 
vin King and the Gospel 
Keynotes, along with liturgi¬ 
cal dancers including Bro¬ 
ther Patrick Leach. Free 
and open to all. POC: Chris, 
307-4158. 

Fairfield Community Church, 

Meeting Creek Road, East- 
view, gospel singing, 7 
p.m., featuring New Mudd 
New Courage. POC: 766- 


son who attends service on 
select days. 

Powell hopes to hold the 
program weekly in 2013. 
Leaders of the nondenomi- 
national church started the 
program after seeing it 
done elsewhere. 

This month, checks for 
$4,603.75 will go to Cherry 
Street Mission Ministries, 
Vision Ministries, Big Bro¬ 
thers Big Sisters of North¬ 
west Ohio, and thearms 
forces.org. 


2521. 

Memoriai United Method¬ 
ist Church, 631 N. Miles 
St., E’town, 9 a.m.-noon. 
Food pantry monthly food 
box distribution. Photo ID 
and proof of Hardin County 
residency required. POC: 
769-3331. 

Morningstar Missionary 
Baptist Church, 1106 8. 
Wilson Road, Radcliff, will 
have a Disabled Veterans 
Seminar at noon. Seating 
begins at 11 a.m. Represen¬ 
tatives from Radcliff Town 
Hall will brief veterans on VA 
disabilities, entitlements for 
surviving spouses, benefits, 
how to register for veterans 
assistance and more. Lunch 
follows. POC: Michael Gam¬ 
ble from Human Resources 
Command at Fort Knox, 
(502) 613-5881; or Pastor 
Harold H. Craig Jr., 351- 
1161. 

New Hope Missionary Bap¬ 
tist Church, 1591 Hill Street, 
Radcliff, Food Closet/Pan¬ 
try, 10 a.m. to noon, across 
from the church in the Fami¬ 
ly Life Center, 1582 Hill St., 
Radcliff. POC: 351-6808. 

Radciiff United Methodist 
Church, 275 S. Woodland 
Drive, Radcliff, Saturday 
Night Alive Service, 5 p.m.; 
relaxed atmosphere, upbeat 
music. POC: 351-3290 or 
www.radcliffumc.org. 

Sunday 

Christ Dependent Commu¬ 
nity Church, 5687 S. Wilson 
Road, Radcliff, serves free 
breakfast from 8:30-9 a.m. 
POC: 877-7214. 

Crossroads Community 
Church, services for the deaf 
or hearing impaired, 11 
a.m., 100 Hobson Way, 
E’town. POC: 300-2345. 

Happy Hearts Feiiowship, 
4 p.m., Pritchard Communi¬ 
ty Center, 404 S. Mulberry 



Interfaith ‘pilgrims’ circle 
world on faith quest 


By GILLIAN FLACCUS 

The Associated Press 

CLAREMONT, Calif. - Lred 
eric and Anne-Laure Pascal are de¬ 
vout Roman Catholics who built 
their lives around their religion. 
When she lost her job last year, the 
young couple decided on an unlike¬ 
ly expression of their religious com¬ 
mitment: a worldwide ‘Interfaith 
pilgrimage” to places where peace 
has won out over dueling dogmas. 

Since October, the Trench cou¬ 
ple has visited 11 nations from Iraq 
to Malaysia in an odyssey to find 
people of all creeds who have dedi¬ 
cated their lives to overcoming reli¬ 
gious intolerance in the world’s 
most divided and war-tom comers. 

The husband-and-wife team 
blogs about their adventures — and 
soul-searching — and takes short 
video clips for the project they’ve 
dubbed the Laithbook Tour. 

The Pascals travel on a shoe¬ 
string budget, kept afloat by 115 
donors who are mostly friends and 
family. They say their travels are 
meant to illuminate examples of 
hope and peace in a world that is 
too often tom apart by faith-driven 
fervor. Their conversation, in a mix 
of Trench and English, is peppered 
with quotes from Mahatma 
Gandhi, ancient Chinese proverbs 
and references to their inspiration, 
St. Lrancis of Assisi. 

They began the three-week U.S. 
leg of their trip late last month after 
arriving in California jetlagged 
from Japan and will visit Israel be¬ 
fore hanging up their backpacks. 



REED SAXON/The Associated Press 

Frederic and Anne-Laure Pascal pose 
in a garden at Claremont Lincoln 
University in Claremont, Calif. 

“There is a saying, A tree that 
falls makes more noise than a forest 
that grows.’ My aim was to meet the 
people who make the forest grow 
and not the people who make the 
tree fall,” said Lrederic, 29, as the 
couple took a break during a recent 
visit to Claremont Lincoln Univer¬ 
sity, an interreligious graduate insti¬ 
tute in Southern California. “We 
have to be the mirror to reflect their 
light.” 

On its face, the project seems al¬ 
most naive, but in practice, the 
Pciscals’ blend of religious journal¬ 
ism and personal exploration has 
brought them face-to-face with 
some of the world’s top religious 
thinkers and deposited them in 
some of the most forgotten parts of 
the planet. 

In five months on the road, the 
couple has trekked through the Sa¬ 
hel in the West African nation of 
Burkina Laso, explored interfaith 


schools in the slums of Cairo and 
traveled across the Iraqi desert at 
night to reach a camp dedicated to 
Christian and Muslim children. 

Along the way, they have felt 
their own faith deepen. 

“What really hit me in Egypt is 
the Muslim call to prayer. The 
more I heard that call, the more I 
was called back to my own faith 
and the more I asked myself, ‘How 
do I pray? Do I pray regularly? Am 
I faithful in my prayer or not?”’ said 
Anne-Laure, 28. “There were a lot 
of things like that where, in meeting 
others, we were brought back our 
own faith and how we live our 
faith.” 

The idea for the trip came last 
year after Anne-Laure’s contract as 
a librarian at the Catholic Universi¬ 
ty in Lille wasn’t renewed. Lrederic 
decided to take a sabbatical from 
his job editing dozens of parish 
newsletters. The couple, who met a 
decade ago through a youth group, 
delayed plans to buy a house and 
start a family and instead spent 10 
months narrowing what countries 
they would visit and setting up a 
foundation. 

They started their tour in 
October in Assisi, Italy, to coincide 
with the 25th anniversary of Pope 
John Paul IPs World Day of Prayer 
for Peace, a 1986 gathering of a 
rainbow of international religious 
leaders. Prom there, the Pascals set 
out to visit interfaith projects in 
nearly a dozen nations, including 
Tunisia, Algeria, Burkina Paso, 
Egypt, Lebanon, Iraq, India, Japan, 
Malaysia, the U.S. and Israel. 


WORSHIP CALENDAR 


St., E’town. Worship Servi¬ 
ces with guests Lannie 
Heath and Mel Mortensen. 
POC: 735-7435. 

Salvation Army Service 
Center, 1006 N. Mulberry 
St., E’town, serves break¬ 
fast at 9:30 a.m., followed 
by morning worship at 10:30 
a.m. The Center also has 
supper and Bible study at 
6:30 p.m. Wednesdays. 
POC: 317-7677. 

The Crossroads UPC, 182 
W. Vine St., Radcliff, has 
“Show Your Colors Day” this 
Sunday, be it a favorite 
sports team, hobby or com¬ 
munity group; bring the team 
and arrive at 9:40 a.m. to 
enjoy coffee and doughnuts. 
Pastor A.J. Dummitt has is¬ 
sued a challenge to the con¬ 
gregation: if the service in¬ 
creases to 150 people for 
this day, he will wear “Ken¬ 
tucky blue” at the service; 
he is a life-long Ohio State 
fan. POC: www.thecrossrds. 
com/. 

Monday 

Heartland Interfaith gen¬ 
eral meeting, 6:30 p.m. (so¬ 
cial time from 6:30-7 p.m. 
with formal meeting at 7 
p.m.). Episcopal Church 
Meeting Hall, 206 W. Poplar 
St., E’town. “This I Believe” 
speakers are Dr. Prabodh 
and Dr. Laksha Mehta who 
are Hindu. POC: Tuula Poiko- 
nen, 765-6517 ortpoikknox 
finn@yahoo.com. 

Radcliff-North Hardin Min¬ 
isterial Association, 6 p.m., 
at Fellowship Community 
Full Gospel Church, 600 
Shelton Road, Radcliff; all 
area pastors and ministers 
welcome. POC: Pastor Gloria 
Fite, 352-4919. 

Severns Valley Baptist 
Church, 1100 Ring Road, 
E’town, Celebrate Recovery, 
a Christ-centered, Biblically 


based recovery program for 
anyone struggling with life’s 
hurts, hang-ups or habits; 6- 
8 p.m.; band begins worship 
and praise at 6 p.m.; gender 
specific/topic specific small 
groups begin at 7 p.m. Cele¬ 
bration Station for ages 4-10 
and child care for birth 
through age 2 available for 
minimal charge. POC: Cheryl 
Mitchell, 765-7822 or cheryl 
@severnsvalley.org. 

Wycliffe Bible Translation 
Banquet, 6:30 p.m.. Holiday 
Inn Express Hotel, E’town. 
Reservation deadline has 
passed. POC: 769-1160. 

Tuesday 

Memorial United Methodist 
Church, 631 N. Miles St., 
E’town, MUMS Seniors Ga¬ 
thering for those age 55 or 
older, 10:30 am. Speaker: 
the Rev. Dr. Richard A. 
Johnson. POC: Jan, 769- 
3331. 

Memorial United Methodist 
Church, 631 N. Miles St., 
E’town, Bible Study led by 
Rev. Allen Gibson, Tuesdays, 
noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Prit¬ 
chard Community Center, 
404 S. Mulberry St., E’town. 
Bring a lunch if desired. 
POC: Allen at 769-3331. 

Soldiers for Christ Ministry 
has Bible study at 7 p.m., 
Pritchard Community Center, 
404 S. Mulberry, E’town. 
POC: Don, (313) 623-6751. 

St. Christopher Catholic 
Church, 1225 S. Wilson 
Road, Radcliff, has all-day 
Eucharistic Adoration, 9:30 
a.m.-7:30 p.m. Tuesdays; 
confession heard from 6- 
7:30 p.m. with benediction 
at 7:30 p.m. POC: 351- 
3706. 

Wednesday 

Calvary Mission Church of 


Sun Country 
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Above Ground & 

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Spas • Supplies 


lo% Off CHEMICALS 
10% Off Selected 
Above Ground Pools 

Now thru April 30*'* 


Aiithorixftf Dealer far Aaquaeil, Pristine JBlue ^Irlarifte. 

Sales'lnstallations * Financing Available wac 


103 Nancy Cox Brive * CantpbeUsviile 
( 270 ) 46^2314 " 1 - 969 - 811^1137 



God, U.S. 31W South, on 
right near caution light, Glen¬ 
dale, Bible study, 7 p.m., led 
by Sister Betty Long. POC: 
737-8293. 

Grace Heartland Church, 

801 Pear Orchard Road, 
E’town, Red Cross blood 
drive, 3-7 p.m. in the Family 
Life Center. Walk-ins wel¬ 
come. Call 589-8431 to 
schedule a donation time. 

New Salem Baptist Church, 
632 New Salem Church 
Road, clothes closet, 5 p.m. 
POC: James Clark, 877- 
2729. 

Northside Mothers of Pre¬ 
schoolers (MOPS) meets 6:30 
p.m. at Northside Baptist 
Church, 1800 Pear Orchard 
Road, E’town, for fun, food 
and fellowship. POC: 765- 
6424. Child care provided. 

Salvation Army Service 
Center, 1006 N. Mulberry 
St., E’town, has supper and 
Bible study at 6:30 p.m. 
POC: 317-7677. 

Severns Valley Baptist 
Church, 1100 Ring Road, 
E’town, Pastor’s Bible study; 
preschool, children’s and 
student groups meet weekly 
at 6 p.m. POC: 765-7822. 

Thursday 

Called Out Ministries 
Church, Houchen’s Plaza 
Shopping Center, Suite 180 
(in the corner by E’town Pet 
Center), E’town. Bible study. 


7 p.m., led by Brother James 
Johnson. POC: Pastor Den¬ 
nis Taber, 737-8279. 

Upcoming 

Glendale United Methodist 
Church, 118 Main St., Glen¬ 
dale, Family Movie Night on 
April 21, watching “Rio;” 
bring a favorite movie snack; 
hot dogs provided. April 29, 
the gospel group The Com¬ 
monwealth will sing; the 
service is followed by a 
potiuck including pork 
chops. POC: Glenn Woodall, 
769-3454. 

Gospel Way Church is spon¬ 
soring a tornado relief bene¬ 
fit chili supper and cake and 
pie auction, 5 p.m. April 21, 
West 84 Fire Department 
Station No. 1, 21129 Sono¬ 
ra Hardin Springs Road. All 
proceeds go directly to 
those in the West Liberty 
area affected by March tor¬ 
nadoes. Donations of cakes 
or pies for auction appreciat¬ 
ed. POC: Michelle Gore, 
862-4679; Brother Jim Sut¬ 
ton, 862-4786; or Charlene 
Wright, 862-9516. 

Grayson County Singing 
Convention’s monthly gospel 
singing, 6 p.m. CDT April 21, 
at Church of Joy. Singers in¬ 
clude Katelyn Burkhead, 
David Noe and Heavenly 
Journey. POC: 259-4490. 

Turn to CALENDAR, All 




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THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


WORSHIP 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


A11 


CALENDAR 

Continued from AlO 


Calvary Missionary Baptist 
Church, 3 p.m., April 22, 614 
E. Main St., Vine Grove. Mis¬ 
sionary anniversary with the 
Rev. Lorenza Lovejoy Sr. and 
guest the Rev. Glenn Gordon 
of Zion Grove Baptist Church 
in Ekron. Dinner served, fol¬ 
lowed by candle lighting cere¬ 
mony. POC: Lana Lovejoy, 
317-4982. 

First Baptist Church of 
Eastview has a revival with 
services at 7 p.m. nightly, 
April 22-25 (or longer). 
Brother Scott Curie is pastor 
of the church. Brother Billy 
Curie will be evangelist. There 
is special music nightly. POC: 
Bobbi Curie, 401-5781. 

Memorial United Methodist 
Church, 631 N. Miles St., 
E’town, Women’s Bible Study 
“Discerning the Voice of God,” 
5:30-7 p.m. Sundays begin¬ 
ning April 22; nursery avail¬ 
able. POC: Kelly, 769-3331. 

New Hope Community Church 
invites the community for a 
free viewing of “Courageous” 
at 6:30 p.m. April 22 at the 
State Theater, 209 W. Dixie 
Ave., E’town. Doors open at 6 
p.m. POC: 737-6645. 

New Horizon Baptist Fellow¬ 
ship, 864 West Rhudes Creek 
Road, Glendale, meeting at 5 
p.m. April 22 for anyone inter¬ 
ested in participating in a 
June 2-9 mission trip to West 
Liberty. If interested but can’t 
attend the meeting, call 737- 
4386 and leave a message 
and contact number. The 
church is collecting food sta¬ 
ple items, baby formula and 
food, personal hygiene items, 
batteries, flashlights and 
more for a tractor trailer load 
to deliver (no clothes or furni¬ 
ture). Drop items off at the 
church Sunday or Wednesday 
or call to arrange a time. 

Heartland Interfaith Book 
Club, 6 p.m. April 23, Hardin 
County Public Library, 100 
Jim Owen Drive, E’town, 
reading “People of the Book” 
by Geralding Brooks. POC: 
Louise Eaton, 737-2148. 

Calvary Mission Church of 
God, 6827 S. Dixie Highway, 
Glendale, 11 a.m. April 29, 
Inspiration by Faith singers. 
POC: 737-8293. 

Locust Grove Baptist 
Church, bluegrass concert 
with Linder Construction, 6 
p.m. April 29, 1817 Red Mill 
Road, E’town. Meal follows. 
All welcome. POC: 765-2967. 

Ridge Spring United Meth¬ 
odist Church, 6:30 p.m., April 
29, 7279 Rineyville Big 
Springs Road, on Ky. 220, 2 
miles from Dollar General in 
Rineyville. Guest singers are 
God’s Little Voices. POC: 
737-4413. 

Round Top Baptist Church, 

705 Roundtop Road, E’town. 
6 p.m., April 29. Concert by 
“From the Heart.” POC: 737- 
7339. 

61st annuai Nationai Day of 
Prayer observance, noon-l 
p.m. May 3, Hardin County 
Courthouse in the circle at 
the flag pole. POC: 765- 
4829. 

Severns Vaiiey Baptist 
Church, 1100 Ring Road, 
E’town, Preschool Ministry’s 
“Zoo-per Wild Party” for ba¬ 
bies through pre-kindergart¬ 
en, May 3. POC: 765-7822. 

Heartiand interfaith Edu¬ 
cation/Steering Committee, 
6:30 p.m. May 7, Memorial 
United Methodist Church, 
631 N. Miles St., E’town, 
Room 206, upstairs; group 
will plan upcoming events. 
POC: Tuula Poikonen, 765- 
6517 or tpoikknoxfinn@ya 
hoo.com. 

Heartiand Interfaith Fel¬ 
lowship Circle, 7 p.m. May 7, 

Memorial United Methodist 
Church, 631 N. Miles St., 
E’town, Room 206, upstairs; 
topic: “War. Is it ever justi¬ 
fied? Where are the limits?” 
Come share thoughts and re¬ 
flections. POC: Jeannie Sam- 
dani, (502) 968-9192 or 
jeanniesamdani@gmail.com. 

Severns Valley Baptist 
Church, 1100 Ring Road, 
E’town, Friend Day, May 20. 
POC: 765-7822. 

New Hope Missionary Bap¬ 
tist Church, 1591 Hill St., 
Radcliff. Walk for Healthy Liv¬ 
ing, 8 a.m. 1 and 3 mile walk. 
Registration open until June 
8 at the church. Entry fee 
$10, proceeds benefit the 
Family Life Center. POC: 
351-6808. 

Severns Valley Baptist 
Church, 1100 Ring Road, 
E’town, Vacation Bible 
School, 8:45 a.m.-noon for 
age 4 through completed fifth 
grade, June 11-15. POC: 
765-7822. 

Severns Valley Baptist 
Church, 1100 Ring Road, 
E’town, summer day camp 
WinShape Camps C3, July 2- 
6 for children who have com¬ 
pleted grades K-5 at the 
church. Save $20 if regis¬ 
tered by April 30. Register 
and learn more at www. svbc 
.cc/children. POC: 765-7822. 



DIRECTORY OF CHURCHES 

Attend the Church of Your Choice 






Would you be willing to sacrifice your life for others? Jesus Christ did. He loved us so 
much that He died upon the cross so that we might have eternal life. Let us never lose 
sight of that fact, be thankful for His wondrous love and live for Him always. 

And when he had given thanks, he brake it, and said. Take, eat: this is my body, 
which is broken for you: this do in remembrance of me. 

1 Corinthians 11:24 (KJV) 


ELIZABETHTOWN 


BEREAN BAPTIST CHURCH 

400 Kentucky Drive, 737-1441 
Jim Webster, Pastor 

BETHESDA MINISTRIES C.O.G.O.P. 
2738 Ring Road, 900-1290 
Jerry Westerfield, Pastor 
BLUE BALL BAPTIST CHURCH 
1482 Blue Ball Church Road 
Bro. Eric Oliver, Interim Pastor 
BROOKS BAPTIST CHURCH 
(Independent Baptist) 

7039 South Wilson Rd., 737-4274 
Dr. Raford Herrin, Pastor 
CALLED OUT MINISTRIES FULL 
GOSPEL CHURCH 

Houchens Plaza Shopping Center 

200 Sycamore St., Suite 180 
Bro. Dennis Taber, 737-8279 

CALVARY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 
1905 North Miles, 737-6940 
Jeff Schexneider, Pastor 
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH 
Battle Training Rd., 769-0416 
CENTRAL AVENUE BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

401 Central Avenue, 765-4373 

CHRIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
CHRIST LUTHERAN CHAPEL (ELCA) 

206 W. Poplar St, 765-5606 
COLLEGE HEIGHTS 
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

710 College St Rd., 765-4284 
Rev. Adam Sparks 

Rev. Sigfredo Delgado, Hispanic Pastor 

COLLEGE VIEW CHURCH OF CHRIST 
61 lA College Street 737-0206 
Evangelist Jacob Holman 
CORNERSTONE CHURCH OF GOD 
Corner of Ring Rd. & Hwy. 1600 
Danny Wallace, Pastor - 769-8383 
CROSSROADS BAPTIST CHURCH 
243 W. Dixie, 505-5496 
Rob Sumrall, Pastor 
ELIM HOLINESS TABERNACLE 
1491 Hodgenville Road 
Bro. J.E. Jackson 
EMBRY CHAPEL A.M.E. METH¬ 
ODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
401 Skyline Drive, 737-5327 
Kenneth Paris, Pastor 
ELIZABETHTOWN BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

1525 North Miles St., 763-6565 
Dr. Danny Haynes, Pastor 
E’TOWN CHURCH OF CHRIST 
North 31W, 765-6446 
John Board, Minister 
ELIZABETHTOWN FIRST 
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE 
1202 North Miles St., 765-4449 
Rev. Raleigh Bostic 
EMMAUS COMMUNITY FELLOWSHIP 
625 N. Mulberry, Ste. 107, 832-7444 
Josh Marlette, Pastor 
EVANGEL WORLD PRAYER CEN¬ 
TER OF ELIZABETHTOWN 
111 S. Mulberry St, Ste. 103 
Ray Romero, Pastor, 723-0734 
EXTENDED HANDS CHURCH 
163 E. Rhudes Creek Rd., 763-6828 
Naomi Patterson, Pastor 
FAITH APOSTOLIC UNITED PEN- 
TACOSTAL CHURCH 

408 Nicholas Street, 737-5425 
David F. Aldridge, Pastor 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
107 Bishop Lane, 765-5013 
B. T. Bishop, Pastor 
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
401 W. Poplar Street 765-4994 
Stuart Jones, Senior Minister 
FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
1016 Pear Orchard Rd., 765-7663 
Rev. Skip Dunford 

FOUNTAIN OF LIFE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 
1495 Bacon Creek Rd., 763-6822 
John White, Pastor 
GALILEE INDEPENDENT BAP¬ 
TIST CHURCH 

587 Rawlings Road, 351-2290 
Tommy Hensley, Pastor, 849-5655 
GLORIA DEI LUTHERAN CHURCH 
MISSOURI SYNOD 

1701Ring Road, (Beside Target) 
Church Office 766-1503 
Pastor Monty Gleitz 
GRACE FELLOWSHIP CHURCH 
110 Chase Way, Suite 6 
270-401-7473 

GRACE HEARTLAND CHURCH 

801 Pear Orchard Rd., 769-1808 
Jeff Noel, Pastor 

GRACE REFORMED CHURCH (PCA) 

1105 Woodland Dr., 769-0173 
David Atkisson, Pastor 
HARDIN COUNTY’S FIRST 
INTERDENOMINATIONAL CHURCH 
5 blocks south of W.K. Parkway 
intersection on 31W, 769-9115 
Bro. Leroy Routt 

HARDIN COUNTY FIRST UNITED 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

South 31W (across from fairgrounds) 
Steve Doyle, Pastor 

HEARTLAND CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
211 S. Main St; Harold Workman 
HEARTLAND CHURCH OF CHRIST 
229 North Miles St., 765-5537 
HEARTLAND FREE WILL 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
3718 S. Dixie, 769-5399 
A member of NAFWB 
Rick Kennedy, Pastor 
HEAVENBOUND BAPTIST CHURCH 
6857 Shepherdsville Rd., 769-5882 
Bro. Gary Sharp 

HERITAGE REFORMED BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

766-2699 

Russ Brown, Pastor 
HOLY APOSTLES ANGLICAN CHURCH 
56 Public Square, 769-1170 
Father Chris Larimer 
HOUSE OF PRAYER 
LUTHERAN CHURCH 

904 North Mulberry, 765-4212 
Rev. Pam Thorson 
Iglesia Bautista FE y Esperanza en 
Jesucristo (FAITH AND HOPE IN 
JESUS CHRIST BAPTIST MISSION) 
401 Central Ave, 765-4373 
Teofilo Pino, Pastor 
IGLESIA LAVINA 

201 S. Mulberry St, 352-8462 
Pastors Marcellino & 

Christella Morales 

IMMANUEL BAPTIST CHURCH 
Off Hawkins Drive, 765-6516 
Charles Darland, Pastor 
KINGDOM HALL OF 
JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES 
25 Harvest Drive 
(off Lincoln Pkwy), 737-5860 
Arlie Bradley, Coordinator 
LAKESIDE WORSHIP CENTER 
1801 Ring Road, 769-1297 
Tim Nickels, Pastor 
LIFELINE TEMPLE 
CHURCH OF GOD IN CHRIST 
7106 S. Wilson Rd., 737-4886 
Supt. Willie E. Scott, Pastor 
LINCOLN TRAIL BAPTIST CHURCH 
4463 Bardstown Rd., 360-1053 
Jeff Harris, Pastor 

LIVING FAITH BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 
(A Cooperative Baptist Fellowship Church) 

207 Corporate Drive, 723-0250 
Rev. Roger Jasper, Pastor 

LOCUST GROVE COMMUNITY CHURCH 
1817 Red Mill Road, 234-1351 
Randy Smith, Pastor 
LONGVIEW UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 
4320 South Wilson Road 
Rev. Hyungsool Kim 
MEMORIAL UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

631 North Miles St., 769-3331 
Dr. Michael Gibbons 


ELIZABETHTOWN 


METROPOLITAN COMMUNITY CHURCH 

119 Brooks Street 300-7099 
Rev. Cathy Porter 

MT. ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 
350 Mt. Zion Rd., 737-7221 
(across from New Highland School) 
Leon Chambers, Pastor 
NAME OF JESUS APOSTOLIC CHURCH 
308 Poplar Street 
Robert Washington, Pastor 
NEW FELLOWSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 
Corner of Hwy. 220 & 31W, 765-6439 
Elmer Varnadore, Pastor 
NEW HOPE COMMUNITY CHURCH 
34 Dee Street 737-6645 
Herb Williams, Pastor 
NORTHSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 
1800 Pear Orchard Rd., 765-6424 
Kevin Roberts, Pastor 
OPEN DOOR ASSEMBLY 
6970 South Wilson Rd. 

Chris Ubano, Pastor 
POWERHOUSE OF PRAISE AND 
DELIVERANCE 

6869 N. Dixie; 270-982-3030 
Towanda L. Hope, Pastor 
PRAISE CHAPEL CHRISTIAN 
FELLOWSHIP 

120 Cornerstone Church Lane 
268-9831 

Michael & Mary LeGrand, Pastors 

ROUND TOP BAPTIST CHURCH 

705 Round Top Road, 737-7339 
Bro. Donnie Davis, Pastor 
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST CHURCH 
215 N. Mantle, 272-9849 
Luis Ruiz, Pastor 

SEVERNS VALLEY BAPTIST CHURCH 

1100 Ring Road, 765-7822 
Bill Langley, Pastor 
SKYLINE MISSION CHURCH, INC. 
801 Skyline Drive, 769-5653 
Co-Pastors: Jerome L. Beasley, Sr. 
Joyce E. Beasley 

ST. JAMES ROMAN CATHOLIC CHURCH 
307 W. Dixie Ave., 765-6268 
Father Charles Walker 
ST. JOHN CATHOLIC CHURCH 
657 St. John Church Rd., 862-9816 
Father Dan Lincoln 
THE CHURCH OF GOD 
1189 Bacon Creek Rd. 

THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST 
OF LATTER-DAY SAINTS 
2950 Shepherdsville Rd. 

E’town: 737-5037; Rad.: 300-8474 
Elizabethtown ward - 
Bishop Marc Craig 
Radcliff ward - Bishop Kicenski 
THE CROSSROADS COMMUNITY 
CHURCH 

100 Hobson Way, US 31W & Bypass 
(behind Big 0 Tires), 769-1577 
Paul “Ed” Shonkwiler, Pastor 
THE ISLAMIC CENTER OF 
ELIZABETHTOWN 

2816 Ring Road, 765-7190 
Imaam Mohamed 1. Lunat 
THE OVERCOMERS CHURCH 
Starlight Drive, 900-1773 
Tom Vaughn, Pastor 
THE ROCK CHURCH 
610 N. Dixie Avenue 
270-765-ROCK or 737-8936 
James & Iris Cole, Pastors 
TRINITY INDEPENDENT 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

835 New Glendale Rd., 769-1630 
Eugene Owens, Pastor 
TRINITY WESLEYAN CHURCH 
902 North Mulberry, 765-6392 
Rev. Dana B. Beland 
TUNNEL HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 
734 Tunnel Hill Church Rd. 
737-8120 

Dr. Nathan Whisnant, Pastor 
VALLEY CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

4685 Springfield Rd., 737-9282 
Rev. Scott Kerr 

VICTORY COMMUNITY CHURCH 

404 College St. Rd. 

Jay Boyd, Pastor - 268-5037 

VICTORY FAITH CHRISTIAN CEN¬ 
TER 

460 S. Mulberry St, 735-1377 
Pervis Carter, Pastor 

VINEYARD CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
OF ELIZABETHTOWN 

201 S. Mulberry St, 234-0590 
Mike Smith, Pastor 

WESTSIDE BAPTIST CHURCH 
PRITCHARD COMMUNITY CENTER 

404 S. Mulberry St 
735-2536 

J. T. Kirkpatrick, Pastor 

YOUNGERS CREEK BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

251 Youngers Creek Rd., 737-8676 
Bro. Dusty Martin 


BOSTON 


BOSTON COMMUNITY CHURCH 

386 Shady Lane, 737-9916 
Richard Martin, Pastor 

BOSTON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

195 Petersburg Rd. 
502-833-2204 

TEMPLE HILL CHURCH 
APOSTOLIC FAITH 

12857 Boston Road 
Bruce Perry, 769-2911 


BRANDENBURG 


ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

Glad Tidings Christian Center 
515 By-Pass Road, 422-2020 
(across from McDonalds) 

Larry Powell, Pastor 
BETHEL UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
120 Bethel Church Road 
Pastor, Dan Paddack; 270-945-4997 
BRANDENBURG CHURCH OF GOD 
1 Howard Drive, 422-5531 
(beside the middle school) 

Rev. Randy Johnson 
BRANDENBURG UNITED METH¬ 
ODIST CHURCH 

215 Broadway, 270-422-2810 
Jim Robinson, Pastor 
BUCK GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
255 Buck Grove, Rd., Ekron 
(Off Hwy. 144), 270-828-2717 
David Campbell, Pastor 
EKRON BAPTIST CHURCH 
2500 Haysville Rd., Ekron 
Dr. Jamie Vance, Pastor; 828-3454 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
149 Lawrence Street 
Pastor, Sherman Ramsey 
GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH 
7691 Hwy 60 • Ekron 
Rev. Dan Newton, 828-2333 
HILL GROVE CHURCH OF CHRIST 
Rt. 1, Guston 
Larry W. Priddy, Pastor 
HILL GROVE CHURCH OF CHRIST 
1110 Foushee Rd., Guston 943-0022 
Brian McCutchen, Pastor 
HOLY TRINITY EPISCOPAL CHURCH 
319 Oaklawn Rd. (behind the library) 
Rev. Stephen Wimsett, 422-3721 
NEW BEGINNINGS CHRISTIAN CENTER 
3770 Old Mill Road, 735-2986 
Paul Fox, Pastor 
PATTESON MEMORIAL 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

100 Newton Rd.-Guston, 547-7283 
Charles Taylor, Minister 
PAYNEVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 
115 Hwy. 376, 496-4446 
ROCK HAVEN COMMUNITY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
Hwy. 1638 (2 miles past 
Otter Creek Park on right) 

Bro. William “Happy” Chandler 
828-2555 

SALEM BAPTIST CHURCH 

5286 Old State Road 

Rev. Guy Cornell, 270-422-1399 


BRANDENBURG 


ST. JOHN THE APOSTLE 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 

515 E. Broadway, 422-2196 
Father Kevin Bryan 
WELDON CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
1595 Christian Church Rd. 

Gary True, Minister, 270-422-5947 
ZION GROVE MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

7050 Brandenburg Road, Ekron 
270-828-3939 


CECILIA AREA 


CECILIA BAPTIST CHURCH 

416 E. Main St., 862-4228 
Erdie Carter Jr., Pastor 
CECILIA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
Methodist Street 
270-737-7558 or 502-523-9323 
Greg Smith, Pastor 
FAIR FARM BAPTIST CHURCH 
Constantine Road, 862-3683 
Brother Kenneth Merritt 
FRANKLIN CROSSROADS 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

4695 Hardinsburg Rd., 862-4825 
Ron Davis, Pastor 
FREEDOMS WAY CHURCH 
1190 Tabb Rd., 358-0863 
Billy Curie, Pastor 
GOSPEL WAY BAPTIST CHURCH 
On Hwy. 86 at top of Arch Hill 
Jim Sutton, Pastor - 862-4786 
GRANDVIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
St. John Rd. & Grandview Church Rd 
Rick Breeze, Interim Pastor 
HOWEVALLEY UNITED METH¬ 
ODIST CHURCH 

On Ky. 86 in Howevalley, 862-3721 
Rose Marie Jones, Pastor 
KINGDOM OF HEAVEN MINISTRIES 
191 Methodist St, 300-9686 
Bob Hunt, Pastor 

LIBERTY CHAPEL GENERAL BAP¬ 
TIST CHURCH 

15205 Hardinsburg Rd. 

Rev. Bryan Matthews 
OPEN VALLEY UNITED BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Hardinburg Rd., 862-4732 
Jeff Doyle, Pastor 

ROUGH CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

181 Howevalley Rd., 862-9540 
Bro. John R. Clark, Pastor 
ST. AMBROSE CHURCH 
Main Street, 765-6268 
Father Charles Walker 
VERTREES BAPTIST CHURCH 
Vertrees Church Lane, 763-9109 
John Boone, Pastor 
YATES CHAPEL COMMUNITY 
CHURCH 

2120 Yates Chapel Road 
Bro. Jeff Reneer, Pastor 


COLESBURG 


COLESBURG BAPTIST CHURCH 

345 Colesburg Rd.; 270-900-1325 
Rick Nauck, Interim Pastor 

ST. CLARE CATHOLIC CHURCH 

St. Clare Rd., 737-7522 


EASTVIEW 


ANGEL RIDGE WORSHIP & RES¬ 
TORATION CENTER 

7142 Spurrier Rd., 242-2194 
(7 miles out Hwy. 720) 

Rev. Don & Betty Teague 
EASTVIEW WESLEYAN CHURCH 
16853 Sonora-Hardin 
Springs Rd., 862-2908 
Bro. Paul Hornberger 
FAIRFIELD COMMUNITY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

2912 Meeting Creek Rd., 668-9102 
Bro. Marvin Dodson 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF 
EASTVIEW 
251 Church St. 

Scott Curie, Pastor 
HIGHWAY OF HOLINESS CHURCH 
Hwy. 62, 862-4509 
Jody Silvers, Pastor 
MEETING CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
Hwy. 84 

Bro. Mike Cannon 
MT. OLIVE CUMBERLAND 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

Mt. Olive Church Rd., 602-684-5037 
Bro. Mike Morrissey, Pastor 
NEEDHAM CUMBERLAND 
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 

180 Laurel Ridge Rd., 270-734-7402 
Rev. Shelby 0. Haire 
PLEASANT GROVE 
UNITED METHODIST 

Hwy. 84 (Big Clifty), 862-3974 
Rev. Valerie Johnson 
POLE BRIDGE INDEPENDENT 
BAPTIST CHURCH 
Hwy. 920 between 
Hwy. 86 & Hwy. 84, 

SMITH CHAPEL UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 
Hwy. 84, 862-3974 
Rev. Valerie Johnson 
SUTZER CREEK COMMUNITY CHURCH 
Sutzer Creek Road, 242-3524 
Rev. Anthony Peters, Pastor 


FLAHERTY 


ST. MARTIN’S CATHOLIC CHURCH 

440 St. Martin Road, 828-2552 
Father Kevin Bryan 


GLENDALE 


CALVARY MISSION CHURCH OF GOD 
6827 S. Dixie Hwy., 369-7946 
Brenda Nelson, Pastor 
DORSEY CHAPEL MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

South Dixie Hwy., 879-8256 
Ernie Priddy, Pastor 
FAITH MISSIONARY BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

7319 New Glendale Road 
Bro. Stephen Hensley 
FREE SPIRIT CHURCH OF GOD 
Hwy. 222, 307-8956 
Tim Capps, Pastor 
GILEAD BAPTIST CHURCH 
2691 Gilead Church R., 369-7863 
(exit 86 on 165 South) 

Rev. Sam Hinkson 
GLENDALE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
119 West Main, 369-7874 
Rev. Michael Bell 

GLENDALE UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

118 Main Street, 268-7744 
Rev. Greg Smith 

LITTLE ZION BAPTIST CHURCH 

7151 New Glendale Rd., 369-9143 
Rev. William McCann, Pastor 

NEW HORIZON BAPTIST FELLOWSHIP 
864 West Rhudes Creek Rd. 

Steve Hill, Pastor 
VICTORY LIFE FELLOWSHIP 
CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY 
6138 South Dixie Hwy., 369-7776 
Randall Austin, Pastor 


GUSTON 


PATTESON MEMORIAL PRES¬ 
BYTERIAN CHURCH 

100 Newton Road, 270-547-7283 
Mary Kuhn, Pastor 


HODGENVILLE 


CHURCH OF GOD OF PROPHECY 

150 Peak Street 
Rev. Faye Barnes, Pastor 


HODGENVILLE 


CHRIST WORSHIP CENTER 

200 Lincoln Blvd., 270-268-3019 
Joe Ramirez, Pastor 

CORINTH BAPTIST CHURCH 
Hwy. 210; Tim Maggard, Pastor 
FIRST MISSIONARY BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

404 S. Lincoln Blvd., 358-9442 
Jerry Wilkinson, Pastor 
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH 
730 Tonieville Road, 358-3193 
FREEDOM’S WAY ASSEMBLY OF GOD 
1170 Old E’town Road, 358-4106 
FRIENDSHIP BAPTIST CHURCH 
2169 Salem Church Road 
Dewey Keyes Jr., Pastor 
FULL GOSPEL ASSEMBLY CHURCH 
500 Kirkpatrick Ave., 358-4436 
Richard Binkley, Pastor 
GOSPEL OF GRACE BAPTIST CHURCH 
1430 Old E’town Rd., 723-4373 
Bro. Dewey Keys Sr., Pastor 
HODGENVILLE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
100 W. Main (on the square) 
Carlton E. Puryear, Pastor 
358-4049 

HODGENVILLE CHURCH OF CHRIST 

613 S. Lincoln Blvd., 358-4352 
Brian Wood, Evangelist 
HARVESTLAND COMMUNITY CHURCH 
P.O. Box 281, 358-5418 
Joe Jolly, Pastor 

HODGENVILLE CHURCH OF GOD 
FAMILY WORSHIP CENTER 

343 Tanner Road, 358-9694 
Mark Knight, Pastor 
HODGENVILLE 
PENTECOSTAL CHURCH 
1710 Campbellsville Road 
David Webb, Pastor, 358-4108 
HODGENVILLE UNITED METH¬ 
ODIST CHURCH 

Lincoln Parkway & Tonieville Rd. 
Rev. Bob Howell, 358-3028 
LANE LINCOLN MEM. CME CHURCH 
200 Tanner Road, 358-9911 
Rev. Aaron Moss, Pastor 
LARUE BAPTIST CHURCH 

2492 Lincoln Farm Rd., 358-4673 
Donald Kennedy, Pastor 
LARUE COUNTY CHURCH OF CHRIST 
Hwy. 210 West, 358-9812 
Robert F. Morris, Pastor 
LINCOLN MEMORIAL MISSION¬ 
ARY BAPTIST CHURCH 

290 Greensburg Rd., 270-932-6309 
Rev. Thomas Downey 
LIVING WORD CHURCH 
216 S. Lincoln Blvd. 

MAGNOLIA BAPTIST CHURCH 
4745 South L&N Turnpike 
324-3535 

MAGNOLIA CUMBERLAND PRES¬ 
BYTERIAN 

235 L&N Turnpike, 324-3472 
Anthony Harris, Pastor 
MIDDLE CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 
3635 Carter Brothers Rd., 358-4462 
Bro. Merrill Kurtz, Pastor 
NEW HOPE APOSTOLIC CHURCH 
42 Summit Height 
D.E. Milton Sledge, Pastor 
NOLYNN BAPTIST CHURCH 
Glendale Rd. (Ky. 222), 358-5586 
George W. Smith, Pastor 
OUR LADY OF MERCY 
CATHOLIC CHURCH 
208 Walters Avenue 
358-4697 
Rev. Mike Tobin 

OVESEN HEIGHTS BAPTIST CHURCH 

1604 Bardstown Rd., 

358-8041 

PARKWAY BAPTIST CHURCH 

325 Old Sonora Road, 358-3631 
Calvin Halcomb, Pastor 
PLEASANT GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
125 Howardstown Rd., 763-6724 
Rick Trumbo, Pastor 
ROANOKE HOUSE OF PRAYER 
9.1 miles from E’town on 
Valley Creek Road, 358-8565 
Matthew Trumbo, Pastor 
SALEM CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
3270 Salem Church Rd., 358-4197 
Sid Lewis, Pastor 

SOUTH FORK BAPTIST CHURCH 

4915 New Jackson Hwy. (31E) 
Jonathan Carl, Pastor - 325-3626 
THE RIVER OF LIFE CHURCH 
524 Kirkpatrick Ave., 358-8466 
Michael Williams, Pastor 
UNION BAND BAPTIST CHURCH 
5434 Stiles Road (Hwy. 84) 

Bro. Leroy Shultz - 369-8951 
UNION CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
970 Union Church Rd., 358-7072 
Bro. Steve Campbell 
WESLEY CHAPEL BAPTIST CHURCH 
Ennis Mill Rd., 877-0199 
John R. Hornback, Pastor 
WESLEY MEADOWS UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

4341 Campbellsville Rd., 325-3740 
Wallace Votaw, Pastor 


HUDSON 


MOUNT GILEAD CHURCH 

Tab Howard Road 
Bro., Donnie Lewis 


IRVINGTON 


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF 
IRVINGTON 

107 Union St., 270-547-2992 
William Parker Sr., Pastor 


LEBANON JUNCTION 


DENNIE MEMORIAL U.M.C. 

Corner of Brook St. & Main St. 
Rev. Calvin Johnson, 502-833-9926 
FIRST APOSTOLIC CHURCH 
171 Water Tower Road 
Rev. Rodney Richardson 


MULDRAUGH 


MULDRAUGH BAPTIST CHURCH 

307 S. Main St., (502) 942-3886 
David Sullivan, Pastor 


RADCLIFF 


ALL NATIONS WORSHIP 
MINISTRIES 

110 Wiselyn Drive, 352-4919 
Pastors Michael and Gloria Fite 
ALPHA UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 
1995 Dixie Hwy., 351-9898 
Hyungsool Kim, Pastor 
ABUNDANT LIFE CHURCH 

1352 N. Logsdon Pkwy., 351-9990 
Jimmy Squires, Pastor 
AGAPE MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 
1488 W. Lin. Trl. Blvd., 352-5680 
Thomas B. Rice, Jr., Pastor 
THE CROSSROADS, U.P.C. 

182 W. Vine St., 351-6060 
Wayne A. J. Dummitt, Pastor 
BACA MIRACLE REVIVAL CENTER 
355 Shelby Avenue, 270-723-0886 
Cleotus & Wanda McElroy, Pastors 
BETHEL MISSION ALLIANCE CHURCH 
1763 Hill Street, 351-6076 
Ray Myung, Pastor 
BARREN RUN BAPTIST CHURCH 
3869 Airline Rd. (take Hwy. 84 
to Barren Run Rd., turn right) 
Mike Williams, Pastor, 765-2943 
BIBLE BAPTIST CHURCH 
156 Shelby Avenue, 351-6866 
Tom Green, Pastor 
CHRIST DEPENDENT 
COMMUNITY CHURCH 

5687 S. Wilson Road, 877-7214 
Bro. Alfred Wesley 


RADCLIFF 


CONNECTIONS CHURCH 

Colvin Community Ctr., 351-2725 
Dr. Jim Shaw, Senior Pastor 
CROSSROADS CHRISTIAN CENTER 
A Foursquare Church 

1786 Rodney Street, 351-6287 
R. Gary Summers, Pastor 
FAITH LUTHERAN CHURCH 
377 E. Lincoln Trail Blvd. 
FELLOWSHIP COMMUNITY 
FULL GOSPEL CHURCH 

600 Shelton Road, 352-3411 
Wilhelmina Jackson, Pastor 

FELLOWSHIP INDEPENDENT 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

1298 Rogersville Road, 351-7700 
Rev. A. Paige Hardin 
FIRST CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
1060 W. Lincoln Trail, 351-4605 
Bro. Art McCann 

FIRST KOREAN BAPTIST CHURCH 

546 Sunset Drive, 351-1700 
Rev. Yong K. Cho 

FULL GOSPEL KENTUCKY CHURCH 

1012 North Hill St., 351-4268 
Steve Song, Pastor 
Services: Korean 11 am English 2 pm 
GLORYLAND HARVEST CHURCH 
757 S. Woodland Dr., 352-5483 
Jacob L. Pearman, Pastor 
GREATER DIMENSION COMMUNITY 
FELLOWSHIP COGIC 

295 W. Lincoln Trl., 352-4323 
Timothy W. Brown, Pastor 
HERITAGE INTERNATIONAL 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
660 Knox Blvd., 351-7770 
Pastors Aubrey & Jannie Jackson 
HOPE TEMPLE CHURCH OF 
GOD IN CHRIST 

1489 North Dixie Blvd., 352-0771 
Dwight L. Haygood, Pastor 
IGLESIA de DIOS LEVANTANDO 
al CAIDO 

673-C Knox Blvd. 

Elizaida Hernandez, Pastor 
KY FULL GOSPEL CHURCH 
1012 Hill Street, 351-4211 
Won Lee, Pastor 
KOREAN PRESBYTERIAN 
CHURCH OF RADCLIFF 
649 Knox Blvd. 

Rev. Kwang Hyun Chung 
LIFELINE ASSEMBLY OF GOD 
1122 South Dixie Blvd., 351- 6150 
Rev. Josh Nagel 

MILL CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 

1182 S. Jones, 351-3524 
T. B. Smith, Interim Pastor 
MINISTERIO VIDA ABUNDANTE 
1352 N. Logsdon Pkwy., 351-9990 
Edwin Bonet, Pastor 
MORNING STAR MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

1106 S. Wilson Road, 351-1161 
Harold H. Craig, Jr, Pastor 
NEW COVENANT FELLOWSHIP 
355 Shelby Ave., 351-8883 
Joe Hammond, Jr., Pastor 
NEW HOPE MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

1591 Hill Street, 351-6808 
0. C. Jones Sr., Pastor 
NEW JERUSALEM SEVENTH-DAY 
ADVENTIST CHURCH 

1226 Wilson Road, 352-2256 
Dejuan Knight, Pastor 
NEW LIFE BAPTIST CHURCH 
140 Logan Street, 352-1414 
Hyuk Lee, Pastor 
NEW RIVER MINISTRIES 

Corner of Northern & Illinois Rd. 
270-307-1313, 502-797-1130 
Mike Willingham, Pastor 
NORTH HARDIN CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

601 Oak Street, 351-LORD 
Ron Hockman, Evangelist 

NORTH HARDIN CHURCH OF CHRIST 
1804 Sam Steward Dr. 

Off of Joe Prather Hwy 
723-3650 

RADCLIFF BAPTIST CHURCH 

673-G Knox Blvd., 352-2204 
Rev. Eric Robinson 
RADCLIFF CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
(Disciples of Christ) 

300 S. Logsdon Pkwy., 351-6494 
Rev. David Conway 
RADCLIFF CHURCH OF CHRIST 
2160 S. Dixie Blvd., 351-6818 
Larry Harrington, Evangelist 
RADCLIFF CHURCH OF GOD 
1325 N. Hill Street, 234-8869 
Larry Richardson, Pastor 
RADCLIFF CHURCH OF 
THE NAZARENE 

466 N. Logsdon Pkwy., 351-4206 
Rev. James M. Lay 

RADCLIFF FIRST ASSEMBLY OF GOD 

250 Rogersville Road, 351-4733 
Herman Gilley, Pastor 
RADCLIFF PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH 
1751 S. Logsdon Pkwy., 351-6199 
Dr. John D. Lentz, Pastor 
RADCLIFF UNITED METHODIST 
275 S. Woodland Dr., 351-3290 
Rev. Art Leach 

RED HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 

1991 Hill Street 
James Royalty, Pastor 

RESTORATION WORSHIP CEN¬ 
TER CHURCH OF GOD 

640 Olivia Alley, 352-3006 
Bishop Carl U. Smalls Sr. 

RESTORING LIFE CHRISTIAN 
CHURCH 

Hampton Inn and Suites 
150 Johnson Rd., 502-233-1627 
Larry & Cynthia Parson, Pastors 

SANDERSON MEMORIAL 
CHURCH OF THE LIVING GOD 

Pentecostal Holiness 
160 Logan Street, 351-3523 
N. Sanderson, Pastor 

ST. CHRISTOPHER CATHOLIC 
CHURCH 

On Wilson Road behind 
Radcliff Middle School, 351-3706 
Father Dennis L. Cousens 
STITHTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
95 Park Avenue, 351-6055 
Dr. Gregg Curtis, Pastor 
STOVALL UNITED METHODIST 
949 Rogersville Road, 351-0250 
Rev. Kenneth lessee 
THE POTTER’S HOUSE 
CHRISTIAN CHURCH 

549 N. Wilson Road, 352-4047 
David Swartz, Pastor 
THE REFUGE 

172 Johns Rd., 351-1288 
Jerry Bell, Pastor 
THE SIGN OF THE DOVE 
1189 Sunset Dr., 351-3550 
Edward Palmer, Pastor 
TRUTH IN LOVE MINISTRY 
(Inner Healing and Deliverance) 

291 Pinewood Drive, 351-2971 
VICTORY FAITH CHRISTIAN 
CENTER 

410 North Dixie Blvd. 

Pervis Carter, Pastor 
WORD CHURCH 

1574 W. Line. Trl Blvd., 974-4689 
Jerry Bell, Pastor 


RINEYVILLE 


ANTIOCH BAPTIST CHURCH OF 
RINEYVILLE (Independent Baptist) 

353 Chase Lake Rd.; 505-6729 
Darin Otjen, Pastor 
PLEASANT VIEW UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

11362 Rineyville Big Spring Rd. 
Harvey Craddock, Pastor, 737-4413 
RIDGE SPRING 

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Hwy. 220, 737-4413 
(Rineyville-Big Spring Road) 

Rev. Harvey Craddock 
RINEYVILLE BAPTIST CHURCH 
5629 Rineyville Rd., 737-7361 
Rev. Mitch Ash 
SHEPHERDS WAY 
COMMUNITY CHURCH 
6085 Rineyville Rd. 

Bro. Cole Caven, 270-872-3650 


SONORA 


FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH OF 
SONORA 

709 Main Street, 369-7234 
Tony Carson, Pastor 

OAK HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 

4196 Oak Hill Rd., 324-3438 
Eric Page, Pastor 

OLIVE HILL MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

Silvermine Road 
Bro. Ralph Jenkins, Pastor 
SONORA BAPTIST CHURCH 
135 Main Street 
Rev. Clarence Boyd 
SONORA CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
809 North Main St., 877-5494 
Bro. Robert Perkins 
SONORA UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 
409 Main Street, 369-8870 
Brother Kevin Stamps 
ZION UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Hwy. 1921 between Hwy. 224 
& Hwy. 720, 369-7682 
Randall P. Jones, Pastor 


STEPHENSBURG 


NORTH STEPHENSBURG MIS¬ 
SIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 

Morrison Lane, 766-8492 
Bro. Eddie Wheeler, Pastor 
STEPHENSBURG MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

10665 Leitchfield Rd., 862-4538 
Rev. Doug Peters, Pastor 
STEPHENSBURG UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 
400 Franklin Cross Rd. 

Rev. Don Sexton, 862-3349 
STEPHENSBURG CHURCH OF 
GOD OF PROPHECY 

Wonderland Cavern Road 
Rev. Wayne Napper, 862-3529 
UNITY BAPTIST 
CHURCH OF STEPHENSBURG 
440 Wonderland Cavern Road 
Rev. Don Flanigan, 862-5998 


SUMMIT 


GOOD SHEPHERD INDE¬ 
PENDENT BAPTIST 
45 Locust Post Road 
SUMMIT UNITED METHODIST 
CHURCH 

Summit-Eastview Rd. 

Rev. Don Sexton, 862-3349 

SUMMIT GENERAL BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

Baptist Church Rd., 862-3538 
Bro. Donald Hall 


UPTON 


BETHEL MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

31W South of Upton 
Bro. Glen Stasel 
CHRISTIAN FELLOWSHIP 
MISSIONARY BAPTIST CHURCH 
Magnolia Street, 270-565-3153 
Bro. Nicky Ferguson 
JESUS NAME HOUSE OF PRAYER 
Weldon Loop, 369-6331 
Tina Wheeler, Pastor 
LUCAS GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
3895 Millerstown Road, 369-7559 
Brandon L. Sehein, Pastor 
STONEY POINT MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

3444 Pleasant Hill Rd., 369-8209 
Bro. Jack Srygler, Pastor 
UPTON BAPTIST CHURCH 
College Street, 369-8289 
J.D. Shipp, Pastor 
UPTON UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

109 North Walnut St., 369-7682 
Randall P. Jones, Pastor 
WALNUT HILL BAPTIST CHURCH 
31W South 

Ollie P. Franklin, Pastor 
WJCR HOUSE OF PRAYER 

Gary Richardson, Pastor 
369-8614 


VINE GROVE 


BIG SPRING CORNERS 
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 

Big Spring Road, (502) 558-5641 
Bro. Jerry Shelley, Pastor 

CALVARY MISSIONARY BAPTIST 
CHURCH 

614 E. Main St., 317-4871 
Rev. Lorenza Lovejoy Sr., Pastor 
GRACE FREEWILL BAPTIST CHURCH 
13490 Rineyville Road 
Rev. John Akers, Pastor 
GRACE LUTHERAN CHURCH LCMS 
127 W. Main St., 270-877-2855 
David Tannahill, Pastor 
HEARTLAND CHRISTIAN CEN¬ 
TER ASSEMBLY OF GOD 
124 Ditto Lane, 877-5683 
Darwin Bostwick, Pastor 
HIGH PLAINS UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 

High Plains Road, (502) 558-5641 
Bro. Jerry Shelley, Pastor 
LIBERTY INDEPENDENT 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

189 Pickerell Lane, 270-735-6733 
Bro. Mark Weidemann, Pastor 
LIGHTHOUSE HOUSE OF PRAYER 
2233 Knox Avenue, 270-828-2471 
Dave Rednour, Pastor 
LIGHTHOUSE MISSION CHURCH 
OF DELIVERANCE 

202 Brown St., 877-0660 
Barbara A. Brown, Pastor 
NEW APOSTOLIC CHURCH 
517 Highland, 877-6376 
Thomas Getz, Pastor 
NEW BEGINNING CHURCH AND 
MINISTRIES 

623 Safari Trail, 351-3274 
Phillip & Paula Quesenberry, Pastors 
NEW SALEM BAPTIST CHURCH 
632 New Salem Church Road 
Rev. James Clark, 877-2729 
REVELATION MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

617 E. Main St., 877-0770 
John R. Marshall, Pastor 
ST. BRIGID CATHOLIC CHURCH 
314 E. Main, 877-2461 
Father Dan Lincoln 
VALLEY VIEW BAPTIST CHURCH 
501Valley View Drive, 877-2150 
Dr. Shawn Edwards, Pastor 
VINE GROVE BAPTIST CHURCH 
408 West Main St., 877-2311 
Chaplain Larry Vance 
VINE GROVE CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
Corner of College & Brown St. 
Mike Yeast, Minister - 877-5558 
VINE GROVE CHURCH OF GOD 
2350 Knox Ave., 877-2177 
Thomas Waddell, PASTOR 
VINE GROVE UNITED 
METHODIST CHURCH 
306 High Street, 877-5231 
Johnny Craig, Pastor 


WEST POINT 


RIVER OF LIFE FULL GOSPEL 

West Point, bottom of Muldraugh 
Hill to caution light, turn right 
follow church signs. Rev. Tom Jeffery 


WHITE MILLS 


CENTER POINT MISSIONARY 
BAPTIST CHURCH 

Center Point Road, 234-8615 
Brother Robert Jewell 
ST. IGNATIUS CATHOLIC CHURCH 
7786 Sonora Hardin Springs Rd. 
Father Charles Walker, 765-6268 
WHITE MILLS BAPTIST CHURCH 
828 Cave Road, 862-5235 
Rev. Bruce Underhill, Pastor 
WHITE MILLS CHRISTIAN CHURCH 
521 Cave Road, 862-3999 
Bro. Tim Dennis, Minister 


MISA HISPANA EN ELIZABETHTOWN 

La Iglesia Catolica de St. James localizada en 307 W. Dixie Ave. Elizabethtown 
ofrece misa en Espahol todos los Domingos a las 5:00 PM. 

“Por favor vengan, compartan y alaben a nuestro Dios como una comunidad Hispana lo sabe 
hacer” Para mas informacion llame al 270 - 312 - 1874 . 

Servios proveidos por El Padre Mike Tobin 


I MILL CREEK BAPTIST CHURCH 


1182 S. Jones St. 
Radcliff, KY 40160 
270-351-3524 


Childcare Provided • Military Welcome 

Web Page: www.niillcreekbaptist.com 
Email: FollowMeToMillCreek@gmail.com 












































































, fc'iiim/ 

Nffwr Showing 



Gall theaters 
far slMW times 

KEVSlGNEGINEnU, 

Bardstowtt 

(502)350-0150 

“"me Hunger Games'" 
(PG-131 

“American Reunfon" (R) 
“Mirror Mirror" (PG) 

"21 Jurrsp Street'' (R) 
"Titanic' 3D (PG-13) 
-Wrath of the Titans" 3D 
(PG-13) 

“Wrath of the Tilans" 
(PG-13) "Dr. Seuss^ 
The lorax" [PG] 

HISfQ«lC3TATE THEATER 
Eltzabethtewn 
234-B258 

Friday and Saturday: 
“Ralntree County’’ 

MOVIE PALACE, 
Elisabethtown 
769-1505 

"The Cabin in the 
Woods’^ (R) 

“Lockout" (P&13) 
“The Three Stooges " 
(PG) 

"Wrath of the Titans 
2D (PG-13) 

“Wrath of the Titans" 
3D (PG-13) 

“Mirror Mirror'* (PGJ 
"The Hunger Games" 
(PG-13> 

"Dr. Seuss' The 
Lorax" 2D (PG) 

"Actor of Vaior" (R) 
"The Vow" (PG-13) 

"21 Jump Street" (R) 
“John Carter" 2D 
“Titanic" 3D 
"American Reunion" 
(R) 

SHOWTIME CINEMAS, 
Radcliff, 351-1519 

"Wrath of the Titans'' 2D 
(PG-13) 

"American Reunion" (R) 
“The Hunger Games" 
(PG-13) 

"The Cabin in the 
Woods" (R) 

“The Three Stooges" 
(PG) 

WAY6UR THEATER, 

Fort 

S42-4284 

"Act of Valor” (R) 

"Project X" [R) 

“Dr. Seuss The Lorax" 
(PG) 



Performance may include 
admission even if not listed. 

TODAY 

sustRKvraMss 

10:30 p.m., Habana 
Blues, 2813 N. Hurst- 
bourne Parkway. Louis¬ 
ville, $5. POC: (502) 423^ 
4434. 

APRIL 17 

YOUNG WIDOWS WTTK 
TROPICAL TRASH AND JOWLS 

@ 8 p.m,, Pyramid 
Scheme, 68 Commerce 
SW, Grand Rapids, Mich., 
$10 advance, $12 day of 
show. POC; (616) 272- 
3758- 

APRIL18 

YOUNG WIDOWS WITH 
TBOPICAL TRASH, 8 p.m. @ 
Smafl's, Hamtramck, 
10339 Conant, Mich., 
$10. POC: (313) 873- 
1117. 

If your band has a peiforniance 
and yiya ivant v> g4t the micd OTit, 
emad Hk date, tuAe^ venue, 
address and conlacl informatLon 
with Ci(}34 of ndjnissaon to 
eaJenda»^Sthcnawscnt«rpH$c.oanL 
This caletidju: listen^ U pnrvided as 
an tnfnnnatloD service. 


■ ■ I ^\_A A 1 THE News-Enihipri 

III 1 / 1 / 

FMUW V V 

‘Cuckoo’ becomes relative 
with HCP production 



Prio 4 g^ ^ NEAL CARDlU/ThB 


Patient Randle McMurptiy tries In vain to intimidate Nurse Raiehed as he takes an early morning stroll through the mental 
hospital in a scene from the Hardin County Playhouse production of "'One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.'" Aar^n Taylor p1ay« 
Mg Murphy as Saiah Ryan portrays Nurse Ratuhed. 



Me Murphy, right, tries to make a point with another mental patient in a scene from ""One 
Raw Over the Cuckoo’s Nest.'' 


By ROBERT 
VILLANUEVA 

rviUajiuevn@ 

[henewScntcrprisje.cOfti 

Mental health is rela¬ 
tive in more wavs than 
one when a real-life broth¬ 
er- and sisternn-law^ Uike 
lead roles in the Hardin 
County Playhouse pro¬ 
duction of ‘"One Flew 
Over the Cuckoo’s Nest” 

Sarah Ryan, who plays 
Nurse Ratched^ appears 
opposite her brother-in- 
law', Aaron Taylor, who 
plays Randle McMurphy. 

“They were jusl the 
right ones for the roles,” 
said Bo Cecil, HCP artis¬ 
tic director, 

Ryan sairl h^ing Tav- 
lor^s sister-in-law didn’t 
sigmticanUy affect their 
performing dynamic. The 
two worked logethe- last 
year m a production of 
“Peer Cynt” at Ha dm 
County Schools Perform¬ 
ing Alls Center. 

More daunting for the 
actors might be the chal¬ 
lenge of delving into the 
subject of mental health, 

“One Flew Over the 
Cuckoo’s Nest" tells a sto¬ 
ry of what happens when 
the spirited McMurphy 
becomes part of a ment^ 
ward ruled by Nurse 
Ratched. 

Accessing the type of 
personality baits reejuired 
to portray their diaracters 
required Rvcui and Taylor 
to visit a dark mindset. 

The term “mentally ill” 
also depends on how you 
define it, so it bocomes rel- 
ative» Taylor said. 

Despite Taylor’s belief 
McMurphy doesnT con¬ 
sider himself mentally ill, 
the character’s proclivity 
for getting into fights 
speaks to some definite is¬ 
sues. That aggressive na¬ 
ture also is a character trait 
Taylor doesn’t possess. 

“He’s a different person 
than i am,” Taylor said, 
“WTren it comes to fight or 
flight, I flight, McMurphy 
fights.^ 

In some respects, he 
said, exercising the mental 
shifts is more exliausling 
than physically demand¬ 
ing roles. 


IF YOU GO 

The Hardin County 
Playhouse production of 
"On© Fiew Over the 
Cuckoo’s Nesr is at 7 
p.m. today, Saturday and 
April 19, 20 and 21 and 
at 3 p.m. Sunday and 
April 22 at Plum Alley 
Theater In the Historic 
Stale Theater complex in 
Elizabethtown. 

General admission 
tickets cost $15 each or 
$13 for those 55 and old* 
er, students, mi fitary and 
military dependents and 
groups of 10 or more. 

For more Infornr^ation 
Of to reserve tickets, call 
(270) 351-0577. 

""Mentally, it can take a 
toll,” Taylor said. 

Ryan, who said she’s 
never played an antago¬ 
nist foi an entire play, felt 
playing Nurse Ratched 
took her into a “creepy 
headspace." 

“"lb tnake an antagonist 
real there’s got to be parts 
of yourself in there," she 


said. 

To understand the an¬ 
tagonist she portrays, who 
Ryan believes displays a 
“complete lack of empa¬ 
thy," Ryan said she 
viewed old footage of 
shock therapy. 

“I feel like if I’m going 
to j)lay a character who 
could order a lobotomy, I 


need to understand ll>e 
giitty horribleness of it," 
she said. 

The roles also are chal¬ 
lenging for Ryan and 
Taylor because they in¬ 
volve such iconic ch^C’ 
ters, probably most recog¬ 
nizable through the 1975 
film version starring Jack 
Nicholson and Louise 


Fletcher. The play origi¬ 
nally was produced in 
19f)3, after the release of 
the novel by Ken Resey. 

The play focuses less 
on the setting than the 
movie did, Cecil said, 
“You have to rely on 
the characters and what’s 
Tom to CUCKOO, Al3 


ENTERTAINMENT CALENDAR 



American Legion^ 1251 Ring 
Road, E’town. 

M 7 p.m. Fridayr pull 
tabs and kitchen open at 
5:30 p.m. 

M 2 p.m. Sunday, pull 
tabs and kitchen open at 
12:30 p,m. Sponsored by 
Hardin Post 113. POC: 
Jesse HafI, 737-9949. 

■ 7 p.m. Monday and 
Wednesday^ pult tabs and 
kitchen open at 5:30 p.m. 
Sponsored by 40 Si S 
Voiture 1387. POC: 737- 
9949, 

Soutitland Bingo, 2368 S. 
Dixie Blvil., Radclrff. 

■ 7:30 p.m. Tuesday 

and Saturday, doors open 
at 6 p.m,, sponsored by 
Hardin County Pet 
Protection. POC: 360- 

9460. 

■ 7:30 p.m. Sunday 
and ivtonday, pull tabs at 
5:30 p.m., sponsored by 
Fort Knox Kentucky Bailers 


women's softball. POC: 
300-2164. 

■ 7:30 p.m. Wednesday 
and Thursday, sponsored 
by North Hardin High 
School POC: 351-3167. 
Ext. 154. 

NartitsidG Bingu Hatl, N. 
Wilson Road, Radoliff 

■ 7 p.m, Fridays and 
Sundays, sponsored by 
North Hardin Lions Club. 
POC: Barbara Walker, 351- 
6927, 

Vine Grove Optimist Club, 
3US Ktm Ave. 

■ 7 p.im. Thursdays and 
Saturdays. Sponsored by 
Vine Grove Optimist Club. 
POC: B77S22S. 

Kn^ts of Columbus, 312 
East HlaLii St., Vine Crovu (tw- 
hind St. Brigid Gharch) 

■ 7 p.m. Tuesday, doors 
open at 5 p.m., sponsored 
by Father Diemert Council 
NO. 3379. POC: 877-2194. 


FRIDAY 

BinDSTOm OPnV. 7:30 

p.m.. Blue Grass Entertain¬ 
ment and Expo complex, 
Bluegrass Parlway and U.S. 
31E. Bardstowfi. Country 
music show featuriing Kelly 
Casey, Jordan Chapman, 
Eric Kerr, Christy Miller and 
the Soundstage band. 
Admission: $10 for adutts, 
$6 for children 6-12. POC: 
(859) 336-9839; www.mu 
sicnansoundstage.com. 

DANCE at LaRue Senior 
Center. 7-10 p.rn,. featuring 
the Prime Time Band with 
Jim Walters, Ronnie Priddy, 
Leroy Sherrard, Larry Seet- 
ye. Doug Gary and Joyce 
Oliver playing a variety of 
music for listening and 
dancing pleasure. POC: Jim 
Walters. 737-5655 or 766^ 
4437. 

MILD BILL’S COUNTRY KAR¬ 
AOKE SNOW, 6 p.m.-midnight. 
Las Chatupas Mexican Res¬ 
taurant, 1007 N. Mulberry 
St., E'town. POC: Mild Bill. 
982-2244. 

SHEPHERDSVILLE MUSiC 
BARN, 1833 Ky. 44 West, 
Shepherdsville, 8 p.m., 
bluegrass music featuring 
Doyle Lawson & Quicksilver. 
$15, POC: (502) 297-9979, 

GRAND SQUARES SQUARE 
DANGERS, 8-10 p.m,, Colvin 
Community Center, Free¬ 
dom Way, RadctJff. POC: 
Dale, 272-7324 or (502) 
515-7893. 

VINE GROVE BLUEGRASS 
JAM. 6 p.m., Vine Grove City 
Hall. Play or fisten. No 
charge. No alcohol or ampli¬ 
fiers allowed. POC: Bobby 


Smith. 300-1316. 

SATURDAY 

COUNTRY MUSIC. 6:30 to 
10 p.m. senior citizens 
building in Hodgenville. 
Singers and musicians are 
welcome. POC: 358-4311 
or viola47@windstream.net. 

GOSPEL EXPLOSION (FAMILY 
NIGHT), 7 p.m. -midnight. 
Radcliff Peddler's Mall, 151 


E. Lincoln Trail, Radcliff; ad¬ 
mission: $5 for adults, $3 
for children 12 and younger. 
POC: Khame', 352-5580 or 
505-0204. 

UNCOLN JAMBOREE. 2579 
Lincoln Farm Road, Hodgen- 
viile, 7:30 p.m., Joel Ray 
Sprowls and the Jamboree 
Gang with guests Billy Nett 
(a professional fiddler), 
Samantha Osborne and 
Talent Show Champion 
Chase McDaniel. $8,50; for 


reservations call 358- 
3545, or purchase tickets 
at the door. 

MILD BILL’S COUNTRY KARA¬ 
OKE SNOW, 6 p.m.-midnight, 
Las Chalupas Mexican Res¬ 
taurant, 1007 N. Mulberry 
St., E’town. POC: Mild Bili, 
982-2244. 

MUSIC RANCH USA. West 
Point, 7:30 p.m., featuring 
The Family & Friends Band 
with Glen Phillips, Dan and 
Debbie Lang, Winston May 
and Gary Talbert along with 
guests Johnny Polinsky, 
Bradley Yancey and Rebek- 
ah Lynn. Adults. $8: sen¬ 
iors, $7; children age 6-12, 
$5. POC: (812) 944-8130. 

PRIME TIME BAND. 8 p.m.- 
midnight. Bardstown Ameri¬ 
can Legion. POC: Jim Walt¬ 
ers, 737-5655 or 766- 
4437. 

TAI CHI EASY EXERCISES. 

10-11 a.m., Hardin County 
Public Library, 100 Jim 
Owen Drive. E’town. led by 
Carol Appier. Prior Tai Chi 
experience not required. 
Free. POC: 769-6337. 

THE TRUE GOUHTRY BAND. 
7:30-11 p.m., Meade Coun¬ 
ty VRW on the bypass in 
Brandenburg featuring 
Maynard Brown, Jerry Day. 
Jeremy Miller Lome Sioan 
and Randy Sloan, square 
dance caller is Jimmy Logs¬ 
don. No membership re¬ 
quired. $6. No alco¬ 
hol. POC: 422-5184. 

SUNDAY 

OPEN MIG, 6-10 p.m., 3- 
Putt Willie's, 850 Pine 
Valley Drive, E'town, POC: 


589-9140. 

MONDAY 

CENTRAL KENTUCKY ART 
GUILD, 6:30 p.m. at Nolin 
RECC Building. 411 Ring 
Road. E'town. POC: Deb- 
bye. 307-7590, 

HEARTLAND DULCIMER 
CLUB, 6:30-8:30 p.m.. First 
Presbyterian Church, 1016 
Pear Orchard Road, E'town. 
POC; Lorinda. 862-9747. 

NEW HORIZON MEN'S CHO¬ 
RUS, 7:30-9:30 p.m., Hardin 
County Schools PAC, 384 
W.A. Jenkins Road, E'town. 
Enter through side door No. 
14. New members wel¬ 
come. POC: Bart Lovins, 
304-6165; lovins@thepac. 
net or www.newhorizoncho 
rus.com. 

ORPHAN CAR DISPUY, 10 

a,m,-5 p.m, Monday-Satur- 
day, Swope's Cars of Yes¬ 
teryear Museum, 1100 N. 
Dixie Ave., E'town: Pack¬ 
ards, Pierce Arrows, La- 
Salles and Hupmobiles. 
Cornducted tours available. 
Handicapped accessible, 
air conditioned, research li¬ 
brary, video and tour bus 
parkihg. Free. POC: 763- 
6175. 

TUESDAY 

HUDm coumv hisiorv 

MUSEUM. 10 a.m.-2 p.m. 
Tuesdays-Saturdays. 201 
W. Dixie Ave., E’town. New¬ 
est addition on loan from 
Tyler Bowman: bell from 
Lynn land College of Gien- 

'liiin 10 EKl^KTAiNMENi; A13 























THe NEWa^ENTERPfHSE 


NEWS 


RIDAV, APRIL 13. 2012 


A13 


‘Raintree County’ at the State 
Theater highlights Kentucky ties 



M C M IWSILNrS Vi WCM CAMERA Wl!WE30W OF TMt WOlKtr 

BJUBNmtEx; coumnr 

m THE GREAT TRAOlTlOM OF CtViL WAR ROMAlMCE 


By BECCA OWSLEY 

bowsley^rhenesvseiiteipirisie.coiii 

‘^Raintrf!e County'’ 
(1957) is a tortured ro¬ 
mance set against the 
backdrop of the Civil War 
It will be shown this w eek- 
ead at The Historic State 
Theater in downtown 
Elizabethtown. 

John Wick)iff Shaw- 
nessy (Montgomery Clift) 
is an abolitionist teacher 
who strays from his high 
school sweethead Nell 
(Eva Marie Saint) to a lo ve 
aifair with Southern siren 
Susanna Drake (Elizabeth 
Taylor)* 

Drake tricks Shawnessy 
into marrying her by fak¬ 
ing a pregnancy and they 
settle in Kaintree County, 
Indiana. Their romance is 
tom apart as Drake deals 
with a deep secret that 
sends her into madness* 
Her paranoia causes her 
to return to the South dur¬ 
ing the Civil War and 
Shawnessy enlists in the 
Union Aimy to find her. 

The film also stars Ni- 
gel Pahick and Ijee Mar¬ 
vin. “Star Trek’’ fans also 
should be on the lookouL 
for Bones, De Forest 
Kelley, who also appears. 

During shooting in 
195 (i, Clift was in a serious 
car wreck on his way 
home from a party at 
Taylor’s home. Taylor, 
Michael Wilding (Tavlor’s 
husband at the time) and 
actor Rock Hudson 
helped rescue Clift from 
the wreck, 

WTken he was able to 


return to the set, his looks 
w'ere changed noticeably 
in portions of the film shot 
after the wTeck. 

The film was nominat¬ 
ed for four Oscars. 

The State Theater will 
have originaJ slill photog¬ 
raphy from the movie and 
a signed letter from Eliz¬ 
abeth Taylor on display in 
the lobby. The display is 
courtesy of the Pioneer 
Playhouse in Danville, 

Taylor died in March 

2011 . 

Showings are 7 p,ni. 
Friday and 2 p.m, and 7 
p.m* Saturday. Tickets are 
$5, 

Because the movie is 
185 minutes, there will be 
an intennissioin 

For more information 


or tickets, call (270) 234- 
8258, 

Becca Ow4ey can be 
reached at (270) 505 1741. 


CUCKOO: 
Production true 
to original story 

Qintijiiucd fruiti A12 


being said,’’ he said. 

Taylor said the produc¬ 
tion gets “back to the lan¬ 
guage of the play."^ It has 
been a while since he aw 
the filin version and he 
wants to keep it that way* 
He wants to poitiay the 
character and not Nichol- 
sou, 

didn't want lo go 
anywhere near that,” he 
said. 

likewise, Ryan wants 
to stay away from tr)ing 
to re-enact the film. She 
feels much of the play 
isn't necessarily about 
what the characters say 
but rather their body 
language. 

Ryan said she 
watched the movie sev¬ 
eral months ago and 
read the noveL The 
play is more like the 
novel dian the movie is, 
she said. 

Cecil noted it in¬ 
cludes a lot of strong, 
adult language and situ* 



Nurse Rate had leads a 
group therapy session* 


afions. 

really doing 
what was done 50 years 
ago," he said, explaining 
he feels it brings the audi¬ 


ence closer to the chaiac- 
ters in a real way- 

The real w^ay includes 
maybe a little help from 
Ryan’s and Taylor’s kin¬ 
ship. 

That's due, in part, 
Taylor said^ the develop- 
iiienL of trust. 

Ryan said working to¬ 
gether during their past 
production together was 
helpful. 

**1 felt like in Aaron I 
had a good partner to un¬ 
derstand how much I had 
going on in the real 
world,” she said* 

Koberl ViUaniievB can be 

reached at (270) 505-1743. 


ENTERTAINMENT 


CLAYCOMB 

LAW OFFICE 

ROBERT K. CLAYCOMB THOMAS P. CLAYCOMB 

bob^i«yconitiiawotitc».c«m twii@ciaycoinU.waffice.c<Hii 

WILL & ESTATES • WORKERS COMPENSATION 
SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY • AITTOMOGILE ACCIDENTS 
REAL ESTATE AND INCOME TAX SERVICES 
PO Box 208 

208 North Lincoln Boulevard 
Hodgenville, Kentucky 

General Law Practice * 270.358.9620 

Tfns is an atfv«rii&emem. 



Cnndnijwd from A12 


dale; also, the general store 
on loan from Gerald Tamme. 
Central Kentucky Art Guild 
Gallery at the History 
Museum is featuring a spe¬ 
cial exhibit, "Rve by Twenty." 
POC for guided tours: 763- 
8339. 

HEARTUND SONGWRITERS 
ASSOCIATION OF KENTUCKY’S 
OPEN MIC NIGHT, 7:30 p.m. 
Tuesdays, at The Gondolier 
Italian Restaurant, 2414 
Rirtg Road, E'town. There is 
no cover and the public is in¬ 
vited to perform. Partici¬ 
pants are encouraged lo 
bring their own instruments. 
Mies and pa system provided 
by the HSAOK. POC: Gary 
Rghts, 763-6459. 

THE DEPOT TAVERH, kara 
oke, 6510 Raherty Road, 
Vine Grove, POC: 268-1611. 

3-PHn WILLIE’S, Pine 
Valley Golf Resort. 850 Pine 
Valley Drive, E’town, corn- 
hole tournament each Tues¬ 
day. POC: Andrea, 737- 
8300. 


WEDNESDAY 

LINE DAH6IN6 WITH THE 
LIGKTFODT DANCERS. 7-8:30 
p.m,, Colvin Community 
Center, Radcliff. Beginner 
line dance lessons provided. 
POC: Gail Faubert, 723- 
0770. 

MILD BIU’S COUNTRY KAR¬ 
AOKE SHOW, 6-11 p.m., Las 
Chalupas Mexican Rest¬ 
aurant, 1007 N. Mulberry 
St., E'town. POC: Mild Bill. 
982-2244. 

A-PUn WILLIE’S, Pine 
Valley Golf Resort. S50 Pine 
Valley Drive, E'town, Star 
Bound Karaoke, 9 p.m.-mid- 
night Wednesdays, POC: 
David, (5021510-0320. 

TAI CHI WALK TRAINING, 11 
a.m.-noon. Hardin County 
Public Library, 100 Jim Owen 
Drive, E'town, led by Dr. Joe 
Chathaparampil; prior Tai Chi 
experience not required. 
Free. POC: 769-2274, 

THE DEPOT TAVERN, Kara¬ 
oke, 6510 Raherty Road, 
Vine Grove, POC; 268-1611. 

THURSDAY 

HEART OF KENTUCKY MEN’S 
CHORUS, 7-9:30 p.m.. 

Memorial United Methodist 
Church choir room, 631 N. 
Miles St., E'town. Interested 
singers invited to attend. 
POC: Woody Will, 766-9946 
or Woodrow.wiil@kyfa.org, 
HEARTUND FILUES UDIES 
BARBERSHOP CHORUS, 6:30 
p.m. practice, the Church of 
Jesus Christ of Latter-day 
Saints, 2950 Shepherdsvilie 
Road, E'town, one block past 
Ring Road. New singers wel¬ 
come. POC: Wilma, 763- 


0010, or Sherry. 877-2553, 
LINE DANCING WITH THE 
HIGHWAY 210 HILLBIUY STOM- 

PEFB, 7-8:30 p.m. at former 
Hardin County Skating Rink 
on Ky. 210. $3. POC: 737- 
2295. 

MILD BIU’S COUNTRY KARA¬ 
OKE SHOW, 6 -11 p.m., Las 

Chalupas Mexican Restaur¬ 
ant. 1007 N. Mulberry St., 
E'town. POC: Mild Bill, 982- 
2244. 

POETRY READING 6 30 p m 

April 19, Hardin County pub¬ 
lic Library, 100 Jim Owen 
Drive, E’town. Guest poet Dr 
Kathleen Driskell Spahng 
University. Open Mic, no pro¬ 
fanity or adult content. POC; 
7696337. 

S-PUTT WILLIE’S. Pine 
Valley Golf Resort, 850 Pine 
Valley Drive, E'town. Ladies 
Night with karaoke and 
dance music, 9 p.m.-mid- 
night Thursdays. POC: David, 
(502) 510-0320, 


ONGOING 

CENTRAL KENTUCKY ART 
GUILD EXHIBITS: 

■ Mary Lou Mall's art¬ 
works are on display 7 a.m,- 
3 p.m. Monday-Friday and 7 
a.m.-2 p.m. Saturday 
through June 18 at Cobbler's 
Cafe, 125 E. Dixie Ave., 
E'town. POC: 982-2233. 

■ Photographs by lucia 
beeler are on display 8 a,m.- 
4:30 p.m. Monday-Friday 
through June 18 at Radcliff 
Tourist Center, 562 N, Dixie 
Highway, Radcliff. POC: 352- 
1204, 

■ The artworks of Jo Friel, 
Rose Cooper, Jisun Mudd, 
Nona Arkisson and Mary Lou 
Hall are on display 9 a.m,-9 
p.m. daily through June 18 at 
Healthsouth Lake view, 134 
Heartland Drive, E'town. 
7693100. 

■ The artwork of Joyce 

Lupresto and Elsie Hall is on 
display 9 a.m.-4 p.m. 

Monday through Thursday 
and 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday 
through June IS at The 
Cecilian Bank. 1808 N. Dixie 
Ave., E'town, POC: 737- 
1593. 

■ CKAG members also 
are exhibited at Gallery on 
the second floor of the 
Hardin County History Mu¬ 
seum. on the corner of U.S. 
31W and Mulberry Street, 
E’town; the CKAG Gallery 
currently has a "Familiar 
Doorways'’ display of paint- 
irtgs (five objects painted by 
20 different artists). Come 
between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m., 
Tuesday through Saturday, to 
see the exhibit. POC: mary- 
louhall® windstream.net. 


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THE NEWS ENTERPRISE 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13* 2012 


Aid 




N. Korea fires 
long-range 
rocket 


By JEAN H. LEE 

This Awyciaied Press 

PYONGYANG, North Ko 

rca ^ North Korea fired a long- 
range rocket early today, South 
Korean and U,S. oihcials said, 
defying international warnings 
against moving forward with a 
launch widely seen as a provoca- 


tion* 

Making good on a vow issued 
days ago, Pyongyang fired a 
rocket at 7:39 a.m. from the west 
coast launch pad in the liamlet of 
Tongchang-ri, i^outh Korea’s 
Joint Chiefs of StafT in Seoul said, 
citing South Korean and U.S. in¬ 
telligence. 

However^ the launch may 


have failed, U.S. officials said in 
Washington. J ap an ^s Defe nse 
Minister Naoki Tanaka appeared 
to concur. 

*^We have coufinned that a 
certain flying object has been 
launched and fell after ffying for 
just over a minute." He did not 
say what exactly was launched. 

He said tliere was no impact 


on Japanese territory from Ihe 
launch. 

In Pyongyang, there was no 
word about a launch, and state 
television was broadcasting 
video for popular folk tunes. 
North Korean officials said they 
would make an announcement 
about tlie launch '"soon.” 


BAPTISM: 

‘We have all 
religions' 

Cofttinujed from Al 


Leitchfield accommodates 
many types of services and 
rituals. 

‘"We have all religions,^ 
he said. “We have it aU 
here,” 

Deputy Jailer Morris 
Basham said the Grayson 
County Detention Center 
has three facilities housing 
ai’ound 580 federal, state 
and county inmates at the 
moment but averages an 
inmate population of 

around 625. The popula¬ 
tion is close in siae to the 
Hardin County Detention 
Center, which holds any¬ 
where from 600 to 700 in¬ 
mates, according to 

Hardin County Jfuler 

Danny Allen. 

Basham said inmates 
w^ho want to address spiri¬ 
tual growth through bap¬ 
tism provide the jail with a 
written request. The bap¬ 
tism usually is carried out 
in 48 to 72 hours. If the in¬ 
mate is not enrolled in 
some type of religious pro¬ 
gram, the request is for¬ 
warded to the jail chaplain, 
who usually conducts an 
interview with tlie inmate 
before the baptism. 

Baptisms are conducted 
in the delention facility in a 
room with a tub the jail has 
provided^ Basham said. 
Baptisms usually are per¬ 
formed with only the in- 
mate and a church leader 
or chaplain present, he 
added. 

If there are alerts indi¬ 
cating the inmate poses 


ARRESTS: 
‘When it’s cold and 
nasty out, people 
stay indoors ’ 

QmdjiQJsd Jrum Al 


lodging a significant num¬ 
ber of inmates for drug and 
alcohol offenses, Allen 
said. 

March 28, area law en¬ 
forcement officers execut¬ 
ed 21 drug-related war¬ 
rants during a roundup led 
by the Greater Hardin 
County Narcotics Task 
Force. Many alleged of¬ 
fenses were related to traf¬ 
ficking in prescription 
medicine and me tb am¬ 
phetamine. 

In a news release, KSP 
Post 4 reported making 67 
DU I arrests in March in 
comparison to 47 in Feb¬ 
ruary. 

Norman Chaffins, tlie 
post's puhbc affairs officer.^ 
said the increase can be at¬ 
tributed to a combination 
of factors including the ad¬ 
dition of five new troopers 
on patrol since Jan. 1. 

Witli more troopers on 
the road, the post has been 
able to do saturated pa¬ 
trols, sending extra troop¬ 
ers to areas where a num¬ 
ber of DUI arrests have 
been made or reckless 
driving has been reported, 
he said. 

In addition, die post an¬ 
ticipated more drunken 
and drugged driving on the 
roadways because of 
warmer weather, Chaffins 
said, placmg more empha¬ 
sis on DUI detection and 
enforcement, 

'"We knew it was com¬ 
ing,” he said. 

The more enforcement 

Chaffins said, the more 
Dill arrests are made. 

Elizabethtown Police 
Department made 23 DUI 
airests in March, an in¬ 
crease from 15 in February , 


poUmlial danger^ a deputy 
jail will escorts the prisoner 
to the ceremony, Eashani 
added. 

In denying the request 
for baptisms, Allen said the 
Haidin County Detention 
Center does not have re¬ 
sources to accommodate 
baptisms at the facility and 
taking an inmate olT-site 
could create financial bur¬ 
dens in fuel and potential 
oveitime hours. Alien said 
he is understalTed, short an 
officer every shift and pays 
anywhere from $10,0(K> to 
$12,000 for overtime every 
two-week pay period. 

Allen also has said in¬ 
mate pailicipation hi bap¬ 
tisms could pose a poten¬ 
tial safety risk for the facili¬ 
ty and its staJT and could 
force the jail to allow other 
religious rituals. 

Hardin County At¬ 
torney Jenny Oldliam said 
the law' allows corrections 
facilities to set their own 
policies regarding religious 
practices, but those poli¬ 
cies must be equitable* ff 
the jail allows baptism, it 
must allow all religious rit¬ 
uals and cannot pick and 
choose, she said. 

Allen also has described 
liability concerns if an in¬ 
mate falls during a bap¬ 
tism. 

Because of those rea’ 
sons, Allen has barred 
groups who are not organ¬ 
ized churches from hold¬ 
ing services and does not 
allow religious materials 
such as prayer cloths and 
rosar)^ beads. 

Basham said Grayson 
County allows prayer 
cloths and rosary' beads, 
but the Catholic Church 
offers “safer'^ versions of 
the beads made of plastic 


said Virgil Willoughby, 
spokesman for the depart¬ 
ment. 

In March 2011, the de¬ 
partment charged 18 witli 
driving under the influ¬ 
ence, he said. 

The slight increase, he 
said, could he attiibuted 
partially to college basket¬ 
ball excitement. However, 
like Chaffins, Willoughby 
said wann weather is a de¬ 
cisive factor* 

‘^When ifls cold and 
nasty out, people stay in¬ 
doors,^ he said. 

Asked about increased 
alcohol availability in the 


tliat contain no metal. 

Basham also said the 
Grayson County Delen¬ 
tion Center, on average, 
holds few'er than 24 bap¬ 
tisms per year. 

“It just depends really,“ 
he said “It’s very cyclic.” 

The jail uses security 
cameras to monitor the 
proceedings and has had 
no instances in whicii an 
inmate attacked someone 
or committed an act that 
would jeopardize safely, he 
said. 

Muslim inmates also are 
allowed to celebrate Ra¬ 
madan in their cells, 
Basham said as another eX’ 
ample 

“We must accommo¬ 
date religion,” he added. 

Hardin County’s bap¬ 
tism policy has been in 
place for at least a decade. 
Allen, who took office alter 
the 2010 election, said he 
has followed the guidance 
of the county attorney and 
others in maintaining the 
ban. Allen .said he plans to 
contact some jails the 
church noted and discuss 
their policies regarding 
baptism and religious prac¬ 
tices* 

“lb be tnifliful, 1 didn’t 
know they’re doing it,” 
Allen said when asked 
about Grayson County’s 
policy. 

John Board, pastor of 
the Church of Christ, said 
he hopes the congregation 
can find a solution through 
conversation with the 
couniy so both sides can 
avoid a legal battle. Board 
noted Fiscal Court does 
not have die authority to 
change the policy and a 
lawsuit would be difficult 
because the church has no 
legal standing on the issue. 


Hardin County aiea, Chaf¬ 
fins said greater availability 
leads to a greater risk on 
the roadways. 

“There’s no doubt,” he 
said about the sale of alco’ 
hoi’s impact on DUI ar¬ 
rests. 

Willoughby said he 
does not believe new alco¬ 
hol sales are contributing 
to arrests and added it will 
be several years before 
EPD will be able to com¬ 
pile enough data to deter¬ 
mine an impact. 

Sarah U^nnett can 
rtached at (270) 505-1750. 


“WeVe still open to dis* 
couise,” he said* 

Board said the church is 
willing to secure its build¬ 
ing T^vith locks and build a 
cage tlie jail could back its 
vehicles into. The church 
also is willing to absorb the 
costs to transpoit the pris¬ 
oners off-site, he said. 

“Thus far they’re just 
not willing to budge,” he 
said. 

Board said the response 


Yes, iTs absolutely true, you can 
actually replace youir old (and 
probably very inefficient) 
furntjlce^ air conditioner, or heat 
pump as a package for at least 
j 1^300 less Ilian you would have 
Eo pay at any other time. 

MV PROBLEM 1$ YOUR 
OPPORTUNITY 
Let me explain, 

At the beginning of every year we 
purchase, for the summer, a load 
of air conditioners and heot 
pumps and have to guess how 
many we'll need to meet the 
demand. Of course we're never 
exactly right. So, we always have 
some inventory left over until 
the next summer’s cooling 
season. 

These are brand new models. 
And they are NOT seconds or 
'‘Blems'' or "'Builder'" models. 
They are factory fresh PREMIUM 
air conditioners and heat pumps 
and have a full parts and labor 
warranty. 

HERE'S HOW YOU CAN GET 

A FURNACE FOR $458 
If you buy om of these leftover 
Premium air conditioners or 
heal pumps at last year's prices 
and have it Installed by June 1st 
(but only if one of the si^es 1 
have in inventory will fit your 
house, of courscT I am giving 
you a high efficiency furnace 
completely installed, for an 
mbeliei'iibk low price of only 
$458. 

HERE'S HOW 
Just call Al1eii''s at 
We will come out and determine 
the availability of the proper ise 
As of right now I have only 21 
air conditioner and heat pump 
left O^^er m ^anou'' and 
efficiencies When they are gone 
this remarkable offer ends. First 
come, first serv^ed! 

We will show you the real world 
price of the air conditioner or 
heat pump that fits your home. 
Then we will show you the 
substantial savings now. And it 
will include all labor, installation 
materials, and a full parts and 
labor warranty on your new 
system. Nothing is left out. 


from the community has 
been overwhelmingly pos¬ 
itive and many residents 
are upset that some in¬ 
mates have privileges lo 
psurtidpate in other activi¬ 
ties that could pose danger, 
sucli as trasli pickup, but 
the jail prohibits access to 
baptism. 

Board denounced con¬ 
cerns about a possible in¬ 
flux of baptism requests at 
the jail. He said his church 


THE CONCEPT IS SIMPLE 
By letting vou win big nmj. 1 will 
win at the end ot the year. 

I'm betting that it i make yon an 
offer that h irresistible (at 
least it should be if your mrn^ce 
or air i.onditLOner over ten 
years old) I will accomplish 
three things: 

L Get nd of my leftover air 
conditioning inventory. 

2. Help cover my rent, utilities, 
insurance and taxes in the slow 
months. 

3. Pay my professional staff of 15 
technicians to work instead of 
paying them to sit home. 

If I can accomplish these three 
objectives, J will minimise my 
losses, and Ehe rest of the year 
can he a winner. 

NO OBLIGATION 
Even after I completely explain 
the installation there is 
absolutely no oliRgaliofi. If you 
decide vou donT want to take 
advantage of this spectacular 
savmg -that's OJv i will give vou 
a surprise gift worth SSft.OO 
because you are kind en ugh to 
read thr ad and give me a 
chance to solve my problem. I 
want you to think well of ARen’s 
Air Conditioning & Heating 
even if you don t buv. 

YOU CAN BUY WITH NO CASH 
You don t even have to pay me 
right away I have set up Eerr He 
financing with competitive rate^ 
Consider this, if you decide to 
make monthly mve.itments 
instead ot paying cash., the 
amount of vour investment 
might be more than offset by the 
saving on vour utility bills U s 
like having your cake and 
eating it too”. 


only would baptize in¬ 
mates who have complet¬ 
ed its program and fully 
grasp salvatioti- 

“Wc believe if they 
don’t understand what 
they're doing, weVe not 
helping them by dunking 
them under water,” he 
said. 

Marty FidJey can be 
reached at (270) 505-1762. 


IRONCLAD GUARANTEE 
J'm so confident that you will 
ave at least 20% on your 
cooling and healing bills (Fm 
projecting more like 30% to 
■ 10 %) that I will pay you Double 
the Difference for one year If 
vou don t. 

There is no way you can lose. 
Your lower utility bills will 
really make a big difference on 
your investment. And 1 will 
even double your savings if you 
save less than 20%. If these 
premium systems were not 
among the best on the market, 1 
couldn’t afford to make such a 
promise. 

WHY THIS OFFER CANT tAST 
You must Gd before May 3Istf 
Here's why. 

1.1 only have a limited number 
of matched systems left over. 
When all of the in-stock air 
conditioners and heat pumps 
are sold, that’s iL First come^ 
first served! 

i. If I have any of the leftover 
systems on May 3ist (although 
1 doubt that 1 will) this offer 

stilknds 

My huMness always starts 
imp rvmg i June and 1 can sell 
mv leftove air conditioners and 
heat pumps this coming 
summe and stilt come out OK. 
Give Allen's Air Conditioning 
£ Heating a call now at 35S- 
3333 and set an appointment 
for your no obligation survey. 
Thank you for reading this 
rather long ad. 1 hope you will 
profit greatly because of ft. 

Waimly, 

David £. Allen 



AtR CONDITIONING - HEATING 
& DUCT CLEANING 

769-2727 • 358-3333 • 369-7700 

www.alleii8aiirconditioniTig.coiti .scsg 


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IH£ NEWS-ENTiRPRiSe 


NEWS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 3012 


A15 


Prosecutors: Zimmerman 
ignored warning to back off 





George Zimmerman, center, is directed by a Semineie County 
Deputy and his attorney Mark O'Mara during a court hearing in 
Sanford, Fia- Zimmerman has been charged with secortd- 

degree murder in the shooting death of the 17-yean)1d Trayvon 
Martin. 


By GREG BLUESTEIN 

The Associated Piess 

SANFORD, Ha, - 
Alter weeks in hiding, 
George ZimnieiTtian made 
his first courtroom appear¬ 
ance Thursday in the 
shooting of 17-year-old 
Traj^on Martin, and pros¬ 
ecutors outlined their mur¬ 
der case in court papers, 
saying the neighborhood 
watch volunteer followed 
and confronted the black 
teenager after police dis¬ 
patchers told liiin to back 
off. 

The brief outline, con¬ 
tained in iin alftdavit filed 
in support of the second- 
degiee inui der charges, ap¬ 
peared to contradict Ziin- 
merman^s claim that 
Martin attacked him after 
he had turned away and 
was returning to his vehi¬ 
cle. 

In the affidavit, prosecu¬ 
tors also said that Martin’s 
mother identified cries for 
help heard in the hack- 
gi oujid of a SI I cal! as her 
sonV There had been 
some question as to 
whether Martin or Zim¬ 
merman was the one call¬ 
ing out. 

The account of the 
shooting was released as 
Zimmerman, 28, appeared 
at a four-minute hearing in 
a jailhouse courtroom, set¬ 
ting in motion what could 
be a long, drawn-out 
process, Oi an abrupt and 
disappointingly short one 
foi man) of the Martin 
fainilv s upporlers be- 
CHise of the strong legal 
protections contained in 
Florida's “stand your 
ground^ law on self-de¬ 
fense. 

During the hearing, 
Zimmerman stood up 
straight, held his head high 
and wore a gray jail jump¬ 


suit He spoke only to an¬ 
swer “Yes, sir,” twice after 
he was asked basic ques¬ 
tions from die judge, who 
was not in the courtroom 
but on closed-circuit TV. 
The defendant's hair was 
shaved dowTi to stubble 
and he had a thin goatee. 
His hands were shackled in 
front of him. 

He did not enter a plea; 
that Tivill happen at his ai- 
raigiiment, which was set 
for May 29. 

To prove second-degree 
murder, prosecutors must 
show that Zimmerman 
committed an hmirme Ul) 
dangerous” act that 
showed a “depravf?d lack 
of regard for human life 
The charge carries a 
mandaloiy' sentence of 25 
years in prison a max¬ 
imum of life. 

The special p osecutoi 
in the case, Ai gela Cotey 
has n^fused to explain ex¬ 
actly how she arrived at the 
chat'ge. But in an affidavit 
filed with the couil, pio t 
cutors said that Zimmer 
man spotted Martin while 
patrolling his gated com¬ 


munity, got out of his vehi¬ 
cle and followed the young 
man. 

Prosecutors interviewed 
a friend of Martin's who 
was talking to him just be¬ 
fore the shooting. His par¬ 
ents’ lawy er has said that 
Martin was talking to his 
girlfriend back in Miami. 

“During this time, 
Miirtin was on the phone 
with a Friend and described 
to her what was happen¬ 
ing,” the affidavit said. 
"^The witness advised that 
Martin was scared because 
he wa.-^ being followed 
through the complex by an 
unknown male and didnft 
know why.” 

During a recorded call 
to a police dispatcher^ 
Zimmerman “made refer¬ 
ence to people he felt had 
committed and gotten 
away with bieak-ins in his 
leighboihnod Later while 
talking about Martin^ 
7'mmerman stated *these 

a-s> they always get 

away ^md iJso said'these 
-—- punksf said the affi¬ 
davit, available at 
www,apiie.w*s/ Itn7Nu. 


STABBING: Wilson being 
held on $250,000 bond 

Cuulinued from AJ 

uation involving Wilson and became a 
victim in the process. Witnesses ffild in¬ 
vestigators that Wilson allegedly has a 


histoiy of making threatening remarks, 
AUaman added. 

Wilson is lodged in the Hardin 
County Detention Center on a 
$250,t>0() bond and Allaman said more 
charges could be pending. 

Mart}' Finley can be 
readied at {270) 505-1702. 




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A1S 


THE NEWS ENTERPRISE 


NEWS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13* 2012 



HEAL CARPIH ■■TlitJ N«w*^EAlwpfiSff 


Meade Counfy High Schoel freshman Adrienne Poole is 
competing in the Miss Junior Teen Amedca pageant this 
weekend. Adrienne and her family live In Brandenburg and the 
suit she is wearing was purchased at a Goodwill Store. She 
will wear the outfit during the interview portion of the pageant. 


POOLE: 

‘I think I can do it. 
1 really do’ 

Cbntiiiiued from AI 


found some pieces with 
original store tags still at¬ 
tach ed. 

Poolc^s sense of style 
and dedication to her com¬ 
munity are tools she hopes 
vrill help her bid for the na¬ 
tional crown. 

“I just feel that it’s more 
than jusl putting on a 
crown and getting your 
hair and ma^^up done," 
she said. 

In fad, hair and makeup 
are Poole's least favorite 
part of competition. 

She prefers the part 
when she takes tlie stage 
and talks about causes she 
supports and ways she has 
helped her community as 
Miss Junior Teen Ken^ 
tucky* The cause she sup- 
poi1s most is msing aware¬ 
ness of and support for ju¬ 
venile diabetes. 

Poolers cousin, a sec¬ 
ond-grader, is severely af¬ 
fected by the disease, so 
she has seen how hard liv¬ 
ing with juvenile diabetes 
can be and how it impacts 
his family* 

‘^Raising a child and 
raising a diabetic child are 
two completely different 
things," she said. 

While in middle school, 
Poole organized a fiindrais^ 
er that in which students 
walked around the build¬ 
ing for exercise* She esti¬ 
mates 800 students collect¬ 
ed more than $4,000 for 
the Juvenile Diabetes Re¬ 
search Foundation. 

Another of Poole’s caus¬ 
es is less serious but still 
important to her* 

She wants to show her 
peers that fashion is acces¬ 
sible by sharing her love of 
shopping at Goodwill. 

Her first trip there was 
with a friend and she was 
surprised by the selection 
at a place where her family 
often donated clothing. 

"I came out with a bag 


full of clothes," she said. 

Now, the store is the 
source of Poole's clothes 
come from, including out¬ 
fits she wears in competi¬ 
tions. If s a cost-saver in the 
pageant world, where the 
cost of clothes, entries, gas 
and other expenses mount 
quickly. 

Poole said her parents^ 
Paul and Eva, have good 
jobs, bul it's hard to be sure 
of anything in the current 
economy. 

just really, really 
opened my eyes*" she said. 

Poole said being a fresh¬ 
man and fitting in can be 
hard, so she understands 
the desire to be fashion¬ 
able. She thinks diat goal 
can be achieved on a 
budget. 


“1 think somedring fit¬ 
ting and being who you are 
is more important than 
where ifs from and what 
you paid for it," she said. 

Poole said qualifying kyr 
the nationa] competition is 
a great opportunity and 
she loves everything about 
pageants. 

can't w^ait to get up on 
stage and hopefully do well 
for Ken Lucky an d bri ng 
home the crown," she said. 

The pageant whiner and 
thrift shopper plans to do 
her best. 

“1 think I can do it. I re¬ 
ally do," Poole said “1 think 
the whole thing^s just going 
to be outstanding " 

Amber Couiler can be 
reacJied sit {270} S05-)746* 


THE NEWS IN BNIEF 



ROBERT LE^5TRfl^^i^KJm3l CWjfter. AP 


HOPEFULLY THIS IS THE LAST COAT 

Terry WrIliams of Neumann Co. Contractors in Merrillan* 
Wis.p applies a coat of paint Thursday to a newly 
qunstryutect water tower east of Waadsoo, ML 


ROMNEY, OKCE NOT IN 
LINE WITH THE NRA, HOW 
GOURTS THE GUN GROUP 
FOR HIS PRESIDENTIAL 
CAMPAIGN* Running for 
the Senate in Massa* 
chusetts, Mitt Romney 
once assured voters in a 
state with strong gun- 
control laws; “I don't line 
up with the NRA " Now 
the likely Republican 
p r esid e n t ial noiuin ee, 
Romney will headline 
the National Rifle Asso¬ 
ciation’s annual conven¬ 
tion today and assure 
tens of Lima sands of gun * 
rights activisb that he's 
squarely on their side. 

Coming j List days after 
rival Rick Santorum 
dropped out of the nom¬ 
ination race, the NRA 
convention in St. Louis 
provides Roiiiney an op¬ 
portunity' to shore up his 
credentials with an im- 
p ortan t conser vati ve 
constituency that badly 
wants to oust Democratic 
President Barack Oba¬ 
ma. 

Romney leads a list of 
prominent Republicans 
- including Santorum, 
Newt Gingrich, House 
Majority Leader Eric 
Cantor and Wisconsin 
Gov Scott Walker - who 
are scheduled to address 
more thcin fi5,{X)0 con¬ 
vention registrants dur¬ 
ing a session billed as a 
'^celebration of Amer¬ 
ican values." Although 
Obama has virtually ig- 
nmed gun issues during 
his term, the NRA con¬ 
siders him a foe and 
plans to moimt an ag¬ 
gressive effort against 
him, 

SYRIAN OPPOSITION 
PROMISES MAJOR PRO¬ 
TESTS TO TEST REGIME'S 
COMMITMENT TO FRAGILE 
CEASE-FIRE Syria's oppo¬ 
sition called for wide¬ 
spread protests Friday to 
test the regime's commit¬ 
ment to an international¬ 
ly brokered cease-fire 


that the U*N. cliief de¬ 
scribed as so fragile il 
could collapse with a sin¬ 
gle gunshot. 

Regime forces halted 
heavy shelling and other 
major attacks in tine with 
the truce that began at 
dawn Thursday, though 
there were accusations of 
scattered violence by 
both sides. The govern* 
ment ignored demands 
to pull troops? back to 
barracks, however, defy¬ 
ing a key aspect of the 
plan, which aims to calm 
a year-old uprising that 
has killed ?)JX)0 people 
and has pushed the 
counlry toward civil war* 

jyRY SELECTION BEGINS 
IN TRIAL OF FORMER SEN. 
JOHN EDWARDS OVER CAM¬ 
PAIGN FINANCE ISSUES. 

After vears of investiga¬ 
tion, aenials and delays, 
jury selection began 
Thursday for the crimi¬ 
nal trial of formei presi¬ 
dential candidate John 
Edwards. 

Edw aids sat at the de¬ 
fense table as about 180 
potential jurors filed into 
a Greensboro, N.C., 
courtroom. U.S. District 
Judge Catherine C* 
Eagles then a_sked Fri- 
wards to stand and face 
them. He grinned and 
nodded as the judge in 
troduced him. 


PRIMER FOR PRIMATES: 
BABOONS SHOW SCIENTISTS 
THEY KNOW A REAL ENGUSH 
WORD WHEN THEY SEE FT. 

Dan the baboon sits in 
front of a computer 
screen. The letters 
BRRU pop up. With a 
quick and almost dismis- 
rive tap, the monkey sig¬ 
nals it's not a word. 
Correct. Next comes, 
ITCS, Again, not a word, 
Fin^illy KITE comes up. 

He pause and hits a 
green oval to show it's a 
word. In the spare of just 
a few seconds Dan has 
demonstrated a mastery 
of what some experts say 
is a form of pie reading 
and w alks away reward¬ 
ed with a LrcaL of dried 
wheat. 

Dan is pari of new re¬ 
search that shows ba¬ 
boons are able to pick up 
the first step in reading — 
identifying recurring paL 
terns and determining 
which fbm-letter combi- 
natiems are words and 
which are just gobbledy- 
gook. 

The study shows that 
reading's early steps are 
far more instinctive than 
scientists first thought 
and it also indicates that 
non-hutnan primates 
may he smarter than we 
give them credit for. 

The Associated Press 



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The News-Enterprise 

FftIDAY, APRIL 13, 20t! 




CHUCK UDNES. SPORTS EDITOR 

(2701 505-1759 
cjores@itndnewserit$ri>rise.com 
Fax; (270) 763-6965 



FILE PHOTO/www.CoachCakcoiTi 

The Kentucky Wildcats' national championship trophy trom the NCAA men’s basketball 
tournament was buckled into the front seat of a Blue Grass Tours luxury bus on Thursday 
morning before the start of the UK Men's Basketball National Championship Trophy Tour. 
According to CoachCal.com, 6,500 fans (1,500 in Ashland, 2,000 in Pikeville, 3,000 in 
Hazard) were part of the tour Thursday. The trophy and coach John CaliparI will be at the 
Towne Drive Kroger In Elizabethtown from 2:30-3:30 p.m. today. 


Groupie Doll wins Vinery Madison Stakes 


By CO! JN FLY 

'I'hc Associated Press 

LEXINGTON - Trainer BufT Bradley and his 80^ 
year-old father had chances to sell homebred Groupie 
Doll, but they believed the 4-year-old chestnut filly be¬ 
longed in the same class of elite sprinters. 

She finally proved them right. 

Groupie Doll rallied from the middle of the pack 
and took control in a four-wide charge to win the 
$^W0j0()0 Grade 1 Vinery Madison Stakes for fillies 
and mares Thursday at Keeneland. 

"^WeVe had a lot of farms inquire about her and it^s 
been very good weVe been able to keep her,^ said 
Bradley, who mnii Frankfort s Bulf Bradley Racing 
Stable. “1 probably needed to sell. My dad probably 
needed to sell, too, but you canH put a price on what 
today w as, you can't W ah hrs age and know inghe's 
very happy that he's able lo c'ipenen e ihii ” 

Bradley and his father, Fred, had their biggest run 
in racing with Brass Hat, winner of three Grade 1 races 
from 2006-09 and amassing 10 victones o\er ■59 starts 
in his seven-year racing careei Groupie Doll has land¬ 
ed a special place in theii famil), too, aftei they sold a 
small stake in die horse to longtime partners Carl 
Hurst and Brent Bums. 

^We knew' we were very lucky to have Brass Hat 
and to be able to have a horse like this that we bred 


and raised again is really special,” Buff Bradley said. 
*^For my father, who didn't want to sell her, he's getting 
up in age and he really enjoys this business. It doesn't 
matter if it's a $5,000 horse, he didn't really want to 
sell That helped us and then a couple of partners 
that've been with us for a long time.” 

Sent off at 7-2 odds. Groupie Doll ran the seven fur¬ 
longs in 1:23.76 under Rajiv Maiagh. The 4-year-old 
chestnut filly narrowly missed a victory at the 
Polytrack in October in the Grade 2 Raven Run Stakes 
and lost by a head, but won aji allowance optional 
claiming race at Gulfstream Park in December and has 
placed in her last four starts. This time, she wore blink¬ 
ers. 

”She belongs with these [horses), like she showed 
today. I knew she had lire talent to mn with these,” 
Bradley said. “When we decided to come to 
Keeneland instead of going to Oaklawn, it just made 
more sense. My father could get there ea5ier, she 
knows this track, she’s nin well on this track and it’s in 
our backyard,'’ 

It was far from a sure thing. She was behind the 
leaders at the start and raced four’Wide in to the turn 
before making her move after a hall She took control 
with a furlong left and expanded her lead at the finish, 
winning by three lengths. 


Wild pitch in 10th 
dooms Reds, 3-2 


By HOWARD FENDRICH 

The Associated Press 

WASHINGTON 

Standing on third base with 
two outs in the bottom of 
the 10th inning, Ryan 
Zimmerman still was 
bummed about the two 
plays he failed to make in 
the field earlier Thursday 
for the Washington 
Nationals. 

Knowing that the 
CincinnaU Rf’ds' relievers 
are prone to throwing “dirt- 
bails,” Zimmerman was 
aware that Alfredo Simon 
might very well miss his 
mark. Sure enough, Simon 
threw a wild pitch and 
Zimmerman raced home, 
helping the Nationals ex¬ 
tend tl^eir best start since 
moviug to Washington with 
a 3-2 victory over the Reds- 

Scoring the winning run 
made Zimmerman able to 
get over the two balls that 
got past him while he 
played third, one in the 
eighth inning and one in 
tire ninth — the latter allow¬ 
ing Ryan Ludwick to deliv¬ 
er a tying two-iun single for 
Cincinnati. 

“If we had lost that 
game,” Zimmerman said, 
“it would have been hard 
for me to sleep tonight.” 

Instead, the Nationals 
improved to 5-2, good for 



EVAN vucc I/The As5Klflt«i Preis 
Washington's finger 
Bernadfna cheers for Ryan 
Zimmerman as he scores the 
winning run in the 10th inning 
of the Nationals' 3-2 win 
Thursitay against the visiting 
Cincinnati Rads. 

first place in the NL East, 
and treated announced 
sellout crowd of 40.907 to a 
win in the home opener lor 
the first time smte 20ftH. 

Craig Stammen (1 -0) 
struck out the side in the 
10 th for the win, needing all 
of 10 pitches for those three 
outs. 

“We don't give in. We 
don't give up,” said Jayson 
Werth, who singled in the 
lOth one out after 
Zimmerman reached base 
when Simon (0-!) hit him 
with a pilch. 

Turn to REDS, B3 


Bengals trade Rivers, 
but welcome Newman 


By JOE KAY 

The Associated L^ss 

CINCINNATI ^ The 

Cincinnati Bengals made 
two roster moves 
Thursday, trading line¬ 
backer Keith Rivers to the 
New York Giants for a fifth- 
round draft pick and agree¬ 
ing ID a deal with two-time 
Pro Bowl comer back 
Terence Newman, an nnre- 
stricted free agent from 
Dallas who struggled in 
pass coverage last season. 

The trade ended Rivers' 
four-year tenure in 
Cincinnati. His stay was 
marred by frequent injuries 
as he missed ^1 of last sea¬ 
son recovering from sur¬ 
gery on his right wrist and 
has been limited to 35 
games in four seasons. 

“Pm excited to gel a 
fi-esh start and brand new 
beginning,” Rivers said, 
“You can't ask for more 
than to be playing for the 
defending world champi¬ 
ons and be in New York.” 

The Bengals made 
Rivers the ninth overall 
pick in the 2008 draft and 
instulled him as a starter. 
He broke his jaw on a hit 
by Pittsburgh Steelers re¬ 
ceiver Hines Ward in the 
seventh game and missed 
the rest of his rookie sea- 
Sfju. He missed time the 
next two seasons because of 
calf and foot injuries. 

“This is an excellent op¬ 
portunity for him to have a 
fresh start,” Gianb coach 
Tom Coughlin said. “Keith 
is versatile enough to play 
the outside on first and sec¬ 
ond down and he can play 
on third down because he? 
runs well And he's fast 
enough to rush the passer.” 

Tlie Bengals also waived 
cornerback cornerback 
Rico Murray, who played 
in the season opener last 
year before going on the 
practice squad. 

Newman, 33^ was the 
fifth overall pick in 2003, 
He went to the Pro Bowl in 



Fllf PHOTOS.-ThS AMWlfltwa PfftM 

Linebacker Keith Rivers, 
above, is leaving Cincinnati 
while comberback Terence 

Mewman Is set to join the 
Bengals. 



2007 and 2009. He was tar¬ 


geted in coverage last sea¬ 
son, and the Cowboys re¬ 
leased him last month, 

Newman is Cincinnati's 
latest addition to a second¬ 
ary that was a strong point 
two years ago, when 
Johnathan Joseph and Leon 
Hall formed one of the 
NFCs best cornerback 
tandems. Joseph left for 
Houston after the 2010 sea¬ 
son, and Hall tore his left 
Achilles tendon in 
November 

llie Bengals signed 32- 
year-old Nate Clements to 
replace Joseph last year. 
They Ve re-signed nickel 
cornerback Adam 

“Pacmaii” Jones this offsea¬ 
son and added cornerback 
Jason Allen. 



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B2 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


SPORTS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


AROUND THE AREA 


PREP BASEBALL 


TODAY 


Event Time 

PREP BASEBALL 

Meade County at Breckinridge County (DH) 6 p.m. 

Florida Beach Bash at Fort Walton Beach, Fla. 

LaRue County vs. Spencer County 10 a.m. 

Redhawk Rumble at Louisville Seneca 

John Hardin vs. Louisville Fern Creek 11 a.m. 

Elizabethtown Spring Break Classic 

Louisville DeSales at Elizabethtown 5 p.m. 

Bowling Green/Warren County Invitational at Greenwood 

North Hardin vs. Butler County 6 p.m. 


SATURDAY 


Event Time 

PREP BASEBALL 

Elizabethtown Spring Break Classic 

Franklin County at Elizabethtown 11 a.m. 

Boyle County at Elizabethtown 6:30 p.m. 

Bowling Green/Warren County Invitational at Greenwood 

North Hardin at Warren East Noon 

North Hardin at Greenwood 2:30 p.m. 

Central Hardin Round Robin 

Grafton (Ohio) Midview at Central Hardin Noon 

Henderson County at Central Hardin 5 p.m. 

Redhawk Rumble at Louisville Seneca 

John Hardin vs. TBD TBA 

PREP TENNIS 

Taylor County at Fort Knox 4 p.m. 


Station 


Station 


SUNDAY 


Event Time Station 

NO EVENTS SCHEDULED. 


ON THE AIR 


TODAY 


Event 

Time 

Station 

AUTO RACING 



NASCAR Sprint Cup: Samsung 500 at Fort Worth 

, Texas 


Final Practice 

3 p.m. 

SPEED 

Pole Qualifying 

6:30 p.m. 

SPEED 

NASCAR Nationwide Series: O’Reiiiy Auto Parts 300 at Fort Worth, Texas 

Pole Qualifying 

5 p.m. 

ESPN2 

Race 

8:30 p.m. 

ESPN2 

F-1: China Grand Prix at Shanghai 



Qualifying 

2 a.m. 

SPEED 

BASEBALL 



MLB 



Rays at Red Sox 

2 p.m. 

MLB 

Cubs at Cardinals 

3:05 p.m. 

WGN 

Reds at Nationals 

7 p.m. 

ESN Ohio 

Brewers at Braves or Astros at Marlins 

7:30 p.m. 

MLB 

Coiiege 



Michigan at Penn St. 

5 p.m. 

Big Ten Net 

Auburn at Vanderbilt 

7 p.m. 

CSS 

BASKETBALL 



NBA 



Suns at Rockets 

8 p.m. 

ESPN 

Mavericks at Trail Blazers 

10:30 p.m. 

ESPN 

BOXING 



Junior Weiterweights 



Katsidis (28-5-0) vs. Mensah (19-3-1) 

11 p.m. 

ESPN2 

GOLF 



European PGA Tour: Maiaysian Open at Kuaia Lumpur, Maiaysia 


Second Round 

9 a.m. 

TGC 

Champions Tour: Tampa Bay Pro-Am at Lutz, Fia. 



First Round 

12:30 p.m. 

TGC 

PGA Tour: The Heritage at Hiiton Head Isiand, S.C. 


Second Round 

3 p.m. 

TGC 

HOCKEY 



NHL Piayoffs: Conference Quarterfinais 



Devils at Panthers 

7 p.m. 

NHL 

Red Wings at Predators 

7:30 p.m. 

CNBC 

Flyers at Penguins 

7:30 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

Kings at Canucks 

10 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

LACROSSE 



Men’s Coiiege 



Duke at Virginia 

6 p.m. 

ESPNU 

Women’s Coiiege 



American at Navy 

7 p.m. 

CBS Sports 

North Carolina at Northwestern 

8 p.m. 

Big Ten Net 

SOFTBALL 



Coiiege 



Jackson St. at Mississippi Valley St. 

3 p.m. 

ESPNU 

Georgia at Kentucky 

8:15 p.m. 

ESPNU 

TENNIS 



Barcelona 



Women’s Singles: Semifinals (same-day tape) 

3 p.m. 

Tennis Channel 

Houston 



Men’s Singles: Quarterfinals 

7 p.m. 

Tennis Channel 

Casablanca 



Men’s Singles: Quarterfinals (same-day tape) 

11 p.m. 

Tennis Channel 

SATURDAY 


Event 

Time 

Station 

AUTO RACING 



IRL: Long Beach Grand Prix at Long Beach, Caiif. 



Pole Qualifying 

6 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

NASCAR Sprint Cup: Samsung 500 at Fort Worth 

, Texas 


Race 

7 p.m. 

FOX 

American Le Mans Series at Long Beach, Caiif. 



Race (same-day tape) 

7:30 p.m. 

ESPN2 

F-1: China Grand Prix at Shanghai 



Race 

2:30 a.m. 

SPEED 

BASEBALL 



MLB 



Teams TBD 

12:30 p.m. 

FOX 

Reds at Nationals 

4 p.m. 

ESN Ohio 

Diamondbacks at Rockies or Brewers at Braves 

8 p.m. 

MLB 

Coiiege 



North Carolina St. at Clemson 

Noon 

ESN South 

BASKETBALL 



NBA 



Suns at Spurs 

9 p.m. 

ESPN 

Prep: Jordan Brand Ciassic at Chariotte, N.C. 



Teams TBD 

7 p.m. 

ESPN 

BOWLING 



Women’s College: At Wickliffe, Ohio 



NCAA Championship 

8 p.m. 

ESPNU 

FOOTBALL 



Coiiege 



Alabama Spring Game 

3 p.m. 

CSS 

Georgia Spring Game (same-day tape) 

5 p.m. 

CSS 

Clemson Spring Game (same-day tape) 

7 p.m. 

CSS 

Auburn Spring Game (same-day tape) 

9 p.m. 

CSS 

GOLF 



European PGA Tour: Maiaysian Open at Kuaia Lumpur, Maiaysia 


Third Round 

9 a.m. 

TGC 

PGA Tour: The Heritage at Hiiton Head Isiand, S.C. 


Third Round 

1 p.m. 

TGC 

Third Round 

3 p.m. 

CBS 

Champions Tour: Tampa Bay Pro-Am at Lutz, Fia. 



Second Round 

6:30 p.m. 

TGC 

HOCKEY 



NHL Piayoffs: Conference Quarterfinais 



Capitals at Bruins 

3 p.m. 

NBC 

Senators at Rangers 

7 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

Sharks at Blues 

7:30 p.m. 

CNBC 

Blackhawks at Coyotes 

10 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

HORSE RACING 



NTRA 



Blue Grass Stakes and Arkansas Derby 

6 p.m. 

CNBC 

LACROSSE 



Men’s College 



Warrior Classic: Rutgers vs. Syracuse 

11 a.m. 

ESPNU 

Navy at Army 

Noon 

CBS Sports 

Warrior Classic: Hofstra vs. North Carolina 

1:30 p.m. 

ESPNU 

Ohio St. at Michigan 

2:30 p.m. 

Big Ten Net 

Maryland at Johns Hopkins 

6 p.m. 

ESPNU 

Women’s College 



Georgetown at Syracuse 

2:30 p.m. 

CBS Sports 

National Lacrosse League 



Toronto Rock at Colorado Mammoth 

9 p.m. 

CBS Sports 

SOCCER 



Premier League 



Manchester City at Norwich City 

7:30 a.m. 

ESPN2 

MLS 



Columbus Crew at Philadelphia 

3:30 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

Spanish Primera Division From Vaiencia, Spain 



Levante vs. Barcelona 

3:55 p.m. 

ESPN 

SOFTBALL 



Coiiege 



LSU at Tennessee 

Noon 

ESPN 

East Carolina at Houston 

3 p.m. 

ESN 

Wisconsin at Illinois (Game 1 Of DH) 

5 p.m. 

Big Ten Net 

Wisconsin at Illinois (Game 2 Of DH) 

7:30 p.m. 

Big Ten Net 

TENNIS 



Houston 



Men’s Singles: Semifinals 

2 p.m. 

Tennis Channel 

Men’s Doubles: Final 

7 p.m. 

Tennis Channel 

Casablanca 



Men’s Singles: Semifinals (same-day tape) 

8:30 p.m. 

Tennis Channel 

SUNDAY 



Event 

Time 

Station 

AUTO RACING 



NASCAR Truck Series: Good Sam 200 at Rockingham, N.C. 


Race 

1 p.m. 

SPEED 

IRL: Long Beach Grand Prix at Long Beach, Caiif. 



Race 

3:30 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

NHRA: 4-Wide Nationais at Concord, N.C. 



Final Eliminations 

7 p.m. 

ESPN2 

BASEBALL 



MLB 



Rays at Red Sox 

1:30 p.m. 

TBS 

Reds at Nationals 

1:30 p.m. 

ESN Ohio 

Tigers at White Sox 

2 p.m. 

WGN 

Angels at Yankees 

8 p.m. 

ESPN 

Coiiege 



Florida International at Louisiana Lafayette 

1 p.m. 

CSS 

Alabama at LSU 

1 p.m. 

ESPN2 

VMI at Coastal Carolina 

2 p.m. 

ESPNU 

Cal St.-Fullerton at UC-Irvine 

5 p.m. 

ESPNU 

BASKETBALL 



NBA 



Heat at Knicks 

1 p.m. 

ABC 

Mavericks at Lakers 

3:30 p.m. 

ABC 

BOWLING 



PBA at Las Vegas 



Tournament of Champions 

1 p.m. 

ESPN 

GOLF 



PGA Tour: The Heritage at Hiiton Head Isiand, S.C. 


Final Round 

1 p.m. 

TGC 

Final Round 

3 p.m. 

CBS 

Champions Tour: Tampa Bay Pro-Am at Lutz, Fia. 



Final Round 

7 p.m. 

TGC 

HOCKEY 



NHL Piayoffs: Conference Quarterfinais 



Predators at Red Wings 

Noon 

NBC 

Penguins at Flyers 

3 p.m. 

NBC 

Devils at Panthers 

7:30 p.m. 

NBC Sports 

Canucks at Kings 

10:30 p.m. 

NBC Sports 


LOTTERIES 


KENTUCKY 

Thursday 

Midday Pick 3: 2-5-1 
Midday Pick 4: 4-3-2-3 
Evening Pick 3: 2-0-8 


Evening Pick 4: 1-5-2-7 
Cash Ball: 1-12-18-23, Cash Ball 2 
Cash Ball Kicker: 9-0-8-9-3 
Decade$ of Dollar$: 6-13-15-23-28-38 
5 Card Cash: KD-AC-10D-2C-10H 


Bulldogs’ Gumm, Martin combine for perfect game 


The News-Enterprise 

Sophomore right-hander Dale 
Gumm and senior reliever Hunter 
Martin combined on a perfect game 
Thursday and John Hardin went 2-0 
in the Louisville Seneca Redhawk 
Rumble. 

John Hardin (9-3) beat Louisville 
Western, 13-0 in five innings and 
topped Louisville Doss, 8-3. 

■ Gumm struck out nine in four 
innings as he improved to 4-0, while 
Martin had one strikeout in the fifth 
against Western. 

Senior Sam Brashear had two sin¬ 
gles and three RBIs, while senior 
Terrick Jaquess had two singles and 
an RBI. 

■ Leading 3-2 over Doss, the 
Bulldogs erupted for five runs in the 
seventh. 

Senior Marcus Pitts had a two-run 
single, while Jaquess and junior Zach 
Miller each had two singles. 

Senior Michael Gann struck out 
six, while allowing seven walks and 
nine hits in six innings. 

JOHN HARDIN 13, LOUISVILLE WESTERN 0 
R H E 

Western 000 00 0 0 4 

John Hardin 305 5x 1310 0 
Dale Gumm, Hunter Martin (5) and Zach Miller. 
Jakub Faircloth and Chase Druin. WP: Gumm (4-0). 
LP: Faircloth. 2B: Gumm (JH), Marcus Pitts (JH). 

3B: Michael Gann (JH). 

JOHN HARDIN 8, LOUISVILLE DOSS 3 
R H E 

John Hardin 003 000 5 810 1 

Doss 200 000 1 311 1 

Gann, Martin (7) and Miller. Haycraft, Sherman (7) 
and Ray. WP: Gann. LP: Haycraft. 2B: Gumm (JH), 
Brandon Arel (JH), Sherman (D). 3B: Gann (JH). 

UP NEXT: John Hardin plays Louisville Fern Creek 
at 11 a.m. today in the Seneca Redhawk Rumble. 

NO. 8 CENTRAL HARDIN 1, LOUISVILLE 
FAIRDALE 0. Sophomore Josh 
Krupinski threw a no-hitter for the 
host Bruins (11-4). 

Krupinski struck out 12 batters and 
was a passed ball on a strikeout in the 
sixth inning away from a perfect 
game. 

‘‘He threw strikes and hit his 

spots,” said Central Hardin coach 
Todd Thompson. “You do that and 
you’re going to be successful.” 

Senior Hunter Barnes had two sin¬ 
gles, while seniors Drew Harrington, 
Derek Westerfield and Cannon Ray 
and junior Ben Hogan added one 
each. Ray scored the winning run on 
senior Dustin Kindervater’s fielder 

choice in the third. 

Central Hardin won its third 
straight game and has won 5-of-6, 
and handed Fairdale (7-11) its third 
consecutive loss. 

CENTRAL HARDIN 1, FAIRDALE 0 
R H E 

Fairdale 000 000 0 0 0 1 

Central Hardin 001 000 x 1 6 0 

Marquess and Klinglesmith. Josh Krupinski and 
Gabe Hogan. WP: Krupinski. LP: Marquess. 

UP NEXT: Central Hardin hosts Grafton (Ohio) 
Midview at noon Saturday. 

LARUE COUNTY SPLITS TWO GAMES IN 
FLORIDA. The Hawks (11-4) beat 
Louisville Holy Cross, 14-3 in five in¬ 
nings before getting mercy-ruled by 
Choctawhatchee (Fla.), 12-0 in five in¬ 
nings in the Florida Beach Bash at 
Fort Walton Beach. 

■ Senior Slade Owens had two 
doubles, three RBIs and two runs to 
lead LaRue County past Holy Cross. 
Senior Jesse Johnson singled, dou¬ 
bled, drove in a run and scored twice, 
while senior Steven Carpenter had 
two singles, three stolen bases, four 


PREP SOFTBALL 

North Hardin 
pounds Choctaw 

The News-Enterprise 

Freshman Bailey Blair struck out 
11 as the North Hardin Trojans rout¬ 
ed Choctaw (Fla.), 10-3, on Thursday 
in the Florida Beach Bash. 

Blair gave up six hits, two earned 
runs and two walks in seven innings. 

Junior Brittanie Mahanna had 
four singles, two RBIs and scored 
twice for the Trojans (5-7), while 
sophomore Dalani Rainwater and 
eighth-grader Shelby Peace each sin¬ 
gled twice and drove in a run. 

North Hardin, which had 15 hits, 
led 6-3 before blowing the game 
open with a four-run seventh. 

NORTH HARDIN 10, CHOCTAW 3 
R H E 

North Hardin 200 022 4 1015 1 
Choctaw 201 000 0 3 6 6 

Bailey Blair and Shelby Peace. Not available. WP: 
Blair. LP: Unknown. 

UP NEXT: North Hardin plays at Meade County at 
5:30 p.m. Monday. 

LOUISVILLE BUTLER 5, NO. 15 CENTRAL 
HARDIN 4 .Junior Abby Ziegler home- 
red as the host Bearettes (7-4) upset 
the Lady Bruins (13-6), handing 
them third straight loss. 

Sophomore April Pence (8-3) took 
the loss as she allowed five hits, three 
earned runs and two walks in five in¬ 
nings. She struck out three. 

Pence also singled, doubled and 
scored a run, while eighth-grader 
Mariah Bryant had two singles and a 

runs scored and an RBI. 

Senior Wesley Kessinger (2-1) got 
the win. He struck out four while al¬ 
lowing four hits and three runs - two 
earned - in four innings. 

■ Veteran coach Chris Price called 
Choctaw one of the best teams he’s 
ever seen. 

Choctaw led 11-0 after three in¬ 
nings en route to handing LaRue 
County its worst loss of the season. 
The Hawks have been shut out once 
this season, but they haven’t been 
mercy-ruled since a 14-0 setback to 
5th Region rival Elizabethtown on 
May 12, 2009. 

Owens and Johnson each had a 
single for LaRue County, which was 
held to two hits and committed four 
errors. 

LARUE COUNTY 14, LOUISVILLE HOLY CROSS 3 
R H E 

LaRue County 305 33 14 9 2 

Holy Cross 100 20 3 5 4 

Wesley Kessinger, Kyle Sheeran (5) and Slade 
Owens. Clayton Snyder, Phillips (5) and Kyle Norris. 
WP: Kessinger (2-1). LP: Snyder. 2B: Jesse 
Johnson (LC), Owens (LC) 2, Trevor Skaggs (LC). 

CHOCTAW 12, LARUE COUNTY 0 
R H E 

LaRue County 000 00 0 2 4 

Choctaw 254 lx 12 9 0 

Johnson, Steven Carpenter (4), Skaggs (4) and 
Owens. Baker and Feckner. WP: Baker. LP: 

Johnson (1-2). 2B: Rackard (C). 3B: Clark (C). 

UP NEXT: LaRue County plays Spencer County at 
10 a.m. today in the Florida Beach Bash at Fort 
Walton Beach. 

MEADE COUNTY 15, BRECKINRIDGE 
COUNTY 1 (5 INNINGS). The Green 
Wave (10-4 overall, 1-0 11th District) 
scored 13 runs in the first three in¬ 
nings, including eight in the third, to 
roll past visiting district foe 
Breckinridge County and earn their 
fourth win in five games. 

Senior Garrett Ledford went 2-for- 


run. Senior Wesley Edwards had two 
singles and one RBI. 

BUTLER 5, CENTRAL HARDIN 4 
R H E 

Central Hardin 100 120 0 410 1 
Butler 100 220 x 5 5 2 

April Pence, Jessica Nall (6) and Mariah Bryant. 
Mallory Evans and Rebekah Ellis. WP: Evans. LP: 
Pence (8-3). 2B: Ellis (B). HR: Abby Ziegler (B). 

UP NEXT: Central Hardin hosts Fort Knox at 6 
p.m. Monday. 

MEADE COUNTY 15, HANCOCK COUNTY 

1. Sophomore Ashley Nikolao pow¬ 
ered the Lady Waves (7-5 overall, 1- 
0 11th District) to their third win in 
four games. 

She hit two home runs and also 
had a triple and a double to push 
them past the Lady Hornets (5-6, 0- 
1). Senior pitcher Brittany Lancaster 
earned the win. 

Complete stats weren’t available. 

UP NEXT: Meade County hosts North Hardin at 
5:30 p.m. Monday. 

HART COUNTY 13, FORT KNOX 2 (6 IN¬ 
NINGS). The visiting Lady Raiders 
(13-3) broke the game open with a 
six-run third as they won their eighth 
straight. 

Senior Breezy Jackson hit a two- 
run homer and seventh-grader 
Taylor Stephenson had two singles 
for Fort Knox (5-6), which has lost 5- 
of-7. 

HART COUNTY 13, FORT KNOX 2 
R H E 

Hart County 136 102 13 5 2 

Fort Knox 000 200 2 6 5 

Unknown and Morgan Atwell. Caitlin Scheuch and 
Ashlee Kohler. WP: Unknown. LP: Scheuch (1-4). 
2B: Corey Kaufman (HC), Jessica Dennis (HC). 

3B: Kaufman (HC). HR: Breezy Jackson (FK). 

UP NEXT: Fort Knox plays at Central Hardin at 6 
p.m. Monday. 

3 with three RBIs and senior Brady 
Smith went 3-for-3 with two RBIs. 
Junior Kaleb Lancaster went 2-for-2 
with three RBIs and senior Bo 
Wilson doubled and scored three 
runs. 

Wilson (4-1) pitched four innings, 
giving up three hits and one walk. He 
struck out four. Sophomore Zeb 
Wilson threw the fifth and struck out 
one. 

MEADE COUNTY 15, BRECKINRIDGE COUNTY 1 
(5 INNINGS) 

R H E 

Breckinridge Co.000 10 1 3 4 

Meade County 148 2x 1512 0 
Dexter Glasscock, Jacob Alexander (3), Brandon 
Henning (4) and Henning, Allen (4). Bo Wilson, Zeb 
Wilson (5) and Brady Smith. WP: Bo Wilson (4-1). 
LP: Glasscock. 2B: Bo Wilson (MC), Zach Coleman 
(MC), Smith (MC), David Rice (BC). 

UP NEXT: Meade County plays a doubleheader at 
Breckinridge County at 6 p.m. today. 

HART COUNTY 9, FORT KNOX 8 (8 IN¬ 
NINGS). The Eagles (2-9) suffered their 
sixth loss in seven games, while the 
Raiders (7-4) have won 3-of-4. 

Senior Trevor Rice was a homer 
shy of the cycle for Fort Knox, while 
freshman Matt Borowski had two sin¬ 
gles and two doubles. 

After falling behind 5-1 through 
two innings, the Eagles rallied to take 
an 8-5 lead in the fourth. But the 
Raiders scored two runs in the sixth, 
one in the seventh and one in the 
eighth. 

HART COUNTY 9, FORT KNOX 8 
R H E 

Fort Knox 102 500 00 811 3 

Hart County 140 002 11 9 5 1 

Tanner Murray, Matt Hubner (2) and Matt Borowski. 
Zack Jewell, Seth Bunnell (4) and Kyle Powell. WP: 
Bunnell LP: Hubner. 2B: Trevor Rice (FK), Borowski 
(FK) 2, Steven Riggs (HC) 2, Brian Williamson (HC). 
3B: Rice (FK), Trevor Cook (HC). 

UP NEXT: Fort Knox hosts North Hardin at 5:30 
p.m. Tuesday. 


SPORTS CALENDAR 


SPORTS TEAM NOTE: Sports Calendar is a free service, but The News-Enterprise 
sports department cannot guarantee when or how many times an item will run. Items 
should be submitted to The N-E sports department no sooner than three weeks prior 
to the date of your event. The N-E sports department has the right to edit all Sports 
Calendar items. To place a Sports Calendar item, call (270) 505-1752, fax it to 
(270) 769-6965 or email it to sports@thenewsenterprise.com. 

BOWLING NOTICES 

Seniors State Tournament at Dix-E-Town 

The 28th annual Kentucky State USBC BA Seniors State Tournament will be held 
Saturday-Sunday at Dix-E-Town Lanes. Competitors must be at least 55 years of age. 
Winners qualify for the ABC National Seniors Championship Tournament, which will be 
held July 9-11 in Reno, Nev. For information, call (502) 473-8753. 

Dix-E-Town Thursday Night Summer League 
Dix-E-Town Lanes will have a Thursday night summer league. Teams will be made up 
of any four-player combination (ladies must have a USBC BA card). The league will 
bowl for 15 weeks. There will be a meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at Dix-E-Town for any¬ 
one interested in joining. For information, call George Wever at 317-2631. 

EVENTS 

Toppers On Tour in Elizabethtown 

Western Kentucky University’s “Toppers On Tour” will stop at Elizabethtown Country 
Club at 5:30 p.m. June 18. Scheduled to appear are WKU interim athletic director 
Todd Stewart, head football coach Willie Taggart, head men’s basketball coach Ray 
Harper and head women’s basketball coach Michelle Clark-Heard. Cheerleaders, 
Topperettes and Big Red, and more coaches and staff members could appear as 
well. Members of the WKU ticket office will also be on-hand to answer questions and 
take orders for football season tickets and deposits for basketball season tickets. For 
information, visit www.alumni.wku.edu/toppersontour, call the local WKU alumni asso¬ 
ciation at (270) 745-4395 or email alumni@wku.edu. 

GOLF NOTICES 
Relay for Life Golf Scramble 

The Relay for Life team Good Clear Will will have a golf scramble at 1 p.m. April 21 at 
Lincoln Trail Country Club in Vine Grove. Entry fee is $100 per person and deadline to 
enter is Wednesday. Prizes will be given to the top three teams ($500 for first, $300 
for second and $200). For information, call Tina Yates at 737-6628 or 766-4367. 

Meade County Amateur Golf Championship 
The Meade County Amateur Golf Championship will be held April 28 and 29 at Doe 
Valley Golf Club in Brandenburg. Tee times begin at 9 a.m. April 28 and 1 p.m. April 
29. Entry fee is $60 for Doe Valley members and $100 for non-members and 
includes greens fees, cart and lunch both days. Deadline to enter is April 22 by 6 
p.m. 

Helping Hand of Hope Golf Scramble 

The Helping Hand of Hope will have a golf scramble May 4 at Elizabethtown Country 
Club. Registration begins at 8 a.m. with a shotgun start at 9. For information, contact 
Sheri Reynolds at 769-3092 or sreynolds@hhhope.com. 

CHUMC Golf Scramble 

College Heights United Methodist Church will have a golf scramble May 25 at Lindsey 
Golf Course. Registration begins at 7 a.m. with a shotgun start at 8:30. Entry fee is 
$50 per player or $200 per team. Deadline to enter is May 21. All proceeds will go to 
benefit the church’s youth group mission trip to Panama. For information, call Terry 
Coy at 401-1997 or 982-3503 (evenings only) or Coleman Hewlett at 872-6140. 
Radcllff Rotary Golf Scramble 

The Radcllff Rotary golf scramble will be held at 9 a.m. June 1 at Fort Knox’s Lindsey 
Golf Course. Check-in is 8 a.m. June 1. Lunch and beverages will be provided. Prizes 
will be awarded for first, third, sixth and last places. If you don’t have a team, one 
will be found for you. For information, call Mike Enlow 765-8659, Ext. 6410. 

HONORS 

NHHS Hall Of Fame 

The North Hardin High School Athletic Hall of Fame’s third class will be inducted in 
September. Nominations will be accepted until May 1. Nomination forms are available 
in the NHHS main office or at www.hardin.kyschools.us/nhhs/athletics/halloffame/. 
For information, call Judy Bishop at 351-3659. 

MEETINGS 

EYSA General Meeting 

The Elizabethtown Youth Soccer Association will have its general meeting at 7 p.m. 
Tuesday at the Pritchard Community Center’s Mulberry room to vote on board mem¬ 
bers. The meeting is open to the public. For information, email Sean Hayes at 
eysasoccer@gmail.com. 

NHHS Boys’ Soccer Meeting 

The North Hardin High School boys’ soccer team will have an organizational meeting 
at 6 p.m. Tuesday at the NHHS library. All parents and players interested in playing 
JV and varsity soccer next fall are invited to attend. For information, email NHHS 


coach Jim Stone at Jim.stone@hardin.kyschools.us. 

EAYF Elections 

The Elizabethtown Area Youth Football league will have its annual elections at 6:30 
p.m. April 25 at the Pritchard Community Center. Anyone who is interested in becom¬ 
ing a member of the commission needs to attend. For information, email Chris Young 
at cyoung58@windstream.net. 

PASSES/TICKETS 
LCHS Baseball/Softball Passes 

Baseball and softball season passes for LaRue County High School are now avail¬ 
able. Passes are $15 for students and $30 for adults. Passes are only valid for regu¬ 
lar-season games. For information, see Melinda Rock at the ticket gate or David 
Dawson at LCHS. 

PLAYERS/COACHES NEEDED 
Team Seeking New Members 

The Brazilian Jiu Jitsu, Judo and submission grappling and E’town Beatdown MMA 
team at Energy Sports is looking for new members. For information, contact Josh 
Johnson at 234-3961. 

CKY Bruins Football Team 

The Central Kentucky Bruins, a 12-and-under travel football team, is in need of play¬ 
ers. For information, call Kevin Griffith at 735-3609. 

REGISTRATIONS 

EAYS 

The Elizabethtown Area Youth Softball league will have signups for its slowpitch 
league from 11 a.m.-l p.m. Saturday at the Gates Field concession stand. The 
league is open to ages 5-17. Cost is $40 per player, and all first-year players must 
provide a copy of their birth certificate. For information, call Russell Tucker at 734- 
0987 or Christie Huffer at 307-2375. 

No-Ox Wrestling Club Personal Fitness Training 
The No-Ox Wrestling Club will offer personal fitness and sports specific training ses¬ 
sions beginning in May. Participants can training one-on-one with a trainer or in group 
sessions in a private gym. No-Ox is also offering private and group wrestling lessons 
for all ages. For information, contact Joe Burroughs at 272-8486 or 
no_ox_wrestling@yahoo.com. 

SWIMMING NOTICES 
Swim Lessons 

The E’town Dolpins swimming team are offering swimming lessons this spring and 
summer. The first session is already full, but there is still room in three others (begin¬ 
ning April 30, May 29 and July 2). For information, visit www.etowndolphins.com. 

WALKS/RUNS 

Hardin County Special Olympics “No Limits” Walk-a-tbon 

The Hardin County Special Olympics “No Limits” Walk-a-thon will be held Saturday at 
First Federal Savings Bank’s Ring Road track in Elizabethtown. All proceeds benefit 
local children and adults with disabilities that compete and train year-round in at least 
one of the 16 sports offered by Special Olympics. Walkers are encouraged to form 
teams that can consist of family, friends, co-workers, or church members to support 
the athletes. Teams can support their efforts by wearing matching T-shirts or carrying 
a team banner. Minimum to participate is $20 for each walker. For information, con¬ 
tact Maureen Johnson at MdaJ5@comcast.net or 877-7127. 

JTA 5K 

The James T. Alton Middle School 5K Run/Walk will be held at 8 a.m. April 21 at the 
school. The event will have five divisions: 19-and-under, 20-29, 30-39, 40-49 and 50- 
and-over. Entry fee is $20 for adults, $15 for school-age children to college age run¬ 
ners and $12 for walkers. Proceeds will benefit the JTA physical education program. 

Blue Ribbon Run at Central Hardin 

Girl Scout Troop 1018 and C.A.S.A. of the Heartland will host the Blue Ribbon Run for 
Child Abuse Prevention Month from 4-6 p.m. April 22 at Central Hardin High School. 
Entry fee is $5. There will also be food, games and music on-site. For information, 
call Lisa at 268-4799. 

Addison Jo Blair 5K 

The Addison Jo Blair 5K will be held May 19 in Glendale. All proceeds go to benefit 
the Kosair Children’s Hospital. All participants who register by May 4 will receive a T- 
shirt and goodie bag. Participants must register online at www.active.com. For infor¬ 
mation, email info@addisonjoblair.org. 











THE NEWS-ENTERPRJSE 


SPORTS 


FRIDAY, APR tL 13, 2012 


B3 


m 


Campbell, Taylor, Knost share RBC Heritage lead 


The Associated Press 

Chad CanipbeU used a 
fast start, and Vaughn 
Taylor and Colt Knost had 
strong finishes to share the 
first-round lead Thm^day 
at 4-under 67 in the RBC 
Heritage at Hilton Head 
Island, S^C. 

Campbell birdied four 
of his first seven holes, 
Knost birdied three of his 
last five, and Taylor holed 
out from the fairway for a 
closing eagle on the par-4 
ninth hole at Harbour 
Town Golf Links. 

Jim Furyk, the 2010 win¬ 
ner, was a stroke back 
along with Harris English, 
Charlie Wi and Matt Every. 
Forty-two players, includ¬ 
ing John Daly in just his 


second PGA Tour event 
this year, were at even par 
or better. 

McLsters winner Bnbha 
Watson took the week off as 
did most players ranked in 
the world's top 20* No* 1 
Luke Donald, who has 
been second, third and seC” 
ond here the past three 
years, opened with a 75. He 
has to finish in the top eight 
Ejr surrender to the top sjjot 
to No. 2 Rory Mcllroy next 
week. 

Matt Kuchar was tied for 
the lead at Augusta 
National with three holes 
left before finishing two 
shots out of the playoff be¬ 
tween Watson and Louis 
Oosthuizen, Kuchar hoped 
to continue his strong play 
at Harboui' Town, hut end¬ 


ed in a large group at I- 
over 72. 

Campbell held a first* 
round lead for the first time 
since the 2009 Masters, His 
game has faded some since 
fiien ” he recorded just one 
top 10 at the British Open 
last year, his fewest since 
conning out on tour in 20f)2 
— and has missed five cuts 
in nine toun^aments this 
yean 

MAUYSIAN OPEN. Chari 
Schwartzel of South Africa 
shot an S under 64 to take a 
one-stroke lead after the 
opening round at Kuala 
Dimpur. 

The 2011 Masters cham* 
pioii birdied five holes on 
the front nine and four on 
the back, 

Jeev Milkha Singh of 


India was next He was fol¬ 
lowed by 2012 Masters run- 
ner-up Louis Oostliuizen of 
Srtjuth Africa, India’s Jyoti 
Randhawa and Jason 
Knutzon of the United 
Slates at 6 under* 

Having traveled 30 
hours to reach Kuala 
Lumpur Golf and Country 
Club after playing at 
Augusta, Schw'artzel and 
OtisLhuizen played tcjgeth- 
er but neither expected to 
dominate in such style. 
Between them, they made 
15 birdies and an eagle. 

“Louis and 1 got off to a 
fast start," Schwartzel said. 
“And it IS always nice when 
tliere are a couple of you 
logcthcT in the group play¬ 
ing well and pulling each 
other along a bit, Louis is 


REDS: didn’t have many 
bullpen options to turn to 

(.^nlinucd Irom Rl 


""It’s a long season, A lot can hap¬ 
pen,’" Werth said. “But I like the way 
weVe started.” 

The Nationals never had been bet* 
ter than 3-4 through seven games 
since they moved to Washington in 
2005* They’re hoping to build on last 
season's improvement, when they 
finished 80-81 and in third place in 
the NL East. 

“We’re showing signs of great life 
here,” said Washington starter Gio 
Gonzalez, who struck out seven and 
didn't walk a batter in seven shutout 
innings* 

He even added hi.s first major 
league hit, foi- good measure, a bloop¬ 
er of a single to left off Mat Latos with 
one out in the fifth, then roiled his 
ncck^ smiled broadly cuid chuckled a 
bit while standing on the bag at first 

“fm glad to get the first one out of 
the way/’ Gonzalez said. 

Thanks to Adam LiiRoche’s two- 
run single with the bases loaded in 
the fifth, the Nationals took a 2-0 lead 
into the ninth, but Brad Lidge blew 
the save, lidge is sharing closer du¬ 
ties for Washington with Henry 
Rodriguez because Drew Storen had 


NATION Z, REDS 2 ,10 INNINOS 

Cincinnati Waslilng^oni 



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Stammen W.1-0 

1 

0 

0 

0 

0 

3 

HBP—by Simon (Zimmerman). WP—Simon. 


surgery Wednesday and will be out 
for months. 

With one out, Lidge walked Joey 
Votto, then gave up Scott Rolen’s 
double and intentionally walked Jay 
Bruce to load the bases. The free pass 
didn’t worki even though Nationals 
manager Davey Johnson liked the 
odds when he saw Ludwick send a 
hopper toward Zimmerman, a 2009 
NL Gold Glove recipient. 


“When that ball was hit down his 
way, I was happy as a clam,"Johnson 
said. “Tough hop.” 

It scooted past Zimmerman, allow 
ing the Reds to make it 2-2. 

“Those are plays that I expect my¬ 
self to make," Ziinm:emiaiT said, “and 
I hope my leammataes expect me to 
make those plays as well.” 

But Zimmerman got a chance to 
make amends. He was at third with 
Roger Bernadina at the plate, when 
Simon threw an 0-1 pitch in the dirt* 
Bernadina at first held up a hand, as if 
to tell Zimmennan not to run. Not 
even noticing that, Zimmerman took 
off and slid under the tag after catch¬ 
er Devin Mesoraco collected the ball 
and threw to Simon, 

“That’s a good read from ‘Zhn/” 
Bernadina said. 

Said Simon r “I just tried to throw 
the ball down. It got away. Nothing 
we can do " 

Reds manager Dii^tv Baker 
lamented that his bullpen options 
were limited. Aroldis Chapman 
worked two inningjs Wednesday, and 
Logan Gndmsek already had ap¬ 
peared in five games - so both were 
off limits. Plus, Baker w^anted to save 
closer Sean Marshall for a possible 
save sittiatjon. 

“That was a tough way to lose a 
game^” Baker said. “We were in a 
tough spot there.” 


playing so well right now. 
If s impressive to watch and 
pulled me along." 

Oosthulzen was unable 
to repeat the shot he made 
in the final round of the 
Mastei's, but he did eagle 
the third hole and made six 
birdies. 

“This morning, 1 felt 
quite good. I knew the 
swing was still good,” said 
Oosthuizen, who lost the 
Masters in a playoff to 
Bubba Watson. “It was just 
adapting to the weather 
and the green speed. But I 
putted beautifully again to¬ 


day and hope to keep it go¬ 
ing for the week.” 

With his wife and two 
young children in Malaysia 
on vacation, Oosthulzen 
was happy to be able to rest 
after his long trip. 

“I got a good night’s 
rest,” he Sciid. “Because al* 
tliough the kids were up all 
night, she said to me: "Get 
some rest and I will look af¬ 
ter them.’ But T feel like I 
am swinging tl^e club well, 
ajid a lot of the time we are 
used to travel and adapt 
quickly" 



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Russell tops Fish at II.S. Men’s Clay Court 


The Assoriafcd Press 

HOUSTON - Qualifier 
Michael Russell took ad¬ 
vantage of the ailing Mardy 
Fish for a 6-3, 6-1 victory 
Thursday in the second 
round of the U,S. Men^s 
Cl^ Cauri ChampionshipH 

Fish, the top seed in the 
tournament and ranked 
ninth in the world, was 
playing for the first time 
since pulling out of Davis 
Cup competition against 
France for what he c^led a 
health issue. 

“What happened a cou¬ 
ple of w'eeks ago scared 
me,” Fish said. “Obviou.sly, 
Fm not over it. 1 think any^ 
one could see I wasn't my¬ 
self." 

Second-seeded John 
Isner faced Argentina’s 
Horacio Zeballos later 
Thursday in a second- 
round match at River Oaks 
Country Club, 

The 136th-ranked 
Russell knew^ he had a great 
opportunity. 

“In the beginning, 1 
thought he was playing 
pretty wcU and it was neck 
and neck and then his 
game definitely detcrioral 
ed big lime," Russell said. 
“1 just tried to ride the 
wave.” 

Fish hit only 52 percent 
of his first selves and had 
five double-faults. 

The 33-year-old Russell 
beat a top-10 player for the 
first time in liis career. He 
double-faulted once and hit 
on 70 percent of his first 
serves. 

“I was hying to take ad¬ 
vantage of my seiYice game 
and I took advantage of a 
lot of his unforced errors,” 
Russell said, “It turned out 
great," 

Russell said he was sur¬ 
prised that Fish played so 
quickly, 

“He wa*s playing very 
quick between points," 
Russell said* “It w’as unusu- 


a]. When I’m up a break 
usually you’ll take a little 
n^ore time but he was kind 
of rushing thr ough, I wasn’t 
going to stop him. I wanted 
to keep the momentum go- 


irig” 

Kish said he wasn’t cer¬ 
tain about his next move. 

“I’ll gel with family aiid 
try to sort some things out," 
Fish said. 


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B4 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


SPORTS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


COLLEGE FOOTBALL 


NASCAR 


Law enforcement and SEC 
programs have long history 

By DAVID BRANDT 

The Associated Press 


Busch Brothers becoming an 
owner-driver combo in Texas 


The Bobby Petrino saga has drawn attention to 
an often overlooked aspect of big-time college foot¬ 
ball: the relationship between coaches and the po¬ 
lice who handle security for them. 

Around the Southeastern Conference, providing 
sideline security for SEC programs is considered 
coveted duty. Some officers travel to away games, a 
cost paid for mostly by the schools. It can range 
from volunteer duty to part of the officer’s regular 
schedule. 

Arkansas State Police Captain Lance King, who 
provided security for Petrino at Razorback games, 
got the call from the coach’s phone when he 
wrecked his motorcycle. 

King was cleared of any wrongdoing and it’s not 
unusual for marquee college coaches to have at 
least a casual relationship with the law enforcement 
officials who work closely with the program. 

‘‘We consider it an honor because college foot¬ 
ball is such a public part of life in the south,” said 
Mississippi Highway Patrol Maj. Billy Mayes, a 31- 
year veteran of the MHP who graduated from Ole 
Miss in 1981. “But from my point of view, the rela¬ 
tionship is strictly business. Some coaches are more 
personable than others. Ed Orgeron didn’t talk to 
us much. Houston Nutt did.” 

In the Petrino case, the coach felt comfortable 
enough with King to have the officer handle the 
crucial minutes following the crash. 

Since the incident, Petrino has been fired with 
cause in the wake of explosive details of the crash 
and attempted cover-up, including lying about de¬ 
tails of the accident, infidelity and workplace fa¬ 
voritism. Arkansas athletic director Jeff Long found 
that the coach made “a conscious decision” to mis¬ 
lead the university in the aftermath of the crash, in¬ 
cluding that 25-year-old Jessica Dorrell was on the 
motorcycle with him during the accident. 

Long’s role in that aftermath was examined by 
the Arkansas State Police, but the department con¬ 
cluded he did not violate “any State Police policy or 
state laws.” 

At LSU, the state police escort began back in the 
late 1970s when Jerry Stovall was coach, according 
to State Police Capt. Doug Cain. The trooper for 
current LSU coach Les Miles is Sgt. Bryan Madden, 
who has handled the assignment since 2008. He 
was an LSU player in the early 1990s, and has been 
with the State Police for more than a decade. 

“One thing a lot of people don’t realize is it’s a 
volunteer assignment,” Cain said. “Those troopers 
are not paid (by the department), and up until a 
couple years ago they had to take vacation time 
when they went out of town with the team.” 

LSU compensates Madden for any hotel rooms 
and travel expenses, which was a common arrange¬ 
ment according to responses from police in 
Mississippi, Tennessee, Georgia and South 
Carolina. 


By STEPHEN HAWKINS 

The Associated Press 

FORT WORTH, Texas - The 

Busch Brothers are adding a new dy¬ 
namic to their relationship. 

When Kurt Busch gets in the car 
for tonight’s NASCAR Nationwide 
race in Texas, where he ran in that se¬ 
ries for the first time and won six 
years ago, it will be his debut driving 
for younger brother Kyle’s new stock 
car team. 

“It is owner-driver, but it is broth¬ 
er-brother, and it’s unique with me 
having the upper hand on age,” 33- 
year-old Kurt Busch said Thursday. 
“But I respect him for the guts that he 
has to jump into this endeavor, to be 
the owner.” 

After the first of about 17 
Nationwide races driving for his 
brother, they will be competitors 
again Saturday night in the Sprint 
Cup race. 

It was at Texas last November 
when NASCAR barred 26-year-old 
Kyle Busch from driving for Joe 
Gibbs in the Cup and Nationwide 
races. That came after Busch, driving 
the truck he owned, deliberately 
wrecked championship contender 
Ron Hornaday Jr. during a caution in 
the race that started a tripleheader 
weekend. 

Since NASCAR’s last trip to the 1 
1/2-mile high-banked track, Kurt 
Busch has changed Cup teams. He 
split with Penske Racing after six sea¬ 
sons in what was called a mutual part¬ 
ing of the ways and is with the new 
much smaller and less-funded 
Phoenix Racing team. 

“Both teams that I’m with this year 
are very unique circumstances,” he 
said. “We’ll have chances at winning 
in the Nationwide car, we’re going to 
have to claw and scrap and fight real 
hard with the Cup car. But we’re go¬ 
ing to have our opportunities to have 
fun every week.” 

After the Easter break, NASCAR 
resumes this weekend with the first 
scheduled night Cup race of the sea¬ 
son, though not the first one. (Don’t 
forget that rain-postponed Daytona 
500 that was run on a Monday night). 


THIS WEEKEND’S NASCAR RAGES 

SAMSUNG MOBILE 500 
Site: Fort Worth, Texas. 

Schedule: Today, practice (Speed, 3-4:30 p.m.), 
qualifying (Speed, 6:30-8 p.m.); Saturday, race, 
7:30 p.m. (FOX, 7-11 p.m.). 

Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval, 1.5 miles). 
Race distance: 501 miles, 334 laps. 

Last year: Matt Kenseth won to end a 76-race vic¬ 
tory drought. Clint Bowyer was second, followed 
by Kenseth’s Roush Fenway teammates, Carl 
Edwards and Greg Biffle. 

Last race: Ryan Newman won at Martinsville on 
April 1 to snap a 22-race winless streak. He took 
the lead off the first green-white-checker restart 
when a three-wide accident took out leaders Jeff 
Gordon and Jimmie Johnson. A.J. Allmendinger 
was second. 

Fast facts: Roush Fenway has eight Texas victo¬ 
ries. ... Tony Stewart won at the track in 
November, holding off Edwards. ... Denny Hamlin 
swept the 2010 races for Joe Gibbs Racing. ... 
Biffle leads the season standings, six points 
ahead of Dale Earnhardt Jr. ... Earnhardt is win¬ 
less in 135 races since his fuel-mileage victory at 
Michigan in June 2008, his lone win in 150 starts 
for Hendrick Motorsports. He had 17 victories in 
291 starts for Dale Earnhardt Inc. ... Kenseth 
won the Daytona 500. 

Next race: STP 400, April 22, Kansas Speedway, 
Kansas City, Kan. 

O’REILLY AUTO PARTS 300 

Site: Fort Worth, Texas. 

Schedule: Today, practice, qualifying (ESPN2, 5-6 
p.m.), race, 8:30 p.m. (ESPN2, 8-11 p.m.). 

Track: Texas Motor Speedway (oval, 1.5 miles). 
Race distance: 300 miles, 200 laps. 

Last year: Carl Edwards raced to his second 
straight victory at the track, leading 169-of-200 

Greg Biffle, who has seven consec¬ 
utive top-10 finishes in Texas and 
won at the track in 2005, is the re¬ 
laxed points leader. 

Biffle took advantage of the time 
off with a Bahamas vacation, charter¬ 
ing a big boat that he stayed on dur¬ 
ing the week. It was peaceful, with 
crystal clear water, pristine beaches 
and really no one else around. 

“I haven’t been on a vacation in 
quite some time like that,” Biffle said. 
“Man, I’m ready to go. I’m fired up. 
... I’m pretty excited about getting go¬ 
ing.” 

Texas is the only Nationwide race 
in a four-week span. There have been 
two weeks off in the second-tier series 
since its race at Lontana on March 24, 
and there isn’t a race next week. 

“It feels like it’s been a while. ... 
Easy breezy April,” said Danica 
Patrick, who is in her first full 
Nationwide season. 

After the radiator was punctured 
by debris, Patrick dropped out of the 
California race with engine trouble 
and finished 35th. She completed 
only 63-of-150 laps the day before her 
30th birthday. 


laps. 

Last race: Joey Logano gave Joe Gibbs Racing its 
eighth consecutive Nationwide victory at Auto 
Club Speedway in Fontana, Calif., winning March 
24. 

Fast facts: Elliott Sadler, the winner at Phoenix 
and Bristol, leads the season standings. Las 
Vegas winner Ricky Stenhouse Jr. is second, 18 
points back. ... Dale Earnhardt Jr. is making his 
fifth Texas start in the series. He won at the track 
in 1998. ... Denny Hamlin is driving Gibbs’ No. 18 
Toyota. ... Kurt Busch is piloting Kyle Busch 
Motorsports’ No. 54 Toyota. ... Trevor Bayne won 
at the track in November. 

Next race: NASCAR Nationwide Series 250, April 
27, Richmond International Raceway, Richmond, 

Va. 

GOOD SAM ROADSIDE ASSISTANCE 200 
Site: Rockingham, N.C. 

Schedule: Today, practice; Saturday, practice, 
qualifying; Sunday, race, 1 p.m. (Speed, 12:30- 
3:30 p.m.). 

Track: Rockingham Speedway (oval, 1.017 miles). 
Race distance: 200 miles, 200 laps. 

Last year: Inaugural race. 

Last race: Kevin Harvick won the spring race at 
Martinsville for the third time in the past four 
years, leading all but two laps March 31. Richard 
Childress Racing teammate Ty Dillon was second. 
Fast facts: The race is NASCAR’s first at the 
track since 2004. Andy Hillenburg bought the 
facility from Speedway Motorsports owner Bruton 
Smith in 2007. ... The 20-year-old Dillon, racing 
for grandfather Richard Childress, won the 2010 
ARCA season finale at the track to wrap up the 
series title. ... Sprint Cup driver Kasey Kahne is 
competing. ... Daytona winner John King leads the 
season standings. 

Next race: SPF 250, April 21, Kansas Speedway, 
Kansas City, Kan. 

“I was able to give myself plenty of 
distractions over the last couple of 
weeks. ... A never-ending birthday 
party,” Patrick said. “Breaks get me 
excited to get back at it again. I think 
that’s what it’s done.” 

There was a party on her birthday, 
followed by trips to Cabo and 
Northern California and a surprise 
party. 

Patrick’s limited Sprint Cup sched¬ 
ule with Tony Stewart’s team won’t 
have her driving in Texas until the 
November race. 

Missing from the Nationwide field 
this weekend is Trevor Bayne, the 
November winner who is fourth in 
points this season. But a lack of spon¬ 
sorship forced Roush Penway Racing 
to leave the No. 60 car out of this 
race. 

Kyle Busch’s Nationwide team is 
sponsored by Monster Energy, which 
was looking to do only a certain num¬ 
ber of races before the racing broth¬ 
ers said they would split the full sea¬ 
son in the car. 

Kurt is only a driver and Kyle is 
driver-owner of a team of more than 
100 employees. 


COMMENTARY 


Wade feeling heat for making valid point 


By PAUL NEWBERRY 

The Associated Press 

Go ahead, bash Dwyane Wade all you 
want. 

Call the NBA superstar unpatriotic, 
greedy, just another millionaire athlete who 
doesn’t understand how good he’s got it. 

Then listen, really listen, to what he tried 
to say. 

A lot of people are making a lot of mon¬ 
ey off the Olympic Games. Sponsors. 
Executives. Television networks. Governing 
bodies. Vendors. Everyone, it would seem, 
except the athletes. 

It’s a multi-billion dollar pie, why 
shouldn’t they get a slice? 

“Look, what Dwyane Wade said isn’t en¬ 
tirely wrong,” said former U.S. Olympic 
swimmer Gary Hall Jr. “Maybe he went 
about addressing the issue clumsily. But the 
issue he is addressing is real. Do the 
Olympic Games exploit the athlete? 
Absolutely. Do the Olympic Games exploit 
patriotism? Absolutely.” 

A day earlier, Wade was quoted as say¬ 
ing there should be some compensation for 
NBA stars who give up a good chunk of 
their summer to play in the Olympics. The 
Miami Heat guard was a member of the 
gold medal-winning American teams in 
2004 and 2008, and he’s agreed to compete 
once more at the London Games, which 
begin July 27. 

“It’s a lot of things you do for the 
Olympics - a lot of jerseys you sell,” Wade 
said. “I do think guys should be compensat¬ 
ed.” 

The backlash was immediate. On mes¬ 
sage boards, fans accused Wade of defam¬ 
ing the Olympic movement, of not caring 
about his country, of only being concerned 
about padding his already hefty bank ac¬ 
count. There were calls for him to be left off 
the U.S. team. 

Even some fellow Olympians consid¬ 
ered his view out of line. 

“When you’re walking in the opening 
ceremonies behind your flag, you’re think¬ 
ing about all the people who stood for this 
country in the armed services, all the men 
and women who sacrificed and represented 
our country to the fullest,” said American 
fencer Tim Morehouse, who won a silver 
medal at Beijing. “You shouldn’t be think¬ 
ing, ‘Man, I should be paid for this.’ If that’s 
the way you’re thinking, you should just 
stay at home.” 

Recognizing the maelstrom he stirred 
up, Wade issued a statement Thursday say¬ 
ing he didn’t want to be any Olympic pay. 
He also tweeted that pride for his country 
“motivates me more than any $$$ amount” 
— which shouldn’t be in question, anyway, 
since he’s poised to join a very small club of 


U.S. hoopsters who have competed in three 
Olympics. 

What a shame it turned out this way. 

There was a real opportunity to make 
some significant changes in the whole 
Olympic structure, changes that would’ve 
benefited all athletes - not just a small 
group of NBA millionaires who don’t real¬ 
ly need the money anyway. We’re talking 
about those who are barely scraping by, 
who have to take a part-time job to make 
ends meet, who dip into their own pockets 
to pay training and travel expenses because 
their obscure sports don’t generate enough 
money to pick up the tab. 

You know, the majority of athletes in 
London this summer. 

“I’ve been waiting for one iconic athlete 
who would look beyond his own success 
and fame to help all those other athletes 
who have nothing to speak of,” said Evan 
Morgenstein, the agent for a number of 
high-profile swimming stars such as Dara 
Torres and Amanda Beard. “No one makes 
that much money. We’ve been looking for 
the messiah.” 

Wade was poised to take on that role, but 
it appears the strong gust of negative public 
opinion sent him fleeing for cover. Maybe it 
would help if a few more high-profile ath¬ 
letes joined him on the firing line, crafting a 
message that focuses on helping all 
Olympians. 

Hall and his agent, David Arluck, have 
talked in the past about starting up a union 
to represent athletes in their dealings with 
the U.S. Olympic Committee, but the idea 
never got very far. 

Now, the last thing we want to see is a 
strike on the eve of the opening ceremony, 
or the next Olympics being called off be¬ 
cause of an IOC lockout. That said, there’s 
no doubt that the current labor arrange¬ 
ment is far too one-sided in favor of those 
who watch the games from the private box¬ 
es, decked out in tailored suits. 

“The culture has to change,” Arluck said. 
“There’s always been a lot of talk about 
unionizing. But nothing has really hap¬ 
pened. That’s a real shame.” 

Lor a start. Hall suggested, how about 
setting aside 5 percent of all TV revenues 
for the men and women we’re actually 
watching on the tube? NBC will be paying 
$4.38 billion for U.S. broadcast rights at the 
next four Olympics. Using Hall’s modest 
figure, that would create an athletes’ pool of 
$219 million — which breaks down to 
roughly about $8,400 per athlete (the 
Summer Games are supposed to be capped 
at 10,500 athletes, while the much-smaller 
Winter Games generally have about 2,500). 
The number grows when rights fees from 
the rest of the world are factored in. 


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THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


B5 



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pick up at your corwen- 
(ence. Call {270\ 
234-6206. Also, tteo to¬ 
rn wal of abandon-ad au¬ 
tos- 


CARRY CONCEALED 
Deady Weapons Class 
being held ori Sunday. 
April IS. flam. For more 
irformatron, call (270) 
863-6341 or 307-3666 
ask fdr Donald 


FEAST ON THE WORD 
MINISTRIES will have 
Brighter Day in a free con¬ 
cert on Friday, April, 13, 
6:30pm, 904 N. Mulbery St, 
Elizabethtown, Ky. A free 
meal will be served at the 
beginning of the service. A 
love offering will be taken. A 
ministry where everyone is 
welocme. Come and be 
blessed. POC prayer 
forceinc@hotmail.com or 
270-268-3998. 



HAVE FUNi WiN BIG at 
Southland Bingo. Tues¬ 
day. April 17tn’ S2Q0 sin¬ 
gles, $500 Doubles. $500 
Odd/Even. $500 Triple. 
S 1.000 Coverall &. much 
more. 2360 S. Diwe. Rad- 
eliTT (270) 352-4640 

Sponsored by Hardn Co 
Pet Protection Org 0956 



OVER $74.50 

worth of Coupon 
Savings in 

The 

News Enterprise 

Sunday,. 

April 15th 

call Today to 
Subscribe 
(370) 505-1770 


Loans 


•AVOID ADVANCED Fee 

loan scams. It’s illegal for 
companies doing business 
by phone to promise you a 
loan and ask you to pay for 
it before they deliver. For 
free information, write to the 
Federal Trade Commission, 
Washington, D.C., 20580. 


"I J Free Items 


3 MEDIUM TO LARGE 

Black adorable mixed bred 
pups. Born 2/22/12. 
313/434 area. Free to good 
homes (502) 797-9885 


Free Items 


ANIMAL REFUGE CEN- 

TER trying to adopt adora¬ 
ble kittens & puppies into 
good loving homes. Very 
reasonable adoption fee 
which includes: spay & neu¬ 
ter & all vaccinations. For 
more information call (270) 
877-6064. 

FREE PUPPIES FREE 

Puppies neighborhood Ro¬ 
meo father, Blue Heeler 
mother. Cute and very 
smart. Six weeks old and 
ready for a good home. 10 
to choose from. 
270-862-3005 after 6 pm 

JACK RUSSELL - To a 

good home. Good with chil¬ 
dren & so so with other ani¬ 
mals. Call (270) 312-0712 
or (270) 317-4602. 

KITTEN - 2-3 weeks old, 
abandoned by mother. We 
have a dog & can’t keep. 
Call (270) 219-9392. 

LAB/BEAGLE MIX 4 mos 

old, male, great with kids 
and other dogs. Needs 
room to run. Great Dog. 
Free to good home. 
270-735-5960 
MALE & FEMALE PUP- 
PIES Black Lab with Do¬ 
berman, about 5 months 
old, very friendly, good with 
kids, free to good home. 
Call 270-879-4522 leave 
message. 

MALE BOXER, brindle in 
color, housebroken. 

270-317-3270 

SMALL TERRIER DOG 

loveable, spayed, approx 1 
1/2 yrs old. free to good 
home. Call 270-763-6614 

TO A GOOD HOME, 5 

week old Bloodhound 
mixed puppies. 3 females, 1 
male.270-360-1525 
WE ARE COLLECTING 
unwanted yard sale items 
for the 4th annual March of 
Dimes yard sale. Free Re¬ 
moval. Call (270) 234-4153 

WHITE CAT with 4 kittens. 
Call (270) 369-8915. 

WILL PICKUP FURNI¬ 
TURE, used washers S 
dryers, appligrirces. junk 
cars tot our Church Food 
Bank. Items reed to be in 
good eondiriou can (270) 
763-7956. 



2Q Lost 

BLACK/GRAY medium 
size Terrier mix. beloved 
family pet, Marty is 16 years 
old and may have lost his 
way home, lost on Thomas 
Road in Rineyville. Please 
call if you have seen him, 
he was lost on Tuesday 
270-737-5650. 

CHiHUAHUA - tan & white 
in color, name is Charlie. 
Lost Thursday, June 27, 
2008 in the Tom Brown Es¬ 
tates area. About 10-12 
lbs. Wearing a flea collar. 
(270) 828-5019. Reward. 
RED MAX GRASS/LEAF 
BLOWER, red in color, lost 
on Lincoln Ave to Upper 
Colesburg Road. Please 
call 270-401-5818. 

SMALL FEMALE GRAY 
DOG- freshly groomed, blue 
collar, needs medication, 
lost from behind the cinema 
area in Elizabethtown. Call 
270-401-6018 or 723-2555. 
WEDDING RING 
white gold, lost near Five 
Star south end of town. 
Please call 270-307-0781. 


25 

ADOLESCENT PUPPY 

with collar, no id tag, well 
cared for, found on the in¬ 
tersection of Woodland and 
Lincoln in Radcliff. Must 
have photo id or veterinar¬ 
ian records to claim. Call 
270-723-4569 or 270- 
307-0823 to identify. 


25 FDund 


ADULT MALE PIT BULL 

black & white, no collar, 
very friendly, found in the 
West Rhudes Creek Road 
area, please call to identify 
270-769-5581. 
AUSTRALIAN SHEPHERD 
FOUND in LaVista Subdivi¬ 
sion, Rineyville, KY. Owner 
call and describe dog. 
270-763-8401 

CELL PHONE found at in- 
tersection of Howevalley Rd 
& Shipley Rd, in 
Howevalley. Call Tim to 
identify 270-304-8500 or 
270-862-9768. 

CHILD’S BACKPACK 
FILLED with toys found at 
Peterson Drive soccer fields 
in Elizabethtown Fall 2011. 
Embroidered with child’s 
name. Call 270-358-8028 to 
identify. 

CUTE BEAGLE tri color 
male, found on North Wil¬ 
son Road, Elizabethtown, 
Whistling Hills Subdivision, 
no collar, please call to 
identify 270-272-7605 

FOUND, ONE LIGHT 

Brown Bull Terrier in the 
area of Peterson Place and 
Macintosh. Very sweet dis¬ 
position, gray collar, no 
tags. Contact John at 
502-422-0881 for more in¬ 
formation 


GERMAN SHEPHERD, 

possibly with lab mixed, 
about 4 months old, female, 
well taken care of puppy, 
very well behaved, found of 
vicinity in Gaither Station 
Rd/Severns Street Etown. 
Call 270-765-3687 
YELLOW GOLD CAT. fe- 
male about a year old. no 
collar, very well behaved & 
friendly, found in vicinity of 
West Bryan Rd. Call 270 
765-4152 


33 


Computers & 
Service 


1 


55 Autos 


BUICK LACROSSE 2005 
55k miles $139/mo Dan 
Powers 270-259-2438 
CHEVORLET AVEO 2LT 
2011 $183/mo Dan Powers 
270-259-2438 
CHEVROLET COBALT 

2010 $183/mo Dan Powers 
270-259-2438 
CHEVROLET MALIBU 

2011 $245/mo Dan Powers 
270-259-2438 

CHEVY MALIBU -2003- 
$4,995. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
CHEVY MALIBU LT - 
2011, loaded, $15,988. Dan 
Powers CM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 

DODGE AVENGER 2008 
$184/mo Dan Powers 
270-259-2438 
FORD TAURUS 2010 $269 
month Dan Powers CM 
Center 270-259-2438 
HYUNDAI SONATA 2011 
$279 month Dan Powers 
CM Center 270-259-2438 

KIA SOUL -2011- $15,995, 
Call Pinkham Lincoln Auto, 
270-737-2460. 

LINCOLN MARK LT 2007 
$377 month Dan Powers 
CM Center 270-259-2438 
MERCURY MOUNTAIN- 
EER 2007 $229/mo. Dan 
Powers 270-259-2438 
NISSAN ALTIMA 2011 
$259 month Dan Powers 
CM Center 270-259-2438 
NISSAN ALTIMA 2011 
$267/mo Dan Powers 

270-259-2438 

PONTIAC G6 2008 
$184/mo Dan Powers 

270-259-2438 
TOYOTA CAMRY 2011 
$265 month Dan Powers 
CM Center 270-259-2438 


Autos 

*25,000 & Up 


CHEVY CAMARO 2 SS - 

2010, leather, loaded, 6 
speed, $31,880. Alex Mont¬ 
gomery, (270) 465-8113. 

CHEVY CAMARO RS - 

2010, 1 owner, automatic, 
$27,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 

CHEVY CAMARO SS - 

2011, automatic, 1 owner, 
$38,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 

CHEVY TRAVERSE LT 

-2011- 6k miles $26,988. 
Dan Powers GM Center, 
(270) 756-5212. 

HONDA CROSSTOUR 

EXL 2010 -$29,900. Hardin 
County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 


Autos 

^20,000 to ^24,999 

2007 JEEP WRANGLER 
UNLIMITED SAHARA - 
W/WARRANTY!! $21,900 
61K MILES SILVER RWD 
AUTO PWR LOCKS & 
WINDOWS CRUISE ABS 
RUNNING BOARDS TINT 
2 SOFT-TOPS (STOCK 
AND BESTOP SLANT) 
$2K ROCKSTAR & NITTO 
WHEEL PKG NEOPRENE 
SEAT COVERS PLUS $2K 
WARRANTY THRU 86K 
MILES OR JUN2016! KBB 
= $20.5K + $4.5K IN OP¬ 
TIONS = U SAVE $3K! 
678.325.9344 
JAMYRDA@GMAIL.COM 

CHEVY CRUZE - 2011 - 
2LT package, 14,000 miles, 
$21,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 

CHEVY IMPALA LT -2011- 

$20,995, Cecilia Auto 
Sales, 270-737-5845 

CHEVY MALIBU LTZ - 

2011, loaded, sunroof, 
$22,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 


DODGE CHtflGER RT - 
2008. Hemi. Black. 
44.CKW milea. -orgirial win¬ 
dow $35,700 with 

options, asking 5-23.000 
Call Joe. (270) 300-8745 


FORD FLEX SEL -2010- 
$24,995. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 

FORD MUSTANG CONV. - 

2011 - $24,900. Hardin 
County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 


HONDA ACCORD 

EX-2010- $22,900. Hardin 
County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 


HONDA CRV EX -2009 - 
$22,900. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141 

TOYOTA AVALON - 2008- 
$21,995. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460. 


Autos 

*15,000 to *19,999 

CHEVY CRUZE -2011- 
$19,995. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 

CHEVY CRUZE ECO 

-2012- 1500 miles, like new 
$18,988. Dan Powers GM 
Center, (270) 756-5212. 

CHEVY IMPALA LT -2010, 
leather seats, 27,000 miles, 
$19,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 

CHEVY MALIBU LT 

2011, leather, sunroof, 
$19,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 

CHEVY MALIBU LTZ 

-2011- 13k miles loaded. 
$19,988. Dan Powers GM 
Center, (270) 756-5212. 

CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 

2009 26k miles $16,988 
Dan Powers 270-756-5212 

CHRYSLER 300 - 2010 - 
local trade, 47,000 miles, 
$19,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 


5 Happy Ads 


5 


Happy Ads 



Why look at tliose big glasses, 
and such a baby face/ 
Wow, could it be so, is this our 

Uncle Trace? 


BIRTHDAY 
VNCU TMCHI 

We love Voci/ 

Keegan ^ Addison . 


SUI 


2 


In Memory 


12 


In Memory 


In Loving Memory of your 
90th Birthday 





ynd&aaaad 

April 13, 1922 - June 13, 1999 



£(we, gMM. family 



Autos 

*15,000 to *19,999 

FOR^flfjSTAN^^OO?- 

loaded, 47,000 miles, cd, 
cruise, $16,995. Alex Mont¬ 
gomery, (270) 465-8113. 
GMC SIERRA 2010 auto, 
air, cruise, only 6k miles 
$15,988 Dan Powers 
270-756-5212 
HCNDA ACCCRDLXP- 


2008, $14,900. Hardin 

County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 

HCNDA CIVIC HYBRID 

2008, $15,900. Hardin 

County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 

LINCCLN MKZ -2007- 


$16,995. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 
LINCCLN TCWN CAR Sig- 
nature Series, 2004, 
$14,900. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 
MERCURY MILAN -2010- 
$16,950. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 
MERCURY SABLE -2008- 
$14,995. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 
MITSUBISHI ECLIPSE GS 
Spyder, 2009, convertible, 
loaded, $17,995. Alex Mont¬ 
gomery, (270) 465-8113. 
MITSUBISHI GALANT 
-2011- $16,995. Call 

Pinkham Lincoln Auto, 
270-737-2460 
NISSAN VERSA -2011- 
$15,995, Cecilia Auto 
Sales, 270-737-5845 


Autos 

*10,000 to *14,999 

Buicl^JCERN^^OO?- 

loaded!! $10,900. Call Elite 
Auto Group, 270-358-0750 
CHEVELLE MALIBU -1965 
$13,999. Call Laketown 
Motors, 502-839-8006. 
CHEVY COBALT LT SE- 
DAN- 2010-$13,900. Har¬ 
din County Honda, 
270-765-2141. 

CHEVY IMPALA LS -2010- 
$14,995. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 
CHEVY IMPALA LT -2012- 
10k miles. $18,988. Dan 
Powers GM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 

CHEVY MALIBU LS -2007- 

$12,995, Cecilia Auto 
Sales, 270-737-5845 
CHEVY SCNIC GT -2011- 
loaded $17,988. Dan 
Powers GM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 

FORD F150 - 2007 - Ext. 
Cab, XLT, 4x4, $14,995. 
Herb Jones Auto Group, 
(270) 765-2123. 

FORD FUSION - 2008 - 
nice car, $11,995. Herb 
Jones Auto Group, (270) 
765-2123. 



FORD MUSTANG -1966- 
red. completely redone. 
£13.600 FIRM. AJso 199S 
Volvo 30 miles to the gallon 
of gas. S2.300, Cal 
502-545-5661. _ 

HONDA CIVIC - 2008 - 
$14,900. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 
HONDA CIVIC LX -2009- 
$14,995, Cecilia Auto 
Sales, 270-737-5845 
HYUNDAI ELANTRA 2010, 
$12,913. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 
HYUNDAI TIBURON GT 
-2007- $10,995. Call 

Pinkham Lincoln Auto, 
270-737-2460 
MERCURY MONTEGO 
-2007- $10,900. Call Hardin 
County Honda, 270- 
765-2141 

NISSAN MAXIMA SE - 

2004 - $10,425,Hardin 

County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 

PONTIAC GRAND PRIX - 
2008, $12,988. Dan Powers 
GM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 

V W BEETLE - 2008 - 
$13,900. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 


Autos 

*5,000 to *9,999 

BMW 328i -1999-$6,995. 
Call Radcliff Auto Sales 
Inc., 270-351-4585. 

BUICK LESABRE -2005- 
$7,995. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
CHEVY HHR LS - 2010 - 
auto, air, $9,988. Dan 
Powers GM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 

CHEVY IMPALA- 2004- 
$5,995. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
CHEVY IMPALA - 2005 - 
loaded, air, auto, cd, 
$8,980. Alex Montgomery, 
(270) 465-8113. 
CHRYSLER 300M -2001- 
$5,995. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
CHRYSLER PT CRUISER 
-2006- $6,999. Call 

Laketown Motors, 502- 
839-8006 

HCNDA ACCCRD LX - 

2002, loaded, air, auto, cd, 
$5,800. Alex Montgomery, 
(270) 465-8113. 

HCNDA FIT SPCRT - 2007 
- $9,995. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 


LINCOLN LS -2002 -VE. 
Champagne. sunrcof. 
power vwntkjws. heated 
garage kept. 
69.SfK) miles, recent oil 
change, nev; tires 
brakes. $7,125. Call (270) 
737-3023. attef4-30pm or 
(270J 307-1799. 


Autos 

*5.000 to *9,999 


NISSAN PATHFINDER 

2005 $9495 Dan Powers 
270-259-2438 


PCNTIAC BCNNEVILLE - 

2003- $7,995. Call Radcliff 
Auto Sales Inc. 270- 
351-4585 



PONTIAC FIERO SE 

1986 94.27Sk miles. VS 
Silver, automanc. power 
Windows. Sunroof, one 
cwTier. condirion 

£3250 Call Paula 
270-723-1896 


PCNTIAC GRAND PRIX 

-2005- $5,999. Call 

Laketown Motors, 502- 
839-8006 


Autos 

Up to *4,999 


94 4 96' FORD ESCORT 
LX WagpnSn 1.9 liter 
motors, auto transmia- 
Sion, $ir, p4' ha$ amffm/ 
cd S radng v^eele. Qood 
plates. 96 ts a parts car. 
Both run. $1,250 tof balh 
C^l (270) a77^&2. 

(27D) 028-4479. 9am^9pfti 


CHEVY LUMINA EURC - 2 

door, very clean, $2,995. 
Herb Jones Auto Group, 
(270) 765-2123. 

CHRYSLER SEBRING 

-2004- $4,999. Call 

Laketown Motors, 

502-839-8006. 


FORD CONTOUR -1998- 
$2,495. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 

MAZDA 6 -2002-$4,999. 
Call Laketown Motors, 
502-839-8006 

MAZDA 626 -2000- $3,995. 
Call Radcliff Auto Sales Inc. 
270-351-4585. 


MERCURY COUGAR 

-2000- $3,995. Call Radcliff 
Auto Sales Inc. 
270-351-4585 


SUZUKI VERONA -2004- 
$3,500. Call Laketown 
Motors, 502-839-8006 


TOYOTA CAMRY -1997- 
$3,495. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 



2008 CHEW SIL¬ 
VERADO 3500 HD,V-fl. 
Turbo Diesel Dually. 
Crew Cab, 4WD. LT, 
39.200 K. Running Neif 
Bars. Towingi. Camper 
Pkg. Drop In Bed Liner, 
Clean interior 5 Exterior. 
Asking bank payoff' 
$35,890 (27D) 925-3778 


Trucks 

*20,000 to *24,999 

CHEVY SILVERADO - 

2007, $22,988. Dan Powers 
GM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 


DCDGE RAM 4X4 - 2008 - 
Quad Cab Sport, $23,995. 
Herb Jones Auto Group, 
(270) 765-2123. 


Trucks 

*15,000 to *19,999 

CHEVY 2500 CREW CAB 

2004, LT, 4x4, loaded, 
$15,900. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750 

CHEVY SILVERADC LT - 

2008, Ext. cab, 23k miles, 
$19,988. Dan Powers GM 
Center, (270) 756-5212. 

FCRD F250 LARIAT DIE¬ 
SEL 4x4, Ext. Cab., utility 
truck, $18,500. Elite Auto 
Group, (270) 358-0750 

GMC SIERRA EXT. CAB - 

2007, auto, V8, $16,988. 
Dan Powers GM Center, 
(270) 756-5212. 

GMC SIERRA SLE -2011- 

$18,995, Cecilia Auto 
Sales, 270-737-5845 

GMC SLT DIESEL - 2003 - 
4x4, 2500 series, loaded, 
$16,300. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750 


Trucks 

*10,000 to *14,999 

CHEVY 1500 EXT. LT - 

2003, 4x4, leather, power, 
$11,500. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750 

CHEVY AVALANCHE 
1500 LT - 2005 - $14,900. 
Hardin County Honda, 
270-765-2141. 


CHEVY CREW CAB 
2500HD 2003. 4x4. 
whjte. leather. pcw^\ 
ataaring brakaa. cold 

all. auto, good oterao.od. 
tires in good condition, 
bed liner fl to^r>g pkg. in- 
clgdad 100 000 milas 
?til1 look? & runs good 
$10,495. (270) 723-0267. 


FCRD F-150 LARIAT 4X4 

-2004- $10,995. Call Rad¬ 
cliff Auto Sales Inc. 
270-351-4585 


FCRD RANGER 2006 EX 
Cab XLT 4X2 $11,995 

Dan Powers GM Center 
270-259-2438 


Trucks 

*10,000 to *U,999 

JEE^RANG^^Sa 

2003 $10,995 Dan Powers 
GM Center 270-259-2438 


Trucks 

*6,000 to *9.999 

dodg^TaISt^^^- 

2003, V8 automatic, 
$9,900. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750 
FORD F-150 -1998- $5,495. 
Call Radcliff Auto Sales Inc. 
270-351-4585. 

FORD F250 - 2007 - 
$7,900. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750. 

FORD RANGER 4X4 
-2001- $5,999. Call 

Laketown Motors, 502- 
839-8006. 

FORD RANGER XLT - 

2001, 4x4, 4.0 V6, power, 
$9,500. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750 
GMC K-15 4X4 -1983- 
$5,495. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 


Trucks 
Up to *4,999 

CHEVY 1500 - 1989- 

$2,695. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
CHEVY S-10 -1995- 

$2,999. Call Laketown 
Motors, 502-839-8006 
DODGE RAM 4X4 -1998- 
$2,999. Call Laketown 
Motors, 502-839-8006 
FORD $3500 OR best offer. 
Rebuilt motor, 18K miles. 
98% rust free. Clean inte- 
rior.(254) 681-0713 



FORD FiSO *1992* Lariat 
4X2. XLT. 50 va. autt^ 
mafic, all with 

cruiEB, bnght red. garage 
kGp4, actual mileage 
64.312. £3.495 Call 

275-735^1521. 


sport Utility 
Vehicles 


JEEP WRANGLER SA¬ 
HARA - 2007 - $18,900. 
Hardin County Honda, 
270-765-2141. 


SUVs 

*25,000 & Up 

DODGE RAM 1500 -2011- 
4X4, $30,950. Call Pinkham 
Lincoln Auto, Call 270- 
737-2460. 

GMC YUKON SLT 4X4 
-2011- $37,995, Cecilia 
Auto Sales, 270-737-5845 
HONDA RIDGELINE, 2012 
$34,900. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 
SUBARU FORESTER XT 
LIMITED $25,900. Hardin 
County Honda, 

270-765-2141. 


SUVs 

*20,000 to ’24,999 

chev^quIno^^oo9, 

Sport, AWD, $20,988. Dan 
Powers GM Center, (270) 
756-5212. 

FORD ESCAPE ^ 

-2011- $20,950, Call 

Pinkham Lincoln Auto, 

270-737-2460. 

LINCOLN MKX -2007- 
$20,850. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460. 
NISSAN JUKE -2011- 
$23,995, Cecilia Auto 

Sales, 270-737-5845 


SUVs 

*15,000 to *19,999 

CHEV^QUINO)^010 - 

4 cylinder, front wheel drive, 
$15,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 
HONDA PILOT, 2008, 
$18,774. Hardin County 
Honda, 270-765-2141. 

KIA SOUL - 2011 - 27,000 
miles, new tires, $17,995. 
Herb Jones Auto Group, 
(270) 765-2123. 

LINCOLN NAVIGATOR 
2005 4 X 4 $11, 995 Dan 
Powers GM Center 
270-259-2438 
NISSAN PATHFINDER - 
2007, 3rd row seat, 
$15,900. Elite Auto Group, 
(270) 358-0750 
TOYOTA RAV4 - 2007 - 
loaded, power locks & win¬ 
dows, $15,980. Alex Mont- 
gomery, (270) 465-8113. 


SUVs 

*10,000 to *14,999 

BUIcl^ENDEZVOUS - 

2009, CXL pkg., loaded, 
$13,980. Alex Montgomery, 
(270) 465-8113. 

CHEVY SUBURBAN LT - 
2004, $11,500. Elite Auto 
Group, (270) 358-0750. 
PCNTIAC TCRRENT - 
2007, all wheel drive, 
$11,995. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 


SUVs 

*5,000 to *9,999 

CHEV^nZE^OBE^ 

2001, loaded, security sys¬ 
tem, $8,980. Alex Mont¬ 
gomery, (270) 465-8113. 
CHEVY TRAILBLAZER - 
2003, 2 wheel drive, 

$7,495. Herb Jones Auto 
Group, (270) 765-2123. 
CHEVY TRAILBLAZER 
-2005- $7,295. Call Radcliff 
Auto Sales Inc. 270- 
351-4585 








































































































































































































































































































B6 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


SUVs 

^5,000 to *9,999 

FOR^^SCAP^C^"- 

2005, 4x4, auto, air, $9,900. 
Elite Auto Group, (270) 
358-0750 

FORD EXPEDITION 2003 
Eddie Bauer 4X4 $6,995 
Dan Powers GM Center 
270-259-2438 
GMC YUKON XL - 2001 - 
4x4, loaded, cruise, tilt, 
$8,500. Alex Montgomery, 
(270) 465-8113. 

HONDA CRV -1999- 
$5,495. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
JEEP GRAND CHERO¬ 
KEE Laredo, 2001, loaded 
w/equipment, $8,900. Elite 
Auto Group, (270) 358-0750 
MERCURY MOUNTAIN- 
EER -2002- $5,999. Call 
Laketown Motors, 502- 
839-8006. 

NISSAN PATHFINDER 

2005 SE 4 X 4 $9,995 Dan 
Powers GM Center 
270-259-2438 


SUVs 

Up to H,999 

dodg^^urang^Tm 

-19999- $4,995. Call Rad- 
cliff Auto Sales Inc. 
270-351-4585 
HYUNDAI SANTE FE 
-2001- $4,999. Call 

Laketown Motors, 502- 
839-8006 

MITSUBISHI OUTLANDER 

-2003- $4,999. Call 
Laketown Motors, 502- 
839-8006 


Vans 

'25,000 & Up 

hond^Tdysse^5?l 

2010- $30,675. Call Hardin 
County Honda, 270- 
765-2141 


Vans 

'20,000 to '24,999 

nIssaJ^oJS^^o^- 

$23,950. Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460 


Vans 

'15,000 to '19,999 

DODG^^^^^RAND 

CARAVAN SXT -2010- 

$19,995, Call Pinkham Lin¬ 
coln Auto, 270-737-2460. 


Vans 

'5,000 to '9,999 



CHEVY EXPRESS 3500 . 
2007- Powsf winckwvs. se¬ 
curity system, ae, AM^'FMi 
white. $8,500. C^l (270) 
505-6640_ 

CHRYSLER PACIFICA 
TOURING -2005- $6,999. 
Call Laketown Motors, 
502-839-8006 
CHRYSLER TOWN & 
COUNTRY -2006- $8,995, 
Cecilia Auto Sales, 
270-737-5845 
DODGE CARAVAN - 2007, 
beautiful vehicle, $7,900. 
Elite Auto Group, (270) 
358-0750 


Vans 

Up to *4,999 

CHEV^?EnnjR^^S- 

$2,195. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
CHEVY VENTURE -1999- 
$3,995. Call Radcliff Auto 
Sales Inc. 270-351-4585 
FORD WINDSTAR -2000- 
$3,500. Call Laketown 
Motors, 502-839-8006 


J C Services & 
40 Repairs 

e^TI^^^ggIng 

Master Logger Certified. 
Specializing special cutting. 
Call 270-524-2967._ 

RELIABLE, TKUSTWOR^ 
THY busings or rosidontta 
office cleaning. Metier a 
two rooking for extra in¬ 
come iReferencee availa¬ 
ble. Will concentrate or 
what 15 important to yoj. 
Will adpust my hours to youi 
salisfactior i have my own 
matenels. jual call & leave 
tfie deantng up to me. Con¬ 
tact Knsly at (562; 
507-1617. 


^ Lawn & 
40 Gardens 


GOT MOLES digging in 
your yard? Call Ford 
Lawn Service to have 
your yard treated for 
mol^. AJso. yard mow¬ 
ing. landscaping, pres¬ 
sure Visshing & tree trim¬ 
ming Topsoil available 
call (270) 3254238 


RIGGS 

TRACTOR 

GARDEN 

TILLING 

270-234-7049. 

SWISHER 60” Finish cut 
trailmower, Tecumseh En¬ 
gine. Can be towed behind 
an ATV, golf cart, lawn trac¬ 
tor or similar vehicle. Great 
to add 60” of more cutting 
power. Asking $750 will 
consider offers. Call 
270-862-3208 


Home 

Improvement 


^ and read 

ECLIPSE COrtlTRACT* 
jIVG, LLC Got Hail dam¬ 
age? Call ui today Tor 
your (fee inspection Fully 
ineured and licensed. 
Roofing, siding and en¬ 
dows 100'^ of references 
Locally owned and oper¬ 
ated! 

Offering 20 year labor 
wsrrantiee 502424-0 S35 
ecups ay ourhoma. wm 


jlQ Auctions 


ABSOLUTE AUCTION 
APRIL 17, 2012...10:07 
AM - 637 ACRES - 45 
TRACTS - 2 HOAXES - B 
BARNS-CROPLAND- 
PASTURE - FARM. 
STEADS4NSPECTIONS; 
See vwbsite for datee and 
times. Location: Hodgen- 
ville Cemmurnly, KV 
1607, Larue County. Call 
BILLY FRANK 
HARMED AUCTIONEER 
502-348-SO2S Harned 
AuttiOnears, LLC 
billyfrankharned cem - 
Nicholes #1103 


ABSOLUTE AUCTION 
Saturday, April 21st, 

NOON. 5 bedroom mobile 
home w/addition, shed, 
1.29 acres, 4581 Valley 
Creek Rd (KY 567), approx¬ 
imately 3 miles east of Eliz¬ 
abethtown. $5,000/ down 
auction day - Owner Fi¬ 
nancing. 10% Buyer’s Pre¬ 
mium. Affordable home 
w/wheelchair ramp. More 
info, posted on site. Inspec¬ 
tions Wednesdays April 4th, 
11th, 18th - 10 a.m. to 6 
p.m. 

DON’T MISS THIS RARE 
OPPORTUNITY TO BID 
AND BUY @ YOUR 
PRICE!!! 

Crain-Davis Auctioneers, 
LLC E. Brad Davis, CAI, 
GRI, Auctioneer/Principal 
Broker, 312 N Mulberry St.; 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701, 
(270) 735-3581 or 

1-800-301-9942 


TO FULnU- KRS 
356 200 to t59.2S0 
Tr€a$ur$ Ch^t Mni Stor¬ 
age at :^S0D S. Oms 
R adcliff 4611 N Dixie 
Hwy.. ETowbi and 1270 
Old Elown Rd In Hodgen- 
ville will hold a LIVE auc¬ 
tion on 4-13-12 start ng at 
10:30am to 2500 S. Dxia 
Hwy Radcliff and than 
w]| proceed at 4611 N. 
Dixie Hwy in EtcMn and 
Ttien proceed to iZro Old 
E'towti Rd.. Hodganvilla. 
This is a LIVE AUCTION 
conduefed by Action AuC' 
tinn Co.,. Steve Walton, 
auctioneer. A 10 percent 
buyers premium and 8 
percent sale tax wll be 
added to all wnning bids 
to dstermine final sal a 
price. The fcltowirg ten¬ 
ants are Hazst Joseph of 
E'town. Tracey L^nard of 
Radcliff. Johnathan 
Rusher. Nathan House of 
E'tovmi, Norman Grov es. 
Robert Izard of Vine 
Grove. Melissa Miracle of 
Buffalo. Lydia Sharpe of 
Brooklyn. NY. Arlene S. 
Williams of McKjnney 
TX, Chns M Hanison of 
Colorado Springs. CO. 
Tamara Lunsford of Cov¬ 
ington. LA. K-evrn T. Law" 
son. Fort Kno^f Bidder will 
have the opportunity to 
look at the unrts the time 
of the sale. Treasure 
Chest N^ni Storage re- 
aervea the right to reject 
any and all bids. If you 
hava any question^ call 
(270) 982-2188 


55 



AMERICAN PIT BULL 
PUPPIES Have 3 beautitu 
pups. Born now 13 

Y^k6 ofd. Have beer 
wormed 4 times, and hac 
theif 6,8,10. 8 12 weeks 
shots Hava shot recordh 
from VET on each pup 
Hawe 1 Btue female wfwhite 
markings-S600.1 Blue/Fowr 
male w/wtiite markings- 
$300. and 1 Red male 
wfwhile markings- $200. 
These pups are ready fci 
good homes Have botf 
parents- Male is blue 
vrfv^to and i$ A.D.B.A.. 
AND Female is red nose 
colby-U.K.C. Very sweel 
loving family pets.and giea- 
with Kicis too. These pupa 
are trained on puppy pads 
already' Call ar^ime to in¬ 
quire. or Id seef ooll# 
SQ2-31D-6009. or e-mai 
lildov e^SZe^aol. com -at t n, 
PUPS 


BEAGLES! BEAGLES! 
Tn color. 2 Tiny Beagles 
and more to choose from. 
Very loveable, good with 
children and great hunting 
dofipf 6 v^ks old. vwll 
provide shots. $75 each 
cm (270) 312-5007. 

(270) 369-9992 leave 

message. 


BOXER AND LAB MIX 6 

weeks old, 2 girls and Ithe 
boy, free to good home. 
Wormed, needs shots. 
2702726471 ...texts ac¬ 
cepted 


must sell! 



CHOCOLATE COCKER 
SPANIEL PUPPY 16 
week old Chocolate 
Cocker Spaniel puppy 
(female). Shots are up 
To date, Puppv te regis¬ 
tered and we do have 
the papers for her. Her 
name is "Qristot' and 
we are looking for a 
good home for her. We 
have decided with our 
busy household that 
two puppys are too 
much so wc are wanting 
to find a good home for 
Bristol. 1360.00 Please 
call 270-S01-2203 or 
email 
f I Lgh tmed ic3120g mai L c 
om if your interested 



55 


ITALIAN GREYHOUND 
Puppies, small litHe to 
do shedding lap dogs. 
$hot$ started, wormed, 
pet homes only, great 
family dogs, good win 
ether pets $325 cash. 
Call after 4pm. i270) 
862 5119, or 734-5511 


REGISTERED 
YORKSHIRE TERRIER 
PUPPIES 

ready to go to thetr new 
homes, both parents on 
site S are small dogs 
Both male/femarle availa¬ 
ble Serious inquires only 
270-862-5998. 


SIBERIAN HUSKY 
female. A IjE months old 
AKC registered with friN 
pecigtee. an shots. S550 
or best offer Call (270) 
351-4832. 



TOY RAT TERRIER 
PUPPIES vet checked, 
first shots, parents on 
Site. S2D0 call (270) 
272-1280 or (502) 
299-7449. 


Cn Feed, Seed 

3 J & Hay 


STRAW BAES - S3 

each. Vlnimum of 25. De¬ 
livery aiv ail able Acoorcing 
to mileage Call (270) 
268.0794 


50 


Farm 

Equipment 


JD ROUND HAY 

BALER. 375, field ready, 
perfect condition, approx 
used 1500 rolls of hay. 
$6500. International 
grinder and mixer, good 
condition, $750. Call 
270-862-4858 


NEW HOLLAND 648 

Round Baler, good condi¬ 
tion $10,000. M&W RL 
456 Hydraulic Fold Down 
Rake $1900. Hay Tedder 
$1700. M&W Disc Mower 
7’ $1900. All shed kept. 
Call 270-766-4183 


Ct Farmers 
UI Market 


HARDIN CO, 
FARMERS 
MARKET 

NOW OPEN 


Saturday. 7arTv12prn 
Comer of Frierson 
Dr & Hwy 62 



Farm 

Miscellaneous 


2 BUSH HOG Sft & 7ft 
S860& $1,000. 1979 Ford 
TBird. 85,MO miles, nice 
car $6,500. btt 3 point 
hitch disk S600 1200 gal¬ 
lon steel water lank 
$500. John Deere horse 
drawn ncing plow SLDOO. 

3 tandem trailers. 2 
16ft & 1 14ft $1,000 to 
$1,500. Wood ¥toves. 
Call 270-257-^243 or 
270- 547-8962. 


150 4 5FT STEEL POST, 
3 fence charger one is so¬ 
lar,. 8hp Briggs & Straiten 
engine, dd windows 
weights Sib great farm 
gales or Tishir^. 20 old 
green pane house writ' 
daws. 270- 35M997 if no 
answer leav e message. 


Boats 

Up to '4,999 


23' IMPERI/IL BOAT - 
1991 - Red & white. 
VoIvcFinta motor. Cuddy 
cab. good stereo, body & 
interior in good condtton. 
Starto & idles good, trailer 
with new tiros. $2,388 
Call (270) 723.0267. 


BASSTRACKER with 
trailer. Great condition. 
Will throw in life jacket, 
ores, electric motor (free) 
no guarantee of quality of 
these items. $850, will con¬ 
sider offers 
Call 270-862-3208 


M Motorcycles 
&ATVS 


1999 HONDA GL 1500 

motorbike, given out free, 
due to sudden death of 
owner Contact fredman 
jamesl@ gmall.com 


MOST MAKES AND 
Models WE BUY BIKES 
270-763-1109 



Easy-To- 

Find 

Bargains 
In The 
Classifieds 


Motorcycles/ATVs 
Up to '4,999 

2004 ARTIC CAT TRV 
500 4x4. ATV is abtwe 
excellent condition. ATV 
has many extra's such ns 
snow plow fonder 

guards uilriy earner and 
chrome rims, ATV was 
built to carry tim adult 
riders wtth max bOOIbs. 
ADULT DRIVEN ONLYT 
ATV was extensively 
used tor dear hunting and 
has only IQOO hours Full 
serviced mainlenance re¬ 
cently completed Only 
$3,000, Call Jim. (270) 
300-6283 or (270) 

737-5355 

HMLer DAVIDSON 

20<M. XLS83 Sportster. 1 
owner, garage kepi biroh 
viirte. excellent condition, 
lots of diroma Scraam- 
ing Eagle exhaust, quick 
release detachable wind- 
shiald 3i too many add 
ens to ltd $4 DQO ota 
Call (270) 766-8099. 

0^ Appliances 

WHIRLPOOL GAS cooking 
stove, prophane, can be 
converted over to nature 
gas, $150,270-668-4487 

Qrt Home 

OZ Furnishings 

SOFA, LOVE SEAT & RE¬ 
CLINING CHAIR Grey, 
burgundy & cream. Good 
condition $300 Call 

270-351-8541 

QQ Antiques & 
Ou ColEectibtes 

45TH BARDSTOWN 
ANTIQUES SHOW 
&SALE 

Your vintage marketplace 
with dealers from near & far 
selling desirable collectibles 
from 1850’sto 1970’s. This 
weekend at Nelson County 
High School. Saturday 
10-5, Sunday 11-4. Admis¬ 
sion $6 or $1 off with this 
ad. 812-989-8289 

Qi Musical 

OH' Equipment 

BANJO AND CASE Barely 
used Trinity River banjo 
and hard-shell case: $250 
270-748-5376 

00 Miscellaneous 

SS PAYING CASH $$ 

for your junk cars, ttucl® 
and farm equipment. 
8200 Tor ar^ complete au* 
tomobile or truck. Will 
pick up at your emven- 
lence (270) 23443206. 
Also, free removal of 
abandOfted autes. 

500 BOOKS Paperbacks 
50 cents. Hardbacks 
$1.00-$5.00. Pictures 

and Frames $1.00-$5.00. 
Old tools and other mis¬ 
cellaneous items. 

Call 270-734-6541 

2009 AMANA Refrigerator 

is black & stainless steel, 
pull out drawer freezer, 
H69xD33xW32. Suggested 
retail is $1499; asking $650. 

Evenings 502-386-3769. 
Daytime 270-268-6191. 

ANTIQUE WICKER BABY 
STROLLER $125 

Call 270-300-3824 or 
270-765-6923 

CHEST FREEZER, 19 
TV. 32" TV. o»k stove, 
portable DVD player, Dell 
monitor. Dm tower, Dali 
keyboard, maroon strap¬ 
less tormal prom efress 
size 6 and turquoise prom 
dress size 3-4. (270) 

307-3441. 

FLATBEDTRAILER6X16 

with rails, wood deck, 2 
axles, 4 tires, tail lights, very 
good condition. $1300 
OBO. 716 Amish Rd So¬ 
nora, Ky 

Call 270-369-0507 

METAL DETECTORS 
Find Your Treasure 

GPld Sitver 

Coins. Relics 

Garred and Fi&her 
available. 

Call McCay s 
ZrO-769-5022. 

PURPLE PARSON 

CHAIRS $25 ea of all 4 for 
$90 Call 270-763-9020 

SIDE BY SIDE refrigerator, 
couch & loveseat, w & d, 
stove, treadmill, chest 
freezer 312-0722, 763-7956 

STEEL LAWN TABLE SET 
W/4 chairs $100. 

270-234-0802 

TAUPE SOFA COVER for 

3 cushion sofa $35. Craft 
rolling tote $25. Brother 
Printer/Scanner & Fax ma¬ 
chine $30. AT&T base 
home and cordeless head¬ 
set black $25. Large white 
Lotus flower and brass table 
lamp $40. By appointment. 
Call 270-763-1999. 

UNIQUE COLLECTION 
of Sal lie Middleton flowers 
and Wrd pictures. 529.95 
& 539 95 each Booth 329 
Peddlers Mall. E'town. 


Cemetery Plots 


2 BURIAL PLOTS in 

North HariJn Memorial 
Gardens, ground level 
marker aection. near flag¬ 
pole. priced to sell. Call 
(270) 389-6559.or {27U} 
789-8261 


Furniture 


“ALL NEW NAME 

BRAND Pillowtop Malt rose 
selt Full SMOh Queer 
5115, Kir>g $165. Can de- 
liVdL Call (592) 664-7988. 



Off THB PRiSS 

The Kit to “HOT OFF THE PRESS* m* fH4nd new to tlw 

ciHtHtodie. Ton get * ohet «t th«im en tn* fihct hat or uvuOHoetion. 
To Iw ffinv Y«ir ed I* in "HOT OFT THE PR»S", «ill 709^1200 eirt. 8B01. 


2 0ORM, Z BATN, 1 Cai 
Garage, Gardan Home. 
121 Mdntdsh Dr., close to 
John Hardin High School, ir 
Applevjood Subdiv i$ion 
Large Private Ratio. Vaulleo 
ceiling. Esttia Large Kitchen. 
Heat Pump. Ceiling Fans. 
Extra Storage. Deposit ant 
Rertt S875. (270) 307-2353. 


1612 W CROCUS, Vine 
Grove/Radcliff (right on the 
line). All new appliances, all 
new carpet, flooring, and 
paint. 3 bedroom, 1.5 baths, 
quiet neighborhood, Ig. 
fenced backyard w/storage 
shed. $850/mo with 
$850/dep. Minimum 1 year 
lease. 270-572-3258. 


NowHimgl# 

2ND SHIFT FRONT 

DESK 6 Night Audit. 
Also, housekeeping. Ap¬ 
ply in person betv^en 
1Qam-2pm M LaQuirtta 
inn 6 Suites, 216 Com- 
marca Dr.. ElriZabBthtowffi, 
Ky No phone calls 
please. 


NowHiringlll^ 

2nd El 3rd Shift 

Must be mature, honest 
dependable 8 able to 
work weekends. 165 Quik 
Slop. 1-65 exit 165, Leba- 
nori Junction. 

(502) 833.3700 



FORD F150 1992 Lanai 
4X2 XLT 5 0Ve, auto- 
metic. all power with 
cruise, bright red. garage 
kept, actual mileage 
64 312 S3495 Call 

270.735.152^ 


HARDIN CO. 
FARMERS 
MARKET 

NOW OPEN 

Saturday, TarrvIZpm 
Comer of Peterson 
Dr & Hwy 62 


HODGENVILLE - 2 bed¬ 
room house. 1 bath, large 
y$rd, ceiling fens, icii 

baserment wth washer 
dryer hookup. 505 Kifk- 
palnck Ave. Hadgenville, 
KY 1 VF. lease & refer¬ 
ences required. 5450 
rent, $450 deposit. Call 
(270) 360-8692 Available 
nov/ 

JD ROUND HAY 
BALER. 375, field ready, 
perfect condition, approx 
used 1500 rolls of hay. 
$6500. International 
grinder and mixer, good 
condition, $750. Call 
270-862-4858 


CLASSIFIEDS 


NEW HOLLAND 648 

Round Baler, good condi¬ 
tion $10,000. M&W RL 
456 Hydraulic Fold Down 
Rake $1900. Hay Tedder 
$1700. M&W Disc Mower 
7’ $1900. All shed kept. 
Call 270-766-4183 


NOW 4WAJLABLE - 
Gteet E'town location. 1 & 
2 bedrdome, startirig at 
$475 all utilities plus ca¬ 
ble paid Please call (270) 
312.8822: (270} 312-6882 


OFFICE SPACE 
FOR LEASE, 
one Of toe bear 
locatidns in town 
beside Wal-green's 
and Taco Bell. 

1200aqft. 

276-737-1396. 



PONTIAC FIERO SE 1966 
94,275k miles VS Silver 
autamatre, power windows, 
sunroof, one owner, gooc 
condition S3250 Call Paula 
270-723-1895- 

RIGGS 

TRACTOR 

GARDEN 

TILLING 

270-234-7049. 


WILL PICKUP FURNI 
TURE, used washers & 
dryers, applianoas. junk 
cars for our Church Food 
Bank. Items need to be in 
good condirion can (276) 
763-7956. 





TAUPE SOFA COVER for 

3 cushion sofa $35. Craft 
rolling tote $25. Brother 
Printer/Scanner & Fax ma¬ 
chine $30. AT&T base 
home and cordeless head¬ 
set black $25. Large white 
Lotus flower and brass table 
lamp $40. By appointment. 
Call 270-763-1999. 


TOY RAT TERRIER 
PUPPIES vet checked, 
first shofa, parents on 

eite. R^i^od in my homo. 
Call (270) 272-1280 or 
(562) 299-7449 


Located in EJIaabethtown. 
270-268-RENT (7368) 
EtowdAp art manls.cofh 
find us on taoebook 


SUPPORT 
YOUR LOCAL 
FARMERS 

NEW 1,2^3 BDRM 


FORD $3500 OR best offer. 
Rebuilt motor, 18K miles. 
98% rust free. Clean inte- 
rior.(254) 681-0713 


HOT OFF THE PRESS 769-1200, EXT. 8601 


Furniture 



CHILD "CABIN TWIN 
BED" TTiifi comes with a 
twin bed and mattress 
and also the coardl- 
nating erift«rtainn>ent 
center. The bed has a 
slide out desk that can 
be tucked under the bed 
or left out. Under the 
bed there is significant 
storage behind the 
three drawer chest and 
book shelf with two 
shelves that are under 
the bed also. These 
pieces arc interchanges 
able and can go in any 
ordar under the bed. 
There is a laitder on the 
side of the bed for chil¬ 
dren to climb and get 
into the bed The enter¬ 
tainment center has 
three drawers and a me¬ 
dia cabtiMt with shelves 
inside. This furniture is 
in really good condition. 
Asking $300.00 Please 
contact John at 
270-501-2203 Or email at 
flightrriQdic312igg mail, 
com for more pictures. 


HAVERTY’S SOFA AND 

love seat, Italian leather, 
dark green, contemporary. 
$750. Capel wool braided 
rug, oval, 8x11, dark green 
variegated. $350. 270- 

737-2928 


90 


Yard and 
Garage Sales 


.IfiftROiSAUE,. 


CECtUA- 467 Lombard/ 
Drive, Lakewcod Sub. Fri, 
April 13. S to ?. Sat. Apnl 
14 S to 11. MuUi family 
yard sale. Toys for variety 
of ages, birth to toddler 
girl & boys clothes 


miss as and men's clcto- 
ing, curio cabinet, dorm 
room refrigerator solid 
oak entedainment canter. 
Kirby vacuum, 2 sets of 
boy baby bedefrng. books 
arid home decor 




CECEUA- 7t Black Hills 
Dt. Habe'rsham SubcivU 
Sion. Fn I3th ■ Sat 14th. 

Tam - 7 Family 
Downsized, everytoing 
mu&tgo! Furniture, toya, 
household goods, gias^- 
v;^re. tools and clothing 
HUGEl HUGEl SALE! 


ELIZABETHTOWN 115 E 
Poplar St. 9-2 Saturday, 
4/14. HUGE sale. Tons of 
women’s clothes/ shoes/ 
purses, furniture, kitchen 
items, misc. items galore! 
You don’t want to miss this. 


.\ARD5AUE 


ELIZABETHTOWN 115 
Woo-dEn Ln.. Fn Sat 
8‘12. Electric STove. 
Futon, Christmas Decor 
HouseviSfes. Furniture. 


Cake Supplies, Stampin 
Up. Sports items. 2 seis 
of Golf Clubs. Books. 


DVDS and much more. 



Good Things 
To Eat 


ST. CATHARINE FARM, 

Beef & pork: Half or lOOlb 
variety box, locally bred, 
born & raised. Antibiotic, 
steroid, hormone free. Now 
accepting Visa/MC. (859) 
805-1278 or 

(859)336-0444. 


YARD 


ELIZ^ETHTOWN 1304 
Kentucky Dr Fri & Sat Api 
13&14 8am to 2pm. Cloth¬ 
ing, movies, householc 
goods & mloo 


90 


Yard and 
Garage Sales 


ymm 

-^HODGENVILLE"* 


166 Northridge Circle - 
Saturday. April 14th. 
Eam-4pm Breyer Horses 
old metal toys, breydes. 
Barbie dofis. Curio cabi¬ 
net. coffee table,. Carpert- 
ter and decfric tods, roll¬ 
ing eoetfold. like new 
roac^ huator, cEotoas and 
lots of Miscellaneoius 


ELIZABETHTOWN 1704 
WOOLDRIDGE FERRY 
ROAD Friday April 13th 
8AM-6PM SaturdayApril 
14th 8AM-1PM Children’s 
clothing from 5-15 years 
old, adult women’s and 
men’s Clothing. Kitchen and 
house ware 

items.Bedroom,dining room 
and living room furniture, 
entertainment centers,26” 
TV,misc.children’s 
toys,motorcycle gear,kids 
bicycle and scooter,push 
mower/leaf blower. 




303 High Street. Friday 
I3tn - Saturday I4th. Bam 
- Spm. Twin beds. 

Dreeser, Chest toys. 
Keggerator. Gocart Body. 

Tooto. couch and 
Loveaeat, stainless steel 
Grill, kids clothing, tall 
mens dotNng, dshwear. 
Boat cover. Vint^e ^ke 
machine. Pepsi machine. 
Wedding Dress. 


FRit>y 



ELIZABETHTOWN 
200& Claarviawur . Fri & 
Sat.. April 13th & 14lh. 
8am-7 Relay far Lite 
fundraising sale: Multipla 
Tamillestf Kids items, fur- 
nture mateTnrty cl sthes & 
NASCAR just to name a 
feW’f Lots more^ 



BUFFALO 687 Alvin 
Brooks Rd., Saturday, 
April 14th. CNI- 

drens cloEhiag, toys. cds. 
purses, mens & vrfimens 
clothing. & lots gf miscel‘ 
laneous items h Lamarv- 
ade Stand! 


ELIZABETHTOWN- 208 
Deepwood Drkve. multi 
Tanruiy yard sale. Friday. 
April 13 8;6Q until AW 
and Saturday. 8:00 until 
7. Exercise equipment. 
Over 50 ladies Harley Pa- 
vid&oo shirts, men's Har¬ 
ley Davidson shirts, her- 
mets baby girl ctotheG 
baby boy clothes, lots of 
women clothes. Home fn- 
tenor petures. household 
items too much to men¬ 
tion. 


90 


Yard and 
Garage Sales 


lARDSALE 

ELIZABETHTOWN- 215 


Deetbrook LN (Take NW 
Pear Orchard to Jackie 
ST], April 13 & 14. 
8am-5pm 3 temily yard 
sale. ArttEque toe Box. 
household items, lots or 
evening gewns prom, 
bndesmards. MOB 

dresses (NEW. many 
sizes). Auto Sub Boxes, 
large dog transport cage, 
assorted ''Stampro Up" 
craft supplies, weddng 
dress (low low prtce). 
enough cicthee to fill any 
retail Store (many 25 cent 
items), girls 5-7 year old 
shoes. 


ELIZABETHTOWN 2411 
RING ROAD, Ste 100 & 

102 (Cool Springs Shopp¬ 
ing Center) To benefit Relay 
for Life. Friday, April 13, 
9am to 4pm. Saturday, 
April 14, 7am to 12pm. No 
early birds please. 


3fiftR0iSAUE.. 


ELIZABETHTOWN- 270 
Hampton Ln 2 miles pest 
White Castle on nght. Fn 
I3th ■ Sal t4ih. Sam ■ 7 
Men's. Women's & &oy^ 
olothea Computer desk 
boys bike, houaetvold 
items, toys, ckafoboard 
Too rnuchto list 


M Yard and 
Garage Sales 

yafd Saie 

ELIZABETHTOWN 3S47 S 
Wlteon,(2 houses prior tc 
Lincoln Trail Hospital) Fri S 
Sat Apr 13 & 14, Sam lo^ 
No corly birds picose. rair 
dale followi ng weekend. A 
proceeds go to removing 
mold from the home of e 
handicapf>ed child. 


ELIZABETHTOWN- 413 
Tcicia Lane (near ECC), 
Fn, April 13. 8 to 2, Sat. 
April 14 8-12 Rain or 

shine Loto of name brand 
clothing. Women's Plus 
18W-4X; Girls 8-12: 
Men's M-XL ■some 3>3-T: 
Lane Bryant. Jusfree. PS 
AeropostalB. Gap Old 
Navy. Aeropostale & 
more. Lots of toys & 
books, trampoline, air 
hockey table, household 
items, rxi^tume jewelry, 
lots of mscelleneous 


□ 


INiiP 
TO VISIT 


ELIZASETHTOWN- 417 


Ridgecrest RD, Terrace 
Hills S-ub Fnctey. April 
13th. 8am-7 Designer 

clothes, Eleclric scooters. 
sleeping bags. Ions of 
stuff!! Priced to go!! 


/M'hikt.f 


ELIZABETHTOWN 


2742 Valley Creek [2 mi- 
le$ out of ETown) Fri. & 
Sat. Apnl l^h & 14th 
8em-4pm. Cow & Rooster 
cclleoticn. toys, glass* 
vjgre Barbie toys & a lot 
of miscellaneous. 



ELIZABETHTOWN 2755 
Vhdde Creek Rd Fn & 
Set. 9am-1pm no earliy/ 
late birds.) BabyAodefler 
bade, port a crib, adivity 
car, fiding toys, stjoiler. 
antique cabinet, micro 
wavs, twin bed also twin 
& full bfe & maltress. irii- 
tamt thru adult clothes, 
shoes, lots more Rain or 
shine Call 270-723- 5173 


ymm 


ELIZABETHTOWN. 3185 
Bardstown Road, us 62. 
directly ini front off Lirrcoln 
Trail School. Friday. April 
13. Sam. Adult S children 
clothif^, shoes, toys. 2 
vacuum d manors and 
miscellanaoLs items 


YARDSAUE 

ELIZABETHTOWN- 322 
Mornin^rde Drive Fri & 
Sat. Bam to?. Furniture, 
Coke items, bike, clothes 
women's & children's, 
shoes, sorne toys. Christ¬ 
mas items, 



ELIZABETHTOWN 
3830 $ Dixie Hwy. Fri. & 
Sat., April 13lh & 14th. 
7:30am-? HUC^ yard 
sale' Part of Estate Sato 
Biker toothers. cam|:ing 
equip,, tools, furniture £ 
etc. 


YARD5AUE 

ELIZABETHTOWN ■ 423 
Chestnut St . Fn 13th - 
Sat 14th 8 am - 2pm 
Y ard Sale. furniture, 
housewares, lots of other 
mieoaltoneous items. 


ELIZABETHTOWN 424 
PARK avenue Saturday 
April 13 8am-1pm 
Household Items, Children 
and adult clothing baby toys 
and lots more 



ELIZABETHTOWN- 424 
PonnsylvaniA Ave 3 family 
yard sale Fn & Sat fiam to 
7 2 dressers, IV, sega gen- 
acic Harley Davideor 
jecket. clothes, shoes 
stroller & esr seat set, othei 
baby items and lots of misc 



ELIZABETHTOWN - Sl3 
Rembrandt Dr (Monterey 
Bub.). Saturday. April 
14lh. fiam-? FisNng 
equipment. Camo cloth¬ 
ing. deei' stored, house^ 
wares, vintoge toys, cloth¬ 
ing, kitchen teble & 
chairs, womens gotf 
clubs. Beanie babies. 
Holiday Barbie e<frticn 
(QQ'e), ceaconal decora¬ 
tions' 



.jFf 

ELIZABETHTOWN *576 
Roundtop Rd.. Fri. 13th - 
Sat. 14th. 7am - Spm Doz¬ 


ens of brend 
name/designer Nue 
leans. Sizes 29-38 waists, 
with 29-33 length. 
Tools.leather couch-biaok 
synthetic recHning rocker 
WAudubon, men. women, 
taenage and boy's dothes 
Ar^ftiques. oak kitchen ta¬ 
ble. 2 oak end tables. 2 
mahegany end tables, 
X-box vWdowns of 
giamec computer cablec 
mouse, speakers, ortce 
chairs, lamps, peturas 
silver plated service, oak 
kitchen cabinets, kitchen 
sinks, teucels. pedestal 
$ink$. commodes, vinyl 
siring. R19 incuEaticn vi¬ 
nyl windcm...much more 





















































































































































































































































































































































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


B7 


M Yard and 
Garage Sales 


ymm 

ELIZABETHTOWN - Sfl 
Willow Oak Court 
(across trom new Sevsrns 
Vall^ Chyrch) 13 $ 14 
e-3. 3 l^mll/ TVs S 
etande: prom cfiesses. 
oouoh., porosFain dolFs. 

items, clothes, toys, 
clothes, all sizes, men. 
vsoni$n$ and chtldran^. 
purses, lamps, oomplele 
workout teoter antique 
rocker, lots of nidk nacks. 
lots of mscellaneous 
items all musigo^ 


lilUIDSALE. 

ELIZABETHTOWN 7C 
^tedc^en Dr off Hwf ^ E 
(Back Home Catering) Sa* 
Apr 14 7am-4pm. Hc^jsS' 
wares, furniture and aoftif 
re&taurant equipment. 


ELIZABETHTOWN 76- 
WHISPERING Pine Way W 

Saturday April 14th from 
Sam to 4pm.. Moving sale! 
Kitchen Island, book 
shelves, misc. furniture, 
pots and pans, Christmas 
trees, hanging pot rack, 
small appliances, filing cabi¬ 
nets, yard tools, too much 
to list!! 



ELIZABETHTOWN^ Four 
family garage sale. 16: 
Fieldstone Wav. w^f 
turn on Bacon Creek 
Road by Subway. go 
about one mile turn on 
Flatrock) Frr S Set. B lo 
Gtass bowl Tront cfuna 
cabinet with borage, baby 
clothes, com piece Greco 
baby trarvel system, ctean 
air maohmea. fishing 
reals like naw dull press 
laaar level Bd handy 
saw. paper £ paint sup' 
plies, dothes and floor 
steamers. Isrge setection 
DVD's S CD's, Antique 8 
piece set Varenne China. 
Coach and name brand 
wallets and purses, ccm- 
tortere. to^ls. rugs, dec¬ 
orations. pictures. cCothss. 
Clark shoes lots of jow^ 
airy, miscellaneous 


ELIZABETHTOWN HUGE 
YARD SALE! 399 Collins 
Drive, E-town. Friday 
7AM-Noon, and Saturday 
7AM-Noon! Toddler clothes 
and toys, pre-teen clothes, 
home decor, to much to list! 


YARD 


ELIZABETHTOWN Marge- 
ret Dr (1/2 mile past UncDir 
Trail Elementary). Fn & Sal 
Apr 13 ai4 Bam to? 32 
TV, furniture. Iota of lade 
Clothing Size infant-14, 
mens, wcmens. and plus 
size clothing, shoes, name 
brand purses, toys, erit 
sets, shredder^ toots 
books, home decor, pool ta¬ 
ble . lots of misc items 
Something for everyone. 


M Yard and 
Garage Sales 


IN BETWEEN ELIZA¬ 
BETHTOWN & RADCLIFF 

280 Fentress Blvd, Satur¬ 
day, 14th. 9:30am. 

2 Military Families moving. 
Lots of clothes, shoes, 20in 
wheels and several other 
things. 


lARDSALE 

RADCLIFF- 1074 Glen- 


wood Drive. Fri S> Sat- 
7'30 to ? Toddler girts 
clothes newborn to 2T 
high chairs, car seat, 
stroller, name brand 
purses, shoes, men's 6^ 
vmmens. girls clothes 
sizes 5 Id 14. luggage 
tree stand, coolers, wheel 
barrow, hou&ehold mts- 
cellsneous. tyrnrture. ex¬ 
ercise equipment, 2 tread¬ 
mills 270-317.3336 call 
for dreciion Dr questions. 


RADCLIFF 147 BOONE 
TRACE. Fri/Sat: 0900-???? 
Baby items, clothing, toys, 
furniture; adult clothing; 
knick knacks; computers; 
Army clothing and equip¬ 
ment; sports cards and 
more! 


Uftitjf) 


RADCLIFF 407 WEEm 
Rd. ^ Sun April 14 ? 
IS Sam Ip ? Eari birds w^- 
come Moving Sale, cabi¬ 
nets, microwave, dehumidi- 
fer, bread machine, book¬ 
cases, chest of drawers, 
lots of misc items. 


lARDSALE 


RINEYVlLLE-196Lea 
Ct. Fri 13th-Sat. 14th. 

Sam ■ Spm. Tods, 
clothes, baby stuff, paint¬ 
ings. pictures, various 
household items, com¬ 
plete computer and other 
miscelteneons items 



RINEWILLE- 257S 
Thomas Rd.. Fri. 13th 
Sat. 14th. Daylight-? Lots 
of toyp. clotheB. fughchpir. 
little tykes sltde. gaming 
systems & accessones. 
mens & women's clothes, 
alot o-f name brand items. 
Charcoal grilL primitiva 
decor, household ilome 
Too much to li^' 
HUGE! HUGE! 
HUGE! 


IKRDSALE. 


RINEYVILLE- lake 1600 
te 1536 turn beside 
Rineyville Baptist Church 
to Thomas Road follow 
signs. 9.00 to ? April ^2& 
13. Bfarid name clothes 
like new or new HolriEter, 
American 

Aereposlale jearrs. 'ShOfts. 
tee shirts, dresses, men. 
women, jr, baby dot has. 
oar seate. new baby E>ed 
set. bassinet, boys 5 to 
ID, piram dresses (ID to 
24L shoes, purses, jewel¬ 
ry, make up. books, 
games, fumilurs. -curtains, 
sheets, bedspreads, elec* 
tnc appliances, toys. 9 lot 
or miscellaneous. 


mVRRYU! 

ELIZABETHTOWN 
West view Dr., Thur Fri ^ 
Sat Apr 12.13,14. 

Bam to ?. 16x24 poot, 
farm tabia/benchs. bike, 
bball goal, bed^ng, pic¬ 
ture frames, baby girl, 
boys, jr mens dothes, 
baseball cleats^g 4 
bats, full size mattress £ 
springs, vvreatiling belts & 
toys,, tods, xbOK 360, 
paintball gun Call 
766-0141 



Elizabethtown, 5926 Shop- 
herdsville Rd Friday Apr 1^ 
Bam to 5pm. Books, tods 
movies. puzzles, lawn 
mower, dsh^shar, £ misc 


1ARDSALE 


GLENDALE 1516 Gf end ale 
Hpdgonv ilia Rd W 
ThuT-Sal Apr 12-14 9am to 
5pm. Furniture. doEhes, tot£ 
to adult, household items 
antiques and more. Rain oi 
shine 



HODGENV3LLE , 29 Rhillip 
Ct Sat Apr 14, B:3Dam to % 
no early birds Oothes 
wwJding dress, tcjiys. furrti- 
tore and lots of householc 
items. Call tor infc 
270^735-6470. 


IfiftRRiSAUEi. 


STEPHENSBURG- Big 
Vara t-ale. Sat April 14th. 


B 3D to Eastv ew Road, 


Blue s'vwvel rocker, Nde a 
bed. j beds with mat* 
tresfi like reyy gas cook 


fitcvie. 3 sets toWes a 


chairs. 4 and tabjios. 
couch. 2 odd chairs, sev¬ 
eral lamps, tots of cookie 
Jars, cfiflhea. B^aaswBre. 
silverware, stereo, olher 
items to numerous to 
mention 27D.862-4961 



THRU THE QR7PE 
VINE- located in Glendale 
off Main Street, 1 block 
south of The Whistle 
Stop Storewide 1Q% off 
sale Saturday. April 14. 
11am-9pm. Register for 
350 gift card. Gourmet 
food tasting. Showcasing 
Flaunt a new line of hand¬ 
bags and accssscnes 


VINE GROVE 1002 

Muirfield Court 8:00 am on 
Saturday, April 14. Spring 
cleaning! Miscellaneous 
household items, children’s 
and adult clothing, etc. 


yafd Sate 

VINE GROVE 1675 
Burns Rd (off Deckard 
School Rd ) Fn ^ Sat. 
April 13th & 14th, 

Sam-1pm both days 
Handmade quilts. Barbie 
dolls Furbies, some an^ 
tique furnilurs. oollect- 
bles. 


HODGENVILLE 2240 
SALEM LAKE ROAD. 

270-872-7883 or 872-7884 
call for directions 
Thursday -Sunday. 7am-? 
April12th-15th 
Early birds gets the worm. 

Spring cleaning 
Baby items: lots of baby 
clothes Bed, pack & Play, 
stroller, car seats. Bicycles, 
4-wheeler, Furniture, Tools, 
camping equipment, gas 
grills, construction truck top¬ 
per, lawn mower trailer, 
adult/children clothes. 
Ranger parts. Motorcycles 
and gear( lots more stuff) 



VINE GROVE - 309 Cefv 
tral Ave.. Saturday, April 
14th, 9am-4pm. Furniture, 
household items, biahy 
items, dglhing (all sizes), 
beauty Items, Star Trek 
dOliectibtes. Everything 
must go^'' Great Yard 
sale! 


90 


Yard and 
Garage Sales 


1MRD5AUE 


VINE GROVE- 410 
Lynovwidd Ave. off of Ce¬ 
dar Crest April 13 & 14, 
Bam to ?. Ram date April 
21 Twq family yard sale 
Furniluie, aptpliflnces. 
power wheels, cinette set 
toys, animal oage. clothes 
adult 6 kids. 6 rriisc. 


j Kaifiin^; 

VINE GROVE- 770 High¬ 
land Ave. Fri. I3th - Sat 
I4ih. 0am - ?. 5 Family 
Yard Sele' Quilts. Mens 
and Women's clothing, 
shoes, purses, boys 
clothes, infant to 12 
months, infant swing. Cor 
sest wF base. Madela 
breast pump wr small 
compact back pack only 
used 6 months $160 
OBO. Porcetom c<3llection 
doll?, new still in boxes, 2 
Pack and Plays, printer, 
books. 3 bathroom cabi¬ 
nets W mirror, glass ware, 
email kitchen apptioncee. 
suitcases, jewelry box, 
rugs, towels, curtoins. 
weed eater and lots of 
miscEllerYeous items. 



Employment 


*AVOID EMPLOYMENT 
SERVICE SCAMS Don’t 
pay to find work before you 
get the job. For more infor¬ 
mation write the Federal 
Trade Commission at 
Washington, D.C., 20580. 


NowHiringlil^ 

2ND SHIFT FRONT 

DESK S Night Audit. 
Also. hcusekeei3ing. Ap* 
ply in peracn between 
10am-2pm at LaQuinta 
inn B Suites. 21D Com- 
marca Dr.. Elrzabethtowm. 
Ky No phone rails 
please. 



Employment 


Now Hiringlllfr 

2nd Sl 3rd Shift 
Must be mature, honest, 
dependsbl? 6. able to 
work weekends. 105 Quik 
Stop. I-6S esat 105, Leba¬ 
non Junction, 

(502) 033-3700 


ACCOUNTS PAYABLE 
Spetiali-&t needed for 
busy office environment 
Mu$t be a multi te$ker. 
proficient in Word. Excel 
* basic accounting prac¬ 
tices. Fight receptionist du¬ 
ties also. Benefits include 
insurance. 401k a vaca¬ 
tion. Send resume to: Boa 
H. The New$ Enterpnee. 
403 W Dxie Avq Eliza¬ 
bethtown. KY 42701 


Administrative Assis^ 
tart 1o Maintenance and 
Engineering 

□bliss include assisting 
Company Engineer (P.E.) 
and Mainiortence Man¬ 
ager on conskruotion and 
rmintenanoe projects. 
This inofudes maintaining 
files. Organizing sched¬ 
ules. and corTmuhtoaring 
with contractors and sup- 
pi isrs. Experience with 
Microsofl Office Suite re¬ 
quired. □erical experi¬ 
ence in the construclion 
industry preferred. Coitv 
pel hive wage, health ft 
dental insurance, 40 Ik 
and paid time ofl availa¬ 
ble. Please send resume 
to enployment 

®newcoini)CMf.com New- 
corrb Oil Co. is an Equal 
Oppon unity Errployer 
Newcomb Oil Co. Is oom- 
rritted to a drug free work 
p/ace. 

WWW. newcambaif. cam 


ADMINISTRATIVE 
CUSTOMER SERVICE 

positions must have 
experience Manufacturing/ 
Production various shifts. 
Apply in person at Express 
Employment Professionals, 
come by 935 N, Mulberry or 
call 270-737-4724 for more 
information. 


Elizabethtown Nursing and Rehab 
Center is seeking an 

RN Admissions 
^ Coordinator 

To: 

• Review admitting department operations. 

• Ensure compliance with applicable standards. 

• Oversee the in-patient/out-patient functions, bed 
assignments, and completion of preliminary 
paperwork for entering patients. 

• Work with medical, nursing, and accounting staff 
to ensure appropriate patient placement. 

• Confirm that all insurance benefits coverage 
meets standards of admission as dictated by policy. 

Requirements: 

• Must be a RN in the state of KY 

• 2-4 years of experience in the field or in a skilled 
nursing environment/long term care/rehab. 

• Familiarity with a variety of Skilled Nursing 
Facility/Long Term Care concepts, practices, and 
procedures. 

Great opportunities for advancement! 


Apply today at: 

Elizabethtown Nursing & Rehabilitation 
1101 Woodland Drive, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
Phone (270) 765-6106 
ATTN: Kathy Holderman 
“Extendicare, helping people live better ” 


FINANCE 

MANAGER 


Business is BOOMING at Pinkham 
Lincoln Automotive. We are expanding 
our Finance Department to 
accomodate our growing business. 


For the opportunity to join one of Central 
Kentucky’s Top Finance Departments, 
Contact Jonathan Webb or Gary Burris 
for a confidential interview at: 


[ 270 - 737-2460 



PINKHAM 


AUTOMOTIVE 

1505 N. Dixie Hwy. 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701 






Service Technician 


with Diesel Experience 

GM Certified a plu s 

WE OFFER HIGHLY COMPETITIVE PAY PLANS, ALONG WITH: 

Flat Rate Based on Experience and Tool Inventory 

Perfomance Based Pay Plans 

Disability Coverage 

Medical Insurance 

401 (k) Retirement Plan 

Paid Holidays & Paid Vacations 

Tuition ReimbursmentforASE Certification 

Paid GM Training 

Paid Uniforms 

Performance Bonus & More! 


If you hove the skills we need and want 
to get started, email us at: 

chevyservice@jonesautogroup.org 

with a brief outline of your certifications. 
Please include your name, address and 
preferred telephone number, or call Mark 
Rickett at: 

800-609-2277 or 270-765-2123 


Make our needs work for you! 

Contact us NOW! 







Employment 



Employment 



Employment 



Employment 


ARE YOU a COL 
DRIVER WHO UKE3 
TO BE 

HOME EVERY NEGHT7 



SERVICE FIRST 


WAREHOUSE fti 
DISTRI BUT1DN CDukl 
he the lob for you!!J 
Fa&lerowmg ccmpsrv^ i5 
Immediatelv hiring for Isl 
£ 2nd shin drivers Ben¬ 
efits inciude heaith, den- 
tel 

vision, and psid 
vac arionsfrialJday a! 1 
Pleats' apply in pefson at 
907 Pelers&n Drive. 
EtoMfl. KY at back 
ofTira by dock 5 
NO PHONE CALLS' 


CDL DRIVER BONUSES 
AVAILABLE. Limited posi 
tiers open Id deliver Altec 
Trucks. Good rates. Quick 
pay. partial settlement Ir 
advance. cut ci 

□ur new ^izabethtown loca¬ 
tion and several other loca¬ 
tions nationwide! Free train¬ 
ing and free fo^ vrfien yee 
sign on' Sea why are 
the number one diiveaway 
cempany m the business 
1-66S-764-16D1 
WWW. quality dn v eaway. cerri 



CDL Schcol starling 

soon 

Please call for more 
information 
Also needing 
Experienced CDL 
Class A Drivers 
-Reliable home time 
- Consistent freight 
- One of the industiys 
best pay packages. 

000-844-1060 ext. 144 


EXPERIENCED 

PREFERRED^ 


CHAtW UNK FENCE IN¬ 
STALLERS . wood & Vi 


nyl Experience preferred, 
valid drivers license with 
ctean driving recerd a 
muck Background check. 


CLASS A CDL TRUCK- 
DRIVER Need Regional 
Company Driver, No-Touch 
Freight-All DryVans! BE 
Home WEEKENDS! 
Benefits/90days. 

Call 866-872-6700 XI006 
CONSTRUCTION WORK 
in basement walls. Start pay 
$10 hr. Insurance and holi¬ 
day pay after 60 days. 
Chuck Rust Concrete, 
(502)249-2177. 


RNs and LPNs 

Elizabethtown Health Rehab has PT and FT needs 
on Evening and Night shift for RNs and LPNs 


Apply directly at: 

Elizabethtown Nursing 
& Rehabilitation 

1101 Woodland Drive 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
Phone (270)765-6106 Fax (270)737-6690 

Attn: Kathy Holderman 
Or apply online at Extendicare.com 

V_ y 


SALES 

PROFESSIONAL 



IVe offer highly competitive 
pay plans along with: 


• Medical Insurance 
•401 (k) Retirement Plan 

• Paid Holidays 

• Paid Vacations 

• And more! 


If you have the skills we need and want 
to get started, email us at 

maj@jonesautogroup.org. 


Please include your name, address and 
preferred telephone number. 

Make our needs work for you! 

Contact us NOW! 


DRIVER BONUSES 
AVAILABLE! 


FOR QUALIFIED CDL DRIVERS TO DELIVER ALTEC TRUCKS 
ELIZABETHTOWN AND / OR 17 OTHER LOCATIONS. 
GREAT RATES, RELOAD OPPORTUNITIES, QUICK PAY, 

AND HOME TIME WHEN YOU WANT IT 

Qua^V 

www.QualityDriveAway.com 

1-866-764-1601 


CELEBRATING 25 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE 



We are currently looking for 

Independent Contractor Telemarketers 

who will work from their home to renew 
newspaper subscriptions. 


Great Far 
Retirees 
Or Stay-At- 
Home Moms! 


Mail resume to: 

The News-Enterprise 

408 West Dixie, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
Attn: Rashana Brodie 


extra cashP 

Do you have a computer & 
a good phone presence? 


DIESEL MEChHAMC 
needed. 

Ist shift 7amH4pm 
Saturdays mandatory 
Top pay based on 
experience 

Mack and Volvo 
experience needed 
Engine rebuilding a 
plus 

Rotating after hours 
on call 

Pick up an application 
or send resume to: 

All Star Trucking, 
Inc., 1606 Progress 
Way Ste. B 
Clarksville, In 47129 


DOCTOR NEEDS full 
time Lioertaed Massage 
Therapist for a busy Office 
in Elizebethtgvjn Send 
resume to P.O.Box 996. 
Elisebethtown, KY 42702 
or email nasuma to 
DSEA1999 @gnn ai I, com 


DOMESTIC RELA^ 

TTONS/FAMLY Law 
Paralegal/Legal Secre¬ 
tary. 3year$ miriinnum 
perience preferred. Re¬ 
sumes may be emailed 
to: info^ml-kylaw.corri. 
faxed to- (270) 765-7301 
or deliverecl to 56 Public 
Square. Elizabethtown 


DUMPTRUCK 

DRIVERS 

NEEDED 

E-town Area 
12.00-15.00/Hour 

SI 2-2 S2-0908 
WWW, keni uc kian a 

trucking .com 

IN HOME CAREGIVER for 

disabled man Needs 
as.sistance with bathing, 
dressing, daily exercise. 
Must be caring, experi¬ 
enced in health care, 
C.N.A., or LPN. Back¬ 
ground and criminal check. 
Paid weekly, hours negotia¬ 
ble, 8-12 hours daily, Satur¬ 
day & Sunday time and half. 
Call 270-317-0457, leave 
message, if no answer. NO 
call after 9pm. 


JOB FAIR 

April 1?tli 
9am-4pm 

Bring 2 Forms of D 


THE _ 

RESERVES 

NETWORK 


(270)9fi2-3193 

etown @ther eser ves 

netwofl^.eom 


LICENSED HEARING 
SPECIALIST needed for 
leader in the hearing 
healthcare industry Ibr 
Louisville. Elizabethtervw 
and Frankfort areae. 
Salary/com miaaion ard 
benefit package avail able 
for qualiliod inrXviduai 
Pleaae call am-371^27 
to achodule an interview 
EOE. 


LIFELINE HOMECARE 
IS currently seekinfl an 
Information Specialist" 
for our E-Town office to 
work in the field as a 
homecare aide on an as 
needed btasia Reaponai- 
bllitias include nteinta- 
nance of personnel rec¬ 
ords. timely aubmi-aaon of 
recorcte to the central of¬ 
fice, and day-to-day oper¬ 
ations of office in I he ab¬ 
sence or under direction 
of the Project Director. 
QUALIFICATIONS; High 
$cNoqI Diploma wth com¬ 
puter. bookkeepng and 
general receptiorast aype- 
rience Applicants must 
be able to pass a drug/ 
background screen have 
updated TB test rasuHs 
and dependable transpor¬ 
tation. 

Please apply by emal at 
h r.l ifel i nehomBMre@ 

qmalLcom FAX (606) 
676-9157, or send 
resume to Lifeline 
Horn scare Inc . PO Box 
429, Somerset. KY 
49502. Attention HR 


Ofi[^xt1cliiil|' l^ptbjncf- 


LOCAL BUSINESS 
needs Ser'wee Mamser, 
must possess good com¬ 
munication skills, outgo¬ 
ing persorrality. problem 
solver, pay based on 
experier>ce.£>^ free eih 
vtronay^nt. Send resume 
to The News Enterpnse, 
Box G. 4Q8 West Dixie 
Avenue. Eliza befhtovm. 
KV 42701. 


00 


Business 

Opportunities 


lOO 


Business 

Opportunities 


lOO 


Business 

Opportunities 



Business 

Opportunities 


I paid off my credit cards! 




Become a News-Enterprise and Courier Journal 
Independent Contractor. 

You can build your own business, tool* You should have: 

• A valid driver’s license and insurance 

• A reliable car or other method of delivery 

• A few hours to devote to your route. 


Only a few hours a day! Collections not required. 
Never done this before, we’ll show you how! 

Perfect for retirees, stay-at-home parents & students! 

If you are self-motivated, service driven, available 7 days 
a week in the early morning before the sun comes, have 
reliable insured transportation, and eager to earn the 
money you want and need, apply today! 

For More Information or to apply, visit: 

The News-Enterprise, 

408 W. Dixie Ave., Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
(No Phone Calls Please) 


It’s in the paper. 

The News-Enterprise 















































































































































































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


QJ Employment 


Local Company 
seeks CDL Drivers 

We offer competitive 
with Viac aliens, 
health insurance. 401K 
available. Ynu provide 2 
year$ ^penanc$. Clean 
MVR and a positive afti- 
lude e0O’5'T6-3'iO3 or 
502^348.3503 


MACHINIST-CNC MILL 
PROGRAMMER/ 
OPERATOR 

^^^imum 3 years job 
shop experience required. 
Compuiar skills are nec¬ 
essary. Mastercam and 
Autocad a plus. Candi¬ 
date should be highly mo- 
tivatsd, understating of 
general shop practice, ca¬ 
pable of decision making 
as indepandani worker. 
Pay based on experianco. 
Send resume or apply in 
person at BG Machine 
Inc. 2390 Now Haven 
Road, Bardstown, 

40OQ4. 502-348-90^1 

MOWING OPERATORS 
AND LABORERS 

NEEDED. Send resume to 
Box V % News Enterprise 
408 W Dixie Hwy Elizabeth¬ 
town, Ky 42701 


NowHIrlnglil^ 

WOW LOOKING for 
cooks and part lime hosT 
esses Must apply in per- 
sorr Mon-Thur 3pm-Cpm 
2008 H Mdlberry St 
E-town. 


PRESCHOOL TEACH. 
ERS CHRISTIAN Faith- 
based Ptiesehcol Program 
hifirig AM S PM Pre^ 
school and Substttute 
Teachers tor Summer 
Program and up coming 
school year Experienced 
preferred Apply in persoo 
at Heart 8 Soul Pre- 
^OhOQl. Grape Heartland 
Church (370) 983-0874 
or (270) 735-5492 


NowHiringlli^ 

SERVICE TECHNICIAW 

Local pa?t oontrot com* 

pgny hgs immediate 
opening for a service 
technicran to service ac* 
counts in the local area. 
Good commumication 
skills and high scnod or 
GEO raquirad Apply m 
person at Etown ^termi¬ 
nating Co. 28tS Ring Rd 
E. Bi2at»thtovm Ky 
437(31 Am^ncan heros 
welcome to apply. 


QJ Employment 


TRUCK AND AUTO ME¬ 
CHANIC. Louisville Re- 
peir Fe^Cility looking lor 
mechanic with exponanca 
in bfake suspension snd 
front end work. Musi havia 
own loafs. Day sfiih. good 
pay, benafils. Call 
S02-584-2181 


WHAT ARE YOU 
GOJNG WITH 
YOUR LIFE 
RIGHT NOW??? 

Are you interested in a 
well paying career??? 
We have an opening 
for a great person to 
make a great income 
and work in a great 
environment We are 
a buy here pay here 
dealership in 
RadclifL KY. looking 
to increase our sales. 
You need to be 
people fiiendly, 
outgoing, dependable, 
computer literate, and 
eager to learn. We 
provide you with 
everything you need 
to succeed. If you 
have been in the sales 
industry we are 
particularly interested 
in speaking with you 
although we will train 
the right person 
Calt Trm today 
for an inlsiview 
502-814-2352 or 
502-650-2130 cetf 


nC Employment 
JO Wanted 

GENERAL CLEANING 

and Need a night out? 
Babysitting in your home 
Call 270 877 2002 


Business 
Opportunities 

*AVOID FRANCHISE 

Scam: When it comes to 
earnings and locations, 
there are no guarantees. 
For free information about 
buying a biz op or franchise 
without getting scammed, 
write the Federal Trade 
Commission at Washington, 
D.C., 20580. 


Mobile Home 
Rentals 


2 a 3 BEDROOM MO¬ 
BILE hornet, singles S 
doubles, located 5 min¬ 
uted TrbiTi R. KrtOx. In 
Mjidrdugli Available In 
mediately. If you cant pay 
yaur rent on tme. please 
dont call Mobile Home 
Park [502) &42 0120 


2 BR1 BAallelec.c/a 
450+200 dep. 

2 BR 1 BA gas/elec, c/a 
400+200 dap. 

2 BR 2 BA all elec, c/a 

550+300 dep 

3 BR2 BAaiierec. c/a 

650+400 deposit 
Call 27Q-351-1376 or 
homestead m h pi c.cq m 


3 BEDROOMl 2 BATH 
BRICK HOUSE Ue>My 
decorated, basement wth 
one oar garage, deck 
overTook fishing lake, on 
3/4 acre lot. 15 min SW of 
Elwffi an '83. 57y5 
mo S700 deposit Ready 
to moye in 

Call 370-50^9890 qr 
270-505^9991 


4 BDRM, 2 BATH, kit appli¬ 
ances, + W/D hook up, 
30x50 garage, on 7 acres, 
$995 mo., + dep. 3057 
Carter Brothers Road, 
Hodgenville. Call (270) 
358-3166. 


ALL UTILITIES PAID * 
Free Cable vHth HBO. 
$95 per week and up. 
rents our FURNISHED 
MOTEL ROOMS, $130 
per v^k and up rents our 
FURMSHED MOBILE 
HOME.S located in Etown, 
small deposits. NO 
LEASE REQUIRED’ 
(270) 759^1 


MOBILE HOMES, 2+ bed¬ 
rooms, located In Royal 
Oak MHP off 31W in Glen¬ 
dale. Water and garbage 
paid. Call Ann at 
270-872-8940 


ONE i ™0 BED 
ROOMS available with 
eteciric & gas included or 
pay your own ulilititis. 
Short lerm lease availa- 
bte. Adiacent to Ft. Knox, 
Con tractors walcorre. 
C^1t (270)351-4247. 

UTILITIES PAID - E’town, 2 
bedroom, 1 bath small mo¬ 
bile. Nice area. Thomas St 
& Strawberry Alley. $475 
Month. Deposit $400, pay¬ 
ments OK. Background 
check. Laundry on site. Pet 
restrictions. 316 W Dixie 
Call (270) 300-8859. 


Mobile Home 
Sales 


2 & 3 BEDROOM MOBILE 
HOMES rent to own. Use 
Your TAX REFUND for 

down payment. Move in 
ready, owner financing. We 
buy mobile homes for 

CASH! Parkside MHP 

(270) 268-3978. 


3 BED, 2 BATH - Brand 

new. vinyl eiding. shingle 
roof. 7 yif, warranty, only 
$339 a month Hurry only 
3leTF 1-880-290-7678 


3 BR 2 BAall electric 
A/C 3l heat 
New carpet and paeit 
ro move ini 
2 BR 3 8Aall electric 
A/C & heat; new paint 
Ready to move in! 
Call (270) 351-1376 or 
homestead m h pH c ao m 


HOME FOR SALE. 
Near town. 

We el6C buy used homes. 
Clayton Homes, 
of i3aagDw. Ky 
270-678-2460, 


NEW 3 BED, 2 BATH 
doutJlewtde at Factory Di¬ 
rect Phees. Call Ngw^' 
1-808-290-7678 


SALEI SALE SALE! 
New Singlee under 
$23,899. New Doubles 
under 333.899 FREE De¬ 
livery and Set-up on every 
home. Rnancing availa¬ 
ble OakwuQd Homee 
1-008-280-3890 


Apartments 
For Rent 


'•'LARGE 2 BEDROOM 
Apartments Located on 
Bell wood Or., Robina Ct.. 
Elisabethtown 3 full baths, 
all apfiiancee inducing 
washer/dryw. l.lOO sq. it. 
Pet standards. $575 rant. 
$450 deposit Call (370) 
765-7438 or 260-0325. 


•*PIN OAK CT, RAD 
CLIFF 1 bedroom 
townhoua^. inoiudea car- 
pen. covered paiio. stor¬ 
age. All appliances in- 
Cludingi w^eher ^ dryer 
$425 rent 8 $350 deposit 
Cafll 270^260-0025 


*Apartments* 

Elizabethtown 
Fort Knox- Radcliff 
No Vacancies 
For Waiting List Email 
Liberty Station Rentals 
at info @ lsrentals.com 
www.lsrentals.com 


Apartments 
For Rent 

‘ELIZABETHTOWN* 

Glenview Court 
2 bed. 2 bath 
*WOVE/A/SPEC/AL* 
Exe cutive Group 
Property MgiTit,^ Inc. 
(270)234-1820 
leasing@eg-pnn com 
ex ec uE ivegroupweb. i om 


♦LUXURIOUS ONE BED¬ 
ROOM Located at 1820 N 
Mies St in Elizabethtovm. 
tile tidor8 in kitchen and 
bath area, microwave. Ice 
maker, garbage aksp<sai. 
000 sq ft., pet st^ndarc^. 
$475 per month $400 de- 


ion Apartments 
I lXi For Rent 


1300 SO. FT 2 BED¬ 
ROOM, 2 BATH 15x25 
great rttom. 2 large walk 
in cloaet$. utilrtyroom. re- 
ftigeratCHT. stove, central 
heat 8 air. Located on 
South Mantle. $645 
monthly plus depo n 
Cdl (270) 769-5499 


ALL UTILITIES PAD - 
Free CabFe with HBO, 
$95 per Week and up, 
rents our FURNISHED 
MOTEL ROOMS, $130 
per week and up rents 
our FURNISHED MO¬ 
BILE HOMES located In 
Etown, smalt deposits. 
NO LEASE REQUIRED! 


posit. Call (270)-26e-6a25 




TOO HOT? 
come Jump i n 
Oiir PCX:]' 


1 S 2 Bedrooms 
Open Layout 
Pet& Wefcome 
Short 8 Long Terms 
2 Mnutes From Post 
Outdoor Pool 
Playground For Kids 

On«ite Storage units 

Andersnn Estates 
270-351-5757 


1 BDRM TOWNHOUSE 
Westport Road. Elowi. 
Kilohen appllanaes. 
tw^D. pate Storage. 
$459 per mo + dep 
CalM270) 358-3166 


1 BEDROOM APART¬ 
MENTS $450 a month in¬ 
cludes water. Available 
immediately. 5 nninute>e 
from Ft. Knox, located in 
Mbidraugn. if you can't 
pay your rent on time, 
please ctor^'t call Mobile 
Home Park 502-942-0126 


1 or 2 BEDROOMS 
Apartments. Washer/ 
Dryer heuk ups. seme 
VMth Washer. Dryer, pet 
policy, close lo Ft Kjkjx. 
Rent ftcurt $385 to $475 
Call (276) 351-3373 


(279) 769-6771 


*RADCLIFF - Large 1 bed¬ 
room, all utilities paid. Pet 
standards. Navaho Dr. 
$450 monthly, $350 de¬ 
posit. Call (270) 268-0825. 


APRIL SPECIAL 1ST 
MONTH FREE Located 
lese then 5 m nuto^i from 
Wilson Cate on R Knox 
Walmart St. other conven¬ 
ient $ hopping. Pet 
frianijy Hunters Ridge 
Ai?t, (270) 351-0103. 


AVAILABLE 2 BEDROOM 
APARTMENT furnished, 
good furniture, TV, micro- 
wave. Utilities paid. $600 
month, $450 deposit. Con¬ 
venient location 5 minutes 
to Ft Knox. 502-935-0340, 
or 502-819-2428. 


BARNWOOD LN - ELIZ¬ 
ABETHTOWN located off 
pear Orchard Rd Lar^ 2 
bedrocm. water paid 
$475 rent, $400 deposit. 
Pet standards, (270) 
765-7435 or (270) 
268-0825 


BRANDY CHASE 
APARTMENTS 
*aean 1 BR apia 

* Large Townhouses 

* Furn. Exl Stay Apts. 

* Convenient Location 

* Just 5 Min To Post 

* On-site Management 

(270) 352-0606 

trandychass^pts. com 


Pin @ak 

VII I. A ^ 



BRICK 

TOWNHOMES 

(270) 734-0230 







ion Apartments 
IlXi For Rent 


120 


Apartments 
For Rent 


BUCKINGHAM 

CONDOMINIUMS 

APARTMENT RENTALS 
All appliances including 
washer/dryer. 

Pet standards 
8am - 5pm Mon - Fri 


900 A David Ct. 
(270) 769-1269 



CARDINAL CREEK 
GREAT LOCATION 
2 bdrn(V2 bath $699 



SILVER CREEK 
3 bdrrTV2 bath. $799 
2 bdrms/2bath. $699 
‘Wood floors 
*W;D hook-up 
(270) 2GB-4035 
Homesteadre ntaLcom 


CONDO, 2 BEDROOM - 
2 Barh. Great Lccafion In 
E'towfi cm {370} 
273-4707 


ELIZABETKTOWN 

C/a/'s Fointo 
Dupl&?c&s 

2 2 bath, garage 

Care/Cabte hoi 

PINE VALLEY 
2 bed. 2 bath 
F 

W/D & cable incEuded 
Exe cutive Group 
Property Mgmt,, Inc, 
(270) 234-1820 

laasirtafijEu-Dm com 
execuiivegroupweb com 


FORT KWOX/Muldraugh 
1 &R/lBa Sasham apt. lo¬ 
cated 1 mile from poet. 
Lrg furn. 8 unfum. apts, 
safe, rilean and Mlilaiy 
friendly. All utilises incl. in 
rent helps nthly budget. 
$540 men On Sfte Mgr 
end Maint Icm^t dep^ to 
area 502)942 3615 
f r VI r@bel tsouth. net 


FURNISHED STUDIO lo¬ 
cated in nice area In Rad- 
cirff Pin Oak Ct All appli¬ 
ances aneludinq washer 8 
dryer. Pet standards.. Al 
utilities paid- $495/^0. 
$300 secunty deposit 
call 370^260-0025 
HERITAGE MANOR At 
North Miles and Colonial 
Dr. Duplex community. 2 & 
3 bedroom w/1 & 2 baths. 
Stove, refrigerator, dish¬ 
washer, laundry hookup. 
Cathedral ceilings, sky¬ 
lights, fireplaces, ceiling 
fan, walk in closets. Chil¬ 
dren welcome. Your own 
private yard and driveway. 
Call 502-708-2550. 


avaiuBLENOW! 

IN ELIZABETHTOWN 
Tyler Park Apartments. 
1163 Lewis Dr Ground 
Floar, 1 Bedroom apart¬ 
ments. $350 monthly + 
utilities. Security deposit 
$300. Washer and dryer 
in air units. Income re¬ 
stricted. 278-737-7591 


fUHRISTOmER' 

Square 


Janes Prop. Management 
2 bed 2 bath 
2 bed 1 ba 
1 bed 1 ba 


S miles from Ft. Knox 
Radcliff. K7 

WWW. dhnstophersque re. 
com 


370-351-3176 



KIMBALL 


TOWNHOMES 
Ready to move in 
2 bedroom. 1.5 barth. 
supar large rooms, 
private patio $735 - $749 
buf now ONLY $599. 
fi&K about detailst 


(27Q) 268-7368, 


THECLASSIFIEDSk 


THE PLACE TO BE 



'StgjV 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 'SfgjS) 'SfgjV 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 'StgjV 'StgjV 'StgjV 'StgjV 'StgjV 'StgjV 'StgjV ^Stgjv 'Stgjv 'Stgjv 

Lawn & Garden pljcEQyQlcY 


K R Lawn Care 

Great Lawn Care • Great Price 

Accepting New 
Customers! 


• Shrub Trimming • 

Leaf Removal • Lawn Mowing 




krlawncare 1 @yahoo. com 


A CUT BETTER 
THAN THE REST 

New Customers Wanteil For 2012! 


✓ Mowing ✓ Trimming 
✓ Tree & Shrubbery Trimming 
✓ Leaf Removai ✓ Gutter Cieaning 
✓ Free Estimates ✓ Pressure Washing 

Residential / Commercial 

Call Wes @ (502) 432-7571 


AU4&.STAR 

LANDSCAPE 

• Commercial and Residential Mowing 

• Full service maintenance agreement 

• Landscape trimming & power seeding 

• Trees trimmed & removed 

• Excavation/skid loader work 

• Fertilizer & weed control 

270.766.8784 

FREE ESTIMATES • FULLY INSURED & LICENSED 
Please Give Us A Call! 


Community Lawn Service 


Reasonable & Affordable Service 

• Commercial & Residential 

• Mowing & Trimming 

• Landscape Design & Installation 

• Shrubs & Hedge Trimming 

• Fertilizing & Power Seeding 

feeEstimate^ 735~3660 




Serving Hardin and Roanoke Areas 



Your Business 



Greenman 

Handyman 


Quality Work, 
Friendly, 
Professional, 
Clean Site. 

Give us a 
call, we da 
it all... 


' Residential & 
Commercial Lawn 
Care & Leaf Removal 

' Shrub, Hedge & 

Small Tree Trimming/ 
Pruning/Removal 

' Garden Tilling & 
Maintenance 

• Junk Removal 



• Garage/Basement 
Cleaning 

• Gutter Cleaning 

• Interior Painting 

• Window Washing 

• Storm Clean Up/ 
Brush Removal 

• Home and Office 
Cleaning 


Vs Planting 
Time! 

Proven Winner Petunias 
& Superbeiis, Begonias, 
Geramiums, Fushias, 
Doubie Impatiens, Waves 
Petunias, Vincas, Pentas, 
Heliotropiums, Succulents, 
Tropicals, Lantanas, 
Grasses, Gerbera Daisies, 
Knock-Out Roses and 
much more! 


Nice Selection of 
Fruit & Shade 
Trees, Shrubs and 
Arborvitaes! 


WEEKLY SPECIALS 

Sat., April 28th 6am-10am only 
5” Geraniums 10% Off $2.60 
4-1/2” Begonias 10% Off $2.48 

Sat., May 5th 6am-10am only 

Perennials 10% Off 
4-1/2” Petunias & Million Belles 
10% Off-ONLY $2.25 

Sat., May 12th 6am-10am only 

Flowers & Vegetables (Mix & Match) 
Flats of 48s $11 

Baskets & Flowering Pouches $1 Off 


Call Randy at 27G.272.4961 


greenmanhandyman.com 


MILLER’S 
GREENHOUSE 
& FURNITURE 


Quality Plants - Value Priced Everyday 


$10 OFF 


Any purchase 
of $50 or more. 

One coupon per visit. Not valid 
with other offers. Excludes 
furniture, trees & shrubs. Must 
present coupon. Expires 6-9-12 


In The Classifieds 


MILLER’S GREENHOUSE 


Will custom plant your containers. 
Call for an appointment! 

Complete line of Amish Crafted Heirloom 
Home & Office Furnishings - custom order 
from our selection of catalogs. 

Quality Furniture ■ Value Priced Everyday! 

Directions: Exit off I-65 onto 31W turn left Main Street 
in Munfordville. Turn onto KY Hwy. 88 West. Go 5.5 
miles to Kensinger. Turn right off KY 88 onto Macon 
Kessinger Road for about 2.5 miles. 

Can’t miss us on the left! 

270-524-7684 

2375 Macon Kessinger Rd. Munferdville, KY 


Jone^ / ^Broth ers 

LAMD S CAPING 

MOWING 3 FERTILIZING 
SPRING CLEAN-UPS 

Low Price Guarantee!!! 
^Senior and Military Discouji^ 

Call or email for FREE ESTIMATE 

( 270 ) 219-9616 

jonesbrotherslandscaping@live.com 


«*(• D*' 

^ 9 


9 




y/p\> 

Total Turf Constructors 

liiii 




Retaining Walls 

Landscaping 

Lawn Mowing & Lawn 

Maintenance Programs 

Free Estimates & Fully Insured 


• Installation, Design And Service 

For Fully Automatic Sprinkler System 

• All Pro Putting Greens 

• Nightscape Lighting 

• Drainage/Erosion Control 

• Certified Backflow Preventer Testing 


270-877-6554 or 270-828-3174 


lrrigation_Plus@hotmail.com or 
www.irrigationplusky.com 


uiiviv GRADING & SEEDING I 


Milby’s Lawn & 
Landscaping 


' FINISH GRADING 
' RETAINING WALLS 
INSTALLED 


BOBCAT WORK 
POWER SEEDING 
STRAW BLOWING 


Call 763-7852 

Licensed & Insured 



4, The 

»LAWN BUTLER 

Serving Itoefi- Ijwji 


Power Dethatcher/Slit Seeding 
Shrub Trimming & Mulching 


• Spring, Leaf & Bed Cleanup 

• Small Landscape Jobs 

• Bed Ring Edging • Mowing 

NEAL MCDOWELL, Owner/Operator 

LICENSED & INSURED, Elizabethtown, KY 

270-76841370 or cemomWIl 


<P 


R&G LANDSCAPING 
& MOWING 

Sodding • Mowing 
Cleaning Flower Beds 
Leaf Removal 


Also Staining Decks, Pressure Washing, 
Interior & Exterior Painting, Drywall Wor 


Q 



<D 


Call Gary, 270-734-6556 




RENEWAL LAWN CARE 

dcREmRAm/\i 


Mowing 
Trimming 
Backhoe & 
Dump Truck 
work 


We will do 
our best to 
work with 
your budget. 

stimates 


Call (270) 312-4883 


Tree Services 

• Orignal Landscape Deagns 

• Shmbs/Tree Plantirg 

• Finish Grading 

• Power Seeding/Sod 

• Straw Sowing 
•Fertilimg 


' Storm Damage 

• Mulching/Accent Rock 

• Tree Service 

• Stump Remowil 

• Trirnrning/Pruriing 

• Mov^ 

• Laridscape/Lawn Maintenance 


Free Estimates & Fully Insured 

~ (270) 877-5886 
Cell: (270) 272-5153 




Specializing in the creation and total 
service of ponds, fountains and all types of 
aquatic landscapes. 

Now selling products and supplies at 
Bluegrass Garden Center on Westport Rd. 
in Elizabethtown. 

Fish and aquatic plants available. 


Joe Mattingly/Owner 
270-765-7497 



C\J 

CO 


CO 

C\J 


cu 


• Commercial & Residential 

• Mewing, Trimming, Edging Ql ^ 

• Landscaping, Landscape Maintenance . — 

• Mulching Accent Reck g jjJ 

• Fertilizer, Lime m 

• Fewer Seeding, Seed & Straw Blewing ^ 2 

• New Yard Installatien - Finish Grading ^ (/) 

• Gravel Drive Install, Grading ^ in 

• Frent Leader Werk - Bush Hcgging LI! Q 

• Leaf Cleanup & Remeval O 





































































































































































































































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


B9 


The News-Enterprise 


Service Directory 



TO PLACE AN AD TODAY, CALL 270-765-3862 

Builder & Developer 

1 Construction 

1 Home Improvement 

1 Pressure Washing 



26 Years Experience 

- Whole House Remodels - 

Interior or Exterior 

Kitchens & Bathrooms a specialty 

Basements Finished • Decks 

Screened Rooms - Wood or Aluminum 

Tile, Hardwood & Laminate Flooring 

Additions - Trim Work Licensed 

Garages • Attached or Detached insured 


Call Jack Love, 270-234-3802 

Fax: 270-369-6250 


Ceramic Tile 


Ron^s ¥ile 
& Nore 


QUALITY THAT SPEAKS FOR ITSELF! 

SPECIALIZING in: 

• Kitchen/Bath Renovation 
& Remodeling 

• Patios & sidewalks 

• Custom Shower Panes 

• Custom Back Splashes 

• Tile Repair & Cleaning 



FREE estimates 
& Fully Insured 

Residential or commercial, 


Contact: Ron Beard (270) 862-9538 cell 766-9032 


lAMIC TILE 



Specialises in: 

• Back Splashes 

• Shower Pans 

• Regrout 

• Grout Staining 

• Laminate Fiooring 

• Hardwood Fiooring 

Interior Design & 
Custom Work 

270-872-9939 


Chimney 


Bailey’s Masomy, Inc. 


— Since 1980 — 

240 W. Dixie Ave., Suite 200 
Elizabethtown 



> CHIMNEY CLEANING/ 
INSPECTIONS • 

• Stainless Liners Installed 
• Tuck pointing • Foundation Repairs 
' Repairing of Fireplaces and Chimneys 

Fully Licensed & Insured ■ Bonded 
Free Estimates 

We accept all major credit cards 

270-765-0969 

baileysmasonry(a)bbtel.com 
wvniv.baileysmasonry.com 
5 Billy J. Bailey, Owner 


Concrete 



EC. 


^CONCRCTE 

rPHASEiW' CUSTOM CONCRETE WORK 

veways ^Stamped 
^Patios -Any Pattern 
^Sidewalks -Any Color Comb. 

Licensed & Insured-20 Years Experience-Great References 

CALL NOW FOR FREE ESTIMATE! 

270-317-4183 


Construction 


L D 8. Son Construction 

iB M n ^ pii? 


We also do: 


Remodeling, Sunrooms, 
additions, roofs, siding, 
windows & more. 


10% Senior Citizen Discount 
30 Years Experience 
Fully Insured 

Office: (270) 547-5603 
Toll Free: 1-866-828-5241 



f cONST^UDTiaiM INC. i"'Jack of All Trades 


•New Homes -Decks -Painting 

•Additions -Shingie & Metai Roofing -Fiooring 
•Remodeiing -Poie Barns & Garages -Drywaii 
•Vinyi Siding -Windows & Doors -Trim Work 

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B10 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 



ACROSS 

1 Crony 

4 Light 
(Sp.) 

7 Summary 

12 Carte 
lead-in 

13 “A Chorus 
Line” 
song 

14 Entertain 

15 Energy 

16 Good 
product, 
idiomati¬ 
cally 

18 Recede 

19 Be frugal 

20 Record 

22 Id coun¬ 
terpart 

23 Loathe 

27 Pos¬ 
sessed 

29 “Clue” 
item 

31 Cavalry 
unit 

34 Guiding 
principle 

35 Goes 
over the 
books 

37 Weeding 
imple¬ 
ment 

38 Brewery 
output 


39 Med. 
plan 
option 

41 Creche 
trio 

45 Eucalyp¬ 
tus 
eater 

47 Heavy 
weight 

48 Duke 
Ellington 
classic 

52 Clear the 
tables 

53 Give a 
speech 

54 Deterio¬ 
rate 

55 Time 
of your 
life? 

56 Thick 

57 — Jima 

58 Still 


DOWN 

1 Surfaced 

2 Out of 
sorts? 

3 “The 
Silence 
of the 

4 Privation 

5 One 

6 Woody 
Allen 
movie 

7 En¬ 
grossed 

8 Ostrich’s 
cousin 

9 Scoundrel 

10 Fool 

11 Em, en, 
o, — kue 

17 Recog¬ 
nize 

21 Psalm 
group 


Solution time: 25 mins. 



Yesterday’s answer 4-13 


23 Seraglio 

24 Mimic 

25 Pirouette 
pivot 

26 Conclude 

28 Suitable 

30 “The 
Name 
of the 
Rose” 
author 

31 Bill 

32 Regret 

33 Praise in 
rhyme 

36 Not 
barefoot 

37 Empty 

40 New 

Zealand 

native 

42 Cornered 

43 Over¬ 
charge 

44 Smaller 
map 

45 Dandling 
locale 

46 21-Down 
member 

48 Turf 

49 Exist 

50 Erstwhile 
M&Ms 
color 

51 

Impos¬ 

sible” 




HQGISGK BRBXDMGB IM 
VSRB SG ITB UXBABGI, 
ITB MXITMUBJSAI HSVV 
AMWBISWBA EXD “EQXUQV 
J S B W ! ” 

Yesterday’s Cryptoquip: BECAUSE THAT 
NOVICE ETCHER IS PRETTY UNSKILLED, HE 
USUALLY MAKES A VERY BAD IMPRESSION. 


Today’s Cryptoquip Clue: G equals N 



YEBYVSQNKHEEBYW 
TRTOLJGEBYWPWUR 
PNKRIGGDGBZIOXV 
s q (b R a V e n u n) e c l h o 

MKINGCIDOMEESSC 
AMRYWRE SOUKRNAS 
QAPNDHDRBCEOI RJ 
EDHAYI EF I UGMENC 
AAHAALYNXVHOUOS 
QSSMI PYNMKJNLRH 
FECFBMZGAEFEDl R 

Thursday’s unlisted clue: BEN 

Find the listed words in the diagram. They run in all directions - 
forward, backward, up, down and diagonally. 

Friday’s unlisted clue hint: COOKING DIRECTIONS 


Brave nun 
Ear nag 
Fill Rome 
Had ring 


Hubs 
I log code 
In slow 
Iron rash 


Mad as 
Maid son 
My nickel 
No more 


Ride flag 
Say he 
Tracer 


©2012 King Features, Inc. 4/13 



Unscramble these four Jumbles, 
one letter to each square, 
to form four ordinary words. 


ODORP 









©2012 Tribune Media 
All Rights Reserved. 


ONNKW 


Services, Inc. 






7 ^ 


YULDOC 









KUENTJ 










WHEN HE TAUKEP AEOUT 
H15 NEW FURNITURE 
EU5INE53. HE PIP TH15, 

Now arrange the circled letters 
to form the surprise answer, as 
suggested by the above cartoon. 


A: 




kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 


k 


kk 

kk 

kk 

kk 


Answers Sunday 

Yesterday’s I ENACT SCOUT SPRING ATTAIN 

^ I Answer: When the Jumble artist went for a drive, he 

did this - SANG CAR TUNES 


FRIDAY E1/EA//A/G April13,2012 Cable Key; E-E’town/Hardin/Vine Grove/LaRue R/B-Radcliff/Fort Knox/Muldraugh/Brandenburg 



E 

R 

B 

7:00 

7:30 

8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

10:00 

10:30 

11:00 

11:30 

12:00 


~T 

3 

11 

5 

12 

6 

T 

16 

13 

25 

2 

Allegro 

ExCELebration Dinner 

ReelTalk 

Diversity 

United Way 

Crime Stoppers Health in the 

Elizabethtown City Council Meeting 

6 

3 

WAVE 3 News at 

7(N)(CC) 

WAVE 3 News at 
7:30 

Who Do You Think You Are? “Lionel 
Richie” (CC) 

Grimm “Love Sick” 
prises Nick. (N) (C( 

Hank's date sur- 
:) 

Dateline NBC (N) (CC) 

WAVE 3 News at 

11 (N) 

(:35) The Tonight Show With Jay 

Leno(N) (CC) 

4 

11 

Entertainment To¬ 
night (N) 

Inside Edition (N) 
(CC) 

Shark Tank An entrepreneur seeks a 
second chance. (N) (CC) 

(;01) Primetime; What Would You 

Do? (CC) 

20/20 (N) (CC) 

High School Ga¬ 
metime 

(:35) Nightline (N) 

(CC) 

Jimmy Kimmel 
Live (CC) 

WLKY 

5 

5 

Wheel of Fortune 

(N)(CC) 

Jeopdy! (N) 

Undercover Boss Budget Blinds CEO 
ChadHallock.(N) (CC) 

ACM Presents: Lionel Richie and Friends - In Concert Lionel Richie per¬ 
forms with others. (N) (CC) 

WLKY News at 
11:00PM (N) 

(;35) Late ShowW 

man (N) (CC) 

th David Letter- 

WDRB 

WBNA 

KET2 

WMYO 

WBKO 

9 

12 

Two and a Half 

Men (CC) 

The Big Bang 
Theory (CC) 

The Finder “The Last Meal” Willa is ar¬ 
rested. (N) (CC) 

Fringe “The Consultant” Walter goes 
to the alternate universe. (N) 

WDRB News at 
Ten (N) 

[:45)WDRB 

Sports 

Two and a Half 

Men (CC) 

30 Rock “The Fun- 
cooker” 

The Big Bang 
Theory (CC) 

21 

10 

Cold Case ‘Committed' Identity thelt. 
(CC) 

Cold Case A woman loses her fourth 
son. (CC) 

Cold Case “Start-Up” A healthy 
woman dies of a heart attack. 

Cold Case “Honor” Re-examining a 
1972 PCW murder. (CC) 

The Awakening Live Call-in prayer 
show at Evangel World. 

Friday Sports 

Buzz 

15 

14 

On Story (CC) 

WealthTrack 

Doc Martin “Dry Your Tears” 

“Bus Stop” (1956) Marilyn Monroe. 

Lincoln: KY 

Charlie Rose (N) (CC) 

Tavis Smiley (N) 

10 

16 

The Office (CC) 

Howl Met Your 
Mother (CC) 

Monk “Mr. Monk and the 12th Man” 
Monk must stop a killer. 

Monk Monk’s paperboy is murdered. 
(CC) 

The Office “Fire” 

(CC) 

King of the Hill 

(cc! 

Family Guy (CC) 

Family Guy (CC) 

Law & Order; 
Criminal Intent 

VY 

13 

WBKO at 6 (N) 

Wheel of Fortune 

(N)(CC) 

Shark Tank An entrepreneur seeks a 
second chance. (N) (CC) 

(;01) Primetime; What Would You 

Do? (CC) 

20/20 (N) (CC) 

WBKO at 10 (N) 

(:33) Nightline (N) 

(CC) 

Jimmy Kimmel 
Live (CC) 

A&E 

~T 

7 

18 

l2 

4 

PBSNewsHour(N) (CC) 

Comment Ky. McLaughlin 

Washington W’k Need to Know 

Art in the Twenty-First Century 

World News 

Kentucky Life 

Woodsongs 



The People’s Court “A Mechanical 
Mishap!” (CC) 

Nikita “Origins” Alex makes an an¬ 
nouncement. (CC) 

Supernatural Evil clones of Sam and 
Dean are created. (CC) 

WHASIOpm 

NewsonWBKI 

(;35) Inside Edi¬ 
tion (N) (CC) 

It’s Always Sunny 
in Phila. 

(;35) American 

Dad (CC) 

(12:05) American 

bad (CC) 

7 

17 


7 

Wheel of Fortune 

(N)(CC) 

Jeopdy! (N) 

Undercover Boss Budget Blinds CEO 
ChadHallock.(N) (CC) 

ACM Presents: Lionel Richie and Friends - In Concert Lionel Richie per¬ 
forms with others. (N) (CC) 

27 Newsfirst (N) 

(CC) 

(;35) Late ShowW 

man (N) (CC) 

th David Letter- 

79 

Storage Wars 

Storage Wars 

Storage Wars Storage Wars 

Storage Wars Storage Wars Storage Wars 

Storage Wars 

Storage Wars 

Storage Wars Storage Wars 

AMC 

53 

26 

46 

(5:30) “Overboard” (1987) 

“0 Brother, Where Art Thou?” (2000) George Clooney, John Turturro. (CC) 

“0 Brother, Where Art Thou?” (2000) George Clooney. (CC) 

ANIM 

32 

60 

78 

Alaska Wildlife Troopers (CC) 

North Woods Law: On the Hunt North Woods Law “On Thin Ice” 

Rattlesnake Republic (CC) North Woods Law “On Thin Ice” 

Rattlesnake 

BET 

42 

49 

80 

1 06 & Park: Top “Notorious” (2009, Biography) Angela Bassett, Derek Luke. (CC) 

“The Cookout” (2004, Comedy) Ja Rule, Tim Meadows. (CC) 

Wendy Williams 

CMTV 

45 

66 

86 

(5:15) “Pure Country” 

“Young Guns” (1988, Western) Emilio Estevez. Premiere. 

(:15) “Young Guns H” (1990, Western) Emilio Estevez. 

Trick My Truck 

CNBC 

23 

39 

27 

The Kudlow Report (N) 

The Celebrity Apprentice (CC) 

How 1, Millions How 1, Millions 

Mad Money 

Apprentice 

CNN 

24 

34 

24 

Erin Burnett OutFront (N) 

Anderson Cooper 360 (N) (CC) 

Piers Morgan Tonight (N) 

Anderson Cooper 360 (CC) 

Erin Burnett OutFront 

Piers Morgan 

COMD 

58 

59 

50 

Tosh.0(CC) |Tosh.0(CC) 

Always Sunny Always Sunny 

South Park “Joe Dirt” (2001, Comedy) David Spade, Dennis Miller. (CC) Tosh.O (CC) 

Chappelle Show 

DISC 

33 

38 

62 

Dual Survival “Eating Dust” (CC) 

Dual Survival “Out of Africa” 

Deadliest Catch (CC) 

Deadliest Catch “Deckhands” 

Deadliest Catch “The Gamble” 

Deadliest Catch 

DISN 

99 

29 

67 

Shake It Up! Jessie (CC) 

Jessie (N)(CC) |A.N.T. Farm (N) 

Fish Hooks (N) 

Good-Charlie 

Austin & Ally Good-Charlie 

Jessie (CC) 

Jessie (CC) 

Shake It Up! 

E!TV 

56 

56 

49 

El News(N) 

Fashion Star 

Ice Loves Coco 

The Soup 

Fashion Police (N) 

Chelsea Lately 

El News 

ESPN 

35 

44 

31 

SportsCenter NBA Countdown 

NBA Basketball Phoenix Suns at Houston Rockets. (N) (Live) NBA Basketball Dallas Mavericks at Portland Trail Blazers. (N) (Live) 

ESPN2 

36 

30 

32 

NFL Live (N) (Live) (CC) 

Countdown 

NASCAR Racing Nationwide Series: O’Reilly Auto Parts 300. (N) (Live) 

Boxing Michael Katsidis vs. Albert Mensah. (N) 

FAM 

17 

40 

21 

(6:00) “The Princess Diaries” (2001) 

“The Princess Diaries 2: Royal Engagement” (2004) Anne Hathaway. 

The 700 Club (CC) 


Fresh Prince 

FOOD 

57 

46 

73 

Best Thing Ate 

Best Thing Ate Diners, Drive 

Diners, Drive Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 

Diners, Drive Diners, Drive 

Diners, Drive 

Diners, Drive 

Diners, Drive 

FX 

27 

28 

71 

Two/Half Men 

“Wanted” (2008, Action) James McAvoy, Morgan Freeman, Angelina Jolie. 

The Ultimate Fighter Live (N) 

UFC Primetime 

“Wanted” (2008, Action) 

FXNWS 

29 

31 

A 

FOX Report With Shepard Smith The O’Reilly Factor (N) (CC) Hannity (N) 

On Record, Greta Van Susteren 

The O’Reilly Factor (CC) 

Hannity 

FXSO 

40 

55 

NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Indiana Pacers. (N Subject to Blackout) (Live) Cavaliers Live 

Cavaliers 

Cavaliers, Paint 

Action Sports World Champion 

NBA Basketball 

FXSS 

41 

70 

Is 

The Panel 

The Game 365 

World Poker Tour: Season 10 

World Poker Tour: Season 10 

UFC Insider 

Preds Snapshot 

Action Sports World Champion 

Pride 

GSN 

179 

111 

72 

$25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid $25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid $25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid 

$25,000 Pyramid 

Lingo 

HALL 

77 

68 

48 

Little House on the Prairie (CC) 

Little House on the Prairie (CC) 

Little House on the Prairie (CC) 

Frasier (CC) 

Frasier (CC) 

Frasier (CC) 

Frasier (CC) 

Golden Girls 

HGTV 

49 

51 

77 

Hunters Int’l Hunters Int’l 

House Hunters; Million Dollar 

HGTV Green Home 2012 (N) (CC) 

House Hunters 

Hunters Int’l 

Hotel Impossible (CC) 

Green Home 

HIST 

61 

54 

58 

Modern Marvels “Mega Stores” 

American Pickers “Boys’Toys” 

Full Metal Jousting (CC) 

Full Metal Jousting (CC) 

(:01) Full Metal Jousting (CC) 

Amer. Pickers 

LIFE 

34 

35 

23 

1 Survived (CC) 

1 Survived (CC) 

America’s Most Wanted (N)(CC) 

America’s Most Wanted (CC) 

America’s Most Wanted (CC) 

1 Survived (CC) 

MSNBC 

185 

45 

28 

Hardball With Chris Matthews 

The Ed Show (N) 

The Rachel Maddow Show (N) 

Lockup; New Mexico 

Lockup; New Mexico 

Santa Rosa 

MTV 

43 

37 

88 

America’s Best Dance Crew 

Punk’d (CC) 

Punk’d (CC) 

Pauly D Project 

Pauly D Project 

“Malibu’s Most Wanted” (2003) Jamie Kennedy, Taye Diggs. 

Movie 

NICK 

39 

42 

68 

SpongeBob SpongeBob 

Fred:The Show 

SpongeBob 

George Lopez 

George Lopez 

That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 

Friends (CC) Friends (CC) 

Friends (CC) 

OWN 

71 

224 

61 

Solved Grandparents slain. (CC) 

Solved “Poisoned by Love” (CC) 

Solved A dark secret. (CC) 

Solved “Truth in Shadows” (CC) 

Solved “Poisoned by Love” (CC) 

Solved (CC) 

SPEED 

66 

551 

90 

NASCAR Racing 

SPEED Center Drivel 

Hollywood’s Hottest Car Chases 

Hollywood’s Hottest Car Chases 

Trackside At... (N) 

Dumbest Stuff 

SPIKE 

46 

41 

85 

“Rambo: First Blood Part H” (1985) Sylvester Stallone. 

“Rambo III” (1988, Action) Sylvester Stallone, Richard Crenna. Big Easy Just. 

Big Easy Just. 

SYFY 

48 

64 

70 

1(5:30) “X-Men” (2000) 

|WWE Friday Night SmackDown!(N) (CC) 

Dream Machines Being Human 

Lost Girl (CC) 

TBN 

55 

63 

75 

Supernatural 

Potter’s Touch 

Behind Scenes 

Hal Lindsey 

Harvest (CC) 

Perry Stone 

Praise the Lord (Live). (CC) 

Frederick Price 

TBS 

15 

27 

19 

Seinfeld (CC) 

Seinfeld (CC) 

House of Payne 

House of Payne 

House of Payne 

House of Payne 

“Tyler Perry’s 1 Can Do Bad All By Myself” (2009, Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry. 

TLC 

50 

50 

57 

Say Yes: Bride 

Say Yes: Bride 

Say Yes: Bride 

Say Yes: Bride 

Say Yes: Bride 

Say Yes: Bride 

My Big Fat Gypsy Wedding (N) Say Yes: Bride 

Say Yes: Bride Gypsy Wedding 

TNT 

65 

43 

42 

Law & Order “House of Cards” 

Law & Order “Fame” 

“We Are Marshall” (2006, Drama) Matthew McConaughey, Matthew Fox. (CC) 

“We Were Soldiers” 

TOON 

60 

52 

66 

Adventure Time NinjaGo; Mstrs 

Cartoon Planet 

King of the Hill King of the Hill 

American Dad American Dad 

Family Guy 

Family Guy 

Robot Chicken 

TRAV 

76 

62 

56 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

The Dead Files (CC) 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adv. 

TVL 

59 

65 

54 

M*A’S*H(CC) |M’A*S’H(CC) 

Home Improve. Home Improve. 

Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 

Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 

Love-Raymond King of Queens 

King of Queens 

USA 

28 

33 

41 

Law & Order; SVU 

Law & Order; SVU 

Fairly Legal “Gimme Shelter” (N) 

In Plain Sight “Drag Me to Hell” 

Suits “Tricks of the Trade” (CC) 

Fairly Legal 

VH1 

44 

47 

87 

Behind the Music “Akon” (CC) 

“Menace II Society” (1993) Tyrin Turner, Jada Pinkett. 

La La’s Life Basketball Wives 

Stevie TV 

Sat. Night Live 

WGN-A 

14 

150 

301 

302 

303 
320 
340 
281 
350 

20 

18 

America’s Funniest Home Videos 

Howl Met Howl Met Howl Met Howl Met 

WGN News at Nine (N) (CC) |30Rock(CC) 

Scrubs (CC) 

Scrubs (CC) 


77 

291 

(6:20) “Beetlejuice” (1988) 

“Poltergeist” (1982, Horror) Craig T. Nelson. (CC) 

“Poltergeist II: The Other Side” (1986) 

(:35) “Poltergeist III” (1988) 

17 

201 

Quiz Show (CC) (:45) “Fast Five” (2011, Action) Vin Diesel, Paul Walker. ‘PG-13’ (CC) 

Real Time With Bill Maher (N) jReal Time With Bill Maher (CC) 

Eastbound 

18 

202 

“The Rite” (2011) Anthony Hopkins, Colin O’Donoghue. (CC) 

Life’s Too Short Life’s Too Short 

“Sucker Punch” (2011) Emily Browning, Abbie Cornish. (CC) 

Game, Thrones 

HBOS 

76 

203 

(6:20) “Gladiator” (2000) Russell Crowe. (CC) 

Game of Thrones (CC) 

“Due Date” (2010) Robert Downey Jr. 

(:40) “Going the Distance” 

MAX 

73 

260 

“The Usual Suspects” (1995) ‘R’ (CC) (:45) “Seven” (1995, Suspense) Brad Pitt, Morgan Freeman. ‘R’ (CC) 

Girl’s Guide 

Sex Games Co-Ed Confid. 

SHOW 

16 

221 

The Entitled ‘R’ “Scary Movie 2” (2001) Shawn Wayans. ‘R’ “Scream” (1996, Horror) Neve Campbell. ‘R’ 

Bryan Callen: Man Class The comic performs. 

STARZ 

78 

281 

(6:40) “The Smurfs” (2011) Hank Azaria. (:23) “Midnight in Paris” (2011) (CC) 

Magic City “Feeding Frenzy” (N) 

Magic City “Feeding Frenzy” 

Prince-Persia 

TMC 

74 

241 

(6:00) “Fair Game” (2010) “King of Paper Chasin’” (2009, Crime Drama) D.L.. ‘R’ (CC) 

(:10) “Martin Lawrence Live: Runteldat” (2002) ‘R’ (CC) 

A Get2Gether 


SATURDAY EVENING April 14,2012 


Cable Key: E-E’town/Hardin/Vine Grove/LaRue R/B-Radcliff/Fort Knox/Muldraugh/Brandenburg 



E 


X 


3 

WHAS 

11 

WLKY 

5 

WDRB 

12 

WBNA 

6 

KET2 

T 

WMYO 

16 

WBKO 

13 

KET 

~T_ 

WBKI 

7 

WKYT 

18 

A&E 

l2 

AMC 

53 

ANIM 

32 

BET 

42 

CMTV 

45 

CNBC 

23 

CNN 

24 

COMD 

58 

DISC 

33 

DISN 

99 

E!TV 

56 

ESPN 

35 

ESPN2 

36 

FAM 

17 

FOOD 

57 

FX 

27 

FXNWS 

29 

FXSO 

40 

FXSS 

41 

GSN 

179 

HALL 

77 

HGTV 

49 

HIST 

61 

LIFE 

34 

MSNBC 

185 

MTV 

43 

NICK 

39 

OWN 

71 

SPEED 

66 

SPIKE 

46 

SYFY 

48 

TBN 

55 

TBS 

15 

TLC 

50 

TNT 

65 

TOON 

60 

TRAV 

76 

TVL 

59 

USA 

28 

VH1 

44 

WGN-A 

14 


150 


301 

HBOP 

302 

HBOS 

303 

MAX 

320 

SHOW 

340 

STARZ 

281 

TMC 

350 


B 

7:00 

7:30 

1 8:00 

8:30 

9:00 

9:30 

1 10:00 I 

10:30 

1 11:00 

11:30 

1 12:00 1 

2 

Hardin County 

Branches of Government 

(;45) John Hardin Prom Fashion Show 

4-H Variety Show 

Hardin County Schools ExCel Award Ceremony | 

3 

Wave Country 
with Dawne Gee 

The 725 Show 

Escape Routes The teams head to At¬ 
lanta. (N) (CC) 

The Firm “Chapter Thirteen” Mitch and 
Ray confront Andrew. 

Law & Order; Special Victims Unit 

“Official Story” (CC) 

WAVE 3 News at 

11 (N) 

(:29) Saturday Night Live Host Josh 
Brolin; Gotye performs. (N) 

11 

Entertainment Tonight (N) (CC) 

Titanic (Premiere) The ship collides wit 

h an iceberg. (N) (CC) 

WHASIINewsll 

at11(N) 

(;35) Inside Edi¬ 
tion Weekend 

(12:05) Criminal 
Minds (CC) 

5 

Wheel of Fortune 

(CC) 

Jeopardy! (CC) 

CSI: NY Team members remember 
moments from 9/11. (CC) 

48 Hours Mystery (CC) 

48 Hours Mystery (CC) 

WLKY News at 
11:00PM (N) 

(:35) Sports Sat¬ 
urday 

The Closer “Sav¬ 
ing Face” 

12 

NASCAR Racing Sprint Cup: Samsung Mobile 500. From Texas Motor Speedway in Fort Worth, Texas. (N) (Live) (CC) 

The Big Bang 
Theory (CC) 

Two and a Half 

Men (CC) 

New Girl “Fancy- 
man (PL 2)” 

10 

Psych Lassiter is on the hook for mur¬ 
der. (CC) 

Psych Shawn and Gus help investi¬ 
gate arsons. (CC) 

Psych A kicker’s fool is discovered, 
(CC) 

Pj^ch “Truer Lies” Pathological liar. 

Chuck Salvo 

Glenn Arekion 

Paid Program 

14 

Classic Gospel Classic favorites. 

Iceberg That Sank the Titanic 

Summer Wine 

To Manor Born 

Being Served? 

Time Goes By 

jJubilee (CC) 

Nature (CC) 

16 

(6:00) “The Mexican” (2001, Comedy-Drama) Brad 

Pitt, Julia Roberts, James Gandolfini. 

Howl Met Your 
Mother (CC) 

Family Guy “E. 

Peterbus Unum” 

Family Guy “Pe- 
ter-assment” 

WDRB News at 
Ten (N) 

[:45)WDRB 

Sports 

Friends (CC) 

Friends (CC) 

New Adv./Old 
Christine 

13 

Live at Scott City 
Limits 

Wheel of Fortune 

(CC) 

Titanic (Premiere) The ship collides wit 

h an iceberg. (N) (CC) 

WBKO at 10 (N) 

Irom^ a train crash. (CC) ^ ^ ^ 

4 

Louisville Life 

Red Green Shw 

Kentucky Life Kent. Afield “Local Hero” (1983) Burt Lancaster, Peter Riegert. (CC) 

Austin City Limits (CC) 

Artists Den 

17 

Futurama Leela 
visits her home. 

Futurama “Less 
Than Hero” 

“View From the Top” (2003) Gwyneth Paltrow, Christina Applegate. A 
small-town woman trains to become a flight attendant. 

WBKf News at 10 

(N)(CC) 

(:35)The fnsider 

(N) (CC) 

(:05) Cheaters Her boyfriend and her 
trusted friend. (N) (CC) 

The Country 
Junction 

7 

Wheel of Fortune 

(CC) 

Jeopardy! (CC) 

CSI: NY Team members remember 
moments from 9/11. (CC) 

48 Hours Mystery (CC) 

48 Hours Mystery (CC) 

27 Newsfirst (N) 

(CC) 

Paint Zoom 

(12:05) Paid Pro¬ 
gram 

79 

storage Wars 

Storage Wars 

Storage Wars Storage Wars 

Parking Wars Parking Wars 

Driving School 

Driving School 

Driving School 

Driving School 

Storage Wars 

46 

(4:00) Lonesome Dove (CC) 

“The Bodyguard” (1992, Drama) Kevin Costner, Whitney Houston. (CC) 

“An Officer and a Gentleman” (1982) Richard Gere. (CC) | 

78 

Tanked; Unfiltered 

Must Love Cats (N) 

Tanked “Fish Gut of Water” Tanked: Unfiltered (N) Tanked “Fish Gut of Water” Tanked: Unfitrd 

80 

“Good Hair” (2009, Documentary) Premiere. (CC) 

“1 Think 1 Love My Wife” (2007) Chris Rock, Kerry Washington. (CC) “The Brothers” (2001) (CC) 

86 

“Young Guns H” (1990) Emilio Estevez, Kiefer Sutherland. 

Texas Women (N) (CC) 

Southern Nights “Jones Street” 

Texas Women (CC) 

Southern Nights 

27 

Money in Mot. Princess “Lee” 

Comic Books Unbound 

The Suze Orman Show (N) (CC) 

Princess (CC) Princess “Kim” 

Comic Books Unbound 

Suze Orman 

24 

CNN Newsroom (N) 

Kids on Race: The Hidden Pic 

Piers Morgan Tonight 

CNN Newsroom (N) 

Kids on Race: The Hidden Pic 

Piers Morgan 

50 

(6:30) “Joe Dirt” (2001) David Spade. (CC) “Wedding Crashers” (2005, Comedy) Owen Wilson, Vince Vaughn. (CC) 

“Stan Helsing” (2009) Steve Howey. Premiere. | 

62 

Sons of Guns (CC) Sons of Guns (CC) 

Jesse James; Outlaw Garage 

Sons of Guns (CC) 

Jesse James; Outlaw Garage 

Sons of Guns 

67 

“Radio Rebel” (2012) Debby Ryan. ‘NR’ (CC) (:45) Fish Hooks 

Jessie (CC) A.N.T. Farm 

Jessie (CC) 

Jessie (CC) 

Shake It Up! 

Shake It Up! 

Austin & Ally 

49 

The Voice “Live Eliminations” “1 Now Pronounce You Chuck and Larry” (2007) Adam Sandler, Kevin James. 

Khloe & Lamar 

The Soup 

Chelsea Lately 

Fashion Police 

31 

High School Basketball Jordan Brand Classic. From Charlotte, N.C. NBA Basketball Phoenix Suns at San Antonio Spurs. (N) (Live) 

SportsCenter (N) (Live) (CC) | 

32 

Drag Racing Auto Racing American Le Mans Series at Long Beach. From Long Beach, Calif. Baseball Tonight (N) (Live) (CC) 

SportsCenter 

|E;60 

Baseball Ton. | 

21 

“Aladdin” (1992) Voices of Scott Weinger, Robin Williams. 

“Beauty and the Beast” (1991) Voices of Paige G’Hara. 

“The Karate Kid” (1984) Ralph Macchio. | 

73 

Chopped “Class Acts” 

Hunger Hits Home (N) 

Chopped “Chewing the Caul Fat” Chopped “I’m Your Huckleberry” 

Iron Chef America 

Chopped 

71 

(5:00) “The Proposal” 

“Mr. & Mrs. Smith” (2005) Brad Pitt. A husband and wife are assassins for rival organizations. 

Archer 

Archer 

Unsupervised 

26 

FOX Report (N) 

Huckabee (N) Justice With Judge Jeanine (N) 

The Five 

Journal Editorial 

FOX News 

Justice Judge 

■ 

NBA Basketball Cleveland Cavaliers at Washington Wizards. (N Subject to Blackout) Cavaliers Live 

Cavaliers, Paint Boys in the Hall 

World PokerTour: Season 10 

NBA Basketball 

36 

Action Sports World Champion 

Basketball NIKE Hoop Summit. From Portland, Ore. 

Boxing Jason Davis vs. Frankie Gomez. 

Baseball 

72 

Dancing With the Stars (CC) 

Dancing With the Stars The winner is announced. (CC) 

Dancing With the Stars (CC) Dancing With the Stars The winner is announced. | 

48 

(6:00) “Elevator Girl” (2010) 

“Accidentally in Love” (2010) Jennie Garth, Ethan Erickson. (CC) 

“Wedding Daze” (2004, Comedy) John Larroquette. (CC) 

Golden Girls 

77 

House Hunters Hunters Int’l 

Candice Tells Dear Genevieve 

Color Splash interiors Inc (N) 

House Hunters Hunters int’l 

House Hunters Hunters Int’l 

Color Splash 

58 

American Pickers (CC) 

American Pickers (CC) 

American Pickers (CC) 

American Pickers (CC) 

(:01) American Pickers (CC) 

Amer. Pickers 

23 

(5:30) “Selena” (1997) (CC) 

“Gia” (1998) Angelina Jolie. A successful yet unhappy model takes drugs. (CC) The Client List (CC) Old Christine 

(12:01) Gia (CC) 

28 

Lockup: Raw “Time to Kill” 

Lockup; Colorado Lockup; Santa Rosa 

Lockup; Santa Rosa (N) Lockup; Colorado 

Lock.; Colorado 

88 

Fantasy Factory 

Fantasy Factory 

“Malibu’s Most Wanted” (2003) Jamie Kennedy, Taye Diggs. 

Movie 

America’s Best 

68 

Victorious (CC) 

Victorious (CC) 

iCarly (CC) How to Rock (N) 

iCarly (CC) Victorious (CC) 

That ’70s Show That ’70s Show 

Friends (CC) Friends (CC) 

Friends (CC) 

61 

Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (CC) 

Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s 

Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s (N) 

Beverly’s Full House (N) 

Welcome to Sweetie Pie’s 

Sweetie Pie’s 

90 

Test Drive 

On the Edge (N) 

Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff 

Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff 

Dumbest Stuff Dumbest Stuff 

NASCAR Victory Lane (N) 

FI Debrief 

85 

(4:30) Rocky II 

“Rocky ill” (1982, Drama) Sylvester Stallone, Mr. T. Premiere. (CC) 

“Rocky IV” (1985, Drama) Sylvester Stallone. Premiere. (CC) 

Interview-Vamp 

70 

(6:07) “Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade” (1989) (CC) 

“Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull” (2008) Harrison Ford. Premiere. (CC) 

Dream Mach. 

75 

Gaither; Precious Memories 

in Touch W/Charles Stanley 

Hour of Power (CC) 

Billy Graham Classic Crusades “The Greatest Story Ever Told” (1965) 

19 

Seinfeld (CC) jSeinfeld (CC) 

Big Bang Big Bang 

Big Bang Big Bang 

“Tyler Perry’s 1 Can Do Bad All By Myself” (2009, Comedy-Drama) Tyler Perry. 

57 

20/20 on TLC (CC) 

20/20 on TLC “Desperate Dads” 

20/20 on TLC (N) (CC) 

|20/20onTLC(N) (CC) 

20/20 on TLC “Desperate Dads” 20/20 on TLC 

42 

(5:45) “Transporter 3” (2008) 

“American Gangster” (2007, Crime Drama) Denzel Washington, Russell Crowe. (CC) 

“Mystic River” (2003) Sean Penn. (CC) 

66 

“Catch That Kid” (2004) Kristen Stewart, Corbin Bleu. Premiere. 

King of the Hill Childrens Hosp 

Loiter Squad Family Guy 

The Boondocks Aqua Teen 

Bleach (N) 

56 

Extreme Terror Rides Thrill rides. 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adventures (CC) 

Ghost Adv. 

54 

Home Improve. Home Improve. 

Home improve. Home improve. 

Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 

Love-Raymond Love-Raymond 

Love-Raymond King of Queens 

King of Queens 

41 

NCIS Murdered model. (CC) 

NCIS A survivalist is wanted. 

NCIS An agent is gunned down. 

NCIS “Hide and Seek” (CC) 

“Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007) George Clooney. | 

87 

Behind the Music “Akon” (CC) 

40 Greatest Pranks 3 Practical jokes. 

“Rock Star” (2001, Drama) Mark Wahiberg, Jennifer Aniston, Jason Flemyng. | 

18 

America’s Funniest Home Videos 

America’s Funniest Home Videos America’s Funniest Home Videos 

jWGN News at Nine (N) (CC) 

|30Rock(CC) iScrubs(CC) jScrubs (CC) | 

291 

(6:00) “Daylight” (1996) 

“GoodFellas” (1990, Crime Drama) Robert De Niro, Ray Liotta. (CC) “The Recruit” (2003) Al Pacino, Colin Farrell. (CC) | 

201 

(6:00) “Monte Carlo” ‘PG’ 

“Horrible Bosses” (2011) Jason Bateman. 

Mayweather 

(:15) Game of Thrones (CC) 

(:15) “Horrible Bosses” (2011) ‘R’ (CC) 

202 

(6:40) “X2: X-Men United” (2003) Patrick Stewart. (CC) 

Eastbound 

Enlightened 

True Blood (CC) 

Luck “Pilot” (CC) Real/Bill Maher 

203 

“Unknown” (2011) Liam Neeson, Diane Kruger. (CC) 

“Knight and Day” (2010) Tom Cruise, Cameron Diaz. (CC) 

“Blink” (1994) Madeleine Stowe. (CC) 

260 

50 First Dates (:45) “X-Men: First Class” (2011, Action) James McAvoy. ‘PG-13’ (CC) 

“Alien” (1979) Tom Skerritt. Premiere. ‘R’ (CC) Girl’s Guide 

221 

(5:55) “Phenomenon” ‘PG’ “Lara Croft Tomb Raider: The Cradle of Life” (2003) ‘PG-13’ 

“Piranha” (2010) Elisabeth Shue. ‘R’ (CC) The Borgias “The Borgia Bull” 

281 

“Just Go With It” (2011) Adam Sandler, Nicole Kidman. (CC) 

“Moneyball” (2011) Brad Pitt, Jonah Hill. Premiere. (CC) (:15) “Bad Teacher” (2011) Cameron Diaz. 

241 

(6:45) “In the Name of the King; A Dungeon Siege Tale” (2007) 

“Psychosis” (2010) Charisma Carpenter. ‘R’ (CC) (:35) “Tell Tale” (2009) Josh Lucas. ‘R’ (CC) Naked Fear ‘R’ 


SHOWTIME CINEMAS, Radcliff 351-1519 

“Wrath of the Titans” (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7 
and 9:30 p.m. 

“American Reunion” (R) 2, 4:30, 7 and 
9:30 p.m. 

“The Hunger Games” (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7 
and 9:30 p.m. 

“The Cabin in the Woods” (R) 2, 4:30, 7 
and 9:30 p.m. 

“The Three Stooges” (PG) 2, 4:30, 7 and 
9:30 p.m. 


MOVIE PALACE, Elizabethtown 769-1505 

“The Cabin in the Woods” (R) 2, 4:30, 7 
and 9:30 p.m. 

“Lockout” (PG-13) 2, 4:30, 7 and 9:30 p.m. 
“The Three Stooges” (PG) 1:30, 4, 6:30 
and 9 p.m. 

“Wrath of the Titans” (PG-13) 2 p.m. 

“Wrath of the Titans” 3-D (PG-13) 4:30, 7 
and 9:30 p.m. 

“Mirror Mirror” (PG) 1:30, 4, 6:30 and 9 

p.m. 

“The Hunger Games” (PG-13) 1:30, 2, 4:30, 


6:30, 7:30 and 9:30 p.m. 

“Dr. Seuss’ The Lorax” (PG) 1:30 and 4 

p.m. 

“Actor of Valor” (R) 4:30 and 9:30 p.m. 
“The Vow” (PG-13) 6:30 and 9 p.m. 

“21 Jump Street” (R) 2, 4:30, 7 and 9:30 

p.m. 

“John Carter” (PG-13) 2 and 7 p.m. 
“Titanic” 3-D (PG-13) 2 and 7 p.m. 
“American Reunion” (R) 1:30, 4, 6:30 and 
9 p.m. 


































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


B11 


Ziggy/Tom Wilson Family Circus/Jeff Keene 



Free Range/Bill Whitehead 



Marmaduke/Brad Anderson 



“He tried to sneak into the circus again.” 


Dilbert/Scott Adams 





DeFlocked/Jeff Corriveau 



Baby Blues/Jerry Scott and Rick Kirkman 



Zits/Jerry Scott and Jim Borgman 



Stone Soup/Jan Eliot 


HOROSCOPE FRIDAY, APRIL 13 HOROSCOPE Saturday, april 14 


HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Setbacks 
will force you to take a sec¬ 
ond look and make the nec¬ 
essary adjustments. Use 
your head and think matters 
through. You have what it 
takes to push your way to the 
top. Using muscle and per¬ 
suasive dialogue will lead to 
success and greater stability. 
Don’t Just take part; run the 
show. Your numbers are 6, 8, 
12, 23, 27, 33, 41. 

ARIES (March 21-April 19): 
Don’t waste time on difficult 
people. You must focus on 
the positive and strive to use 
your ideas to help you build a 
better life. Putting up with de¬ 
manding individuals will only 
get you down and lead 
nowhere. Change is needed. 
OO 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): 

Welcome any challenge that 
comes your way. It will be 
easy to impress everyone 
with the way you handle com¬ 
petition. Use your charm and 
communication skills to fer¬ 
ret out information that will 
allow you to win favors and 
approval. OOOOO 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): 
Troubles at home will spill 
over into your professional 
life. You have to separate 
your dealings before you end 
up handling both work and 
home poorly. Focus on what 
you can change and enlist 
people who can help you. 

ooo 

GANGER (June 21-July 22): 

Speak up about the way you 
feel, but don’t make major 
changes before you have 
been given the OK. A move 
that affects other people 
must be handled cautiously, 
or you may end up looking 
bad and causing financial 
and emotional stress. OOO 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): 
Don’t leap when one step at 
a time will bring you better re¬ 
sults. You will miss out on an 
opportunity if you are too ag¬ 
gressive or try to do every¬ 
thing on your own. Enlist the 


help of someone whose skills 
complement your own. OOO 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): 
Take a pass if money is an is¬ 
sue. Avoid lending, borrowing 
or misplacing money and pos¬ 
sessions. Don’t trust anyone 
to do a job that requires your 
undivided attention and skill. 
Take care of your own busi¬ 
ness and excel. OOOOO 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): 
Get away, do something that 
makes you feel good or 
spend time with someone 
you love. The peace of mind 
you gain from rest and relax¬ 
ation will help you make a de¬ 
cision regarding how you will 
proceed with future 
prospects. OOOOO 

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): 
Let your imagination wander. 
The direction you pursue and 
the plans you make will ex¬ 
cite someone who can help 
you achieve the success you 
desire. Lay down some 
ground rules before you get 
started. OO 

SAGIHARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 

21): Don’t cover up someone 
else’s mistake. You have to 
protect your personal and 
professional position. 
Someone is likely to misinter¬ 
pret you in order to make you 
look bad. Fight for your rights 
and avoid untrustworthy peo¬ 
ple. oooo 

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 

19): Size up your situation fi¬ 
nancially and domestically. 
You may have to downsize or 
make some changes at home 
in order to feel comfortable 
with your current position. 
Providing a space that can be 
used for extra income will pay 
off. OOO 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): 

Put love first. If you feel 
strongly about something or 
someone, speak up and 
make decisions that will help 
stabilize your situation. Being 
diverse and adaptable will 
work in your favor. Taking con¬ 
trol will command attention. 
OOO 


HAPPY BIRTHDAY: Let your 
mind wander and your imagi¬ 
nation flow. You will come up 
with unique solutions and in¬ 
teresting concepts that will 
contribute to a cause or a plan 
you want to pursue. Enjoy the 
people you encounter and the 
choices you create. There is 
plenty to gain if you use your 
talents and contribute. Your 
numbers are 8, 17, 21, 24, 
27, 38, 40. 

ARIES (March 21-Aprll 19): 

Join forces with people who 
share your concerns and inter¬ 
ests. There is power in num¬ 
bers, and along with accom¬ 
plishing something great, you 
will befriend someone who will 
make a difference in your fu¬ 
ture. Love is highlighted. 
OOOO 

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): 

Rethink your plans before you 
leap into something that has 
the potential to backfire. You 
need to request more informa¬ 
tion before you proceed. An 
emotional relationship will dis¬ 
appoint you if you expect too 
much in return. OO 

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A 
change will do you good. Sign 
up for a course or attend an 
enlightening tradeshow or con¬ 
ference. Get your mind moving 
in directions that can help you 
advance personally or profes¬ 
sionally. Trust your own judg¬ 
ment, not someone else’s. 
OOOOO 

GANGER (June 21-July 22): 

Size up your financial situation 
and look for a way to cut 
costs. Don’t be fooled by 
schemes that promise the im¬ 
possible. Look at realistic 
ways to bring in more income 
or lifestyle changes that can 
lower your overhead. OOO 

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): You’ll 
be pulled in different direc¬ 
tions. Listen to your heart and 
strive to achieve happiness. 
You cannot buy love. The best 
relationship is one built on 
trust, honesty and being able 
to enjoy one another’s compa¬ 
ny without it costing you. 
OOO 

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): 

Spending time getting to know 
your peers better or looking 


for ways to improve the quali¬ 
ty of your work will pay off. 
Don’t think you don’t have to 
strive for perfection because 
you have outdone the compe¬ 
tition. OOO 

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): 

Enjoy loved ones or travel to a 
destination that brings you joy. 
Self-improvement projects will 
pay off, and changes in the 
way you deal with partners will 
give you an edge. Take the ini¬ 
tiative. The sky’s the limit. 
OOOOO 

SGORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): 

Don’t take what others do or 
say to heart. Emotional ex¬ 
cess can ruin your chance to 
advance. Strive for greater 
freedom and success. 
Overdoing it emotionally, fi¬ 
nancially or physically will work 
against you. Personal change 
will be required. OO 

SAGIHARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 
21 ): Get involved in clubs, or¬ 
ganizations or community 
events that will help you build 
a bigger circle of friends and 
enhance your reputation. The 
people you meet now will be 
of help to you when you want 
to make personal changes in 
the future. OOOO 

GAPRIGORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 
19): Don’t limit your chance to 
follow your heart because 
someone is putting demands 
on you that are not your re¬ 
sponsibility. Step aside and 
make it clear that you will 
make suggestions but you will 
not take on what doesn’t be¬ 
long to you. OOO 

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): 
Spend time at home or with 
someone whose company you 
enjoy. A stronger bond or com¬ 
mitment will form if you share 
your plans for the future. A 
change in your lifestyle or sur¬ 
roundings will be an excellent 
pick-me-up. OOO 

PISGES (Feb. 19-March 20): 
A private conversation will 
help you get a better idea of 
where you stand with some¬ 
one you want to get to know 
better. Don’t be afraid to show 
your true colors or to ask for 
something you need to get 
ahead. OOO 


Peanuts/Charies Shuitz 



N0,TMI5 k)(LLNE\^a2lt)0R<,. 
SOMFOMEWILL PfeomVCOM£ 
ALONS,ANOUlireH($FeETOW ME' 






Beetle Bailey/Mort Walker 



Hi & Lois/Brian and Greg Walker 



Big Nate/Lincoln Peirce 


OKXY, GANG, let’s PLAY 

ball: and if the 

OTHER TEAM WANTS 
TO MAKE FUN OF OUR 
NAME, let 'EM! 



WE'LL SHOW 'EM THAT 
A CREAM PUFF MAY 
BE... UH... FLAKY ON 
THE OUTSIDE, BUT... 
IT'S-UM...HM-IT'S... 



TELL YOU , 

what, just 

TAKE THE 
FIELD. 



EPIC 
FAIL 
ON THE 
PRE- 
GAME 
PEP 
TALK, 
COACH. 



WHAT 90 
YOU MfANr 
im^! y 






m 

YOU 90. mowR 
GUY^” APF PLUNG 
TH^AIPWAVK’Wim 
THPlP-PePUNPANr 
MB0^A&E$’,PAI^N0 
MONDY TO W 




Frank & Ernest/Bob Thaves 


Hagar the Horrible/Dik Browne 




ir$ A 

INVeNTlON CAmi> 
"t.AN0uA<^t" IT W/Z.4. 
li^VOUUT IONIZE 
TH^ 

COIAiaUNICATIOnS 
INl>U$Tliy! 

■■ 


Marvin/Tom Armstrong 



Blondie/Dean Young and Denis Lebrun 


NOW THE ONLY 
TRICK IS GONNA 
NAVIGATING 
THOSE SIOEWALK 
CRACKS TO AVOlO 
THAT LAOOER/ , 



I GUESS WHEN YOU WORK FOR ] 
DITHERS AND IT'S FRIDAY THE 
THIRTEENTH, YOU DON'T TAKE y 
ANY CHANCES,/ j 



Jeff MacNelly’s Shoe/Chris Cassatt and Gary Brookins 
















































































































































































































































































































































































































B12 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


CLASSIFIEDS 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


ion Apartments 
IlXm For Rent 


LARGE 3 BEDROOM 
teahouse located at 136 
DarbryvflQd& Ct 2 lull 
baths. 1 car garage. 
1.3Q0 sq ft Pet stand- 
S7QS rfirit £ deposit 
Call {2701 266-0826 


NEWLY 
REMODELEDI! 
TOP TO BOTTOM 

Close to Ft, Knox. 
2 bedroom. 1 bath. 

W/D hookups. 
Approx, 650 sq ft. 
270-272-3706. 


MOW ^WAJLABLE - 
Greait E'toM) location. 1 6 
2 bedrdome. startirig at 
$475 all utilities plua ca- 
paid Please call {270-) 
312-6822: (270} 312-6882 


PINE CREST I APART¬ 
MENTS is accef^ing ap¬ 
plications fer and 
three iMdroom apart- 
manls. The rerit 6 sgclj- 
my deposit is based on 
the incoirTie for thoae who 
qualify we pay for gas 
heat, vyater. and tra&h 
pick up. Maintenance la 
provided. There ra a laun¬ 
dry room on the complex 
Extremely low income ap- 
plica r^ts are encouraged 
to apply, can apply for an 
apertment between 

S.ODam - 12inoon Monday, 
Tuesday, Thursday, and 
Friday at 504 Vi^ta Dr. 
E-lown, KV. Closed 
Wednesday. Call 

270-769-Sd4S for more in¬ 


formation. TTV # 
l-aOO-640-6056 



RADCLIFF #10 Srowns 
Ct. 1 bedroom. 1 bath, 
small dean vinyl cottage. 
Water included. Tenant 
pays gab/electnlc S275 a 
month. $250 deposit. 5 
mm. from Post Pel stand¬ 
ards ^^^nimum 1 year 
lease (270) 723 0267 


raex:liff 

113 Ash ct. 

2 bed. i.bbath 
garage 
Elmwood Dr. 
Newiy remodeled 
2 ted. 1 bath 
Executive Group 
Property Mgmt., Inc. 
(270) 352-1000 

laasirH3@ea-Dm com 
eyecutivegroupweb com 


RINEYVILLE 

Pointers Ct. 

2 bed, 15 bath 
WasherAiryer included 
Executive Group 
Property Mgmt. Jno. 
(270) 352-1000 
laaaing@ag-pm com 
exec Lti ivegroupweb. com 


SPACIOUS 2 BED¬ 
ROOM, 1 bath apartment, 
601 North Mulberry, newly 
painted, clean, quiet, pa¬ 
tio, carport, storage unit 
available, $505 month, 
trash pick up included. 
Call (270) 268-2854. 


SPECIAL NEW 2 BED¬ 
ROOM, 2 Bath Brick Apart¬ 
ments, City Schools, Full 
Size Washer & Dryer. Call 
270-982-9296 


SUPPORT YOUR 
LOCAL 
FARMERS 

NEW 1,243 BDRM 





Located in Elizabethtown. 


270-Z68-RENT (7368) 
EtdwiAp art manfe.ooin 
find us on faoebook 



Commercial 

RenVLease 


MEDIC/lL or STAND- 
ARD OFRCE epace 
120C+- ST utilrtie€ iiv 
eluded $75O/m0 (270) 

7666072 


OFFICE BUILDING, previ¬ 
ously a beauty salon. Zone 
3. Can be used for any 
business! 469 S. Mulberry 
St., $400 deposit, $400 
rent. Call (270) 862-9442. 


OFFICE SPACE 
FOR LEASE. 
Qne of th# he$t 
locgiions in town, 
beside WaLgreen'a 

and Taco Bell. 

120aeqft. 

270-737-1396 


SMALL WAREHOUSE for 

lease with office, $650 
monthly. Call (270) 
766-8263. 


Real Estate 
Rentals 


|3) 3 BEDROOM 
HOMES all (Hecoic S700 

monlh. plus i7M deposit. 
$ 1 50 non-ref undabie pet 
deposit tit you have 
pets)also 2 bedrooms in 
Efizabethtown. $550 pi us 
deposit $150 pet deposit 
270-2eS-0551 


•119 WOODS CT., 
ETOWN located in beau¬ 
tiful scenic Woods subef- 
vi$!Ckn or Hwy 251. 3 bed¬ 
rooms. large fiving room 
4 dining room area, new 
stainless ^teel appli* 
ances. tnclucf ng washer 4 
dryer, den. game room, 
large 2 car garage. Pet 
standards. 51,250 

rent/deposit Call {270) 
268-0625 


Real Estate 
Rentals 


'IVY POINTE SUBDIVI¬ 
SION Ellzabethtowi, 108 
Randell Casteel Dr . 3 
bedrooms. 2 bath. 1 ear 
garage. fenced yard. 
Shsd. $875 rantAJspdSit. 
Pet stendards Call (270) 
268-0825 


2 BDRM BRICK HOME; 1 

bath, kit appliances, hard¬ 
wood floors, full dry base¬ 
ment. $595 mo + dep. 307 
College St. Hodgenville. 
Call 270-358-3166._ 

2 BDRM 2 BATH, 1 Cai 
Garaga. Garden Home. 
121 McIntosh Dr, close tc 
John Hardin High Schooi. ir 
Appdevjood Subdiv i$3on 
Large Pnv ate Ratro. Vaultac 
ceiling. Extra Large Kilchen. 
Heat Pump. Ceiling Fans. 
Extra Storage Deposit anc 
Rer^ S875 (27Q) 3Q7-2353 

2 BEDROOM - 1 1/2 Datn 
townhouse, central air, 
washer dryer hookup, 
stove, refrigerator, dish¬ 
washer, in Radcliff. 3 BED¬ 
ROOM HOUSE 2 bath, for¬ 
mal dining room, 2 car gar¬ 
age, fenced yard. Pet 
standards. Call (270) 
877-7677. 

3 BEDROOM DUPLEX 

coming available, 1400 sq. 
ft. of living space. 15 min. 
from Leitchfield, 20 min. 
from E’town. $450/month 
Also: 3 bedroom house, 
$600/mo. Both are extra 
nice. Call 242-7590. 


3 BEDROOM 1 BATH - 

1 Car Garage. Hardmod 
Fldprs E’tdvwi Call 
27().352-0965 


4 BEDROOM House, 2 
% bath. 2 atorv. exoellenl 
subdivisbn. Open fidot 
plan, modern kitchen with 
Oak cabrneta hardwood, 
fireplace, recreation room, 
deck, central heat and air. 
2 car attached garage, 
--3.000 sqft quiet sUeet, 
503 Maryland Court. 
E'town $1300 rnonthly. 
C^l 270 506-2920. 


6 BEDROOM, 2 1/2 

BATH home, large fenced 
backyard patio, 1 car gar¬ 
age with workbench. $995 
rent. $995 depoeif CsJI 
{2701 317-1600 


82 LEACT Rmeyville 3 
bedroom. 2 baths, 
fireptace large yard 2 car 
garage, full un(ini&hed 
basement, pet standarefe. 
$975 rent $975 deposit 
270-266-0625 


887 AUSTIN DRIVE, 
RADCLIFF 3 bedroom 
1.5 bath Ranch atyia 
home 1 car qarage 
fenced m backyard. Pet 
standards $795 rant 4 
deposit Call (270) 
268-1)825 


1109 EMORY RD 3 bed¬ 
room 1 bath house, 
fenced back yard, very 
nice. $650 mo, $650 de¬ 
posit. Call 270-765-9899 
or 270-312-9062 


APfORUmLE NICE 
AREA Completely fiir- 
niahed Apartment 1 bed¬ 
room, kitchen, kving 
room, bath, carpet 
throughout. 2 miles from 
Post, utilities included. 
3395 month Muldraugh 
Manor Apts 
Call (270} 497-4547. 


CITY SCHOOLS SOO 
PARKAVE Willow Creek 
Subdivision. 4 bedrooms. 

2 1/2 baths, whirlpool tub. 

3 oar garage partially fin¬ 
ished basement. Ibfmal 
dirwng area. Pet stand¬ 
ards 31495 ranf/deposit 
1 year lease Call (270) 
268-0825 


CLOSE TO FT KNOX IN 
Guston. 2 story home, 
small yard, large deck, 3 
bedroom, 2 bath. $725 
mo. $700 deposit. Rent 
includes water and gar¬ 
bage service. 

Call 270-828-5575 


COUNTRY CHARM 
CITY Convenience. 2 
bedroom. 1 bath, in Elisa- 
beihicwfi. L$rge tot. at¬ 
tached garage. 3625 
monthly. 1 year Tease. 
Deposit references re¬ 
quired Pet restrictions 
(270) 769-9061.234^526 


ELIZABETHTOWN 

SOO-B Lincoln 
3 bed. 2 bath 
221 Alumni Df. 

3 bed. 2 bath 
Clay's Pointe 
Duplexes 
3 bed. 2 5 bathn 
garage. Lawn Care/ 
Cable Int^l 
Exe cutive Group 
Property Mgint,, Inc. 
(270) 234-1820 
leasirbg@pg-pm com 
exec LUivegroupweh com 


FARMNGDALE DU¬ 
PLEXES - 2 bedroom, 1 
b$fh dishweshsf w^$h$r 
^ dryer hookup storage 
shed, pnv ate drive, very 

clean, very guist. $525 a 
month & 3525 depos-it 
C^l (270) 268.2854 



FOR RENT 3 Bed 2 Bath 
on 1 acre New paint and 
flQonng throughout Lo¬ 
cated 10332 S. Dixie 
HWV. Sonora KY. $700 
monlh/S700 deposit. Pel 
Standards. Only sarious 
inquinos ^PPiy (270) 
763-7000. 


HOUSES, MOBILE 
HOMES & 
APARTMENTS 
AVAILABLE FOR RENT 
Located (n Fraherty(10 
minutes from Ft. Knox 
and ETovwi) Rent starts at 
$400 6 up 
Call {270) eea-9713 




Real Estate 
Rentals 


'k-k'k'k'k-it'k-kir-k 
LARGE OLDER HOME 
ON NORTH MAIN 
STREET NEAR DOWN¬ 
TOWN ELIZABETH¬ 
TOWN. THREE BED^ 
ROOMS, TWO BATHS, 
KITCHEN LIVING 

ROOM. WALK-IN 

CLOSET. UTlLfTV 

ROOM FENCED BACK 
YARD PET STAND^ 
ARDS $G00 PER MO. 
REFERENCES AMD 
DEPO"IT REQUIRED. 
CALL 270-765 2BB9 


RADCLIFF 
1771 Rodney 
3 ted, 1 bath 
167 Jackson St. 

3 bed. 2 bath 
VALLEY BTATIOfSI 

13042 Bessels Btvd. 
3 bed. 2 bath 
Executive Group 
Property Mgmt., Inc. 
Call (2701352-1000 

tea£ing@eg-pm ppm 
evec LH iv&grpupweh c orn 


RADCLIFF - 1790 Holly 
Ct 3 bedroom 1 1/2 
bath full unfinished 
ment. large yard, located 
in qiuiet area. Pet stand- 
arda $795 reut a d^pocif 
CaJI (270) 268.0625 

VERY NICE, newly remod- 
eled, 1400 h- sq. foot, 3 bed¬ 
room house, 2 full baths, 
large kitchen, utility room, 
central air/heat. Pet stand¬ 
ards. Lincoln Trial school 
district. E’town. $750 per 
month. $600 deposit. (270) 
234-0257, (270) 312-8142. 


VINE GROVE APART¬ 
MENT 3 bedrooru 1 
bath, centfai atr rancadin 
yard. deok. yard mairrte- 
hanca garbage in¬ 
cluded. $560 rent. $100 of 
of month rent. 

270-319-9770. 


WHITE MILLS AREA - 
Beaulifut country settrtg. 
3-4 bedrijom. 2 balh. psj- 
tiaiJy furnished home. 2 
story partially under¬ 
ground wth the option to 
rent addftional 4 acres. 
3750 montNy $759 da- 
posit Must haV'S refer¬ 
ences.. (270) 491-7132. 


All real estate advertising 
in this newspaper is 
subject to the Fair 
Housing Act which makes 
it illegal to advertise “any 
preference, limitation or 
discrimination based on 
race, color, religion, sex, 
handicap, familial status or 
national origin or an 
intention to make any 
such preference, limitation 
or discrimination.” 

Familial status includes 
children under the age of 
18 living with parents or 
legal custodians, pregnant 
women and people 
securing custody of 
children under 18. 

This newspaper will not 
knowingly accept any 
advertising for real estate 
which is in violation of the 
law. Our readers are 
hereby informed that all 
dwellings advertised in this 
newspaper are available on 
an equal opportunity basis. 
To complain of 
discrimination, call HUD 
toll-free at 1-800-669- 
9777. The toll free 
telephone number for the 
hearing impaired is 1-800- 



□ rrtMFtlHFY 


i Oft Fleal Estate 
luU Sales 


1.5 A:RES set up for 
mcbile home wifh ci^ 
vk^ter. efecfric and septic 
system. Located Off Dixie 
Hwi\ and U.S. Hvjy 60 
near Fort Knox. $27,900. 
Financing Available. Call 
351-4977, 800-33^-6331 
WWW, ken tu c k v-land. com 


4 ACRES SPLIT into 2 
parcels neat Vine Gfove. 
25 acre let hae lovely 3 
bedrdcm 14x70 mobile. 
1.5 acce budding lot has 
eKtra large 2 car garage, 
apacious front S back 
decks, pfivacy fencing, 
paved driveway, partially 
wwoted Quiat dead and 
road. $97.00] obo 
27t)-a77-5973. 


18 MULLIGAN CT. - Doe 

Valley, Meade Co. 2 story 
brick with basement, master 
suite on all three levels, 
huge covered porch & rear 
multi level deck. Quality 
home on wooded double 
golf course lot. Flexible 
Agent/Owner terms & home 
warranty. $299,000, $2,000 
per month lease option. Call 
(270) 735-3581. 


19.5 ACRES all woods, 
located in Breckinridge 
County near Custer 
$25,900. Rnancing Avail¬ 
able. Call 270-351-4977 
or 80Ch336-6331 
wvtfw. k&n tu e k y-land. cam 


For Sale%iv^ 



92 BRENTWOOD DRIVE 
“ OPEN HOUSE** 
Sunday, April 15th 
1pm-3pm. 

3 bedroom, 2 batrt Briok 
Ranch 1792 sq ft Builf jn 
2006. Full urVinished base¬ 
ment. GorgeovfS wood 
floors. Located in Brent¬ 
wood Suhdivi$icn off 0‘ 
New Glendale Road in 
E-tOMi. Asking $199,9001! 
More info at; 

h ttp ://www. fo r satob yowng 

rcomdBtmq/XK8U9 

Call (270)234-3434 


230 W. MAIN, VINE 
GROVE on Main St., in 
front of City Hall/next to the 
Gazebo. Complete Re¬ 
model of Early 20th Century 
home. Office and/or resi¬ 
dence, prime commercial 
lot w/city utilities. Built circa 
1906, this home combines 
period craftsmanship with 
all modern conveniences. 
Asking $145,000. Flexible 
Agent/Owner terms. Call 
(270) 735-3581. 


DOUBLE WIDE HOME 
and one acre of land off 
U.S, Hwy 60 rear Fort 
Knox, 3 bedrooms. 2 
baths, ci^ water, central 
heat and air. ail electric 
on or^6 acre of land, a 
nice and clean homewth 
fresh paint and new car¬ 
pet $64,900 Financing 
available for everyone 
with a reasonable down 
payn^ent, Call 351-4977 
or 800-336-6331 
WWW, kentu c kv-lar^d. com 


i Oft Fleal Estate 
lOU Sales 


11 ACRES Open Grass 
Land and Woods. 
Located weal of Eliza- 
b^thKwi off Hwy. 86 noar 
Custer, Ky. $24,900. R- 
nancing available for eve¬ 
ryone wth a reasonable 
down payment 351-4977 
or 800-336-6331 


WWW, ken tu ckv-land com 



COXS CREEK HWY 245 
A/ea 3 bedroom, 2 1/2 
bath. 2oar garagen fin¬ 
ished basement, all 
brick, large open IqL 
Asking $143,999. 

502-249-7 537 


LET KY LAND OF 
ETOWN Help You Find the 
Perfect Home or Lot. Many 
Listings to Choose from in 
Central Ky. We Will Buy or 
Trade for Your Property. 
Cash Paid. We Will Finance 
Anyone. Call Ky Land at 
737-2111 or 

1-800-737-6030. 


kEW HOUSING LOTS 
Bccldey Woods, New 
Gtendate FM., $31,900 
and up. Sante fe, olf 
hkvy 62 East, 1 sere & up. 
several wooded lots. 
Corflmercial lots in Har¬ 
din Co. Ageni Owned, 
The Land Store,. {270) 
737-0399 


WESTERN HARDIN CO 2 

bedroom. 1 bath. Home on 
5.22 acres, detached 2 car 
garage, new roof 2010, cen¬ 
tral air/heat + energy effi¬ 
cient wood stove, patios, 
pasture fenced, shed for an¬ 
imals, treehouse, asking 
$89,000 (207)862-5047 


Real Estate 
Wanted 


I BUY HOUSES 

Any Rice, Any Area, 
Any Condition 

ALL CASH 
OFFERS 

www.lBuvHouses 

HardinCounly com 

LOOKING to BUY 
a HOUSE? 
Wholesale, 
Lease Option, 
Seller Financing 
WWW. Hardin Co untv 

WholesaleHouses 

xom 


100 Lots& 

I vL Acreage 


4 woo DEO LOTS 

10 ACRES and up. 
Small cabin cn 11 aaes. 
Roamke area of Larue 
County. 

Okay for mobiles 
Agent Owned. 

The Land Store 
270-737-0399 


51 + ACRES 

Hardin County, 
some vjooda. 
large pqnd. 
great hunllng 

The Land Store 
270-737-0399 




A go Lots & 

I OC Acreage 


✓ THIS OUT! 

CALL KY LAND CO. 
OPE TOWN 

INVEST YOUR 
TAX MONEY 
IN LAND OR HOM E 

NqCr$<ltHa$^$$. 

Low - Lt3w Dov^ 
Payments. 

1 to400 acres in over 
10Q6 lOC8tiOn$ m Haidm. 

Mf^adtf^ Hart Larue 
Breck Nelson Grayson 
Allen Counties 
12-15 Homes on land 
available, mo vein within 
Z4 hour$. listing eveiiaHe 
or web at kv-landjcom 
279-737-2111. 


1QC Items 
I OU Wanted 



WANTED- RIDING 
MOWERS, Push 
mowers, gardcni lilters, 
notebook computers or 
any other gas-poworod 
equipment. Running or 
not, cheap or for givea- 
v&f. Must be complete. In 
Meade or Herein Coun¬ 
ties. Not a business. 
(270) 628.4479/877-6682 
yam‘8pm. 


300 


RARE Hospitality 
International, Inc., 
Mailing Address 1000 
Darden Center Drive, 
Orlando, FL 32837 
Hereby declares 
intention{s) to apply 
for a Limited 
Restanrant Alcoholic 
Beverage by the Drink 
and Special Snnday 
Retail Drink license(s) 
no later than April 18, 
2012. The bnsiness to 
be licensed will be 
located at 1614 N. 
Dixie Ave. (US Hwy 
31W) Elizabethtown, 
Kentncky 42701 
doing bnsiness as 
LongHorn Steakhonse 
#5437. The Principal 
Officers are as 
follows: President/ 
Treasnrer/Director, 
William R. White, III 
of 4035 Gilder Rose 
Place, Winter Park, FL 
32792; VP/Secretary, 
Joseph G. Kern of 112 
Kennison Dr., 
Orlando, FL 32801; 

Asst. Secretary, 
Colleen M. Hnnter of 
11920 Delfina Ln., 
Orlando, FL 32827. 
Any person, 
association, 
corporation, or body 
politic may protest 
the granting of the 
license(s) by writing 
the Dept, of Alcoholic 
Beverage Control, 
1003 Twilight Trail, 
Frankfort, Ky. 40601- 
8400, within 30 days 
of the date of this 
legal pnblication. 


1 nC ltem$ 

IJ J Wanted 


WANTED 

CEDAR 

LOGS 

502 - 252-9408 


300 

359-230, Masden Mini 
Warehouse, 1430 N. 
Logsdon Parkway, Radcliff, 
KY, will take sealed bids on 
5 units. Date of sale Is April 
17th, 10:00 A.M. Units can 
be viewed from 8:30 am 
-9:45 am. The seller re¬ 
serves the right to accept or 
reject any and all bids. 


CLASSIFIEDS 


300 Legate 300 Legate 


On April 1st, 2012, Bethel Fellowship, Inc. filed 
an application for the renewal of license of 
W246AT, serving Rogersville, Kentncky. W246AT 
operates at 97.1 Mhz at a power of 27 watts and 
rebroadcasts the signal of station WBFI, 91.5 MHz, 
McDaniels, Kentncky. The W246AT transmitter site 
is located at NL 37 degrees, 49 minntes, 20 
seconds: WL 85 degrees, 55 minntes, 42 seconds. 

Yon are invited to advise the Federal 
Commnnications Commission, Washington, DC 
20554, of facts relating to W246AT’s application for 
renewal or whether the station has operated in the 
pnblic interest. 


NOTICE FOR PUBLIC BIDS 

Wilson & Muir Bank & Trust Company holder of a 
security interest in the following items, will 
foreclose the rights of the debtor and offer for bid 
“as is” the following: 

2002 Mitsubishi Eclipse 
Serial #4A3AC44G52E028082 
For cash to the highest bidder at Wilson & Muir 
Bank & Trust Co., 250 W. Dixie Avenue, 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701. The vehicle will be 
available for inspection at Wilson & Muir Bank & 
Trust CO., 250 W. Dixie Avenue, Elizabethtown, 
Kentucky 42701. Wilson & Muir Bank reserves 
the right to bid. 


NOTICE OF ASSUMPTION OF DEPOSITS 
APPLICATION 

Notice is hereby given that application has 
been made to the Office of the Comptroller of the 
Currency (“OCC”), for approval of the 
assumption of liabilities of the following branch 
offices of First Federal Savings Bank of 
Elizabethtown, Inc., 2323 Ring Road, 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701 by First Savings Bank, 
F.S.B., 501 East Lewis & Clark Parkway, 

Clarksville, IN 47129: 2030 Highway 337 NW, 
Corydon, IN 47112; 8160 Beech Street NE, 
Elizabeth, IN 47117; 6500 State Highway 64, 
Georgetown, IN 47122; and 7340 Main Street, 
Lanesville, IN 47136. 

First Savings Bank, F.S.B. intends to continue 
to operate the acquired branch offices at their 
current locations with the exception of the 
acquired offices located at 2030 Highway 337 
NW, Corydon, IN 47112 and 6500 State Highway 
64, Georgetown, IN 47122. 

This notice is published pursuant to 12 U.S.C. 
§1828{c) of the Federal Deposit Insurance Act 
and 12 C.F.R. §163.22 of the regulations of the 
OCC. This notice will appear at approximately 
one-week intervals over a 30-day period 
beginning March 30, 2012 and ending May 2, 
2012. 

Anyone may submit written comments in 
connection with this application within 30 
calendar days of the initial publication date of 
this notice. The comments must be sent 
simultaneously to the Director for Licensing, 
Office of the Comptroller of the Currency, One 
Financial Place, Suite 2700, 440 South LaSalle 
Street, Chicago, IF 60605, and to the attention of 
Larry W. Myers, President and Chief Executive 
Officer, at First Savings Bank, F.S.B. to its 
address stated above. Written comments in 
opposition to the application should address the 
regulatory basis for denial of such application, 
and be supported by the information specified in 
12 C.F.R. §116.120(a). You may request a meeting 
on such application by including a written 
request for a meeting with your comments to the 
OCC. Your request should describe the nature of 
the issues or facts to be discussed and the 
reasons why written submissions are insufficient 
to adequately address the facts and issues. The 
OCC will grant a meeting request only when it 
finds that written submissions are insufficient to 
address the facts or issues raised, or otherwise 
determines that a meeting will benefit its 
decision making process. 

You may view the non-confidential portions 
of the application and the non-confidential 
portions of all comments filed with the OCC by 
contacting the OCC District Office listed above. 
This information is available for public viewing 
at the appropriate OCC District Office during 
regular business hours. If you have any 
questions concerning these procedures, contact 
the OCC District Office at (312) 360-8800. 



You haven’t filed an income 

tax report 

in how long? 


Dishonesty ^ 


never pays 

Governments lose billions of tax dollars 
every year from the income of 
individuals and businesses, as well as 
from unpaid taxes. Tax evasion can take 
many different forms: Tax shelters, 
undeclared work, excessive tax planning, 
omitting to submit an income tax 
return or to declare revenue earned 
from investments on the stock 
exchange, etc. 

Consequences for tax evaders 

Tax evasion has major consequences 
for those who are caught: It can result 
in a criminal conviction. If they are 
found guilty, they could receive a heavy 
fine, go to prison or end up with a 
criminal record with all the negative 
repercussions this situation can result 
in. 

Consequences for the general public 

This embezzlement of public funds also 
has consequences for society in general. 

Governments invest considerable sums of money in attempting to catch poor 
payers and tax evaders. This money, added to that lost every year due to tax evasion, 
amounts to a huge loss of revenue for governments. These losses directly affect 
their level of debt and influence their capacity to provide services and to finance 
programs in response to the needs of our society; social programs are often the first 
to be cut. Moreover, law-abiding individuals see their tax burden increased unfairly. 

Tax evaders, as much as society in general, are affected by tax evasion. So pay what 
you owe now before having to pay too much at a later date. 

Tax time is approaching fast so be sure to call 270.765.3862 to 
participate inThe News-Enterprise 2012 Tax Directory. 
You’re guaranteed to see a return on this investment! 


Accounting & Tax 


PROFESSIONALS 


• Income Taxes 

• Bookkeeping 

• Payrolls 

• Small Business Services 

Accepting New Clients 

Kiystal Williams 

Manager 

790 N. Dixie, Suite 400 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701 

(270) 982-5200 
Fax: 982-5202 

Monday-Friday 9am-6pm 
Saturday 9am-4pm 


SAVE *25 OFF 

INCOME TAX PREPARATION 

Offer valid with this coupon for individual 
income tax preparation through 04/15/12. 


1^ 


New clients only 


Hurley & Company CPA’s pllc 

Certified Public Accountants 
906 Woodland Drive, Suite 202 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
737-0858 


Accutax ^ 

Personal, Farm & 

Business, Taxes Payroll & Jf 
Bookkeeping Services 

mm cuem 


270 737-3956 

415 West Dixie, Elizabethtown, Ky 


Don’t wait in iong iines, 
8 preparers to serve you! 

Jerry Morphis - Owner 



Open M-F 9am-8pm 
Sat 9am-5pm 











































































































































































































































































The News-Enterprise 


C1 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, $01$ 


Homes 

YOUR NO. 1 SOURCE FOR REAL ESTATE AND AUCTIONS 


BUY OF THE WEEK 

72 COLYERS LANE, ELIZABETHTOWN: With almost 
3,200 finished square feet of living space and 
upgrades galore, this home features three bed¬ 
rooms, two full baths and two half baths. Over¬ 
sized bedrooms, large walk-in closets, and beau¬ 
tiful hardwood and tile througiout. Offered by 
Janes Realty Group, Inc. 

Page D6 



GARDENER^S TOOLBOX SERIES 

The Gardoner's Toolbox series continues 
April 23 with How to Grow Green Beans. 

Do you have bad memories of snapping 
string beans? Now there are lots of beans 
that don't need to be de-stringed. Have you 
heard of the Greasy Bean? Want to grow 
some? Explore the range of flavors, taste and col¬ 
ors of green beans. 

Classes are at the Hardin County Extension Service and begin 
at 6 p.m. Classes are $5 each, unless otherwise noted. Regis¬ 
tration and payment must be received one week prior to class. 





By KIM COOK 

For Thf^ Press 

Now that ajicither of “^Mad 

Men” is taking m back to the 1960s, 
lovers of Mid-century Moden:i style axe 
eyeing the sets for inspiration. 

Luckily, the popularity of the AMC 
show and the design style makes it easy 
to find ftimiture that the stage. 

The retro decor complements many 
of today's fiimishings - somethhig to re¬ 
member when you’re Lrying to eapiiire 
that '60s vibe, said Anthony Larosa, for¬ 
mer famituj e design department chair¬ 
man at Savannah College of Ait and 
Design. He cautions against going all-in 
on the vintage look, f^ven if you love it. 

"^People would have had a mix of ftir- 
nitiue in their homes,” he notes. “We get 
attaclied to tilings; we take them witli us 
when we mcjve and redecorate^" 

If you’re keen to incoiporate vintage, 
reproduction or newly reissued pieces 
from tlie ‘'Mad Men" era^ he suggests 
starting by looking at books and maga¬ 
zines from the period to see what real iH’ 
tenors looked like. 

That’s the approach the show's set 
production team took. 

UVING ROOM FURNITURL “Mad MenV 
set decorator, Claudette Diduf said she 
and Production Designer Dan Bishop 
are especially proud of tlie Manhattan 
apartment they created for newlywed 
characters Don Draper, an ad agency 
exeCi and his former secretary, Megan 
Calvet The split-level, open-plan living 
room was initially envisioned by show 
creator MatOiew Weiner, buL it was up to 
the production team to make the space 
cool, livable and able to accommodate 
shoot l eqim ements. 

‘'We have to be able to move walls, 
and set up camera platforms, so we 
couldn’t have actual furniture in certain 
places* The sofa, bench and wall unit are 
all built for the space and can be easily 
removed,” said Didul. 

Those looking to capture the look 
might like Gus Modem's tweedy, tai¬ 
lored Rochelle sofa, designed by David 
Rxisiadlo, which looks a lot like the 
Drapers'^ ($1,999 at www*wayfair,com)* 

Crate & Barrers Bek Air collection of 
coffee and side tables features walnut- 
stained tops on svelte, cast-aluminum tri¬ 
pod bases (side $399, coffee $549). 
Vinlage Danish modem pieces axe hai d 
to find and often pricey, but the Callsta 
teak sideboard, with its honey hue and 
lean profile, has llite look at a reasonable 
price ($1,499). 

Plorence Knoll’s Lounge series of 
geometric chains and sofas are classics* 
While the real thing will set voii back 
$4,000 or moi'e, you can find a similar 
one at www.roi econctpis con for $549. 
Niels Bendtsen'" a^ry glass topped, float- 
ing-diawer Honiewoik desk often sells 
for about $2,000, but Rove, a 
Vancouver, British Columbia-based 
tailer, offers it for $899. I’here’s a wide 
variety of “inspired by" pieces here. 

Herman Miller commissioned furni¬ 
ture designer Mark Goetz to design a 
sofa that would compiement the work of 
early Modem icons like Isamu Noguchi, 
George Nelson, and Chailes and Ray 
Eames* Tlie result is a tailored yet com¬ 
fortable leatlier seat wrapped in a clean 
curve of molded plywood veneer 
(www.aJlmodem.com, $3,949). 

Goetz said, '‘What makes the best 
Mid-century pieces is that they not only 
appeal to our persona! sense of style; 
they have a degree of visual and fime- 
tional tmth that makes people want to 
live with diem.” 

UCffTING^ In period TV sIlow's, light 
fixtures are essentia] in delivering the 
right look. On “Mad Men," they’re prac¬ 
tically characters in themselves. Tall, 
slender w'ood, coloifuJ opaque glass, 
gleaming metal - every set’s pei-sonality 
is punctuated by one or two statement 
lamps. 

Didul said the production team fa¬ 
vored vintage lampshades despite their 
fragility “ITie slubbed silk on them is just 
beautiful, and the light through them is 
really unique,” she said. 

Hers came from Los Angeles-area 
prop shops and vintage stores. 

You can find suiiilar versions, such as 





The WarK 
Goetz sofa 
for Herman 
Miller. 

Al^ Mod^^rG. AP 


Above and right, Don and Megan Draper's 
apartment from the current season's 
premiere of “Mad Men” arranged by set 
decorator Claudette Didul. 


MtCHACt YAR4SH/AMC. AP 


Lamp Work's walnut Tulip table arid 
fioors lamps (from $224.89 to $42739 at 
vrtvw way fair, com), and www.shades 
oflightcom's long-necked tuiquoise or 
orange ceramic table lamps ($129 each), 

Babette Holland's new capsule- 
shaped Gemini and Apollo lamp designs 
reference the '60s space missions. She's 
done some of the bases in solid hues, 
others in her signature stripes, but the 
palette is true to tl^e em — cranberry, 
gold, olive, sapphire {$4.50 each at 
www.ylighbngcom,) 

"WeVe been told that the colors re¬ 
mind people of those 1950s tumblers, so 
they immediately love them," she said, 
talking about the aluminum drinkw'are 
found in many homes at the time. “So 
much of the design of that period is time¬ 
less. We did OUT best to tap into that and 
bringit forward.” 

MT, ETC. Most of the modem art on 
"^Mad Men” isn’t actually vintage. Didul 
has found great pieces at rental galleries 
such as Ari Pic in Los nAngeles, and 
through artist friends. 

The dramabc dot graphic in the 
show’s ad agency office was created by 
the art depaitment imder Bishop's guid¬ 
ance. The piece echoes die work of 
English Op Art proponent Bridget Mey. 
Similar posters axe at www^zazzle.com, 
starting at about $ lOO, 

You can find lepioduced examples of 
one of that era i inoit prolific designers^ 
George Nelson, kno\™ for sunburst, as¬ 
terisk, polygon and ball wall clocks 
(Polygon clock, $590 at www.way 
fair.com) as well as the molded poly¬ 
propylene Swag desk chair ajid Marsh¬ 
mallow sofa {$499 and $3,299 respec- 
Lively at www.hivemTsdem XOm), 

MLETTE. Debra Kling, a New 


One of the show's most popular sets is 
tlie black, wliite and chrome sanctum of 
silver-haired company partner Roger 
Sterling, Didut said the brief from 
Weiner was “'Italian hospital,’ and 
there's actually a scene where copywiiter 
Freddy Rumsen calls it thatn” 

You can buy ffie Artemide Nesst> 
mushroom table lamp for $455 at www 
.allmodem.com. 

Hokku Designs' off-wliite Coacorde 
leatlier sofa wodd fit right in loo ($1,897 
at www.wayfaiucom)* 

Blu Dot's Chicago series of wood ve¬ 
neer and tubular .steel-box shelving looks 
similar to pieces found in Sterling 
Cooper Draper Piice's offices ($599 and 
up at www.wayfair.com). 

l^rosa said secondhand stores are a 
particularly good source for mid-century 
office fujnituxe. 

‘^Companies that sell used office fumi* 
ture often have the best prices for vintage 
stuff,” Larosa said. 


York-based color coimiltajit and decora¬ 
tor, sees Mid’century Modem style as 
grounded in neutral hues. *^Sunple lines, 
natural elements like stone and stained 
wood, and earth tones, punctuated by 
what I call ‘Diner Brights' - orange, ma¬ 
genta and turquoise,” she said. 

To slay true to the style, Kling advises 
mixing these hues into a background of 
neutrals, and keeping the floor plan 
open. 

Didul and her team have done that 
on the "^Mad Men” sets, incorporating 
colorful throw pillows, ashtrays and 
drinkware throughout the rooms. 

Etsy.com is a good source for vintage 
fabrics; mod Pucci pru^ts, modem florals 
and grmvy graphics are a fun way to 
add ‘60s sMe with textile accents, 

HOME FROM THE OFFICE The offices of 
'"Mad Man’s" advertising agency. 
Sterling Cooper Draper Price, are filled 
with cool tumitiire that would work ^ 
home, in living and work spaces alike. 


\t 































































C2 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


^ ABSOLUTE ESTATE AUCTION 


0540 IMRDWSSVflG ROOD. CWCtim, HV 

DinECTlOllS: From Dixie Highway in E'town, turn on South Mulberry St. (Hwy, 62 West), At 
Cecilia Junction turn right on Hwy. 86 towards Ceciiia. Stay on Hwy, 86 and turn right just past 
Howevalley School. 

REAL ESTATE: On Sat., April I4thp Lewis Auction Co. will be setling this splendid 2 bedroom 
home to the highest bidden The interior features a large living room, eat m kitchen with 
dishwasher and mtcrowave included 2 bedrooms 2 full baths and laundry room. Central heat 
and air. County water and septic system. Covered front porch, deck, and storage buitdmg with 
eleoinc. Come prepared to bid and buy lh s tine propeny at your pnce! 

PEtlSOIIAL PROPERTYr Bow front ohina cabinet 8 PC bedroom Beacon 31 day 
mantle clocks day bed. booksneJves couch match[r>g swive! rocker^ ooffee and end tables lift 
chair, TV and stand, lamps, table w/6 chairs, wash stand, GE SXS refrigerator GE smooth top 
stove, chest freezer, washer and dryer, elec, power chain file caoinet. glider/rocker. wheel 
chafr, walker, office chairs^ medicine cabinet, quilts. I mens, figurines h gJaesware, sewing 
machine, painted hand saw. pressure cooker, porch swing, and morel 

TERMS: REAL ESTATE ^ $5 000 down oay of auolion and baiarice wiih deed within 30 
days. 2Q12 property taxes prorated. Possession with deed. Potential buyers may conduct any 
inspections prior to auction. Waiver of inspections wiH be used at auction, PERSONAL 
PROPERTY - Cash or good check with photo lu T0% buyers premium will be added to the 
final bids on both fhe real estate and personal property to detecmfne the sale pnce 

“B^ERYTHmQ BELLS TO THE HIQHEST BtDDEB AND IN AS 15 CONDITION^* 
THE ESTATE OF ELEANOR GOODMAN - OWNER 
FOR MORE INFO OR TO TOUR THIS HOME PRIOR TO THE AUCTION 
CALL AUCTIONEER/BROKER KENNY LEWIS (270) 707-1630 



1225 HUNTMES Ukm 


DIRECTIONS; From Dixie Highway in Radctiff, turn on West Lincoln Trail 81 vd. Then turn 
right on Logsdon Parkway. Property wiJI be on the left on the corner of Logsdon Parkway 
and Hunters Lane. 

REAL ESTATE: On. Sat,. April 21st, Lewis Auction Co, will be selling this gorgeous 3 
bedroom. 2 bath home to the highest bidder. The main level features a large living room, 
kiichem dining a ea, 3 bedrooms ^nd full bath The baseme t is fi ished with a spacious 
family/game room bath bonus room and lau dry room Cent al heat and air City utilities 
and all city conveniences Extras Lnclude; Ceiling fans, cozy sun room, hardwood floors, 
whole house backup generator, security doors, patio-, fenced rear yard, storage btdg.. 2 oar 
garage, concrete drive and land caped corner lot Excellent location and move rn cond tion. 
Come prepared to bid and buy this great property al your pncei 

ANTIQUES AND FINE FURNISHINGS: OaK corner bench w/ labfe Wmosor style 
rocker, dining table w/ six cane back chairs lighted china cabinet side chairs w/ cane 
inserts, serving table, oak gfass front cabinet vintage trunks, foot stools oak dayhed, 
blonde Hollywood bedroom set* chest of drawers corner shelf, Penciled mghtstand Ou^en 
Anne coffee table, glass top coffee table, several occasional tables upholstered couches, 
recfiner, glass door bookcases vintage chitds chair crystaJ and brass lamp [e^d d glas-^ 
lamp, floor lamps. Hermie wall clack, area rugs, linens, metal bnakcases. stereo, framed 
Ray Harm print" framed German print" fr med needlework nice collection of framed 
pictu res and wall hang rnq s and many of her n Ice f u mishings. 

ANTIQUE GLASSWARE AND COLLECTIBLES; Sterling Silver candlesticks, 
collection of porceiain figurines end collectibles to include Royai Copenhagen Enesco, 
Napcoware, Lefton. Gobet. FriedeL and more. Westmoreland plate. Fenton vase. Bohemian 
crystal, German barware several sets of crystal glasses Fostona S/P India a diamond 
point, crackle glass decanter Wexford pitcher/glasses, Coke glasses Ausiran decanters^ 
Corello ware nests of pyrex bowfs German porcelain terns pink depression Pran is re 
China, Bavarian China Mikasa china. Great Amencan Revciutinn collector platus, 
Sheridan Revere and One da silver plate \\en\^ Hah o Solegin flatware in che I collection 
lighters, ofd measuring mstrumenl Daisy BB gun 760 Pumpmasler B6 gun old record 
albums, German record albums, old movie pro}ector collection of alarm clocks v ntage 
lurvchbox. vintage dolls, vintage games, religious figures, vintage Life magazines, vintage 
luggage, Christmas decorations, and much, much more. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY: Dmette set w iwo chairs utility carts, utility cabinets uiHity 
stoots, metal and pia'^lic shelving room divider two and four drawer iites metai wardrobe* 
storage cabinets TV cart corner computer desk office chair video cabinet handicap 
□hair, DP Air Ciser and more! Fngidaire refrigerator. WhirEpoof refngerator. Whirlpool HO 
dryer, GE HO wa her, Kenmore electric stove. Sears console air cleaner. Sears 
dehumidilier HP computer printer paper shredders microwave Whte sewing machine in 
cabinet, Oreck upnght. Eureka canister sweeper Panasonic and RCA TV s electric heaters 
and table fans, lots of small kitchen appliances adios and other small electron csl Roper 
push mower, tenilze spreade's weed eater, hedge trimmer, hose reel, step ladder, 
extension ladder, hand cart, hand and yard tocis^ flower pots, concrete statuary, outdoor 
furniture and many other items! 

TERMS: REAL ESTATE* $5,000 down day of auction and balance with deed within 30 
days. 2012 property taxes prorated. Possession with deed. Potential buyers may oandud 
lead base paint analysis or any in: pection- pnor to auction Waiver of lead base paint 
testing and any inspeclions will be used at auction. PERSONAL PROPERTY - Cash or 
good check with photo ID. 10% buyers premium will be added to the winning bids on both 
the real estate and personal property to determine the sale price, 

*^BVEBYTHiHG SELLS TO THE HIGHEST BiDDEB AND IN 45-15 CONDITION'' 
THE ESTATE OF PAUL E. SHULT2 
30HN SCOTT - ATTORNEY FOR THE ESTATE 
FOR MORE INFO OR TO TOUR THIS HOME PRIOR TO THE AUCTION 
CALL AUCTtONEElVDROKER KENNY LEWIS (276) 737-1836 



XELU LEWI3 
Aa^ 


STEVE ST£CX 
3174744 


wc* CRwrcifER 

App, 4JUellflflW 

m-sin 


CEO 

7165-7695 


EALL ANY OF OUR PROFESSIONAL AUCTIONEERS 
TO RESERVE YIHlIt AUCTION DATE. 



ABSOLUTE AUCTION 


SAfURDAVTAPRiLMiMOfliM^J 


tff 2 MBTRffiOf ffiAK 
EIQHOKINTIIIVK NY 



DIRECTIONS: From Dixie 

Highway in Etown. turn on South 
Mulberry St (Hwy 62 West) Then 
turn left on Bacon Creek Rd. (Next 
to Subway) Tnen right m Quail 
Meadows Subd. on Partridge Way, 

REAL ESTATE: On Sat., April SSfh. Lewis Auction Co. will be sailing this beautiful 2 
bedroom, ^ 1/2 bath horne lo the highest bidder The interior features a living room, eat-in 
kitchen w/dishwasher, dming room or oonus room, 2 bedrooms, 1 1/2 baths, and laundry 
closet. Central heat and air. Extras include: Ceiling fansr walk-in closet, 2 car garage* and 
large la d^caped lot Excellent locaiion Come prepared to bid and buy this fine property at 
your pneef 

VEHICLE: 1992 Chevy Silverado pickup truck. 120k miles. 

PERSONAL PROPERTY' Amercan drew cherry dining room table w/6 Chairs, Rolf top 
desk. Cherry china cabinet. 3 pc. Bedroom suite^ Cherry drop leaf table. Living room sofa^ 
Cherry entertairtment center Lamp tables corner cabinet framed prints, bookSt ven 
figurines, baskets, vacuum. Dinette table w/4 chairs, microwave cart. GE sxs refrigerator, 
GE electric stove. Small kitchen appliances enamel ware bar stool wlches and costume 
jewelry, stereo, steam cleaner. Nordic track 3000 treadmill, qolf clubs, Christmas 
decorations. Maytag washer and dryer. Linens. 2 Queen Anne chairs. Cherry sofa table. 
Giassfront bookshelf jewelry cabmei metal desk fie caorets, Hohner guitar, coat rack 
Lamps. Fans. Metal cabinet Ladder back cnair. Hand and yard tools. Step and ext. ladders. 
baUe y charger seed sower garden cart shop vac* kerosene neater tv landscape lights* 
patio furniture. Lenox china. Hall pottery, and glassware to include: pink depression, ruby 
red cobkiW blue and etched glass Misc office suppke" pressure washer chest oi drawe s 
binoculars, and much much morel 

TERMS; REAL ESTATE - $5 000 down day Of auction and balance with deed within 30 
days 2012 property taxes prorated Possession with deed Potential buyers may conduct 
any inspections pnor to auction. Waiver ot inspsdions will bo used at auction. PERSONAL 
PROPERTY Ca h yr good check with photo lu 10% buyer " premium will be added to 
the winning bids on botn the real estate and personal property to determine the sale price. 

BYBBYTHING SELLS TO THE HIGHEST BIDDEB AND IN AS IS CONDf HON" 
FOR MORE INFO OR TO TOUR THIS HOME PRIOR TO THE AUCTION 
CALL AUCTIONEER/BROKER KENNY LEWIS (270) 737-1836 


PUBLIC AUCTION 


I THURSDAY, MAY 3rd, 6 P.M. | 



1014 GSmSTEOff 0A. 

EuaaerHTomi, KY 



DIRECTIONS: From Dixie Highway in 
E town turn on North Mites Street (next 
to St. James Church). Then turn right on 
Winchester Blvd. (Winchester Park 
Subdivision), Then left un Manchester 
Drive. Then left on Gnnstead Drive. 

REAL ESTATE; On Thursday. May 3rd at 6 p.m.. Lewis Auction Co. will be selling this 
outstanding 5 bedroom 4 1/2 bath home at public auction The mam floor ot this lovely home 
features an entrance foyer, formal livi g room, kitchen with stainless steel appliances, work 
island, desk, and ceramic tiio tloor. Dining area off ot kitchen with bay window, fornral dining 
room, huge great room with wood fbers and gas log fireplace, spacious master bedroom 
with walk-in closet, private master bath with double vanities and Jacuzzi tub laundry room 
w/$ink, and 1/2 bath. 2 staircases leading upstairs which features 4 bedrooms and 2 full 
baths. The waihout basement rs finished with a spacious family room, game/bonus room, full 
bath, and storage area' Ce tral heat and air City utilitie" and all city co venienoe" Extra" 
include Ceiling fans window furnishings patio large deck, privacy fenced rear yard, storage 
garage concrete drive, 2 car garage w^openers and professionally landscaped lot Over 
5600 sq. ft of living space in tms quality throughout move-in condition home. Excellent 
location If you want a spacious home with all the amenities here it is Owner has moved and 
says sell. Don i miss this fantastic auction. 

TERMS: $20,000 down day of auction and balance with deed within 30 days. 2012 
property taxes prorated, Poi e'lon with depd Potent a I buyers may conduct any 
inspections prior to auction. Waiver of inspections will bo used at auction. 10% buyer's 
premium will be added to the final bid determine the sale price 

NOTE: Broker |iartici|»atian invited. 

Realtors shoutd register praspeettve buyers 48 hours prior to the auction. 

Call Lewis Auction Co. for details. 

OPEN HOUSE SUNDAY, APRIL 22ncf, 
_ 2-4 F.M, _ 

FQlt MORE INFO OR TO TOUR THIS HOME PRIOR TO THE AUCTION CAil. 
AUCTIONEEIVBROKER KENNY LEWIS (270) T37-1S39 



> ABi 

lOLU 

TEAI 

JCTII 

DN 

1 SATURDAY, HAY 5th, 

10 A.III 



T3fEAST 



CECttyLKY 

DIRECTIONS: From Dixie Highway 
fn E town, turn on South Mulberry St. 

(Hwy 62 West)^ Then turn ighi on Hwy 65 towards Ceciha. Property will be on tho left. 

REAL ESTATE; On Sat. May 5th. Lewis Auction Co. will be selling this splendid 3 bedroom 
home to the highest bidder The interior features a large living room with fireplace* kitchen 
with cooktop stove and separate over, dining area. 3 bedrooms, full bath and huge laundry 
room. Central heat and air County water and septic system. Extras include: Ceiling fans, 
hardwood floors, storm doors and windows. 1 attached and 1 detached carports, and 
beautiful landscaped lot with shade trees. Come prepared to bid and buy this fine property at 
your price! 

PERSONAL PROPERTY: Dining room table with 6 chairs, china cabinet, wooden 
bookshelf* coffee and drop leaf end tobies reclmer, beds chest of drawe s blanket chest 
sewing mach ne lamp tables chair", old cameras p "lures kneehole desk Whirlpool wash«r 
a dryer, -mall kitchen appliance' lots ot book' bear collection, vacuum exercise bike, metal 
iiholf* gla swa e bar tools parlor "ofa refrigerator, fireplace set. TV. stereo, daim table, old 
record albums Cub Cadet 2166 riding mower push mower and more! 

TERMS: REAL ESTATE • $5,000 down day of auction and balance with deed within 30 
days. 2012 property taxes prorated. Possession with deed. Potential buyers may conduct 
lead ba"e paint analy r or any nspectiun" p lor to the aucton Waiver of lead base paint 
testing or any mspections will be used at auction. PERSONAL PROPERTY * Cash or good 
check with photo ID 10% buyer s premn m will be added to the final bids on the real estate 
and personal property te determine the sale price. 

"EVEUVTHING sells to the highest BIDDER AND IN AS IS CONDITION" 


AUCTION IS SOLD IN 
COORERATtON WITH 



(270) 769-4663 
JONI MELLOAN, 
BROKER 


FOR MORE INFORMATION OR TO TOUR 
THE HOME PRIOR TO THE AUCTION, CALL 
LISTING REALTOR TONY SiNGER (270) 
234-3617 OR AUCTION EE R/BROKER 
KENNY LEWIS (270) 737*1839 


AUCTION TEAM; 


228 WESTDKIEAVE.,ELIZABETHTOWN,KY 
WEBSITE: www.lewisauction.com 


(270) 737-1839 


mF«ni 

KENNY LEWIS SHiy M 

PRINCIPAL AUCTIONEER q»u nnnv 
REAL ESTATE BROKER NIvft 



SIEVE SliCK 
MAHK&UUID 


RECK itOBY BOBBY LEWIS 


























































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


03 


nnn 


IN THE GARDEN 


Pest management tips for home vegetable gardens 


Now is a good time to 
start thinking about pest 
control for your home veg¬ 
etable garden. 

You can control pest 
problems, and perhaps 
prevent future difficulties, 
in your garden by doing 
some advance planning 
and following a few simple 
Integrated Pest 

Management practices. 
IPM promotes minimal 
pesticide use and empha¬ 
sizes use of all available 
pest control methods in¬ 
cluding cultural, mechani¬ 
cal and biological practices 
to prevent pest problems. 
Examples of the IPM ap¬ 
proach include using 
plants with natural disease 
tolerance or resistance, us¬ 
ing mulch to control weeds 
or row covers to prevent 
insect damage and using 
naturally occurring organ¬ 
isms such as lady beetles or 
praying mantis. 

Sanitation is another 
good IPM practice. Keep 
your garden well-groomed 
during active growth. 
Once you spot diseased 
plant material, remove it 
immediately to keep dis¬ 
eases from spreading. 
Also, promptly remove 
vegetable plants when 
they cease to be produc¬ 
tive. Although you should 
clear out unproductive 
vegetable plants from the 
garden area, you can add 
this plant material to a 
compost pile. Be sure to 
eliminate dead vegetable 
plants in late fall because 
these can serve as overwin¬ 
tering sites for insects and 
disease organisms in your 
garden. 

Before you buy seeds, 
plants or fertilizer, start 
your garden off right by 
answering these questions. 



AMY 

ALDENDERFER 

Have you taken a soil 
sample to determine if soil 
fertility and acidity/alka¬ 
linity will meet plants’ nu¬ 
trient requirements? 

Soil test results will let 
you know how much fertil¬ 
izer is required to provide 
plants with needed nutri¬ 
ents, while preventing ex¬ 
cessive use that contributes 
to groundwater, stream 
and lake pollution. Plants 
that are stressed or weak 
from insufficient nutrients 
or a pH that’s too low or 
too high are more suscepti¬ 
ble to disease and can’t 
readily tolerate insect dam¬ 
age. So, to give your plants 
a healthy start; soil test and 
apply the fertilizer and oth¬ 
er amendments according 
to the recommendations. 

If you live in Hardin 
County, soil tests are free. 

Do you plant your gar¬ 
den crops in the same spot 
year after year? 

Crop rotation can help 
prevent insect and disease 
build-ups. For example, 
potatoes, eggplant, toma¬ 
toes and peppers are sub¬ 
ject to the same insect and 
disease problems. There¬ 
fore, none of these crops 
should be planted in the 
same location more than 
every three consecutive 
years. After three years, 
switch to a different crop 
like beans or corn. If you 
have limited garden space, 
plant some vegetable 
plants in containers such as 



GARDENER’S TOOLBOX SERIES 

The Gardener’s Toolbox Series of 
“How to Grow” classes are hour-lonu 
discussions on growing condi¬ 
tions, nutrients and varieties 
on a particular group of food 
plants. 

■ Green Beans, April 23 

Do you have bad memories 
of snapping mounds of string 
beans? Now there are lots of beans that don’t 
need to be de-stringed. Have you heard of the 
Greasy Bean? Want to grow some? Explore the 
range of flavors, taste and colors of the humble 
green bean. 

Classes are at the Hardin County Extension 
Service and begin at 6 p.m. Classes are $5 each, 
unless otherwise noted. Registration and payment 
must be received one week prior to class. Call 765- 
4121 to register. 


large pots or half whisky 
barrels as a form of crop 
rotation. 

Make a diagram of your 
garden each year to avoid 
planting the same or close¬ 
ly related crops in exactly 
the same spot too frequent¬ 
ly- 

How do you select a 
vegetable plant variety? 

Whether you are plant¬ 
ing corn or tomatoes, 
check to see that the vari¬ 
ety you are planting has 
some disease resistance or 
tolerance. For example, se¬ 
lect tomato varieties la¬ 
beled WFN,’ as they’re re¬ 
sistant to Verticillium Wilt, 
Fusarium and root-knot 
nematodes. Whereas, a 
tomato variety leveled ‘V’ 
is only resistant to 
Verticillium Wilt. 

Do you buy the cheap¬ 
est transplants? 

When it comes to trans¬ 
plants, the best buys are 
the healthy ones. A 
healthy transplant was 
seeded at the right time, 
grown at the proper tem¬ 


perature, and received ad¬ 
equate light and moisture. 
It will have a compact 
growth structure with very 
small distances between 
leaves. The leaves will be 
dark green, large and up¬ 
right with no tendency to 
droop. Stems will be pen¬ 
cil thick and rigid. 

Avoid transplants that 
are beginning to produce 
flowers or fruit. It might 
seem that buying a plant 
with blooms or fruit will 
give you a head start in the 
garden. However, plants 
trying to produce fruit or 
flowers are slow to devel¬ 
op the good root systems 
needed to support later 
fruit production. Never 
buy plants that have in¬ 
sects present or are show¬ 
ing disease symptoms. 

Do you plan to use 
mulch in your garden? 

Mulch helps prevent 
weeds that will decrease 
your garden’s production 
by competing with the 
vegetable plants for water, 
nutrients and sunlight. In 


addition, some weeds har¬ 
bor diseases and insects 
that attack vegetable 
plants. Mulch also helps 
conserve soil moisture. 

Several types of com¬ 
mercial mulch are avail¬ 
able, or you can use news¬ 
papers for the mulch. Start 
with five to eight layers, 
adding more layers as the 
newspapers decompose to 
prevent weed growth 
throughout the growing 
season. Be sure to use only 
newspapers printed with 
soy-based ink and avoid 
using the glossy inserts. 

If you can’t determine 
what is causing a pest prob¬ 
lem in your garden, contact 
the Hardin County Coope¬ 
rative Extension Service at 
(270) 765-4121 or www.har 


dinext.org or Amy.Alden 
derfer@uky.edu or via 
Facebook. 

We can help you dis¬ 
cover what’s causing the 
problem, or send the plant 
or pest to one of the Uni¬ 
versity of Kentucky Plant 
Disease Diagnostic Tabs 
for identification. 

For more information, 
request our publication, 
“Home Vegetable Garden¬ 
ing in Kentucky” (ID-128). 
It is available from your lo¬ 
cal Extension Service of¬ 
fice, or from the UK Web 
site at www.ca.uky.edu/ 
agc/pubs/id/idl28/idl28. 
htm. 

Amy Aldenderfer is a Hardin 
County Extension agent for 
horticulture. Reach her at 
Amy.Aldenderfer@uky.edu 
or 765-4121. 



p 

^Uk 

Tl 

IN 

Ul 

M 

1 

Plus 

Realt 

Y 

■ LLC 

228 West 

Dixie Ave., 

Elizabethtown, KY 42701 

|W-*rs: 

270 

l■9l 

32 - 

55 

5 ! 

) www.platinumplusrealtyky.com 

cij 

MhlML itfUM 
D#MhTUiiPT 




KENNY 
LEWIS 
BROKER 
AUCTIONEER 
CELL: 766-8868 


BEULAH 
CATLETT 
REALTORS 
CELL: 766-8080 


GORDON 

HASH 

REALTORS 

AUCTIONEER 


MARTY 

FULKERSON 

REALTORS 

AUCTIONEER 


CELL: 763-2395 CELL: 735-2302 


BOBBY 
DOBSON 
REALTORS 
AUCTIONEER 
CELL: 735-2241 


RUSSELL 

JEFFRIES 

REALTORS 

769-0369 


KEN 
SIMS 
REALTORS 
CELL: 735-3069 


STEVE 
STECK 
REALTORS 
APR AUCTIONEER 
CELL: 317-6744 


DALE 

CAMPBELL 
REALTORS 
CELL: 401-1583 


BARRY 
BROWN 
REALTOR 
AUCTIONEER 
CELL: 268-8134 


KELLY 

SIPES 

SALES 

PERSON 


RICK 

ROBY 

REALTOR 

AUCTIONEER 


CELL: 304-6341 CELL: 765-9577 



1705 ORIOLE DRIVE 
$182,900 MLS#10014305 

• 3 Bedrooms *21/2 Baths 

• Maple Cabinets • Fireplace 

• Family Room 
• Formal LR & DR 
• Privacy Fence • Home Warranty 
Call Gordon 763-2395 


106 RANDALL CASTEEL CT. 
$123,000 MLS #10011057 

• 3 BR • 2 Full Baths 

• Open Floor Plan 

• Fenced Back Yard 

• 1,242 Sq. Ft. 

• Excellent Home 
Call Marty 735-2302 


702 ABBEYWOOD ROAD 
$230,500 MLS #10014099 

• 3 Bedrooms • Walk-In Closets 

• Fireplace w/Mantle • New Kitchen 
Mouser Cabinets • Tile Flooring 

• Loft Area Could Be 4th Bedroom 

• 2 Full Baths • Back Patio Is Fenced 

• Large 2 Car Garage • 2,040 Sq. Ft. 

All Brick Ranch • Agent Owned 
Call Beulah 766-8080 



110 N. MULBERRY STREET 
$198,000 MLS #10006531 

• Many Possibilities for Business/Offices 

• 4 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths* Next Door to 
Historical Museum and State Theater 

• 1 Block from City Hall 

• Short Distance to all Downtown Areas 

• Close to Court House • Pella Windows 

• Wheelchair Accessible 

Russell 769-8478 

F 


1256 AB WARD RD., UPTON 
$64,900 MLS #10014680 

• 2 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 

• 2 Car Carport 

• 5.5 Acres • Large Barn 

• Boundary Fencing 

Call Bobby 735-2241 


JIM BOB MATTINGLY ROAD 
$239,000 

• Approx. 56 Acres • Several Ponds 
• Automatic Waterers 
• Fenced And Cross Fenced 
• Large Stock Barn With Concrete 
Foundation • Additional Acreage And 
Home Can Be Purchase 
Call Rick 765-9577 


2457 JIM BOB MATTINGLY 
ROAD $109,000 

• Super Clean Doublewide In Rural 
Community • 4 Large Bedrooms • 2 Baths 

• Fireplace • Great View • Additional 
Acreage If Desired • Permanent 

Foundation • Large Concrete Patio 
• Fenced • Garden Spot 
Call Rick 765-9577 


202 MILLER ROAD 
$104,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 1.5 Baths 

• New Heat and Air 

• Completely Remodeled 

• New Windows & Fixtures 

• Move-In Condition 
Call Kenny 737-1839 



100 BLAKE DRIVE 
RINEYVILLE $189,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2.5 Baths 

• Great Room In Basement 

• Large 1.7 Acre Corner Lot 

• Large Above Ground Pool With Deck 
• Additional 2 Car Garage/Shop 
Call Barry 268-8134 




1234 PLEASANT HILL ROAD 
$134,500 

• 4 Acres • Country Setting 
• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Bath • Open Floor Plan 

• Detached 2 Car Garage 

• Easy Interstate Access 

Call Rick 765-9577 



308 HEYING LANE 
$409,900 

• 4 Bedrooms • 4 Full Baths 
• One Owner-Custom Built 
• 12.7 Acres 

• Finished Walkout Basement 
• Immaculate Condition 

Call Kenny 737-1839 


MOTIVATED SELLER 


2992 RINEYVILLE 
BIG SPRINGS ROAD $87,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Full Baths 

• Full Basement • 1 Acre Lot 

-Also selling .8 acre building lot next 
door for $19,900 

Call Kenny 737-1839 


909 SILKTREE CIRCLE 
$164,000 MLS 10013340 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Full Baths • Kitchen 
With Breakfast Bar • Large Master 
Bedroom • Covered Front Porch 
• Covered Back Porch 
• Immediate Possession 
Call Beulah 766-8080 


5408 SONORA ROAD 
HODGENVILLE, KY 
$339,900 

• Great 40 Acre Farm 
• Good Fencing/Nice Barn 
Nice Modular Home • 4 Bedrooms 
2 Baths* Approx.. 37 Acres Tillable 

Call Barry 268-8134 



2376 NEW GLENDALE ROAD 
$549,500 MLS #10011840 

• 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths 
• Cherry Cabinets • Hardwood & Tile 
• Granite & Cohan 
• Inground Pool • Barn 
• Walkout Basement • 8.57 Acres 
Call Gordon 763-2395 



155 MEADOWVIEW LANE 
$129,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Full Baths 

• Hardwood and Tile Floors 

• 1 Car Garage 

• Fenced Rear Yard 

• Move-In Condition 
Call Beulah 766-8080 


708 A & B PRINCETON DRIVE 
$199,500 MLS #10003875 
• Each Unit Offers: 

• 2 Bedrooms • 1.5 Baths • Garage 
• Basement • Currently Rented 

Call Marty 735-2302 


300 CATLETT ROAD 
$180,000 

• 4 Bedrooms • 3 Full Baths 

• 2 Car Garage • Sunroom 

• 2.25 Acre Lot 

3,200 Sq. Ft. Finished Living Space 

Caff Marty 735-2302 


1203 EMORY ROAD 
$99,500 MLS #10011613 

• 3 Bedrooms • 1 Full Bath 

• New Furnace & Central Air 

• All Appliances 

Some New Windows • 2 Car Detached 
Garage • Large Storage Building 

• Fenced Yard & Landscaped 

Caff Beulah 766-8080 


3037 RING ROAD 
$349,900 MLS#10010062 

• Commercial Building 
• Office Space/Warehouse 
• Unlimited Potential 

• Excellent Location • Very High Visibility| 
& Traffic Count 

Call Kenny 737-1839 



MILLERSTOWN ROAD 
$119,900 

• 26-1- Acres • Pond • 5 Open Acres 

• Balance Is Wooded • Fenced For Cattle 
• 2 Bedrooms 

• 1 Bath Farm House w/Basement 

• New Furnace • New Siding 
• 2 Septic Systems 

• Possible Partial Owner Financing 

Call Rick 765-9577 


466 - 470 DIXIE HWY. 
RADCLIFF 

$417,500 MLS #62431 

•Prime Location 

• Close to Wal-Mart *1.256 Acres 

Call Marty 735-2302 


2629 STONEMILL DRIVE 
$359,000 MLS #10003946 

* 4 Bedrooms * 3 Full Baths 
*2 Half Baths * Custom Built Home 
* Part. Finished Basement 
* 2 Car Garage 
* Numerous Extras 
Call Kenny 737-1839 


205 CROGHAN DRIVE 
$189,900 MLS #10013724 

* 3 Bedrooms *2 1/2 Baths 
* Oak Cabinets * White Appliances 
* Hardwood, Tile Carpet 
* Wrap Around Porch * Fenced Yard 
* Partially Finished Basement 
Call Gordon 763-2395 



120/124 WEST DIXIE 
$324,900 MLS #9998871 

* 3,000 Sq. Ft. Office Space 
*4 Apartments * Remodeled 
* $41,400 Yearly Income 

Call Marty 735-2302 \ 



975 WOODS HOLLOW DRIVE, 
RADCLIFF $184,900 

• 4 Bedrooms • 3.5 Baths • 2 Car Garage 

• Fenced Back Yard • Finished Basement 

• Rec Room • Wet Bar 

Call Barry 268-8134 




4685 S. WILSON ROAD 
$250,000 MLS #9997712 

• 4 Prime Acres • Great Development/ 
Commercial Property 
• Income Producer 

• Storage Bldgs • 9 Mobile Home Rentals | 

Call Barry 268-8134 



















































































































































C4 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


KOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


AUCTION 


auction AUCTION 


ABSOLUTE ESTATE AUCTION 


Saiutdmu* ^ril 14ih^ lOzOQAM 


3 BR Home w/Basement - Collectibles - Antiiiues 
Glasswaire - Fumiture - Household Items - Moweirs 

S4S Sm Mulberry S/., Elisabeth town 


Satm 




On the cnirner of N Mulber*) St (US and 
rrank St 7 in Elizabethtown icro from E!iZdbethtt>un Kigh 



across 
Erikson Chiropractic. 

A A HR ] B\ ranch 


style home with 


approximately 1,500 sq ft of Uvmg pate ba ement stuay/den area 
with potential for 4th BJC newer roof, some newer plumbing, 
natural gas heal, central air. and citv utilities. The lot is 
approximately .31 acre and features a gazebo as well as a storage 
shed- Located in the Ehsdbethtown City School d tnet the 
properly fronts both N. Mulberry bt. and Prank St. and provides easy 
accgstol^o^^s^uran^^nj^anv other conveniences. 

cehm he s nill sh pes and stses. blue 
carnival glass bowl w/4 goblets and pitcher- tea kettle, skillets, collector 
drinking glasses, old decanters, old books, hobnatl. m:lk glass, sterling 
silver pieces. Cabbage Patch dolls. 2 tackle boxes with lures, fishing rods 
and reels, stuffed animals lots of parcel in Hgurines all hapes and si^es, 
quills, bed spreads, oil lamps larpe and small, ciindy dishes, crock, wood 
carvings, old jar.s, Dietz kerosene lamp, cast iron kettle, owl decor, pitcher 
& bowl, cake plate w/cover wooden chairs, pitcher L lup et and many, 
many other mis cellaneous items too umerous to list i id vidua My. 

Pull bed w/minored dresser and chest of drawers, 
Jungnan^vaTrcJock. lots of framed pictures, sola w/matchmg easy chair, 
coffee idbic floor clock c d table record player m cm sole cabinet, lots 
of wall decor ever bluoming flowers and plants, candle stick holders, 
wooden desk. 2 bar stools, wooden tramc love scat and chair, g!a.ss top 
end tat le with deer rative in lav ^ end table lamps, mantle clock, wooden 
frame mirrors, small chaiuielier. entertain me nt center, rnagiiiiine rack, 
easy chair fireplace accessories wooden frame sofa w/loveseat and coffee 
tabte/footstoot and matching rocker full bed w/wardrohe and mirrored 
dresser and chest of drawers corner display, electric organ, area rugs, 
woven eat chairs ofa table with fold over tup plant tantl luts of lamps 
all shapes and sizes, drop leaf table wvdrawer. Zenith iV. curio tables, 
antiqut "hma cabinet antique di plav cabinet Sha p m crowave, GE side 
by side refrigerator wood stove and manv other items. 

tl.3llfl3. ^|rj|fc Honda Z50 mmi dirtbike, Lowes 
12 hp 42” riding mower. Lowes 22” 5.25 hp pushmower, hand tools, chain 
saws, rakes sh'\eh, axe pon hole diggers, concrete lawn ornamenL^, 7‘ 

M n ion ]l dder and other items. 

A 1U% buyers premium wilt be added to all winning bids to 
; the final .sale price. On real e.state. $5,00(1 will be due on the 
day of sale with the balance due within 30 days. Inspections of any type 
must be pertormed prior to the sale date or the right is waived. Property 
is sold as is with no guarantees by the seller nor Hodges Auction 
Compa“\ On personal property cash or good check for the full purchase 
amount is due on the day of ale 

f jifiAtv o/ Church ^ J^hm 






ESTATE AUCTION 


Saturday, April 21 Si, 10; 


01 3 BR, 2 BA Custom Home w/Basement 

Buick - Fuimiture - Collectibles - Household Items 

JOI Union Circle, Hadgertvilte 



CEHUrnaFrom the sqtiare m Hodgenville take Hwy-21CI towards Elown. Travel 
about 1 mile and turn lett on PreMdential BKd The properly will be on the left at the 
cor ne^f Pres id^t ial Blvd and Union Circle, 

Q22l2BEEi®^ beauttftlly maintained anth style brick home featuring solid wrod 
door^ncTfnm throughout, an eat-in kitchen with built in panlrv formal dm ig roc m with 
chair rail, foy^i w/ceran ic tile and uat clo el Urge living room will enun molding, 
spacious master bedroom with bay windovy master bath with walk n do el, Imei clo eL 
jetted garden tub and epirale shower, laundrv oom with doset and cab nets 2 l ir 
attached garage ^ and a full unfinished basement ihis tine home i ituated cm a well 
manicured and landscaped lot ju t outside of h tone liodgenville The vacant lot behind 
the home th at fronts PreMdenlial Blvd will be ottered separately. 

2 007 Buick LaCrosse CXL 3 7L Vh with 3^ fiOO miles WTnle with g av inte lor. 
jatl iLlHtTnifcm etal patio set with swing-h chairs table 2 end tables umb ella. Kitchen 
Aid refrigerator, curio table* desk Kelvinalor retrigento E tate wc her Estate dryer, 
Kenmore side by side refrigerator, oak kitchen table w/4 chair 2 to 1 RCA T\ TV tand, 
wood dining table w/6 chalr^^ and leaf, marble top 2 drawer chest on casters, antique how 
front cabinet, china cabinet hutch on cabinet ecretary Howard M Her floor cluck* 'sony 
TV. TV cabinet, drop leaf end table with matching end tables 2 rechrer' table lamps wall 
mirrors, 4 poster queen bed w/n ght^tands and mirrored dre ser and chest oj drawers, 
spindle leg TV stand. RCA T\ quilt rack small ewmg table took tedar trunk Kiiwaid 
Cherry Mountan III queen bed w/mirrored dre ser and chest of drawer padded low rocker, 
floor lan’ip, card table, book heit bed with dresser nU che t telephcme lamp maga ine 
rack. Cone With the Wind Lamp, Hobnail lamp Don En or Butter Time ^ framed prnl* 
uni c he st , aijd other ite ms. 

[jTijiyiiMifIfft Charbroil Master Plai i propane grill, detur. t:\e Uates, 
Bavarian bowl, Fostoria glass, pink depression cake di h CArmval gla C e tnront patter 
Norilake china et Sheffield ilve^ plated spoim step ladders otflce (.hiiis now hovel, 
hose reel gardering tool jumper Ckble Igloo cooler flatware set Mason jar nops, 
knife set* baking w re cuokWire bred maker ted tea mcker Foreman Crill board games, 
bunny figurines paper hredder ever blooming flowers c stu ne jewelrv wood d ugh 
bowl, oil lamp, quilt quilt tors ewmg upplies yarn buttons, wall decorf walker, 
miscellaneous picture , ga deep trye water he es computer monitor* step ladders, 
Pfaltzgraff dining set grlf tlubs p emc ba keU ba kets, iuil cases, hand tools, Christmas 
decor, books, reto ds CrosM ’tan 750 pellet gun quad cane, camera, RCA camcorder, 
PhillipsjW EM CD. afgans. and other items. 

til luKTI A 10^ buyer' premium will be added to all winning bids to determine the final 
sale price. On real estate $5 OOfl will he due m the day cf sale w th the balance due within 
30 days- Inspections of any type must be performed prior io the sale dale or the right ts 
waived. Property is sold as is with no guarantees by the seller nor Hodges Auction 
Company. On personal property, cash or good check for the full purcha e am it t is due on 
the day of sale. 

The Estate of Bernice I^orris - Dale Morris, Attorney 


PUBLIC AUCTION 


Satut^y, April 21st, 12 




2 BR* 1 BA Home - Great Rental or Starter Home 

S2S Kir/IrpaMch Atfe*, ffodyerteiUe 


{ ■X'i-Tl Prom the square 
TTiilp x-ind rnm U H on Lhurchill thci 


in liodgenviile travel south on Lincoln Blvd about V2 

_ Churchill then right on Kirkpatrick. The home will be on the right. 

A 2 BH 1 BA home with approximately 750 sq ft, eat-in kitchen* electric 
Tange.“aTum:hum exterior ga^ heat, city sew^er- and city water- The home is conveniently 
located just minutes from Lincoln Square and would provide an excellent investment 
opportuni h o tarter home 

(2229^ buvtrs premium will be added to all winning bids to determine the final 
sal^Snce On real tstate $5,0C0 will be due on the day of sale with the balance due 
withm 30 days. Inspections of any ty'pe must be performed prior to the sale date or the 
right r waived Properh is sold as is with no guarantees by the seller nor Hodges Auction 
Company. 

Contact Auctioneer Tint Thompson for in formatiom 


UPCOMING 

AUCTIONS 


FRIENDS OF THE NRA BENEFIT 


rll20th, TtOORM. 


Guns - Collectibles - Gear Official Merchandise 

f*TttchQrtt Vommunitp CcNfrr. SiisaheftitKtwn 


ABSOLUTE ESTATE AUCTION 


Saturday 9 -i4^riZ 28th, 10^00 AM* 


3 BR, 1.5 BA Horae on 6 Aores Attiilu CnuiphKiixt'illc 



PUBLIC LAND AUCTION 


Saturda^^ 5th^ lOtOO AM, 


24.5 Acres in 3 IVacts CeciliO 



PUBLIC LAND AUCTION 


Saturday^ May Sih^ 1 




4.1 Acre Tract - Mostly Open 

Ofd Pierce Mlii, Marditt Spriaga 


PUBLIC AUCTION 

A f f mrd liAiTi 

Historic 3 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath Home 

196 E, Poptar Street, EliraheihtQwn 


FOOD BANK BENEFIT AUCTION 


Saturday, May 19thp 10 


Furniture - Electronics - Crafts - Household Items 

WJCR ‘ Raider HoUmc Md., Lpton 


^Oi 
M 

iHt ■!:-^uxLttitt'i.t 


wjcr: 


ABSOLUTE ESTATE AUCTION 


Saturday, May 26tht lOt&O AM. 


3 Bedroom, 1.5 Bath Brick Home - Furniture • Household Items 

833 h: fJm Saad, Maddiff 


ABSOLUTE ESTATE AUCTION 


Saturday f June 2nd, lOtOO AM. 


3 Bedroom, 1 Bath Brick Home with Basement 
Furniture - Antiques - Collectibles 
1979S ttardinshtirg Ifogrf* Cgcfffa 


PUBLIC AUCTION 


Saturday, June Otht lOsOO AM. 


4 Bedroom, 2.5 Bath Brick Home • 2 Bedroom, 1 Bath Fiser Upper 
110 Acres in Tracts • Vehicles * Famitnre - Tools - Household Items 
^0 550 Luttret Klifpe JFom/. Easth'tti^ 


T 5 ^^^niversary 

WD$E5 


Auction Comparty, Inc. 





g 






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M 


A 





m 

'f f 


Since 1937 


”7A( 7f4* 

319 5. Mutbin}^ SL* Elizabethtown* KY 42701 



Cerdelt Philip Mark Tim 

Tabb Tahb Haynvs Alvxjmder ThampiU^iin Thurman 

Auctioneer AncLlunHr AucIlnnEET AuclioDctr Anellimcer AucUoneer 

Draker Broker Broker 


Lany 

Clark 

App. 

Anctliiineci 


Bruce Amy Jarrell Jason 

Reetifs Haynes Gray Jarotfcr 

Ap?, App. Apf. App. 

Anctioneer Auctlonm Auctloitrcr 


Abclloricer 


270<765*4308 www.hodgesauction.com 


AUCTION AUCTION ' 


AUCTION <m> AUCTION 







































































































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


05 


nnn! 


ED THE PLUMBER 


Matching bath fixture finishes should be simple 


Q; Thanks for all the free 
plumbing advice you have given 
me over the years! I’m installing 
new faucets and towel bars in my 
master bathroom. The finish on 
the faucets and accessories will 
be brushed nickel. But my tub 
mixing valve, drain, showerhead 
and toilet handle are all chrome. 
How do I address all that, and 
does this mean changing the en¬ 
tire mixing valve in the wall as 
well? I don’t want to make this a 
big job. — Sam, Nevada. 

A; Brushed nickel is a great 
choice. It has a warm appear¬ 
ance, and because the finish is 
‘‘brushed,” the faucets and towel 
bars will have a soft matte finish 
that can help hide water spots 
and fingerprints. 

Brushed-nickel finishes for 
plumbing fixtures have been 
around for decades, but the ear¬ 
lier versions did not hold up as 
well as chrome. So, nickel finish¬ 
es went away for a while, but 
with new durable plating tech- 



ED DEL 
GRANDE 


nology available, brushed nickel 
is coming back strong. 

Now, let’s get back to your 
question. First, the toilet handle, 
showerhead, shower arm and 
tub-drain trip lever should not be 
a big issue to replace, since they 
are normally easy-to-install 
plumbing accessories. The mix¬ 
ing valve may be a little tougher, 
depending on the make, model, 
and age of the valve. 

Contact the manufacturer and 
see if it has a brushed-nickel-fin- 
ish trim kit available for your 
mixing valve. If so, you should 
be able to replace just the ex¬ 
posed trim, and keep your pres¬ 
ent valve body in the wall. If not, 
you may have to change the en¬ 



Brushed nickel finishes for plumbing fixtures have been around for decades, but the earlier versions did not hold 
up as well as chrome. 


tire mixing valve, and that can 
end up costing you a lot. 


Visit eddelgrande.com or write 
eadelg@cs.com. Always consult local 


contractors and codes. Distributed 
by Scripps Howard News Service. 


infmr 


DWIGHT BARNETT 


Replacing both springs keeps garage door balanced 


Q; I’m going to replace a 
broken spring for our 
garage door. The home- 
store salesman said I need¬ 
ed to replace both springs 
even though only one is 
broken. Is this true? 

A: A majority of homes 
use overhead doors for the 
garage entry. In a few older 
homes I have found doors 
that were swinging, folding 
or sliding, but the overhead 
doors which use a track- 
and-roller system are the 
most commonly installed 
door today. 

Overhead doors are 
heavy, whether they are 
made of decorative wood 
panels or insulated metal. 
The average 16-foot-wide- 
by-7-foot-high door weighs 
around 280 pounds. The 
springs are an assist system 
that counterbalance the 
weight of the door with the 
energy stored in the springs 
to allow the user to open 
the door with very little ef¬ 
fort. 

There are usually two 



DWIGHT 

BARNETT 


springs for the average resi¬ 
dential garage door and, 
depending on the size and 
weight of the door, there 
are two different types of 
springs to counter the 
weight of the door. 

Torsion springs are 
found on a long metal bar 
above the door, and as the 
door is closed the springs 
wind tightly, storing energy 
in the metal coil. As the 
door is opened, the springs 
unwind, releasing enough 
energy to aid in lifting the 
heavy door. 

Lighter-weight and 
smaller doors use tension 
springs, which are located 
on either side of the door’s 
overhead track. When the 
door is closed, the tension 
springs are stretched, stor¬ 
ing energy in the metal 
coils. As the door opens. 


the springs relax, releasing 
the stored energy to help 
lift the door. 

When replacing tension 
springs, it is recommended 
that both springs be re¬ 
placed and matched be¬ 
cause the older unbroken 
spring will have lost some 
of its tension from years of 
use. Replacing both springs 
helps to balance the door 
so that it opens smoothly 
with equal force being ap¬ 
plied to each side of the 
door. 

Once installed, tension 
springs can be adjusted. 
Measure the length of each 
cable, and secure them to 
the door’s track while the 
door is open and the 
springs are relaxed. 

It is important to install a 
second cable inside the 
spring in case the spring 
would come loose or break. 

A word of caution for 
the DIYer: Torsion springs 
should be replaced by a 
skilled installer. Torsion 
springs have so much 


stored energy that they can 
cause serious injury or even 
death if mishandled. I have 
seen where a torsion 
spring’s mounting system 
had broken, releasing both 
of the torsion springs, 
which put a large hole in 
the garage ceiling about 4 
feet above the door. 
Luckily, no one was nearby 




when the system broke. 
You can find the average 
weight of your garage door 
by visiting: /www.garage- 
doorpartsllc.com/weight- 
calculator.html. 

With this information, if 
you decide to do the re¬ 
pairs yourself, take the old 
or broken spring to your 
home store or garage-door 


dealer for help in finding 
the right parts. 

Dwight Barnett is a certified 
master inspector with the 
American Society of Home 
Inspectors. Write to him with 
home improvement questions at 
C. Dwight Barnett, Evansville 
Courier & Press, P.O. Box 268, 
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Professional Realtors® 


319 SOUTH MULBERRY STREET, 
ELIZABETHTUWN, KY. 

270 - 765-3999 270 - 351-3999 


Go to G 0 LDSIIIHE 1 LTVKV.I) 0 III to view our entire inventory of listings 


MLS^ 



76 TIFFANY AVEXUE 
$124,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 
• 2 Car Garage • Corner Lot 
• Walk-In Closets In All Rooms 
• 1,479 Sq. Ft. 

Call Tim Thompson 766-7688 





2051 RINEYVILLE BIG 
SPRINGS ROAD, RINEYVILLE 
$154,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 

• Full Walkout Basement 

• 2.5 Acre Lot 

• Covered Deck And Porch 

Call Bruce Reeves 401-3213 



- 

202 DARRELL DRIVE 
$156,000 

• Great Location • 4 Bedrooms 
► Unfinished Basement • Main Floor 
Master • Laundry Room 
• Over 1,800 Sq. Ft. 

Call Mark Blair 766-8494 


761 TUNNEL HILL 
CHURCH ROAD $289,000 

• New Construction 

* Phillips Homes LLC • Open Floor Plan 

• Walkout Basemen 

• Screened In Porch 

• Large Family Room 

Call Mark Blair 766-8494 



445 SHERWOOD DRIVE 
$349,090 

• Elizabethtown • 7 Acres 
• 3 Bedrooms 
• 3 Baths • Privacy 

Call Penny Miller 307-2703 


102 HOLIDAY COURT 
$147,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths • Open 
Floor Plan • 18 Ft. Cathedral 
Ceiling • Close to Ft. Knox 

Call Jason Jarstfer 312-2943 







218 RESERVE CT. 
$385,000 

► Custom Built @ Country Club 
• Brazilian Hardwood, Tile 
• Luxury Main Floor Master 
• 4 Bedrooms, 3.5 Baths 
• Finished W/0 Bsmt 




84 JOCKEY 
$149,900 

• 3 Bedrooms *2.5 Baths 
► Spacious Rooms • Cul-De-Sac 
• Large Deck And Pool 
• Move In Condition 


Call Penny Miller 888-527-5277 Call Mark Haynes 766-2613 


208 N. MULBERRY 
$180,000 

• 4 Rental Units • 20 Storage Units 
•100% Occupied 
• Great Investment Property 

Call Mark Blair 766-8494 


205 LOMBARDY DRIVE, CECILIA 
$217,500 

• 4 Bedrooms • Lakewood Subdivision 
• 2 1/2 Baths • Over 2400 Sq. Ft. 

• 1.21 Acres 

Call Mark Blair 766-8494 







203 WOEBEGONA 
$119,900 

• 3 Bedrooms • 2 Baths 
• Hardwood Floors • Gas Fireplace 
• 2 Car Garage • Bank Owned 

Call Jody Thurman 766-4461 




7653 NEW GLENDALE ROAD, 
$174,900 

• Terrific Two Story Brick 

• Hardwood Floors • Sunroom 

• Partially Finished Basement 

• Fireplace With Built-In Bookcases 

• 3 Bedrooms/Possible 4 
Call Mark Blair 766-8494 


7ii:i II 


. _ 

516 CLYMENE 
$157,500 

• 3 Bedroom *2.5 Baths 
• Full Basement • Large Rooms 
• Concrete Driveway 

Call Mark Haynes 766-2613 



79 RAINTREE, E’TOWN 
$374,800 

• Custom Built Ranch 
• Great Location 

Call Lisa Matherly 766-8966 






322 OLD CARDINAL DRIVE 
$112,000 

• 3 Bedrooms Brick Ranch • 1 Bath 

• 1,266 Sq. Ft. • City Schools 

• All Kitchen Appliances Stay 

Call Roger McMaster 312-8383 


65 KERRWOOD 
$379,900 

• 3 Bedroom Brick *1.6 Acres 

• Over 3.000 Sq. Ft. 

• 40x56 Garage with Apartment 

• Super Nice Home 

Call Philip Tabb 735-3104 
























































































C6 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


PUBLIC RECORDS 


BUILDING PERMITS 


The following building 
permit information has 
been obtained from Hardin 
County Planning and 
Development Commission 
and the City of 
Elizabethtown Planning and 
Development and the City of 
Radcliff offices. The name of 
the applicant, appiicant’s 
address and use of permit 
are listed. 

Douglas Ray, 5 Bottle 
Drive, county. Use: single¬ 
family dwelling. 

Ryan Johnson, 29 
Deforest Court, county. 
Use: single-family 
dwelling. 

Billy Byerly, 240 Ditto 
Lane, Vine Grove. Use: 
pole barn. 

Mohammad and Miraj 
Gayasaddin, 294 Grand 
Hill Place, county. Use: 
storage shed. 

James L. Dean, 1305 
Overall Phillips Road, 
Elizabethtown. Use: pole 
barn. 

Stephen D. Ramsey, 
1459 Red Mill Road, 
Elizabethtown. Use: car¬ 
port. 

Mark Stickfort, 4968 
Rineyville Big Springs 
Road, Rineyville. Use: 
deck. 


Jimmie L. Workman, 
3817 S. Dixie Highway, 
Elizabethtown. Use: storm 
damage repair. 

William and Cindy 
Betts, 543 Sierra Drive, 
Rineyville. Use: building 
remodel. 

Danny and Freddy Grey, 
701 Wonderland Cavern 
Road, Cecilia. Use: pole 
barn. 

Everett Hall, 522 
Village Drive, Elizabeth¬ 
town. Use: handicap 
ramp. 

Iglesia Universal de 
Jesucristo, 602 Westport 
Road, Elizabethtown. Use: 
church interior. 

Michael Clark, 107 
Dixon Ave., Elizabethtown. 
Use: deck. 

Hardee’s, 1706 N. 

Dixie Ave., Elizabethtown. 
Use: assembly 

City of Elizabethtown, 
330 Waterworks Drive, 
Elizabethtown. Use: other- 
non residential. 

Douglas Adams, 404 
Linda Lane, Elizabethtown. 
Use: single-family 
dwelling. 

Kroger Wine & Spirits, 
207 Towne Drive, Eliza¬ 
bethtown. Use: commer¬ 
cial. 




BOOTH 

Huffer top 
listing agent 

Wanda Huffer of the 
J.E. Bramblett Sales 
Team was named Top 
Listing Agent for March, 
announced J.E. Bram¬ 
blett, principal broker of 
RE/MAX Executive 
Group Inc. in Elizabeth¬ 
town. 

Huffer specializes in 
residential, commercial 
and new construction 
sales. 

Booth top 
sales agent 

Marsha Booth of the 
J.E. Bramblett Sales Team 
was named Top Sales 
Agent for March, an¬ 
nounced J.E. Bramblett, 
principal broker of RE/ 
MAX Executive Group 
Inc. in Elizabethtown. 

Booth specializes in 
military relocation, resi¬ 
dential and new con¬ 
struction sales. 


PUBLIC RECORDS 


PROPERTY TRANSFERS 


HINCKLEY 

Hinckley top 
agent for March 

Charles Hinckley was 
the Listing and Selling 
Agent for March, an¬ 
nounced Toshie Murrell, 
principal broker of 
Network Realty. 

Davenport, 
Cordell and 
Livingston 
honored 

Century 21 Real 
Estate EEC recently rec¬ 
ognized Toni Davenport, 
Kathy Cordell and Jeff 
Livingston, sales associ¬ 
ates with Century 21 Joe 
Guy Hagan, as some of 
the system’s top-produc¬ 
ers nationwide when it 
honored them with the 
ruby level Century 21 
Masters Award. 

Ruby level status 
is awarded to an 
agent who has met 
minimum sales pro¬ 


DAVENPORT 


CORDELL 


LIVINGSTON 



JEFFREY PITS & ASSOCIATES 

Pitts & Associates ranked No. 1 

Jeffrey Pits & Associates has been ranked as 
the No. 1 RE/MAX Team in Kentucky for sales 
and ranked second in the Kentucky/ Tennessee 
Region. The team has ranked in the top 5 since 
the team started in 2005. 


duction of $100,000 or 
30 closed transaction 
sides in a calendar year. 

Charles Ballard and 
Joe Guy Hagan are bro¬ 
ker/ owners of Century 


21 Joe Guy Hagan. 

Century 21 Joe Guy 
Hagan is at 1361 N. 
Dixie Blvd. in Radcliff 
and 1609 N. Dixie Ave. 
in Elizabethtown. 


lincontested Divorce 


$300 


Plus 

Court 

Cost 


Nick L. Pearl Attorney at Law 


The following property 
transfers are listed as giv¬ 
en on deeds at the Hardin 
County Cierk’s Office in 
Elizabethtown. 

Kentucky Land Holdings 
of Radcliff LLC to W. Scott 
Hall, lot 70 Needham 
Spring Farm, county, 
$14,166.67. 

Kenneth Walden to 
Walden Irrevocable Family 
Trust, 264 Lincoln Ave., 
Elizabethtown, love and af¬ 
fection. FMV: $50,100. 

Stone Mark Enterprises 
LLC to Anthony P. and 
Anitta C. Andretta, 2514 
Chatsworth Drive, Eliza¬ 
bethtown, $240,000. 

Kevin B. and Kimberly 
N. Thacker to Joshua M. 
and Melody A. Roop, 377 
Valley View Drive, Vine 
Grove, $150,000. 

Barbara Jean Booker to 
Sonya Givan, 680 Grayson 
St., Upton, $85,000. 

HSBC Mortgage Ser¬ 
vices Inc. to Enrique 
Rosario-Gonzalez and 
Katia Gisel Rosario, 129 
Portobello Drive, Radcliff, 
$181,000. 

Jeff and Heather Miles 
to Donald E. Knotts, 116 
Poppy Court, Radcliff, 
$112,900. 

Anderson Homes Inc. 
to Kevin J. and Jamie C. 
Fink, 100 Shelly Drive, 

Vine Grove, $191,500. 

Hometowne Rentals 
LLC to CHDA Properties 
LLC, 1448 W. Lincoln Trail 
Blvd., Radcliff, $773,200. 

Heritage Properties LLC 
to Richard Rushing, 1302 
Hansborough Road, 

Cecilia, $57,957. 

T.L. Wise to TL Wise 
LLC, 113 Holiday Court, 
Elizabethtown, no mone¬ 
tary consideration. FMV: 
$138,400. 

W. Douglas and Donna 
K. Reed to Douglas L. 

Ray, lot 6 Ripple Ridge 
Subdivision, county, 
$22,500. 

W. Douglas and Donna 
K. Reed to Douglas L. 

Ray, lot 5 Ripple Ridge 
Subdivision, county, 
$22,500. 

Ryan T. and Kristy A. 



CPPOnTyHlTY 


preference, 


All real estate 
advertising in this 
newspaper is 
subject to the Fair 
Housing Act which 
makes it illegal to 
advertise “any 
limitation or discrimination based 
on race, color, religion, sex, 
handicap, familial status or 
national origin or an intention to 
make any such preference, 
limitation or discrimination.” 
Familial status includes children 
under the age of 18 living with 
parents or legal custodians, 
pregnant women and people 
securing custody of children 
under 18. 


This newspaper will not 
knowingly accept any advertising 
for real estate which is in violation 
of the law. Our readers are hereby 
informed that all dwellings 
advertised in this newspaper are 
available on an equal opportunity 
basis. To complain of 
discrimination, call HUD toll-free 
at 1-800-669-9777. The toll free 
telephone number for the hearing 
impaired is 1-800-927-9275. 


Johnson to Joshua and 
Danielle Elmore, 115 
Stoneybrook Drive, 
Elizabethtown, $142,500. 

Short Stop Food Mart 
Inc. to Jeffrey 0. Holbrook, 
property in Hardin County, 
$63,000. 

Jeffrey 0. and Pamela 
M. Holbrook to Shalimar 
Investments LLC, Sukhjit 
Singh Bains, Sukhminder 
Pandher, Tirath Pandher 
and Gurmukh Pandher, 
101 W. Main St., West 
Point, $110,000. 

Allen L. and F. Delores 
Franke Baugh to Grayson 
County Stockyard Market 
Inc. and Mid-Kentucky 
Livestock Market LLC, 
property on South Long 
Grove Road, Glendale, 
$9,000. 

Allen L. and F. Delores 
Franke Baugh to Grayson 
County Stockyard Market 
Inc. and Mid-Kentucky 
Livestock Market LLC, 


property on South Long 
Grove Road, Glendale, 
$9,000. 

Allen L. and F. Delores 
Franke Baugh to Allen L. 
and F. Delores Franke 
Baugh, property on South 
Long Grove Road, Glen¬ 
dale, no monetary consid¬ 
eration. FMV: $125,000. 

Gerry and Kum Up¬ 
church to city of Radcliff, 
property in Hardin County, 
$ 10 , 000 . 

Dana L. and Candy L. 
Metcalf to city of Eliza¬ 
bethtown, 311 Haycraft 
St., Elizabethtown, 
$16,500. 

William Hazes and 
Earlie Mae Ames to city of 
Elizabethtown, 317 Hay- 
craft St., Elizabethtown, 
$45,000. 

William Glen and Tracy 
Lee Simpson Downs to 
city of Elizabethtown, 316 
Haycraft St., Elizabeth¬ 
town, $18,500. 


Louis F. and Gladys M. 
Riggs to city of Elizabeth¬ 
town, lot 166 E. Railroad 
Ave., Elizabethtown, 
$ 21 , 000 . 

Louis F. and Gladys M. 
Riggs to city of Elizabeth¬ 
town, 306 Haycraft St., 
Elizabethtown, $10,500. 

Larry Moore to Jeremy 
R. Moore, property in 
Hardin County, $215,00. 

Big E Inc. to Bronson 
Kapihanui and Amanda L. 
Cambra, 655 Trinity Drive, 
Rineyville, $212,500. 

Bryan J. and Shellie P. 
Washer to Lisa K. Leh- 
muller, 404 Timber Lane, 
Elizabethtown, $325,000. 

Ruby H. Jones to Darin 
L. Hunt, 108 Otter Creek 
Road, Vine Grove, 
$85,100. 

Coy and Pamela Gibson 
to Matthew and Ann M. 
Rowley, 109 Radford 
Court, Elizabethtown, 
$179,900. 


BUY OF THE WEEK 



72 COLYERS LANE, ELIZABETHTOWN: With almost 3,200 finished sq. ft. of living 
space and upgrades galore, this home is a beauty. 3 bedrooms, 2 full baths, and 2 half baths. 
Oversized bedrooms, large walk-in closets, and beautiful hardwood and tile throughout. 
This one is a must tour! Courtesy of Janes Realty Group, Inc., 270-769-9977. 


JANES Realty Group, Inc. 

270 - 769-9977 ^ 



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Heating & Cooling License #M00789 
Boiler License #1596 


LENNOXy 



25 Public Square 
Elizabethtown, KY 42701 

(across from old courthouse) 


270'737'0000 

270-352-0000 


nickpearl@bbteLcom 

www.nickpearl.com 

This is a paid advertisement 



2409 Ring Road, Suite 100 
Corner of Ring Road and Miles Street 

800-264-0399 OR 737-0399 



FOR 

SALE OR 
LEASE 

ZONED INDUSTRIAL 1 WHERE BUILDINGS SIT; 6.788 acres, 4,100 
sq. ft. quonset hut building with 2 over head doors, 2,160 sq. ft. shop with 
several overhead doors, 4 stall equipment shed. Nice property for your 
business. Located in Rineyville, KY. Call Tim. 




56 QUARRY COURT: Lease 
or buy, 6,000 sq. ft. metal 
building, 3 overhead doors, 
1.5 baths, oil change pit 
waste oil furnace, only 3 
miles from 1-65. Call Tim or 
Tom. 


584 WESTPORT ROAD: Lease, 2 
office spaces (1,787 sq. ft. & 2,240 
sq. ft.), kitchenette and 1/2 bath for 
each space, gas heat and central air, 
handicap accessible, plenty of 
parking, bypass road visibility, 
offices are side by side if you need 
more space, ready to move in for 
your business. Call Lindsey. 




UPSCALE OFFICE SPACE located 
in the heart of Elizabethtown’s retail 
and business district. 1,200 sq. ft. 
suites are move-in ready! Excellent 
location off of Dixie Hwy., just 10 
minutes from Ft. Knox. 


LEASE 


NICE CLEAN 3 YEAR OLD 
BUILDING: 1,250 sq. ft. office 
with break room, conference 
room, 2 ea 1/2 baths, heat & air. 
7,500 sq. ft. shop with conference 
room, break room, 1 full bath, 4 
overhead doors, alarm system, 25 
HP air compressor, used oil 
furnace, 3 acre lot. Hwy. 313, 
close to Radcliff & Vine Grove. 
Call Tim or Lindsey. 


COMMERCIAL FLEX 
SPACE FOR RENT AT 
226 PETERSON DRIVE. 

4,800 sq. ft. with 1,110 sq. 
ft. office $2,000/mo. 3,000 
sq. ft. with 200 sq. ft. office 
$900/mo. 




2,100 SQ. FT. COMMER- 
_ CIAL BUILDING at 913 N. 

Mulberry St., E’town, KY. 
Great potential. $279,000. 
Call Tom. 


3 UNIT COMMERCIAL BUILDING 
8-PLEX WITH 3 COMMERCIAL UNITS 
3 DUPLEXES, fully rented. Call Tim or Tom. 


BELLA WOODS SUBDIVISION 

1 acre and up. Lots starting at $21,000. 7 miles from 1-65 out Hwy. 
480 in Shepherdsville. Call to tour these great lots. Agent owned. 


107 ACRE FARM, near Rineyville, open and wooded. Call Tim. 

547 ACRES, near Colesburg, has 2 houses on property, open and 
wooded. $1,300,000. Call Tim. 

51.5 ACRES, large pond, good hunting, approximately 8 miles from 
Ring Road in Elizabethtown. Call Lindsey. 

166 ACRES, R3 zoned in the city of Elizabethtown. Will divide. Call 
Tom at 766-9766. 

100’xl87’ COMMERCIAL BUILDING LOT at 915 N. Mulberry St., 
E’town, KY. $97,500. Call Tom. 

COMMERCIAL: 1-65 visibility. 17,500 sq. ft., several offices, 10 
overhead doors, 8-f acres, E’town. Call Tim 270-766-8263. 
COMMERCIAL: 2 buildings just off South Mulberry in 
Elizabethtown. Already rented. Agent owned. Call Tim. 
COMMERCIAL: 56-f acres on North 31W and Highway 447. Call 
Tim. 

PRIME E’TOWN N. DIXIE LOCATION - Lease up to 3,200 sq. ft. 
Starting at $18.00 per sq. ft. Call Tim. 

4 WOODED LOTS: 10 to 12 acres, Roanoke area of LaRue County. 
Mobile homes allowed. Owner financing available. Agent owned. 
SANTA FE SUBDIVISION: 1 acre and up, off Hwy. 62 East on Upper 
Colesburg Rd. Lincoln Trail Elementary School. Broker owned. 
BECKLEY WOODS: Lots starting at $31,900. Restricted to all brick 
homes. Broker owned. 

LOTS IN GRAYSON COUNTY: OK for mobile homes. Broker owned. 






Teresa 

Aulbach 


Lindsey 

Aulbach 


Tim 

Aulbach 


Tom 

Mason 



“We Sell Land And Houses Too” 

Visit our website: 
landstoreinc.com 























































































THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 


C7 




ASK DAVE MYERS 


FHA makes borrowing tough, but some can get around rules 


The Federal Housing 
Administration has set new 
rules that may disqualify 
some borrowers, but others 
can skirt the regulations if 
they take a few simple 
steps. 

DEAR MR. MYERS; I ap 

plied for an FHA loan to 
buy a house, but my appli¬ 
cation was rejected because 
the credit report that my 
lender ordered showed that 
a collection agency has 
filed a $1,200 claim against 
me for an unpaid credit- 
card bill. I admit that I did 
not pay the bill, but I am 
disputing it because the 
$1,200 refrigerator I bought 
on my card from a depart¬ 
ment store didn’t work 
properly, and I returned 
the crummy fridge. What 
can I do now? 

ANSWER; You, like many 
of my other readers, have 
been snared by new regula¬ 
tions that the Federal 
Housing Administration 
enacted April 1. 

More than 1 million 
people each year purchase 
a home with a low-down- 



DAVE 

MYERS 


payment loan that’s insured 
by the FHA, the federal 
government’s primary pro¬ 
gram to help low- and 
moderate-income buyers. 
The agency guarantees the 
lender if the borrower de¬ 
faults, it will pay the bank 
for some or all of its losses. 

The FHA once ignored 
most collection accounts 
when granting its approval, 
but not anymore. The new 
rules instituted earlier this 
month basically mean any 
mortgage application will 
be rejected — even if the 
borrower is disputing a 
credit-card charge or med¬ 
ical expenses — if the total 
amount exceeds $1,000. 

Ironically, you are kind 
of in the driver’s seat now. 
Though you are disputing 
the $1,200 bill for your 
faulty fridge, the collection 
agency may compromise 


for about half that amount 
and wipe your credit clean 
so you can qualify for the 
FHA loan. 

Those with larger un¬ 
paid or disputed loans are 
eligible for a waiver, if they 
can prove that their hard¬ 
ship was caused by a di¬ 
vorce, a death in the family, 
unemployment or a hand¬ 
ful of other factors. Call the 
FHA for details, 888-466- 
3487, or go to the agency’s 
website, www.hud.gov. 

DEAR MR. MYERS; I saw 
an advertisement for a 
home that is on a ‘‘flag lot.” 
What does this mean? 

ANSWER; A flag lot is a 
parcel that, from a bird’s- 
eye view, sort of looks like 
a flag standing on a pole. A 
long but narrow path or 
driveway connects to the 
street - that’s the “pole” - 
and the bulk of the parcel 
and home (the “flag”) sits to 
the left or right at the top of 
the connection. 

Flag lots are fairly com¬ 
mon, especially in rural ar¬ 
eas and second-home com¬ 
munities. But they’re also 


sometimes found in urban 
areas, where the original 
developer built one house 
that fronts the street and 
another behind it on the 
flag. 

Buying a home on a flag 
lot can be a tricky proposi¬ 
tion. The key concern is the 
buyer must make sure the 
long driveway or path is in¬ 
cluded in the purchase, or 
at least ensures that he or 
she can use it at all hours of 
the day. 

I met a reader at one of 
my public appearances sev¬ 
eral years ago who said he 
bought a small house on a 
flag lot, only to find the 
driveway leading up to his 
house was owned by the 
family who lived in the 
home that directly faced 
the street. He had to pay 
those owners $50 a month 
just to use the driveway that 
led to his house in the back. 

DEAR MR. MYERS; Is it 
true all homes and public 
buildings in Florida must 
have doors that swing out¬ 
ward, rather than inward? 
This would seem like a 


pretty stupid law, especially 
because the high winds that 
come with a hurricane 
would blow an open door 
right off its hinges. 

ANSWER; Florida and a 
few other states have laws 
requiring most public 
buildings have doors that 
swing outward rather than 
inward, but the rules don’t 
apply to personal resi¬ 
dences. 

True, a door that you 
have to pull rather than 
push when you enter a 
building can cause prob¬ 
lems when there are high 
winds. But a greater risk is 
if there’s a fire or other 
emergency inside, say, a 
movie theater or nightclub. 
If the doors opened inward, 
the throngs of people trying 
to get out could cause a hu¬ 
man logjam: Those closest 
to the door might be tram¬ 
pled, and the rest would be 
trapped inside. 

I think such laws are sen¬ 
sible. Though outwardly 
swinging doors are more 
apt to snap off their hinges 
in high winds, there’s a 


much greater chance that 
folks who already are in¬ 
side might need to escape if 
there’s a fire or other emer¬ 
gency. And besides, having 
lived through one hurri¬ 
cane and a few tornadoes 
myself, I didn’t really think 
about going to a movie or 
bar and worrying about 
how the doors of the estab¬ 
lishment might swing as the 
winds were approaching. 

Write to David Myers at P.O. 
Box 4405, Culver City, CA 
90231-2960. Distributed by 
Cow^les Syndicate Inc. 



HH 


SUPER HANDYMAN 


Need to nix mud 
tracks? Try these ideas 

TO 


USA.gov 

1 (800) FED-INFO 


hsb 




WORKING HORSE 
RANCH 

Z21 Blow town Rd. 

Leilchtield, KY 

DjfgcHoTis: from Lcitchheld, 
Hwy 62 west on to Hwy 
go approx 2 miles to 
Hwy. 1133, 2 miles to 
RlovvttJvvn R<i. 

1790 li modular home, 3 
BR, 2 BA, 4t) -I- acres, indm*?!- 
& outdoor arena, 28 total 
stalls, 2 Stallion stalls, 
Foaling Breeding area, 
2 ponds on property, IS x 
% shed, CRuAT for hearse 
clinic, 4H/FFA clinic or 
VotorifLary set-up. Call for 
showing instrvictionsK 


Call David or Bamona Harrington 

Harrington & Associate 
Realty & Auction 
502-95S 9SaB ^ 



We get a lot of questions 
through our website about 
how to deal with mud and 
other things that get 
tracked into your home 
from the yard. How about 
just cleaning up your yard 
to avoid these messes? 
Here are a few ideas that 
you might want to try. 
Maybe your floors, inside, 
might last a little longer! 

A “welcome” mat can 
be placed just inside and/or 
outside your door to trap a 
lot of this mess. Clean or re¬ 
place when they stop work¬ 
ing. 

If your patio or deck is 
dirty, wash it with a power 
washer. Apply sealer to 
dusty concrete surfaces. 

If your grass is a little 
thin, add more or different 
sod or even groundcover if 
you need it. 

If you spend a lot of time 
walking through the yard, 
add stepping stones. These 
can be anything from stan¬ 
dard concrete pads to 
something more decora¬ 
tive, like flagstone. 

A brick pathway or 
gravel path is another op¬ 
tion. This requires a little 
more work, like soil re¬ 
moval, sturdy base material 
and a level finish. But it can 
look nicer, too. 

Any of these options is 
probably something you 
can tackle on your own, 
even on a budget. In fact, it 
might be less expensive to 
install one of these than 
have your carpet cleaned 
or replaced, floor buffed or 
tile steam cleaned. 

■ ■■ 

Q; My house has a series 
of very large wooden 
columns across the front. I 
am seeing rotting wood 
around the base of most of 
them, and I’m concerned 
about it moving forward. I 
would like to see if you 
know of a way to repair the 
columns rather than re¬ 
place them. Obviously this 
would be very expensive, 
and finding someone to do 
it would be hard to do. I 
need to pick your brain. 
What do you suggest I do? 
- V.N. 

A; Before doing any re- 



AL and 
KELLY 
CARRELL 


pairs, you need to resolve 
the moisture issue so it 
doesn’t continue to be a 
problem. If they are struc¬ 
tural and needed to hold up 
your porch, you really 
should have them replaced. 
But if they are strictly deco¬ 
rative, you can get an 
epoxy wood filler that can 
be used to build the wood 
back up again. All you will 
need to do is remove the 
decayed and damaged 
wood and install this prod¬ 
uct. You’ll need to sand and 
paint it to match, but it real¬ 
ly does a pretty good job 
for situations like this. 

■ ■■ 

Q; Our metal table on 
the patio is black, but our 
other furniture is green. 
How can I find the right 
paint to match what we 
have? — E.R. 

A; Several paint compa¬ 
nies make paint just for this 
purpose. It’s the right color 
and finish, usually matte, to 
match existing pieces, so 
everything will look the 
same. Make sure to remove 
any rust, and clean all sur¬ 
faces before applying the 
new paint. 

■ ■■ 

Has your water pressure 
dropped off through the 
years, especially your hot 
water? Many times, this is 
because of a buildup of 
mineral deposits in your 
plumbing system. There’s a 
little trick you can play with 
a dime on your pipes to 
clear out some of these de¬ 
posits. We’ve written the 
steps down so that you can 
try this for yourself. They 
are available directly from 
our website, www.thesuper 
handyman.com. With any 
luck at all, you’ll improve 
your water pressure and 
even get your dime back. 

Have a question or a handy tip? 

Send it to The Super 

Handyman by visiting 
www.thesuperhandyman.com. 
Those of general interest will be 
used in fiiture columns. Cowles 
Syndicate Inc. 



ADD A 

"WELCOME" MAT 


USE STEPPING 
STONES 





// / 





//■ 1 Y 


A BRICK PATH IS A 
MORE PERMANENT 
SOLUTION 


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^ NOTICE ★ 


Effective this date, 
Bobby Jones Reaity & 
Auction is scheduiing 



SPRING 

venoNS 


GALL & RESERVE YOUR DATE! 


This begins our 45th year conducting auctions in Hardin & surrounding 
counties throughout Kentucky. Give us a call at (270) 765-2552 or 
(270) 735-6808. If you are planning an auction this year, get the facts first hand! 

We appreciate your business. 

Bobby Jones, Broker! Auctioneer 

Remember: Straight Talk and 45 Years Experience Does Make a Difference. 

BOBBY JONES REALTY & AUCTION 

(270) 76S-2S52 
As CELL <270) 735-6808 


SINCE 1967, THE AUCTION EXPERTS SLSf 



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Aiirlim2012 

Fantastic location, just 1 minute to Best Buy. 
Call James Williams 270-735-2094 
or Brent Robinson 270-763-3783 



Call 769-HOME (4663) 
1-800-866-3945 

400 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 
Joni Melloan, Principal Broker 


2747RINEYVILLE RD...$849,000 

Over 6,000 sq. ft., 25 acres, lake, pool. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 





113 JERSEY COURT.$389,900 

5 BR, 4 baths, 3,910 sq.ft. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 



626 FOXFIRE.$299,000 

4-5 bedrooms, 4.5 baths, 3,895 sq. ft., sunroom. 

GallJoni Melloan 270-300-4663 


254 WATERFOWL L00P..4249,900 

4 BR’s, 3.5 BA, 2 fireplaces, fin. Basement. 

Gall James Williams 270-735-2094 . 


110 TOMMY GRAY CT.$179,900 

3 BR, 2.5 Baths, Almost 2,000 Sq. Ft. 

Call SaundraPellev 270-307-1746 



310 PINECRESTDRIVE..4125,000 

3 BRs, hardwood, basement, city schools. 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 


710 FOXFIRE ROAD.$599,000 

Outstanding! Custom built by Edmund Edwards. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-706-9104 



1828 DEGKARD SCHOOL RD...$379.000 

Over 3,600 sq. ft.. 10+ acres, horse barn. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 



101 RIDGEWOOD COURT.$549,000 

Custom Home in Mill Creek, 4 Car Garage 

Call Jane Clifford 270-300-6609 



598 TIMBER LANE..4379,000 

French country home in Briarwood Forest 

CallJonl Melloan 270-300-4603 

- m m \m , 


2466W.RHUDES CREEK.$275,000 

Wrap around porch, 11 acres, 4 BR. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-706-9104 



119 FAIRWAY DR....$274,900 

On golf course, $15,000 below appraisal. 

CallJonl Melloan 270-300-4603 


1105 DRIFTWOOD LANE.4540,000 

Quality Jim Kipper built 5 BR, 4.5 Baths. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 



606 LONE 0AK....$359,000 

Custom Built, 3,625 sq. ft., 4 BR 

Call Tony Singer 270-234-3617 



200KAIMI COURT.$259,900 

4 BR, 3.5 Baths, 2960 sq. ft., over 4 acres. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 


Open Sunday 2-4 



106 RIPPLING BROOK GT....$449,900 

6 BRs, 4,700 sq. ft. in the Cedars. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 


810 LAKESIDE DRIVE..4449,000 

4,400 Sq. Ft, 5 BR, 4.5 Baths, Fin. Bsmt. 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 



106 CONNECTICUT CT....$349,900 

Main level master, 4 BR, sunroom, city schools. 

Call Brent Robinson 270-763-3783 



142 HOLMAN AVE.$344,000 

3 BR, 3 bath, finished basement 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 


738 UPPER GOLESBURG RD..$254,900 

9 Acre Horse Farm, 3 BR, 3 BA, Basement. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 


246 RILEY WAY...$232,950 

New, 4 BRs, walkout basement, city schools. 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 


102 TIVERTON WAY....$179,500 

Tastefully update, finished walkout basement. 

Call James Williams 270-735-2094 



1500 NORTH MILES ST.$124,900 

Brick and vinyl, 3 BR, 2 BA, 2 car garage. 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 


128 GRACE C0URT....$229,500 

4 BR’s, 1.7 Acre Lot, Walkout Basement. 

Gall Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 

— LQ nm tff n 



103 GARDEN BROOK CT...$165,000 

3 BRs, 2 baths, fin. bsmt., fenced backyard. 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 


160P0RT0BELL0RD.$205,000 

Wi.d acre, finished waikoui d+ BR. d i/2 BA 

Call Jane Clifford 270-300-6669 




409 PARK AVENUE.$172,500 

UIIClITIIIIIgH DR, lull U(15miimiL. 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 



629 BROWNS LANE.$119,000 

3 BRs, 2BAs, Basement, City Schools 

Call Jane Clifford 270-300-6669 


1039 GREENWAY DRIVE.$99,900 

Great Value! Brick, 24’x24’ Detached Garage. 

Call SaundraPelley 270-307-1746 


1849 THOMAS R0AD...$199,900 

shows great! 3,354 sq. ft., walkout basement. 

Gall Tony Singer 270-234-3617 

- m m i/ m 



ROBINBROOKE DUPLEXES 
$229,000-$269,000 

2 BR, 2 BA Duplexes w/no steps, convenient 

Call Jane Clifford 270-300-6669 
or Brent 270-763-3783 


327ST0NEBRIAR DR.$199,900 

Neat, clean, great yard for play! 

Call Johnny Melloan 270-766-9164 




103 HILLSDALE.$139,900 

4 BR s, 2 Baths, Lincoln Trail School district. 

Call James Williams 270-735-2094 



1 

' iia- 

107 3B FREEMAN GREEN...$89,900 

Updated, secure, quiet, 1BR/1 BA Condo. 

Ask for Jane Clifford 270-300-6669 



702 SUNRISE LANE.$125,000 

Updated Kitchen, Hardwood, Bsmt, City Schools 

Call Jane Clifford 270-300-6669 


• 60 Acres - $195,000 

• Commercial Lot - $139,900 

• Stone Creek Lot - $59,000 

• Thomas Road Lots - 
$40,000 & $50,000 

• Greencrest Drive Lot - $40,000 
Beckley Woods Lot - $36,000 


Meet our people and learn how we do more to help people just like you. 



Joni Melloan 
CELL 300-4663 

joni@melloan.com 


Jane Clifford 
CELL 300-6669 

jane@melloan.com 


Saundra Pelley 
CELL 307-1746 

saundra@melloan.com 


Brent Robinson 
CELL 763-3783 

brent@melloan.com 


Johnny Melloan 
CELL 766-9164 

john@melloan.com 


James Williams 
CELL 735-2094 

james@melloan.com 


George Lynch 
CELL 766-8950 

george@melloan.com 


Tony Singer 
CELL 234-3617 

tony@melloan.com 






































































































































C8 


THE NEWS EWTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 








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Call 270-505-1770 today. Or go to wwwJhenewsgnterprisExom , Or Mail to: 
The News-Eoterpriset 40S West Dixie, Elizahethtown, KY 42701 
Local deltvery only Hail rates are available call 27Q-505-l77(li 

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Dave Jdhn 

WNt« 

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The Dave Team 

www.DaveTeam.com > Dave@DaveTeam,com 
w ww.tt kriox nn i lita ry best .com 


ItIA CSDAIt StLA.\CH Hl>.. E L E25 beJn^^ms. 4 full kiiJis, ^ »r 
ftiiragfr wtT It. Cnnitf, tile. I^w&od. centraf 'vat. iwl.. sjwriOLts mitslfr suite, 
i«k-n‘Jipll haLh. up F^undr^', C’ih fincplac^, JujI I I VAiO. $4t]k umkr 

rL‘t4‘nt i]|i|iTAisaL 


KOVEL ON COLLECTINO 


Dual-purpose furniture: More than meets the eye 


Dual-purpose furnituie 
has been made for cen* 
turies. By the i700s, there 
were chairs with large, 
round backs that flipped 
dov^Ti on the ttip of the 
anus to make a table. 

There also uere ch^ui^s 
that could be flipped over 
to be u'^ed 35 library <?teps 
In the 18(X)s. new types of 
springs and hinges made it 
possible to manufacture a 
flip-down bed that could 
be stored in a closed or 
card tables with hidden 
pull-out leaves that trans¬ 
formed into a dining table. 

A fainou-s French ai chi- 
tect and designer, Ar- 
m and Albert Rateau, de¬ 
signed a clever dual-pur¬ 
pose chair in about 1925. 
The chair had an oak 
frame with ebony veneer. 
The back of the chair was 
upholstered with silk and 
straw. The seat back was 
hinged so that it folded 
down on the rest of the 
frame to form a low table. 
The Art Deco chair design 
was luiique and could be 
useful today in a small 
apartment. 

■ ■■ 

Q: I bought an old bar¬ 
bershop and all the an¬ 
tiques in it, including 
1920s barber chairs, tons 
of razors, razor sharpeners, 
strops, combs and about 
25 ceramic shaving mugs 
decorated with words and 
designs and signed on the 
bottom with makers^ 
marks. My favorite mug, h* 
tied “10th Infantry,'’ has a 
painting of soldiers and a 
bugler. 1 don*t want most 
of these things. How do 1 


PtwtatckirtKy <jf S*lfinM, Jw. 

Unfortunately the removable cushion and frame that formed 
the seat of this ehair are missing. The dual-purpose chair by a 
famous designer was appraised at $15,000-$20^DOO at a Los 
Angeles Modern Auction in DecembeR. 


crown above the letters “H 
& C." Undemealli that are 
the words “^Selb Bavaria” 
and “Heinrich Co,” Do 
you know whal tliese 
plates are worth? 

A: Franz Heinrich 

founded his porcelain 
company in Selb, Bavaiia, 
Gennany, m 1896. The 
company became part of 
Vilieroy & Boch in 1976. 
The mark on your plates 
was used in the 1930s. 

■ ■■ 

Q: We have an original 
typed letter handed down 
in the family from a rela¬ 
tive who was a union 
leader in the 1950s. The 
letter, dated Aug. 30, 1958, 
is from Sen. John F. 
Kennedy and refers to 
“two enclosed speeches” 


he made on the Senate 
floor, one about national 
defense and the other 
about labor reform. The 
letter is signed ^John Ken¬ 
nedy.” The stationery has a 
verifiable watermark and 
we have had the letter au¬ 
thenticated by a local his¬ 
torical society. What is it 
worth? 

A: We're not sure if you 
had the stationery or the 
autograph or both authen¬ 
ticated. And v\e also don't 
blow if your local histon- 
cal society employ t r h as 
a relationship with an auto- 
giaph authenticator It's a 
tricky biisine ^ espcciail) 
with public officials. Ken¬ 
nedy is known to have 
used autopens as early as 
the 1950s before he was 


elected president m 1960. 
It also IS generally known 
Kenned) often asked his 
secretary to sign h ^ letters. 
If the letter is onginal hut 
the autograph cUi autupen 
signature, the letter would 
sell for less than $100, If 
the signaiiue is real, the let¬ 
ter is worth $2,000 or 
more. 

■ ■■ 

Q: My parents received 
a china candy dish as a 
wedding gift in 1944. it has 
a vertical brass handle in 
the center. The mark on 
the bottom is a pair of 
straight-sided M’s within a 
diamond, all within a fan¬ 
cy ^een-and-yellow car¬ 
touche, Under the car¬ 
touche is the stamped 
phrase, “Made in Japan.” 
Can you tell me who made 
the dish and w'hat it's 
worth? 


A: The inaik on your 
dish has been identified as 
one used by Moriyama 
Pottery, a company found¬ 
ed arormd 1911 in Moii- 
machi, a town in Shizuoka 
Prefecture. The china dish 
either was made before 
World War 11, or the fami¬ 
ly stoiy about when your 
parents received the giR is 
incorrect. The “Made in 
Japan” mark was used 
again starting in late 1949. 
■ ■■ 

TIP: Paperweights that 
ai e displayed on a wooden 
table in front of a sunny 
window may magnify the 
sun's rays enough to 
scorch the tabletop. 

Write to Tteny Kovel at King 
Features Syndicate, 

Seventh Ave.^ New York, NY 
IDOI^. Cowles Syniiicate tnc. 


TERRY 

KOVEL 


sell eJl of this? 

A: I'here are collectors 
who wonld ha interested in 
nearly everything in your 
shop. The most-expensive 
chairs are those with elabo¬ 
rate iron trim. They sell for 
hundreds of dollars. And a 
rare occupational shaving 
mug — the bnd wilh the 
name of an occupation 
and an image of a person 
working - can be worth 
even more than a chair. An 
“Aeronaut” mug picturing 
a parachutist auctioned for 
a record price of $45,000 
in 2008. 

You could sell the things 
yourself, but if you're not 
familiar with the collecting 
world, you could ask an 
expert, dealer, appraiser or 
auction house to help you. 

If the collection is in ex¬ 
cellent shape, it probably 
would be best to contact a 
large auction house that 
sells shaving mugs, barber- 
shop signs and barber 
equipment. The smaller 
items can be sold in groups 
(“lots”). It is easy to find 
auctions of barbershop 
items by searching online. 
■ ■■ 

Q: We own 12 plates that 
have a wide gold em¬ 
bossed border and mulli- 
colored flowers in the mid¬ 
dle. They're 11 inches in 
diameter^ and I think 

they're called charger 
plates. The back of each 
plate is marked with a 


CURRENT PRICES 

Current prices are recorded from antiques shows, flea marfrets, sates and auctions throughout the United States, Prices 
vary in different locations because of local economic conditions. 


IPS TWIN WKKS. «XE GROlTv S 

miimlCJ E(h post. Ciiiincii 
harifiA'ml and lilff 


9^^ HYDKH CT,, RF?;Fmi.LE 4 
h^cJiiooms. 2,5 iMllis. rooms, 

Slrowi helt^r than npw. 


M Libbey wine glasses. 
Silver Leaf pattern^ stem¬ 
med. 6 1/4 in., set of 8, 
$40. 

■ Royal Copley Pirate 
Head wall pocket planter, 
dark hair, gray headscarf, 
green shirt with yellow coJ- 
lar. 19bOs, 8 inches, $55. 

M Donald Duck pencif 
sharpener, red Bakeiite, 
Donald dressed as cowboy 
firing cap gun, 1950,11/2 
X 1 1/2 inches, $65. 

■ Wristwatch, lady's, 
bracelet style, diamond ac¬ 
cents, square face, 10K 
gold filled, Gruen^ Swiss, 


late 1940s. $75. 

■ Vogue doll, Betty 
Jane, composition, open* 
close green eyes^ smoky 
eyeshadow, red open 
mouth, four teeth, auburn 
wig^ pink ruffled dress, 
matching hat, 16 inches. 
$155, 

■ Indian MotofcycEe ad¬ 
vertising blotter, image of 
Indian Scout cycle, Bath Cy¬ 
cle Co., Bath, Me., 1920s, 
3 1/2 X 5 inches, $225. 

■ Quill and pillow cover, 
buttonhole applique, green- 
and-red floral wreath, white 
ground, 1932, quilt 82 x 84 


inches, covers 24 x 84 
inches, $350. 

■ Student's merit 
pfaque, ink on paper, stu¬ 
dent’s name Emanuel 
Metzker, dated 1845, pea- 
cock, fish and quill pen de* 
sign, framed, 6x9 3/4 
inches, $820. 

■ Pocket tin, Gold Dust 
Tobacco, 'Worth its Weight 
in Gold/ image of three 
gold miners, Canada, 4x3 
inches, $1,485. 

9 Queen Anne comer 
chair, maple and pine, solid 
splats, turned arm sup¬ 
ports, cabriole legs, pad 


feet. midlSth century. 29 
inches, $1,995. 


Ask flow to save evsn more with ^^Milrtary Best” 


220 N. Dixie Blvd., Radcliff, KY 40160 
m 270^51-2286 or 1-800-962-4461 


-GfiW 


SATURDAY, APRIL 21ST * 10:00 A.M. EST 


OoWles SyTKiicate 


Stay CoNNEflEDToYouR Conninity.» 

SIBS€RIBET0DAY4V 

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""n YES! START MY SUBSCRlPTm TODAY! 


Sunday - Friday DaMvery 

n 3 Months far £40.61 
“I 6 Months for $74.27 
n 1 Year for $131.35 

Nome:_ 

Address; _ 

Clty:„_ 

Phone:_ 


Sunday Only Home Delivery 

n 3 Months for £22.05 
fie Months for $37.13 
□ 1 Year for $70.78 


State: 


more pdclijreo ^rtci m cotnplet* 
it, v|«ki MS si suctlorulp.com, 

(0 * 


F-ittd irt-ori 

faceboofa. 


, Email Address (required):. 


□ Check Enclosed 

Charge my: H Visa T MasterCard O Discover D AMEX 


t itii’ 4Y»i.ca\j»i)N 
Ri'ultor/A urtionevr 
27t>.537-JjeS 


JUK f now'l l!; 
itnikcr/AurtiiiniTr 
27«-I34-H32 


David Ottfe 
Cruse Estate 
‘RESIDENCE, 
WORKSHOP. 

6 AC V-, VEHICLE. 
PERSONAL 

PROPERY/ANTIQUES* 


lation: 3724 Upton Melrose Rd., Upton, KY 42784 

}NS From 1-65 [Upton exit) take HWY ZE4W to 31W north. Xmn left back onto HW¥ 22W. go epprox. 
Upton Molrosa Rl on right proceed approx. 1/2 rnile lo auction site on right. Signs posted 

Reel Estate: Beautiful 3 bedroom, 3 beth residence, fulty renovated end 
ready to move into, has a walk out basement and is situated on 6 acras +/-. 
Thare is also a workshop/garage with wood haat and air. 2 car attached 
garage-, new conorate driveway. 

Persene! Propcfty: 2 cherry cannon ball beds, pair of wing chairs, pair of 
brass floor I mp manogany coffee lable large ornate sofa, mirror, framed 
pouts, cherry drop leaf end table, small hooked ruga, cherry drop leaf sola 
table, floral sofa, 1 pairs of rocKer recimers. 1 candle stands, ovsl oak 
kitchen table w/4 chairs, pie crust tiered tabie, bathroom vanity, Ken more 
refrigerator. Whirlpool etsctric stove. Maytag wastier^dryar, pair of 
footstooEs. set of Mikesa dm netware, assorted kitchen glass were, 
cookware, small appliances. Simplicity vacuum, exercise eQuipment. 2 push 
mowers, TVs. hie cabinets, metal shelving, Eift chair, fireplace tools, 
andiror>s. wheel chair, handicap aids, and other items too rumerous to 
mention. 

Antique/Viniage iiems: Cherry Pembroke tale, Ouncon Phyfe Style sole^ 
drawer walnut tand table New Haven kitchen shelf clock, handmade 
quilts, goose neck rocker n que oak office desk w/^pewriter. pineapple i 
pester bed. rose back sewing rocker, ruby hurricane lamp w/prisms. 
assorted glassware, vases, hand painted plates (Limoges. Bavaria, Nipponl, 
Havilland chocolate 5et Fngidaire stove. GE sheet press, Traveler bicycle, 
cream can, Victorian wall pocket gate leg tabio. school desk w/writing arm^ 
Deco buffets cedar chest, pair of boudoir lamps, Griswold ^3 skillet, Wagner 
#1D skillet, and more, ^terlmg Silver pieces; bS pieces Towle Qld Master 
sterling. fEatware w/cese, 17 pearl handled knives. Chatelaine Porringer An 
Nouveau hand mirror, many assorted serving pieces and flatware (Cady, 
Huber. Lemo.n & Sons, Kendrick S Sons}, l%-\- nddle back spoons {Dui me k 
Co, Kinsey I Also an essonment of silver plated serving pieces and flatware. 
Vehicle-1980 Buiek Park Ava, V8. air, leather seats. 98,009 miles 

NQ BUYERS PREMIUM! 

Terms; Real Estate -15% down day of sale, balance on or before 30 days 
Pcr^qnal Property - Cash or good check day of sale w/proper ID, 2012 Taxes 
will be prorated day of dosing 

was taiil prm to 1378, buyet wilt iia fo si§it had basa 

paint waiv0r. InspEctwns may bn dffne weak prior to safe. 

All announcements made day of sale take precedence over any previous 
written material. 

Executor for the Estate: Ustln| Agent: 

fiary Cruse Stanley Bell 12781766-8352 

If you would iM to tovr this hotnc prior to atictiOTi daY please eootaot 
Stanley Boll ;4^276) 766-8352 

_ ^m\ Ai REAL ESTATE & 

AUCTION CO., LLC 

115 S. Dixie Street 
Horse Cave, KY 42749 
OtTice; 270-786.4242 Fax: 270-786-4343 

""Specialidtig in YOUR Real Estate and Auction 

• chip^i vauetmtcQxvm 

NATE FROGGET, APP. AUCTIONEER 270-S2S-1iMR 
J05H ROBERTSON, APP. AUCTIONEER 27O-537-31S0 
STANLEY BELL REALTOIVAPP. AUCTIONEER270-7SE'B352 
ROGER GONTERMAN. RIALTO R270-300-6607 































































■mE NEWS-Em-ERPRJSE 


HQIHES 


FRIDAY, APRfL 13, 2012 




HOUSE OF THE WEES 





jpgaiw 


PRESTON HIGHWAY 

71X1 Prest&fi Hwy 


••TEMPUR-SimpUcitY 

• • COLLECBON 

^snlbEiic n firm, Tnadkmi & loft 


Qiieen 

memory foam 


lIMJTEDSUpptrpcB STOHf 
COMPARf $999 


Au&KuajidMoK^iii 


^399 


Celebrating at all locations! 


^ Posturepec/ic Plush Queen Set 


ar Warfanty! 


Set 




Ml so- KiNCiSET 

^269: *299 '499 


FEATURING i 
ra/SEALYFOAM 

Kimi TWIN sfT 

QUEEN MT "I'M 

“ S299 

KING SET 


Compare^SS 


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c.iishiou Firm TWIN SET 

QUEEN ST ^749 

“’$799 7^^"' 

Campa re $1^96 KJ N G^et 

SO^^'^ALL 

MATTRESSES’ 


1^ ^ATutiPiO ^ 

P^UTefjeiJk:[Q^ 

l.uxurv hum Inp TWIN set 
QUEEN ur ^4* 

“$499 Sii”’ 

Coinp4teS998 


R*«ra Ptrm TWIN set 

QUEENsct 

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PUl^MV :«¥ H.^ ’■‘L 

T.lixti ry Pil lollop TWIN t 

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orawpo^Stc Nobody Sells Tempur-Pedic for Less, 


i'lTROBuahKS TliU^ NEW 


QL^N 


HatdiTiSburg, KY A Br^odflutHifg, KV 
(270) B47«2136 or |270) 422x2222 
Auctioneers: Made, Steplien & Jamie Barr 
ww^.bamrealtyaucti Ofixom 


ORDER THE HOUSE PLAN 


A choice of stjdes 


The Associal^ Pt^ 

A wraparound porch, a 
welcoming entrance and a 
thoughtftil floor plan make 
this house, Flan 
HMAFAPW00760 from 
Homeplans.coni, a pleas¬ 
ure to come home to. 

The home features 1,640 
square feet of Living space 
on two levels. 

Just inside the foyer, a 
built-in seat provides a spot 
to take off muddy shoes* 
Further in, a fireplace 
flamed by windows warms 
the great room, which is en¬ 


hanced by a sloping ceiling. 

The adjacent nook and 
efficient U-shaped kitchen 
combine with the great 
room to create a spacious 
area for gatherings. The 
sealed snack bar has room 
for three. 

The master bedroom is 
enhanced by a ptimpering 
bath, walk-in closet and 
porch access. A linen closet 
sits close to the laundry 
aiea in this wing. 

LTpstahs, two secondary 
bedrooms each have a win- 
dow^ seat, built-in dresser, 
additional seat with storage, 


HMAFAPW00760 

OEnilS 

Bedrooms: 3 
Baths: 2 

Upper floor: 554 sq. ft- 
Main floor: 1,086 sq. ft. 

Total living area: 1,640 SQr 

ft. 

Dimer^sfons: 52-0 k 43-0 
Exterior Wall Framing: 2x6 
Foundation Options: 
Crawlspace 

and attic access* A bridge 
betu'een them holds the full 
hall bath and overlooks the 
great room. 


To receive a stuc^ pian for this home, HMAI-APW00760, order by phone, onlir>e or by mail. 

By phone: Call (866) 7721013 Quote Lhe pian number. HMAFAPW00760. 

Online: Go to www.houseoftheweek com and type the pfari number Into the fietd labeled “Search 
by Plan ID." The downloadable study plans are avaiiable at no charge. 

By mail: Clip and complete th^s form. Include a check or mouey order for $10, plus state and 
local sales tax^ payable to House of the Week. 

Mail to: 

Hanley Wood 

3275 W Ina Road Ste* 260 
Tucson, AZ 85741 

Plan No. HMAFAPW00760 

Name _ 

Address:_ 

City:_State:_Zip:_ 


For complete terms &. conditions log on to 

www.banTealtyauction.coin 

A 10% Buyers Ptemium will apply. 


HOME ^soci PfOii 


This two-level, 1,$40 square-foot home features a wraparound poroh that offers a variety of 
places to sit outside. 


' I r 

8* •i f ‘i 

A fireplace framed by windows warms the great room, which Is 
enhanced by a sloping celling. The master bedroom Is enhanced 
by a pampering bath, walk4n closet, and porch access. 


Two secondary bedrooms boast window seats, built-in 
dressers and attic access. A bridge between them holds the 
full hall bath. 


ABSOLUTE AUCTION 


SAT., APRIL 28th, @ 10 AH EDT 

LOCATED IN MEADE COUNTY near the Garrett 
Community at 30 Buck Knobs Rd. Ekrgn, KY 40117. 
From Garrett at the intersection ol Hwy. 144 and 
1238 take 1238 North about 2 miles to Buck Knob 
Rd. The property is on the comer. (Signs Posted). 
ORDER OF AUCTIONr Selling at 10:00 AM EDT 
sharp will be the real estate. There is no personal 
property. 

HOME - 1.5 ACRES 

(Only three miles from Hwy. 1638) 

Selling will be a 2000 square foot brick ranch style 
home with basement and attached garage. The home 
has 4 bedrooms, 2 baths, large den with fireplace, 
living room, foyer, and kitchen. There is a walkout 
basement, gas heat, central air, county water, shade 
trees, and 1.5 acres of land. The home has aluminum 
overhang and gutter helmet, county water and paved 
road frontage on Buck Knobs Rd and Hwy. 1238. The 
home has many recent improvements including new 
flooring, interior paint* kitchen counter tops, 500 
square foot deck, paved driveway, and landscaping. 
PRE-SHOWING; The home will be open for 
inspection Tuesday. April 24th from 4:00 to 6:00 p.m. 
EDX or by appointment with Brent Fentress, Agent 
(270) 980-0608. 

3 ACRE BUILDING SITE 

Selling 3 acres, all open land with some trees. The 
property fronts Hwy. 1238 and county water is 
available. It is zoned R-1 residential & is restricted to 
stick built homes only. There is a 24x32 building 
located on Lhe property. 

JJ. & BRENDA BROWN OWNERS 


SPRJNCMURSr 

517-65*0 

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FRANKFORT 


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C10 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13, 2012 




HOMESTYLE 


Adding star quality to interior spaces 


Infuse interior spaces 
with star quality by adding 
some kind of statement 
piece such as a unique ar¬ 
chitectural element, head¬ 
turning furniture or a pop 
of unexpected color. By 
working in just one ‘Vow” 
feature, you can transform 
your room and transfix 
your guests. Try one of 
these five ideas. 

1. HANG A HUGE PIECE OF 
ARTWORK. Artwork has the 
magical power to add lots 
of drama and personality to 
a room. So when you fill a 
wall with a really, really big 
piece of killer art, the im¬ 
pact is stupendous. There is 
something incredibly pow¬ 
erful about using an entire 
wall to spotlight one won¬ 
derfully oversized piece. 

2. PLACE A BULKY CABI¬ 
NET IN AN UNEXPECTED 
SPOT. Large cabinets pack 
lots of punch and elevate 
the look of any room. 
Whether it’s a large book¬ 
case in your study, an an¬ 
tique armoire in your bed¬ 
room or a cabinet in your 
kitchen, these big beauties 
steal the show. While built- 
in cabinetry is a must in 
your kitchen, the new trend 
is to also add a contrasting 
piece of furniture to use for 
storage and display. 

3. WORK IN AN ARCHITEC¬ 
TURAL ACCENT. Long before 
my friend Anne was able to 
build her new home, she 
knew she wanted to add in 
some architectural accents 
that would make the rooms 


MARY 

CAROL 

GARRITY 


really hers. One of her 
ideas sent me to the moon: 
barn doors hung in the 
doorway between her fami¬ 
ly room and kitchen. An¬ 
other eye-catching feature 
Anne added to her house 
plan was rustic beams that 
crosshatch the ceiling of 
her family room. Unless 
you’re building a new 
home or remodeling your 
existing home, you may 
not be able to add architec¬ 
tural elements like those, 
but you can use your cre¬ 
ativity to instill drama by 
mimicking the look using 
different means. For in¬ 
stance, if you want to de¬ 
fine a large doorway, like 
Anne did with her barn 
doors, place big, bulky 
floor screens on either side 
of the doorway. 

4. ADD A PIECE OF EYE¬ 
CATCHING FURNITURE. You 

wouldn’t want your entire 
home filled with statement 
furniture, but a piece here 
and there will keep interior 
spaces lively. Anne decided 
to give her bed star quality 
by crowning it with a state¬ 
ment-piece headboard. I’ll 
let you in on a little secret: 
She achieved this look not 
by investing in a regal bed 
frame, but by hanging two 
inexpensive painted wood 



Nell Hill’s, SHNS 


These green barn doors separate the kitchen from the family room and look sensational whether opened or closed. 




panels above the top of her 
bed! 

5. TRY A POP OF COLOR. 

Everyone has a different 
CQ^- color quotient. Some 
people want their spaces 
filled with bold, beautiful 
color. Others prefer a qui¬ 
eter, more muted palette. 
No matter where you fall, 
consider adding a new pop 
of color to your space. I 
guarantee it will turn heads. 

YARDSMART 


I recently got the paint¬ 
brush out and did a little 
color redo in my home. I 
was at a boutique hotel in 
Chicago that had painted 
the interior doors black, 
creating a wonderful con¬ 
trast to the rest of the interi¬ 
or woodwork, which was 
painted cream. I had an 
aha! moment and decided 
to try the same trick at 
home. I’ve been itching to 


replace my lackluster inte¬ 
rior doors with six-paneled 
mahogany doors. But when 
I got the bid from the con¬ 
tractor, I was floored. So, 
for the price of a gallon of 
glossy black paint. I’ve 


tricked up a few of my 
doors. 

This column has been adapted 
from Mary Carol Garrity’s blog 
at www.nellhills.com. Reach her 
at marycarol@nellhills.com. 
Distributed by Scripps Howard 
News Service. 


RE/MAX® RE/MAX® RE/MAX ® 

From Fort Knox 
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Five factors that will help you sow seeds 


270 - 735-6585 




Former M 
DonnaK@r 




Growing plants from 
seed sown directly into the 
soil looks easy, but can be 
downright frustrating for 
beginners because there 
are so many ways a seed 
can fail. Sometimes failure 
results from a problem 
with the seed itself. Other 
times the weather can in¬ 
terfere. And other factors 
can come into play, too. 

To ensure a vigorous 
start for seeds, consider 
these five factors: 

1. Seeds must be 
packed for this growing 
season. The date will be 
printed on the packet to 
ensure freshness, just like 
food products. Lettuce 
seeds enjoy limited viabil¬ 
ity, but each kind of veg¬ 
etable seed has a different 
life span. 

2. Soil temperature 
must meet the needs of 
the crop. If the soil is too 
cool, the seed just won’t 
sprout. To make a seed 
think the soil is warm, 
growers use a heating mat 
under seedling trays to 
mimic this natural warm¬ 
ing of the earth. Sow cool- 
season veggies such as 
chard and peas early be¬ 
cause they don’t need 
such warm soil to germi¬ 
nate. Do not plant your 
summer seeds in the soil 
until conditions are ade¬ 
quately warm. If it’s 
warm, the seeds will ger¬ 
minate and grow quickly 
out of reach of crawling 
pests that love to munch 
tender young seedlings. 

3. Seeds sprout better in 
lighter soils. When you 
sow a seed into clay soil, 
the covering can become 
so dense the seedling can’t 
grow through it. In clay, 
gardeners often cover 
seeds with compost or 
ground peat so the 
seedling won’t have a 
dense cover. If you’re a 
first-time gardener, be¬ 
ware of pressing the soil 
down too tightly over a 
seed; this increases the re¬ 
sistance as it tries to bust 
out of the ground. 

4. Always plant at the 
proper depth. Every seed 
has a designated planting 
depth stated on the pack¬ 
age. Some will call for just 
a scant covering because 



MAUREEN 

GILMER 


those seeds need light to 
germinate. Corn and sun¬ 
flowers are planted deep¬ 
er. Fail to put that kernel 
deep enough and its an¬ 
choring roots won’t form 
well enough to support 
these tall plants. For seeds 
that lack a package or 
those you collected from a 
plant last year, the rule of 
thumb is to plant at a 
depth that’s twice the di¬ 
ameter of the seed. In gen¬ 
eral, the larger the seed 
the deeper it’s planted. 

5. Maintain consistent 
moisture the first few 
weeks. Think of newly 
planted seed like you 


would a 2-year-old child. 
At this age they get into 
trouble in a flash and need 
constant supervision. The 
same applies to your new¬ 
ly planted seed. The soil 
must remain evenly moist, 
but not wet. If a seed be¬ 
gins to grow and sends out 
a small root or stem, fail¬ 
ing to keep it adequately 
moist can cause both to 
dry out. If a new root or 
stem dries enough, its tis¬ 
sues die and growth stops. 
Therefore, keep an eye on 
the seedbeds or rows 
every day, watering morn¬ 
ing and evening, if neces¬ 
sary, to help your seeds 
grow consistently. 

Learning to sow prop¬ 
erly takes time, but atten¬ 
tion to detail will allow 
anyone to master this use¬ 
ful skill. 


Maureen Gilmer is a 
horticulturist and blogger 
at www.MoPlants.com/blog. 
Distributed by Scripps 
Howard News Service. 


mm: 


Executive 
Group, Inc. i 

J.E. Bramblett Sales Team ® 

Each Office Independently Owned & Operated 

100 Chase Way, Suite 1, Elizabethtown, KY 42701 


RE/MAX® 


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ABSObDTE 

AUCTION 

974 HARGAN ROAD, VINE GROVE 
(HWY. 1882) 

SATURDAY, APRIL 14TH • 10:00 AM 

/ We will be Auctioning off a \ 
large selection of items at 
Absolute Auction. Numerous 
box lots of merchandise: 
Glassware, some tools, 
household items, toys and 
Much More! 

Seller is very motivated to sell, 
so everything must go! Be sure 
to bring your truck and trailer 
along as there are too many 
'y_ items to list! _/ 

There will be a 10% Buyer’s Premium added 
on to all bids to determine the final sales 
price. Cash or good check will be accepted. 

UEARTLANt) 

AUCTION CO. 

Donna Spangenberger, Auctioneer 



247 S. Wilson Rd., Radcliff, KY • 270-352-7451 
Email: heartlandauctionco@yahoo.com 

Visit us at Auctionzip.com. Simply click on upcoming auctions and type in the zip code. 


i 


(270) 769-3033 



(270)351-1222 



BEST 

1-800-824-0815 ^ 

320 West Dixie Avenue J 



KENT GIBSON 
BROKER 
312-6961 


Elizabethtown, Kentucky 42701 


BestRealtyKy.com • email: bestrlty@bbtel.com 


PRINCIPAL BROKER 
737-7325 




i- yviT ■. • i.a 



218 CHEROKEE BLVD. 

• Contemporary Ranch 

• 3800 + Sq. Ft. 

• 4BR, 3.5BA 

• Must Tour To Believe 

• City Schools 

Call Brad. #0527 

305B WINGFIELD 

• Luxury Patio Home 

• 1357 Sq. Ft. 

• 2BR, 2BA 

• 2 Car Garage 

• No Assoc. Fees 

Call Kent. #0525 

4767 BARDSTOWN RD. 

• 4 BR, 2 BA 

• 1.337 Acre Lot 

• Screened Porch 

• Large Workshop 

• Full Basement 

Call Brad. #0501 

240 OAKWOOD DR. 

• 5 BR, 4 BA 

• 3 Fireplaces 

• Finished Basement 

• Attached & Detached Garage 

• City Schools 

Call Brad. #0491 

513 N. Mantle 

•3BR, 1.5BA 

• Brick Ranch 

• Full Basement 

• City Schools 
•$103,500 

Call Brad. #0528 


904 N. MAIN ST. 

• 3 BR, 2 BA 

• Fresh Paint 

• New Carpet 

• City Schools 

Call Brad. #0474 


82 BROCK RD. 

• 3 BR, 2 BA 

• 1.75 Acres 

• Finished Basement Areas 

• Close to Ft. Knox 

Call Kent. #0503 

1145 OAK ST. 

• Brick Ranch 

• 2 BR, 3 Full BA 

• Finished Basement 

• Price Reduced 

Call Kent. #0409 





108 RADFORD CT. 

• New Construction 

• Hardwood & Tile 

• 3 BR, 2 BA 

• Covered Deck 

Call Brad. #0520 

42 TIM TAM CT. 

• 3 BR Ranch 

• Convenient Location 
•$116,000 

• Cul-de-sac 

Call Charlie. #0458 

210 DEBORAH ST. 

• 3 Bedrooms 

• Brick Ranch 

• Quiet Dead End Street 
•$101,500 

Call Todd. #0270 

610 DOGWOOD DR. 

• 4 BR, 2 BA 

• Formal LR & DR 

• Finished Basement 

• City Schools 

Call Julie. #0496 

333 MADISON DR. 

• 3 BR, 2 BA 

• Many Upgrades 

• Finished Basement 

Areas w/Fireplace 

• Quick Possession 

Call Julie. #0493 



• 11 Acres, iviuiti-Use 

• Pear Orchard & 

W. Bryan Rd. Frontage 

• House & Lot Available 
w/Land Tract 

Call Kent. #0502 

514 DIECKS DR. 

• LR w/Vaulted Ceiling 

• Large Eat-in Kitchen 

• Sunken Family Room 

• Newer Windows & Siding 

Call Brad. #0497 

333 ROBIN RD. 

• Updated Cape Cod 

• Wonderful Kitchen 

• Full Basement 

• Joins Morningside Elem. Campus 

Call Brad. #0461 

BUILDING ’ Pleasant View • Four Seasons • Tullamore Est. - Bardstown 

1 Pines • Woodsbend • Thoroughbred Estates 

^ • Arbor View • Andover Pointe - Glendale 


HARDIN COUNTY ANIMAL CONTROL 

P.O. Box 1116, Elizabethtown, KY 42702 • www.pawsdonations.org 




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■mE NEWS-Em-ERPRJSE 


HQIHES 


FRIDAY, APRfL 13, 2012 


CIl 


Min XH 6&RQENER WITHIN 


Debunking myths about trees, woody shrubs 


There are lots of gar* 
dening mjihs out there. 
Take planting and 

woody shmbs^ for exarn- 
plc^ They don't need a 
deep planting hole, they 
don^t need organic matter 
or fertilizer amended lo 
the soil and they don’t 
need to be pmiied back to 
“balance" the foliage of the 
plant with its traumatized, 
transplanted roots. 

At best, these practices 
do no good and waste a lot 
of time and energy. At 
worst, they'll make the 
plants take longer to be¬ 
come established and ere* 
ate problems down the 
road. The deep-hole myth 
probably started with peo¬ 
ple thinking tJiat trees and 
shrubs have roots that 
spread dowmw'ard. If you 
dig a deep hole, some soil 
has to go back to the bot¬ 
tom to raise the plant to 
proper heigbL In time, that 
disturbed soil sinks, the 
plant drops below the soil 
surface, water collects and 
stands in the depression^ 
drives air from the root 
iione and the plant dies. 

Instead, dig a hole the 
same depth as the plant’s 
root ball, but three times as 
wide, so the rot)Is can nat* 
lualiy spread horizontally. 
For shrubs, once the diani’ 
eter is correct, set the plant 
in and check *e depth: the 
top of the root ball sliould 
be level or even slighter 
higher than the ground. To 
compensate for likely set¬ 



ft 


JOE 

LAMPL 


tling after planting, 1 al¬ 
most always dig the hole 
about 1 inch shallower 
than the rocjt ball so the 
lant sets a bit high at first, 
en I mound soil up to 
the base of the plant to 
cover the roots. 

There’s another trick 
you need to know to get 
the depth correct for trees. 
Rather than making sure 
the root ball is even with or 
slightly higher than the 
sill rounding ground, it’s 
tlie flai e of the tjiuik where 
the roots begin lo fonii 
that youTe looking for, 
and that can be a good bit 
below the soil line of the 
container. 

It’s a common practice 
these davs for trees (and 
shrubs) to have been re¬ 
potted several times before 
you buy them, with moie 
soil being added cddi lime 
to the container, bo be sure 
to pull back the layer of 
soil on top until jou can 
cleaily see the base oi the 
ti"unk flare and fed oi ee 
the roots spreading out 
from that po nt Th t’s the 
level that need" to match 
up with the iurrounJmg 
ground once it's planted. 

I he second myth says 
to amend the backfill soil 
with large amounts of or¬ 



SHNS ctMteiv Jwdm CfM&lnBham 

Planting trees and woody shrubs Is simple. Understand and work with nature, and your garden 
will thank you. 


ganic matter. This idea is 
costly and unnecessary. 
Many tesbj have proven 
that trees and shrubs plant¬ 
ed without amendments 
establish more quickly 
than their coin posted 
cousins. 

When the hole is read)% 
remove the plant from the 
container and dieck tlie 
roots. If they're spiraling 
around the inside of the 
container, tea^e them out 
to break the pattern. Place 
it into the planting hole 
and half fill with soil 


Water well to settle and 
close air pockets. When 
the watei has drained, add 
the rest of the soil, lightJy 
tamp and water again. 

Apply a 3-inch-thick 
“doughnut” of mulch 
around the plant to retain 
soil moisture, keeping it at 
least an inch away from 
the tmnk to discoiu age rot. 
For the first two weeks, I 
water about eveiy other 
day. For the next two 
months, FU water every 
four days or so in hot 
weather, every week in 


it with the small, trans¬ 
planted root ball. But if 
you cut off branches, the 
plant puts its f^nergy' into 
replacing lost leaves and 
root growth stops — exact¬ 
ly opposite of what it 
needs. Prune dead, dis¬ 
eased and broken branch¬ 
es, but stop there for now 
until whatever youVe 
plcinti^d IS well eslablished. 

PlaiUmg trees and 
woody shrubs is simple: 
wide, shallow hole, 
mulched soil and regular 
water. Nothing else is nec¬ 
essary. Understand and 
work with nature and your 
garden will thank you. 

Joe Laxnp% hast of ‘^Growing 
SL Greener World’^ on PBS., ts a 
master j^urdener and author. 

For more informatiDn^ visit 
wwwjoegardener .cum. 
Distributed by Seripps 
Howard News Service. 


mild. But the best rule of 
thumb is to stick your fin¬ 
ger m the soil and test it. If 
your finger comes up with 
damp soil stuck to it, 
there’s enough water. It’s 
critical to provide enough 
water during establish¬ 
ment, but Fve drowned 
many a newly planted tree 
by over watering also. 
Don’t fertilize yet; die soil 
provides all nutrients for 
the first year. 

The last myth says to 
prune one-third of the 
plant’s foliage to ‘^balance’' 



92 maple; lane 

U29,SOO. 4 hedtoonu, 2 hnlh^. ^ 
(t,. washout 

thWiTifFit. bMl;>'flr(l. close to tnincoln Trail 
SlIiwiI, Koi pomi, (Kxnfr’Fmt'd deck, 
wuHfshui) in back. lo adH 

DireiCtians! l^e GSf lum lUl onto Tun nel 
HUI Rojd, piil CoMKr 31«taliron on rtehC 
Maple Line ii next Moui^ [a nfth 

dn ri^hE. Of lahic lid. Eo 

ShkvlitnJiviLlc RiL leHl inEu BluritrjiiS, 
follow sigos. 



Carol Casw«ll 
270-766-4479 
carokas79@yahoo,c*in 


iROUND THE HOUSE 


101 IDEAS 


Neutral rooms that wow 


A cmiinumg compmdmm 
of tips and tricks from Home & 
Garden Television: 

Beige needn’t be bland. 
Create neutral interiors that 
are I'elaxing, subtle and so¬ 
phisticated. 

PUMP UP NEUTRAL HUES. 

To avoid a m nochromatic 
color scheme, bump the 
color of voai ia<i 11 up or 
down one shade on the col¬ 
or wheel to cieate a 3-D ef¬ 
fect. On a w all, use a lighter 
color on top and a darker 
color on the bottom k The 
bvo shades maintain the 
neutral pale tie and create 
contrast 

ACCESSORIZE WITH ME- 
TALLICS. Every room needs 
a little bit of bling. By using 
imique finishes like tile, or 


wallpapeJ infused with tex¬ 
tured beading, neutral 
shades can feel very glam* 
orous. Bring in bits of color 
with gold leafing, copper 
and gold. 

FIND NATURAL INSPIRA¬ 
TION* Though nature boasts 
dramatic shades of every 
color, the environment’s 
neutral hues can also in¬ 
spire, Create rooms with a 
natural and sophisticated 
feel by blending subtle 
shades of cream and 
brown. 

UYEB IT OH. Different 
combinations of fabrics are 
important if you go all neu¬ 
tral in a room. A textured 
rug, silk pillows, even in ihe 
same cream tone, will look 
different Mixing the same 
color in different textures 


creates a great feel. 

HIGHLIGHT THE DETAILS* 

A neutral is the perfect 
backdrop for all the details 
in your space — whether an 
art collechon or pieces 
from w'Orld travels. 

ADD EXCITEMENT WITH 
TEXTURE. A eiene paint 
palette can be brought to 
life with a mixture of tex¬ 
ture and metalbc finishes 
GO GRAY! Gra\ li a go to 
neutral fo mtenor de"ign- 
ers. “My favonte neutral 
without a donht is gray You 
can go either cool or wann 
with it and can conlrasL any 
color against says Beth 
Dotolo of Pulp Design 
Studios in Dallas. 

Courtesy J^saniae Hays of 
Aphroidiic on hgiv.coitL 
Distributed by Scripps 
Howard News .Servloe, 


M 


FRIEDMANN 


Fireday brick tile is versatile 


\Vh 2 Li would you think 
of using brick on your 
floors? How about your 
walls? There is a fireday 
brick that seems to have 
good possibilities for many 
uses, so let's talk about it, 

WeVe mentioned 
Fireclay Tile, a California 
company that specializes in 
recycled products, before. 
Its latest collection is 
Glazed Thin Brick, also 
made from recycled mate¬ 
rials - reclaimed landfill- 
bound clay and shale. 

The brick comes in nine 
colors. You can actually see 
the brick behind the color, 
rather than simply seeing a 
painted brick. The brick is 
slightly bigger than stan¬ 
dard* which is a nice look, 
and is cost effective. All 
Glazed Thin Brick is 5/3- 
inches thick and the stan¬ 
dard size is 3-1/3 inches by 
2-7/16 inches, with comers, 
caps and glazed edges also 
available. 

This brick tile can be 
used indoors or out It re¬ 
sists the weather, and the 
wear and tern- of indoor 
traffic. It is suitable for 
com m ercial appl icati on s, 
too, such as restaurant 



ROSEMARY 

SADEZ 

FRIEDMANN 


kitchens, pools and spa ar¬ 
eas, so you can see it has to 

be durable. 

Founded in 1986, Fire- 


clay Tile (w’ww.fireclaytile 
.Ct3m) specializes in durable 
and aesthetic handmade 
ceramic and glass materiafs 
that are affordable and 
“green," 

Sadez Friedmann Is 
an intEtrior designer in 
Fla^ and antbor of “Mystery of 
Color.” Distributed by Sedpps 
Howard News Service. 


Kentucky Land 

of Elizabethtown 

OWNER FINANCING 
FOR ANYONE! 

NO CREDIT CHECKSI 
AVAILABLE 7 DAYS A WEEK! 




WE WILL BUY OR TRADE FOR YOUR 
PROPERTY - CASH PAID 

1-800-737-6030 • 737-2111 

ufiit ^Uuutce. cut^j&tw 

down pity me nt. 




.I'CTIOIV 


'■'VV’-r' 


II 


PUBLIC AUCTION 




Saturday, April 21 st -1 sOO PM 

Location: 1617 B W. Vine St., Radcliff, KY 

Selling * Vehicles: 2003 Freight liner 24 ft. these! truck, John Deere 620 diesel tractor, 
2010 M3240 4 wd drive tractor vv/loader. 1991 International single axle dump trucks 1999 
Toyota Pickup truck two 13 ft. box Irrilm, 2011 Lincoln MKX loiidcd with 71 miles, 
2008 Cht\y Aveo 4 door, Dutchman full size 32 ft. camper, 2003 Lincoln Navigator fully 
loaded and more may be added. 

Equipments Kubota 3 pt. hitch rototiiler, Kubota ZD326 zero turn mower, lohn Deere 
2860A zero turn mouei Great Dane Super Surfer zero turn stand up mower. King Kutter 
finish mower Sktd loader f ft. Robcat grader box, 3,0 backhne attachment. Ridged 
4 S gal dual tank aif compre^sf r, Brute jack hammer w/4 Millet Bobcat generator/ 
welder Lincoln 225 an welder 20 ton shop press tree spade, log chains, pallet forks, 
Cratt<in an rid ng lawn nrower and more. 

Rigid pipe threader. Rq^id hand held threader, Skil belt/disc Sander, Craftsman 
lable saw, 2 drill presses and more. 

An tiqnes/Collec tables; Silver c ni to include Morgan dollars, Franklin llatfs, Buffalo 
head nickels. Steel pennies. Dtme,'i. Indian head pennies. Silver One Dollar Certificates: 
ten dollar bill, five dollar bills, two dollar bills, asst'd autographed sports memorabilia, 
asst’d signed art work pedal Singer sewing machine, dishes, dining room set two 
.secretaries, cane bottom chairs, tiered table, set of iron scales, wood framed mirror, two 
bicycles and more. 

Giin«; 54 cal RP rifle w/scope^ 10 ga* shotgun^ Crackshot 22 rifle, four assCd 22 rifles* .38 
5 shot pistol, two Clock .40 pistols. Winchester Model 12 Pump shot and a single 
shot 12 ga. 

Miscellanef^us; Assorted fruit and other trees, 2 pedestal sinks removed from the 
Pentagon, pocket knives, interior and exterior dciors, new replacement windows. 2 floor 
jacks, stainless DDQ set, window air conditioner, TV’s, tires, like new Acer laptop with 
WiFi, turkey fryer, elec. Grill pool table and much more to he added. 

Terms and Conditions: 10% buyers premium added to winning bids to determine final 
sales price. 6% sales tax on applicable items unless resale certificate presented, all items 
sold as Ish Individual consignors will represent their items. Action Auction is merely 
acting as an agent for each seller and is not responsible for statements made by sellers. All 
items to be removed day of auction unless arrangements made for larger items. Paymenl 
to be by cash, good personal or company check or Visa or MasterCard, Vehicles may not be 
released to buyers unless item is paid for in cash, certified funds or after checks have 
cleared. 

Auctioneers Note: We may run two auction crews simultaneously. Refreshments will 
be served. Visit iwwActio nAiietionln fo^com for complete list and pictures. 


!! ABSOLUTE AUCTION 





Saturday, April 28th -10:00 AM 

Location: 501 St. Brigid St., Vine Grove, KY 

Selling this well maintained 3 bedroom home located in historic Vine Grove, KY with 
almost 1.200 sq, ft, of living spaccn There is a huge covered back deck for outdoor 
activities. The large 1/3 acre lot is fenced and has two sheds as well 
PERSONAL PROPERTY includes couch^ chair, coffee and end tables. TV's, two dining 
rtHim tables, entertainment center, corner display cabinet, chairs, kitchen appliances, 
futon, refrigerator, washer, dryer, office chairs, computer desk, stereo units, large reel to 
reel tape deck, assorted books, beer steins, assorted glassware, set of Mikasa dishes, lawn 
mower and more not yet inventoried. 

TERMS AND CONDITIONS: A 10% buyers premium will be added lo all bids to 
determine the final sales price. 6% sales tax will be added to all personal property items 
unless the buyer has a valid Kentucky resales ttix number. Aft personal property to be 
removed day of auction unless arrangements made for large items. 

REAL ESTATE; A non-refundable deposit of $4,000 to be paid on day of auction with the 
balance due with deed at dosing. Closing to be within 30 days of auction. Time is of the 
essence. Since this home was built prior to 197S, potential buyers may conduct a lead 
ba.sed paint mspection (or any other inspection) prior to the auction and if not 
conductedn mu.-st .sign a waiver of lead based paint inspection. NOTE: HOUSE MAY BE 
SOLD » CALL OR CHECK OUR WEB SITE AFTER APRIL 25TH TO VERIFY* 
Please visit our website at witfw*ActionAuction!iifo*com for pictures and up to date 
inventory or call cither Steve Walton at (270) 351-4400 or Dave Earls at (502) 974-4199^ 
This auction is being cnnducteil in cnqjunctinn ivith 
Cold well Banker Success Realty, David Earls, REALTOR and listing agent. 



STEVE 

WALTON 


ACTION AUCTION COMPANY, INC. 

l975N,I)L'deBlvd.,fciddiff,KT4(]]SU 
IB7VI3SH4U0 • TollFn« 1-UB8-273-SA90«Fn (370) 3514500 
Steve WaltoD, PriDcipal Auctioneer * Thomas McKinDey, Broker 

Eddie Puftinin - Kerr^ McCandkis - Aadhneers 

Bfk - ihti Shtvefg - Q^ite Cudet^nf 

Tfwmoji McKinney ^ Rnbby Ateiffnder - Jerry Stewnri * Apprentice Audwneers 


DAVE 

EARLS 


Commercial • Residential • Farrrts • Antiaues • Estates • Government • Liquidations 











































C12 


THE NEWS-ENTERPRISE 


HOMES 


FRIDAY, APRIL 13. 2012 









226 N. Old Preston Hwy., Shepherdsville, KY 40165 


THURSDAY, MAY 10th, 2012-11 AM EST 


more information call the office at 270’769’I6SS or 1-800^624’1782. 


THE REIEDLINQ BUILDIMO: 10,000 Sq. R. Bldg, Zoned B-l Commercial 
on i Acres. 1st Level has 2 Offices, Commercial Garage & a Vacant 3,000 
Sq. Ft. Finished Space. 2nd Level has 2,000 Sq. Ft. 4 Bedroom, 3 Bath 
Apartment. There Is also a Banquet Hall that can seat approx. 200 and has 
His and Hers restrooms. Paved parking. Building is not partitioned. Great 
Visibility from Preston Hwy. 


INSPECTION TIMES: April 19th & 26th and May 3rd from 11 A.M. to 1 P.M. 
DIRECTIONS: Take exit 121 for KY-1S2S toward Brooks Rd, Turn right onto 
KY-1526 E/John Harper Hwy, Turn lefi onto KY-61 tl/?N Preston Hwy, Turn 
right onto Old Preston Hwy - Properly On Lett. 


TERR^ AND CONPlTlDNE; AUCTIDN: HeHtl or> sll£. Tfuri! Will hntroduetEorks an an ititplanul'lon of the aucllon process and terms nl inc sale. All onnauncemanfs take proccdcncc over piinlod. advertFsed, or oral tnlcrmattan. RE{jl5tRATlOl^^ 
Registration will be one hetjr prior lo sole on ajctlon day. AUCTION TERHSl mere will do o 10% Buyers added lo Ihe winning bid to dclermlne the llnal seFllng price. REAL ESTATE: 15% al the purchese price down on auclldn day wild the 
baFuncd being due wllti tnc deed wiehin 134} days. CLOSING: The balance of the purchase price will Pc due and payable al cEaslng. Closing can be scheduled tPr as scon as possible but In no event shall tne closing be Faler then 30 days alter the 
auctidn date. CONDITION OF sale; The prbpcrty wllF be sold '^as-aa, where^ls" wlinodit expressed cr implied warranty. Ah imlormetlon was delivered Irsm sources believed to be coned, but Is not gusranlecd. Buyers shall rely on ihelr own 
inidfmatlon. Judgment, and prior Inspedion or Ihe property and records. Seller will furnish good and marketable tFtfe to property. TAltES: Taxes will be proraled. ROSSESSIDN REAL ESTATE: Possess!on wilh Dead, 30 days. 


n r J 




• NO MINIMUM • NO RESERVE 
YTHING SELLS REGARDLESS OF PRICE 

EQUIPMENT a 
FURNITURE AUCTIUN 


too Vtnolpnci Place Centro Dr., Vino Grove, KY 40175 

Behind the Re/Max Building & Snappy Pizza 

DIRECTIONS: 31W to JOB Prather (Hwy 313) Approx. 5 miles down on the left (use the Vinetand Park Subdivision Entrance) 


TERMSt Possession will be when auctioneer declares Item sold- Cash or Goeef Check day ol sale. There will be a 10% buyer^s premium added to all winning bids to determine finsi 
selling price. A 6% KV sales tax wlU be collected on all applicable items. Resale certlticates are a must for deaters. Everything sells as fs where is with no warranties by seller or 
auction company regardless of price. Air announcements day of sale lake precedence over any other form of advertisements 


J.E. 

Sramblett, CAI 
Auction^er/Broker 


Billy 

Ward 

CAI, Auctioneer 


VISIT OUR 


Blake 

Bramblett 

Apprentice 

Auctioneer 


Jay 

Pitts 

Apprentice 

Auctioneer 


Jake 

Bramblett 

Apprentice 

Auctioneer 


Will 

Thompson 

Apprentice 

Auctioneer 


Justin 
Ward 
Realtor/ 
Auction Staff 


WEBSTiTE AT wwwAUCTIOJVGROUPS.com 


SELLING: 


TRACTORS; Kubota Tractor 3130, Kubota Back Hoe TL 1350, 
Caterpillar 9318 High-Lift. 

TRUCKS: 2000 Ford Excursion wl 263,000 miles, 2004 Red 
GMC Truck, 2- 89 Ford U-Haut Type Advertising Trucks, 88 Red 
FI50 Truck W/ Utility Bed, 89 Red F-250 Truck W/ Utility Bed 
TRAILERS: Dump Trailer, Green Army Trailer, Tool Trailer, Boat 
Trailer, Golf Cart Trailers, Aluminum Trailer, and Many More 
FARM EQUIPMENT: Bush Hog Front End Loader M246, Street 
Sweeper, Back Hoe, Grader Box, Aerator, Auger, Etc. 
MISCELLANEOUS ITEMS: Pontoon Boat, 2 Kawasaki 4- 
Wheeler 220’s, Golf Cart, 75 Gat Tank, 100 Gat Tank, Seeder, 
Blower, Small Lawn Mower, Lots of PVC Pipe, Pallets, Propane 
Tanks, Generator, Sheds, Fencing, Gates, Etc. 

IS APARTMENTS WORTH OF FURNITURE INCLUDING: 
Bedroom Sets, Dinette Sets, Living Room Sets, Mattress Sets, 
TV stands, TVs, Linens, Pot and Pan Sets, Silverware, Throw 
Rugs, Clocks, and other miscellaneous items. Most like new. 


ALSO 

NUMEROUS 
HAND TOOLS 
TOO MANY TO 
MENTION. 


SATURDAY, APRIL 21 ST, 10:00 AM 























































GENO’S 


formalMa 

F F A I R 

f 

INC. 


' "J^votvi out, OteJluiH' to clmuWv let fn&Juit 4am ... 

Congratulazioni Coach Calipari!' 





www.gfatux.com 
and receive these 


^Q| facebook.com/gfatux 




twitter.com/gfotux 


Geno’s Formal Affair • Towne Center 

141 Towne Drive • Elizabethtown, KY 

270 . 360.1211 


n 




GENO’S 


Tuxedo 
Savings Card 


Ttto ciffer has rv> <»3h vaiyg'i( may not Ik exciwnged ter «5li. uses w w 

paj^nl for riwfctKtfKilM. shaQ fH^ aii^ lo prior pufctttsos ar>d may^ rut be 

wilh *Bcwnfe 'twcJwl c^lwtiow. prorobOTS, rartial aocw^ory only wderj cpt 
speoai $40 Tuxedo Savrf»ji Card reqiares aaea and a S25 neqtirM ai least 
hw wMfcspdcf ID if»uM flats Swstoffttcfdei^ pfomo COde 201201 






GENO’S 


Tuxedo 
Savings Card 

This ofVef fas no cash vakn; 4 mafy not ba enchanged for cash, used as cash, or applied be 
wpwrt tor rnerttwrxflM. Offer shall riot apply to (wpurchaws and rrHY not IsreOw^ 
other discajnte ’tiudaet cotfectore, promoton*.^f1«4 rental, orrfy wdwe or 

sp^ otfers. $40 Tuxw Sarnr^ r»iU(r» and a $2S (i^irkl at taasi 

two iweks prior to the use dato See store far detafts. pfQiyiQ code 201201 





iz 

cS 




GENO’S 


Tuxedo 
Savings Card 

Tlifet olfar has no cash value: 4 may not be awhangsd for cai4*, u«d as cai*K or applied ai 
pa^nerit Ety rnerdundise . Offer shall rut apply to pm punMses arto may 1 ^ be 


payments 
Wirt other — 
^iiNCiai oAi>r&. 

Iwo wpelts prior tp 


If andaS^^pi^rl 

promo code 201201